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Encyclopedia > WrestleMania III
WrestleMania III
Details
Promotion World Wrestling Federation
Date March 29, 1987[1]
Venue Pontiac Silverdome[1]
City Pontiac, Michigan[1]
Attendance 93,173[1][2][3][4][5][6]
Pay-per-view chronology
WrestleMania 2 WrestleMania III Survivor Series 1987

WrestleMania III was the third annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). The event was held on March 29, 1987 at the Pontiac Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan.[1] Its tagline was "Bigger, Better, Badder". The official theme song was Aretha Franklin's "Who's Zooming Who?", which was used during the ending video montage. Image File history File links WMiii. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... A disputed record setting 93,173 fans in attendance for WrestleMania III at the Pontiac Silverdome. ... Pontiac is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan named after the Ottawa Chief Pontiac. ... WrestleMania 2 was the second annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation (although the first WrestleMania was only on pay-per-view in select areas). ... Survivor Series 1987 was the first annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event for the World Wrestling Federation. ... Official WrestleMania logo WrestleMania is an annual professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by World Wrestling Entertainment since 1985. ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Pay-per-view is the name given to a system by which television viewers can call and order events to be seen on TV and pay for the private telecast of that event to their homes later. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... A disputed record setting 93,173 fans in attendance for WrestleMania III at the Pontiac Silverdome. ... Pontiac is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan named after the Ottawa Chief Pontiac. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ...


The event is particularly notable for the reported attendance of 93,173, the largest recorded attendance for a live indoor sporting event in North America and the largest paying crowd in the history of professional wrestling.[1][2][7] This number has been disputed, however, and many believe the real attendance to be around 75,000.[1][8][9] The event is widely considered to be the pinnacle of the 1980s wrestling boom.[8] Almost one million fans watched the event at 160 closed circuit locations in North America.[1] The number of people watching via pay-per-view was estimated at several million.[1] Pay-per-view revenues were estimated at $10 million.[10] North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1980s wrestling boom (sometimes referred to as the 2nd Golden Age of Wrestling) was a surge in the popularity of professional wrestling in the United States of America throughout the 1980s. ...

Contents

Report

Background

Like other WrestleMania events, WrestleMania III was hyped for several months in advance. The main feud stemmed from André the Giant's betrayal of kayfabe ally, the WWF Champion Hulk Hogan.[11] The feud began when Hogan was presented a trophy for being the WWF Champion for three years,[12] and André, his good friend, came out to congratulate him.[13] Shortly afterwards, André was presented a slightly smaller trophy for being "undefeated in the WWF for 15 years".[12] Hogan came out to congratulate André but ended up being the focal point of the interview. Annoyed by this, André walked out during his congratulation speech. Soon after, on an edition of the interview segment Piper's Pit, Bobby Heenan, a long-time Hogan adversary, announced himself to be André's new (kayfabe) manager.[4] André then challenged Hogan to a title match at WrestleMania III and attacked Hogan, ripping off Hogan's T-shirt and crucifix necklace.[1][5][13] Official WrestleMania logo WrestleMania is an annual professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by World Wrestling Entertainment since 1985. ... A professional wrestling feud is a staged disagreement between two wrestlers or factions of wrestlers over a purported slight or insult. ... André the Giant was the stage name of André René Roussimoff, (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993) a French professional wrestler and actor. ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb; IPA: ) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is the portrayal of professional wrestling as not staged or worked. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Championship is a professional wrestling world heavyweight-grade championship in the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... Terrence Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... Pipers Pit was an interview segment featuring Roddy Piper which was mainstay on WWF television from 1984 to 1987, although Piper also hosted similar segments while wrestling for other promotions. ... Bobby The Brain Heenan (born Raymond Louis Heenan on November 1, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional wrestling manager and commentator. ...


Another main feud leading up to the event was between Ricky Steamboat and the Intercontinental Champion Randy Savage. The feud began during a title match between the two, when Savage seriously injured Steamboat and kayfabe crushed Steamboat's larynx.[11] This resulted a long, bitter feud that lasted for six months, included several bloody match-ups and finally culminated at WrestleMania.[7] George Steele was in Steamboat's corner, having developed a crush on Savage's valet, Miss Elizabeth.[4] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Intercontinental Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Randall Mario Poffo (born November 15, 1952 in Columbus, Ohio), is a former American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name of Macho Man Randy Savage. ... The larynx (plural larynges), colloquially known as the voicebox, is an organ in the neck of mammals involved in protection of the trachea and sound production. ... George Steele, better known as George The Animal Steele, real name William James (Jim) Myers (b. ... In professional wrestling, a manager is a character who is paired with a wrestler. ... Elizabeth Ann Hulette (November 19, 1960 – May 1, 2003), best known as Miss Elizabeth, was a U.S. professional wrestling manager. ...


Billy Jack Haynes and Hercules' feud started when Bobby Heenan continuously taunted Haynes, telling him that Hercules was the real master of the full nelson. This came to a boiling point when Hercules attacked Haynes on an edition of Superstars of Wrestling, which led to their Chain match at WrestleMania. Haynes and Hernandez had reignited a feud that went back through every federation the two were ever in together.[citation needed] This battle was advertised as the "Full Nelson Challenge".[14] William Haynes, Jr. ... Hercules Ray Hercules Fernandez (1957–2004) was a professional wrestler who primarily wrestled in Florida and Texas. ... Quarter nelson as illustrated in Farmer Burns correspondence course, c 1912. ... WWF Superstars of Wrestling was a professional wrestling program that debuted on September 6, 1986, replacing WWF Championship Wrestling. ... A bloodied Kane inside a current style WWE cage. ...


Another heated feud leading up to this event was between Harley Race and Junkyard Dog. When The WWF Wrestling Classic became the King of the Ring tournament, Harley Race went on to win the tournament and began referring to himself as "King" Harley Race. He came to the ring in a royal crown and cape to the ceremonial accompaniment of the classical music piece "Great Gates of Kiev" by Modest Mussorgsky.[15] After each of his victories, Race forced his defeated opponent to "bow and kneel" before him. Usually, Race's manager, Bobby Heenan, forced the defeated opponent to "bow and kneel" by grabbing his hair.[16] Junkyard Dog protested Race's self-proclaimed monarchy in the WWF and stated there would never be a complete ruler in the WWF. This led to a match on the March 14, 1987 episode of Saturday Night's Main Event, in which the King and his manager both tried to make Junkyard Dog bow for them. This set the stage for the WrestleMania match, which included the stipulation that the loser had to bow to the winner.[14] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The nicknames Junkyard Dog & JYD may also refer to former pro-basketball player Jerome Williams, Saint Louis University swimmer Scott Dewlen, or Australian Football coach Dean Laidley. ... King of the Ring is an annual World Wrestling Entertainment tournament first held in 1985. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Saturday Nights Main Event is a professional wrestling television program that aired occasionally from 1985 to 1991, under the World Wrestling Federation banner on NBC in place of Saturday Night Live. ...


On January 26, 1987, the British Bulldogs lost the WWF Tag Team Championship to The Hart Foundation in a match that saw the Dynamite Kid so debilitated that he was carried to the ring by Davey Boy Smith and did not see much physical action. Danny Davis was the referee and allowed The Hart Foundation to use illegal double-team maneuvers.[17] After being given some time off to recuperate, the Bulldogs continued their rivalry with The Hart Foundation when they teamed up with Tito Santana against the Foundation and the referee-turned-wrestler Danny Davis in a six-man tag team match at WrestleMania III.[14] is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The British Bulldogs Dynamite Kid & Davey Boy Smith British Bulldogs were the team of Davey Boy Smith & The Dynamite Kid in Stampede Wrestling & WWE (then WWF). ... This article is about the tag team championship that is currently defended on the RAW brand of WWE. For SmackDown!s tag team championship, see WWE Tag Team Championship. ... The Hart Foundation was a collective name used by various stables in the World Wrestling Federation. ... Thomas Billington (born December 5, 1958 in Golborne, Lancashire) is a retired English professional wrestler who competed in the World Wrestling Federation, Stampede Wrestling, All Japan Pro Wrestling and New Japan Pro Wrestling in the mid- to late-1980s. ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... Danny Davis Dan Marsh was a professional wrestling referee and a professional wrestler most famous as Danny Davis of the World Wrestling Federation. ... Merced Solis (born May 10, 1953) better known by his ring name Tito Santana, is a semi-retired Mexican-American professional wrestler whose career spanned from the late 70s to the early 90s. ...


Rock music singer Alice Cooper was in Jake Roberts' corner during his match with The Honky Tonk Man. The Honky Tonk Man had attacked Roberts with a guitar on Roberts' interview segment The Snake Pit, which legitimately injured Roberts' neck.[18][19] This event began Roberts' turn into a babyface as well as the feud between the wrestlers, which culminated in their WrestleMania match. For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Alice Cooper (born February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans four decades. ... Aurelian Jake Smith, Jr. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... -1... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The feud between Adrian Adonis and Roddy Piper began when, following a leave of absence from the WWF, Piper returned to find his Piper's Pit segment replaced by The Flower Shop, a segment hosted by then-effeminate wrestler Adrian Adonis.[20] Piper, who returned as a face, spent weeks crashing Adonis' show and trading insults, leading to a "showdown" between the two segments that ended with Piper being assaulted and humiliated by Adonis, Piper's former bodyguard "Cowboy" Bob Orton, and Don Muraco. The trio left Piper with his face covered in red lipstick, lying in the middle of the remnants of the destroyed Piper's Pit set. In response, Piper stormed the set of Adonis' show and destroyed it with a baseball bat. This led to their Hair vs. Hair match at WrestleMania III, which was billed as Piper's retirement match from wrestling before becoming a full-time actor.[5] Keith Franke (September 12, 1954 – July 4, 1988 [1]) was an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Adorable Adrian Adonis. ... Roderick George Toombs (born April 17, 1954) better known by his ring name Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler, and film actor. ... In professional wrestling, a face or babyface is a character who is portrayed as heroic relative to the heel wrestlers, who are analagous to villains. ... Robert Keith Orton, Jr. ... Don Muraco (Born Don Morrow on September 10, 1949), also known as The Magnificent Muraco was a Hawaiian professional wrestler in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. ... A bloodied Kane inside a current style WWE cage. ...


Event

Other On-Screen Talent
Role: Name:
Commentator Bobby "The Brain" Heenan
(Rougeaus/Dream Team match)
Gorilla Monsoon
Jesse Ventura
Referee John Benella
Dave Hebner
Jack Kruger
Jack Lutz
Joey Marella
Interviewer Mary Hart[21]
Vince McMahon
"Mean" Gene Okerlund
Bob Uecker[21]
Ring announcer Ray Combs[1]
Howard Finkel
Bob Uecker[1][21]
Timekeeper Mary Hart[1]
Supporting Alice Cooper
(in Jake Roberts' corner)[1][21]
Vocalist Aretha Franklin[1][21]

Vince McMahon claims that as he was about to announce "Welcome to WrestleMania III!", he felt the spirit of his father Vincent J. McMahon, who had died three years earlier. The show opened with Aretha Franklin singing "America the Beautiful".[21] Bobby The Brain Heenan (born Raymond Louis Heenan on November 1, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional wrestling manager and commentator. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jesse Ventura (born James George Janos on July 15, 1951), also known as The Body, The Star, Governor Turnbuckle, and The Governing Body, is an American politician, retired professional wrestler, Navy UDT veteran, actor, and former radio and television talk show host. ... Dave Hebner (born May 17, 1949 in Richmond, Virginia) is an American professional wrestling authority figure, promoter, road agent and referee. ... Joey Marella (February 28, 1963 - July 4, 1994) was a professional wrestling referee and the son of legendary wrestler and announcer Robert Marella (aka Gorilla Monsoon), though their relationship was never acknowledged on television. ... Marys famous legs Mary Hart (born November 8, 1950) is an American television personality and a long-time host of the syndicated gossip and entertainment round-up program Entertainment Tonight. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... Eugene Mean Gene Okerlund (born November 29, 1938 in Robbinsdale, Minnesota), is a former American professional wrestling interviewer and announcer. ... Robert George Uecker ((IPA pronunciation: [], a homophone of the card game Euchre) (born January 26, 1935 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American former Major League Baseball player, later an award-winning sportscaster, comedian and actor. ... Raymond Neil Combs, Jr. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert George Uecker ((IPA pronunciation: [], a homophone of the card game Euchre) (born January 26, 1935 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American former Major League Baseball player, later an award-winning sportscaster, comedian and actor. ... Alice Cooper (born February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans four decades. ... Aurelian Jake Smith, Jr. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... Vincent J. McMahon Vincent J. McMahon (July 6, 1914 – May 24, 1984) was a U.S. professional wrestling promoter. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... America the Beautiful is an American patriotic song which rivals The Star-Spangled Banner, the national anthem of the United States, in popularity. ...


The first match of the night was The Can-Am Connection vs. Bob Orton and The Magnificent Muraco. The match ended when Rick Martel gave Don Muraco a high cross-body to get the win for his team.[1][22] The Can-Am Connection was a tag team comprised of Rick Martel and Tom Zenk in the WWF through 1986 and 1987. ... Robert Dale Orton Sr. ... Don Muraco (Born Don Morrow on September 10, 1949), also known as The Magnificent Muraco was a Hawaiian professional wrestler in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. ... Rick Martel (born Richard Vigneault on March 18, 1956 in Quebec City, Quebec) is a former Québécois professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) between 1980 and 1995. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ...


The second match that aired was Hercules (with Bobby Heenan in his corner) against Billy Jack Haynes in "The Full Nelson Challenge". The match ended when Haynes locked Hercules in the Nelson hold#Full Nelson outside the ring and both were counted out.[1][22] After the match, Bobby Heenan assaulted Haynes, and Haynes chased Heenan into the ring. Hercules then assaulted Haynes with his chain before locking him in a Full Nelson of his own.[23] Hercules Ray Hercules Fernandez (1957–2004) was a professional wrestler who primarily wrestled in Florida and Texas. ... Bobby The Brain Heenan (born Raymond Louis Heenan on November 1, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional wrestling manager and commentator. ... William Haynes, Jr. ... Quarter nelson as illustrated in Farmer Burns correspondence course, c 1912. ...


The third match of the night was the Mixed Tag Team Match of King Kong Bundy and his midget team of Lord Littlebrook and Little Tokyo against Hillbilly Jim and his own midget team of The Haiti Kid and Little Beaver. King Kong Bundy's team was disqualified when Bundy attacked Little Beaver. The referee called for the bell, as Bundy was not supposed to be in the ring with the midgets.[14] Much like singles matches, tag team professional wrestling matches can and have taken many forms. ... Chris Pallies (born November 7, 1957) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, King Kong Bundy. ... A midget professional wrestler is a dwarf or person of short stature who competes in professional wrestling. ... -1... Shigeri Akabane, known by his ringname Little Tokyo, is a retired Japanese professional midget wrestler who has competed in North American promotions during the 1970s and 1980s including Herb Abrams Universal Wrestling Federation, the American Wrestling Association and the World Wrestling Federation, most notably appearing at WrestleMania III in a... Jim Morris wrestled ten years with the World Wrestling Entertainment as a wrestler known as Hillbilly Jim. ... Raymond Kessler was a American professional wrestler, who suffered from dwarfism, and went by the nicknames Haiti Kid in the World Wrestling Federation and Little Mr. ... Lionel Giroux was a midget professional wrestler. ...


The fourth match of the night was the "Loser Must Bow" match between Junkyard Dog and King Harley Race. "Mean" Gene Okerlund was with Bobby Heenan, Harley Race, and The Fabulous Moolah, and Moolah predicted that Junkyard Dog would have to bow to the King as he is supposed to do.[23] Bobby gave Moolah the crown and told her to put it on the King's head after the match.[23] Junkyard Dog came out to the ring to a big ovation in the Silverdome.[24] During the match, the two battled back and forth, and Harley Race gave the Junkyard Dog a belly to belly suplex when he was distracted by Bobby Heenan to get the win. Due to the stipulation, Junkyard Dog was required to bow and kneel to the King. He did a little bow and then hit Harley Race with a steel chair. After attacking Race, Junkyard Dog took the royal robe of the King and left the ring with it.[1][22] The nicknames Junkyard Dog & JYD may also refer to former pro-basketball player Jerome Williams, Saint Louis University swimmer Scott Dewlen, or Australian Football coach Dean Laidley. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eugene Mean Gene Okerlund (born November 29, 1938 in Robbinsdale, Minnesota), is a former American professional wrestling interviewer and announcer. ... Lilian Ellison [1], better known by her ring name The Fabulous Moolah (born July 22, 1923), is a female professional wrestler who is marketed by World Wrestling Entertainment for holding the record for the longest title reign by any athlete in any professional sport. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The next match that aired was The Dream Team against The Fabulous Rougeaus. Raymond Rougeau started off the match by locking up with Brutus Beefcake. The two men later tagged out, and Greg "The Hammer" Valentine brawled with Jacques Rougeau as Dino Bravo looked on from the outside of the ring. Raymond used a sleeper hold on Valentine and Beefcake jumped off the ropes and accidentally hit the Hammer with a double axhandle. The Rougeau Brothers gave Valentine a double team move, but the referee was arguing with Beefcake. Dino Bravo jumped off the top rope and hit Raymond while he was pinning Valentine, and Valentine pinned him for the win.[23] The Dream Team argued into the match, so Greg Valentine and Dino Bravo left together, leaving Beefcake in the ring alone.[2] The Dream Team was a World Wrestling Federation tag-team from 1985 to March 29, 1987 consisting of Brutus Beefcake and Greg Valentine managed by ”Lucious” Johnny Valiant. ... The Fabulous Rougeau Brothers was the tag team name of real-life brothers, Jacques Rougeau & Raymond Rougeau, best known from their run in the WWF, from 1985 - 1990. ... Raymond Rougeau (born February 18, 1955 in St. ... Edward Harrison Leslie (born April 21, 1958) is an American professional wrestler, best known for his work in the World Wrestling Federation under the ring name Brutus The Barber Beefcake. ... John Anthony Wisniski Jr. ... Jacques Rougeau (born June 13, 1960) is a French-Canadian professional wrestler from Saint-Sulpice, Quebec, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s with the World Wrestling Federation under his own name, and as The Mountie. ... Adolfo Bresciano (August 6, 1948 - March 11, 1993) was an Italian-born professional wrestler, best known for his work as Dino Bravo, self-proclaimed Worlds Strongest Man. ... The rear naked choke (often abbreviated RNC) is a chokehold in martial arts applied from an opponents back. ...


Footage of an interview with Roddy Piper aired next. As the interview was shown, Piper made his way to the ring to face Adrian Adonis in his retirement match.[23] Jimmy Hart was in the corner of Adrian Adonis. Piper and Adonis began the match by attacking each other with a belt. Adonis put a sleeper hold on Piper in the middle of the ring and released the hold thinking that he won the match. Jimmy Hart got in the ring to celebrate with Adonis, but Brutus Beefcake came to the ring to help Piper recover, and Piper attacked Adonis and gave him a sleeper hold of his own.[25] Piper got the victory, and after the match was over, Brutus got in the ring and cut Adrian Adonis' hair as Piper held Jimmy Hart down.[1][22] Adonis then ran from the ring in embarassment.[25] Roderick George Toombs (born April 17, 1954) better known by his ring name Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler, and film actor. ... Keith Franke (September 12, 1954 – July 4, 1988 [1]) was an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Adorable Adrian Adonis. ... The Mouth of the South Jimmy Hart (also known as The Colonel) (born January 1, 1943 in Memphis, Tennessee) is a professional wrestling manager, executive, composer and musician. ...


Up next was a six-Man tag team match featuring Danny Davis and The Hart Foundation against The British Bulldogs and Tito Santana. This match had many near-falls for the Bulldogs, yet Jim Neidhart broke up most of them. When all six wrestlers got in the ring, Danny Davis hit Davey Boy Smith with Jimmy Hart's megaphone and pinned him for the win.[23] A professional wrestling tag-team consists of two or occasionally three wrestlers who are working together as a team. ... Danny Davis Dan Marsh was a professional wrestling referee and a professional wrestler most famous as Danny Davis of the World Wrestling Federation. ... The Hart Foundation was a collective name used by various stables in the World Wrestling Federation. ... The British Bulldogs Dynamite Kid & Davey Boy Smith British Bulldogs were the team of Davey Boy Smith & The Dynamite Kid in Stampede Wrestling & WWE (then WWF). ... Merced Solis (born May 10, 1953) better known by his ring name Tito Santana, is a semi-retired Mexican-American professional wrestler whose career spanned from the late 70s to the early 90s. ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956), is a professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ...


The next match aired was Butch Reed's pay-per-view debut against "The Bird Man" Koko B. Ware. Reed won the match with a rollup after a high cross-body from Koko. After the contest, Reed's manager Slick got in the ring and attacked Koko B. Ware, but Tito Santana quickly rushed to the ring and stopped Slick. Tito ripped some of the clothes off of Slick, who retreated as Reed got back in the ring, only to get a double drop kick from Koko and Santana. Butch Reed (born Bruce Reed on July 11, 1954 in Warrensburg, Missouri) is a professional wrestler best known for his stints in the World Wrestling Federation and the National Wrestling Alliance/World Championship Wrestling. ... Koko B. Ware & Frankie James Ware aka Koko B. Ware is former professional wrestler. ... Kenneth Ken Johnson, better known to wrestling fans as Slick, is a former WWF manager of such wrestlers as the Iron Sheik, Nikolai Volkoff, Butch Reed, Big Boss Man, Akeem, The Warlord, Paul Roma, and others. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The next contest was a title match involving WWF Intercontinental Champion Randy Savage and Ricky Steamboat. Savage attacked Steamboat as he greeted fans at ringside.[1] Savage then pushed Steamboat over the security rail and delivered an elbow that thrust Steamboat's throat into the rail, sending him to the hospital.[1] The match itself lasted for nearly fifteen minutes near-falls.[4][7] At one point, Savage was about to use the ring bell as a weapon but was stopped by George Steele, who knocked him off of the top rope.[4] When Savage attempted to give Steamboat a scoop slam, Steamboat reversed it into a small package to get the win and become the new WWF Intercontinental Champion,[4][7] marking the first time in WrestleMania history that the Intercontinental Championship changed hands.[2][26] This match is considered by many to be one of the greatest matches in World Wrestling Entertainment history.[3][4][7][26] The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Intercontinental Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Randall Mario Poffo (born November 15, 1952 in Columbus, Ohio), is a former American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name of Macho Man Randy Savage. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ... George Steele, better known as George The Animal Steele, real name William James (Jim) Myers (b. ... Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ...


The tenth match of the night was between The Honky Tonk Man and Jake Roberts, who had Alice Cooper in his corner. When Jake went for the DDT, Honky Tonk Man's manager Jimmy Hart pulled Roberts' legs, and the Honky Tonk Man rolled up Roberts from behind, held on to the ropes, and pinned him for the win.[1][22] After the match, Alice Cooper got in the ring and used Roberts' python, Damien, to attack Hart.[23] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aurelian Jake Smith, Jr. ... Alice Cooper (born February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans four decades. ... In professional wrestling a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive a held opponents head into the mat. ... Aurelian Jake Smith, Jr. ...


The next match of the night was a tag team match featured the Iron Sheik and Nikolai Volkoff against The Killer Bees. Slick asked all of the fans to rise to respect Nikolai Volkoff's singing of the Soviet National Anthem. Volkoff began singing and Hacksaw Jim Duggan came to the ring with his two by four, which had an American flag attached to it. Duggan got on the microphone and said that Volkoff was not going to sing because America is the land of the free and the home of the brave.[23] Duggan stayed at ringside while the match ensued. The Iron Sheik locked a camel clutch on one of the Killer Bees, and Jim Duggan hit him with his two by four. The Iron Sheik and Nikolai Volkoff won as a result of disqualification. Hossein Khosrow Ali Vaziri (حسین خسرو وزیری), (born March 15, 1943 in Tehran, Iran) is a retired Iranian professional wrestler better known by his ring name The Iron Sheik. ... Nikolai Volkoff (born Josip Peruzović in October 14, 1947) is a professional wrestler who is best known for his performances for the World Wrestling Federation. ... The Killer Bees was a tag team comprised of Jumpin Jim Brunzell and B. Brian Blair in the World Wrestling Federation from 1985 to 1988 and later on in the independent circuit. ... Flag of the Soviet Union The National Anthem of the Soviet Union (or Hymn, Russian Гимн Советского Союза, Gimn Sovetskovo Soyuza) replaced the Internationale as the national anthem on March 15, 1944. ... James (Jim) Duggan (born January 14, 1954 in Glens Falls, New York), better known by his ring name Hacksaw Jim Duggan, is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with the World Wrestling Federation and World Championship Wrestling. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ...


In what was billed as the "biggest main event in sports entertainment",[27] the main event pitted WWF Champion Hulk Hogan against André the Giant for the WWF World Championship.[1] Howard Finkel introduced Bob Uecker as the guest ring announcer for the main event, and Mary Hart was introduced as the time keeper. Bobby Heenan was in the corner of André the Giant as he came to the ring. The fans booed André heavily, and Hogan came to the ring to a huge ovation.[23] Approximately two minutes into the match, Hogan attempted a bodyslam on André, but he was unable to lift the giant and nearly lost the match.[27] Later in the match, André gave Hogan an Irish whip to the far side of the ring and attempted a big boot on Hogan, but Hogan gave André a clothesline to take him down. Hogan then scoop slammed the 540 pound André and executed a leg drop to get the win and retain the World Wrestling Federation Championship belt.[4][6][27] John Cena after winning the WWE Championship at WrestleMania 21 The World Wrestling Entertainment Championship or WWE Championship or WWE Heavyweight Championship, is the top prize in the WWE, though exclusive to its Smackdown! brand since August 26, 2002 while the World Heavyweight Championship is exclusive to WWE RAW. History... Terrence Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... André the Giant was the stage name of André René Roussimoff, (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993) a French professional wrestler and actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert George Uecker ((IPA pronunciation: [], a homophone of the card game Euchre) (born January 26, 1935 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American former Major League Baseball player, later an award-winning sportscaster, comedian and actor. ... Marys famous legs Mary Hart (born November 8, 1950) is an American television personality and a long-time host of the syndicated gossip and entertainment round-up program Entertainment Tonight. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ... Sean Waltman performs a leg drop on Shark Boy A Leg drop or Legdrop refers to an attack used in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler will jump and land his leg across a fallen opponents chest, throat or face. ...


Aftermath

Piper went on to film Hell Comes to Frogtown and They Live and then made sporadic appearances on television before finally returning to host a Piper's Pit segment at WrestleMania V.[25] He continued to be active in professional wrestling for more than a decade.[2] Hell Comes to Frogtown Hell Comes to Frogtown is a 1987 B-movie that was created and directed by Donald G. Jackson. ... They Live is a 1988 film directed by John Carpenter, who also wrote the screenplay under the pseudonym “Frank Armitage”. The movie is based on the short story Eight O’Clock in the Morning by Ray Nelson. ... Pipers Pit was an interview segment featuring Roddy Piper which was mainstay on WWF television from 1984 to 1987, although Piper also hosted similar segments while wrestling for other promotions. ... WrestleMania V was the fifth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ...


After WrestleMania III, Hogan and André the Giant continued their feud, culminating at WrestleMania IV.[1] Their first televised match after WrestleMania III was on The Main Event on NBC on February 5, 1988 and drew 33 million viewers, making it the most watched match in professional wrestling history.[4] The angle surrounding this match was that after being absent for approximately a year, André was ready to return to wrestling, but only for the money and not for the glory.[4] In the match, André ended Hogan's four-year reign as champion with the help of a screwjob finish involving twin referees Earl and Dave Hebner.[4][28] This also set up a rematch at WrestleMania IV as part of a tournament to crown a new champion.[4] WrestleMania IV was the fourth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... For the Fingathing album, see The Main Event. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ... In professional wrestling a screwjob occurs when a match ends in a controversial finish, often involving cheating or outside interference. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dave Hebner (born May 17, 1949 in Richmond, Virginia) is an American professional wrestling authority figure, promoter, road agent and referee. ... WrestleMania IV was the fourth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ...


Twenty years after the event, Aretha Franklin once again opened a WrestleMania pay-per-view by singing "America the Beautiful" at WrestleMania 23.[29] Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... America the Beautiful is an American patriotic song which rivals The Star-Spangled Banner, the national anthem of the United States, in popularity. ... WrestleMania 23 was the twenty-third annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ...


Results

Ricky Steamboat vs. Randy Savage for the Intercontinental Championship

The Can-Am Connection was a tag team comprised of Rick Martel and Tom Zenk in the WWF through 1986 and 1987. ... Rick Martel (born Richard Vigneault on March 18, 1956 in Quebec City, Quebec) is a former Québécois professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) between 1980 and 1995. ... Thomas (Tom) Erwin Zenk (Born: November 30, 1958) is a former American professional wrestler, also known by Tom Zenk and his nickname Z-Man. ... Robert Keith Orton, Jr. ... Don Muraco (Born Don Morrow on September 10, 1949), also known as The Magnificent Muraco was a Hawaiian professional wrestler in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ... William Haynes, Jr. ... Hercules Ray Hercules Fernandez (1957–2004) was a professional wrestler who primarily wrestled in Florida and Texas. ... Bobby The Brain Heenan (born Raymond Louis Heenan on November 1, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional wrestling manager and commentator. ... Jim Morris wrestled ten years with the World Wrestling Entertainment as a wrestler known as Hillbilly Jim. ... Raymond Kessler was a American professional wrestler, who suffered from dwarfism, and went by the nicknames Haiti Kid in the World Wrestling Federation and Little Mr. ... Lionel Giroux was a midget professional wrestler. ... Chris Pallies (born November 7, 1957) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, King Kong Bundy. ... Shigeri Akabane, known by his ringname Little Tokyo, is a retired Japanese professional midget wrestler who has competed in North American promotions during the 1970s and 1980s including Herb Abrams Universal Wrestling Federation, the American Wrestling Association and the World Wrestling Federation, most notably appearing at WrestleMania III in a... -1... Much like singles matches, tag team professional wrestling matches can and have taken many forms. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bobby The Brain Heenan (born Raymond Louis Heenan on November 1, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional wrestling manager and commentator. ... Lilian Ellison [1], better known by her ring name The Fabulous Moolah (born July 22, 1923), is a female professional wrestler who is marketed by World Wrestling Entertainment for holding the record for the longest title reign by any athlete in any professional sport. ... The nicknames Junkyard Dog & JYD may also refer to former pro-basketball player Jerome Williams, Saint Louis University swimmer Scott Dewlen, or Australian Football coach Dean Laidley. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Dream Team was a World Wrestling Federation tag-team from 1985 to March 29, 1987 consisting of Brutus Beefcake and Greg Valentine managed by ”Lucious” Johnny Valiant. ... John Anthony Wisniski Jr. ... Edward Harrison Leslie (born April 21, 1958) is an American professional wrestler, best known for his work in the World Wrestling Federation under the ring name Brutus The Barber Beefcake. ... John L. Sullivan was a professional wrestler better known as Johnny Valiant. ... Adolfo Bresciano (August 6, 1948 - March 11, 1993) was an Italian-born professional wrestler, best known for his work as Dino Bravo, self-proclaimed Worlds Strongest Man. ... The Fabulous Rougeau Brothers was the tag team name of real-life brothers, Jacques Rougeau & Raymond Rougeau, best known from their run in the WWF, from 1985 - 1990. ... Jacques Rougeau (born June 13, 1960) is a French-Canadian professional wrestler from Saint-Sulpice, Quebec, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s with the World Wrestling Federation under his own name, and as The Mountie. ... Raymond Rougeau (born February 18, 1955 in St. ... Roderick George Toombs (born April 17, 1954) better known by his ring name Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler, and film actor. ... Keith Franke (September 12, 1954 – July 4, 1988 [1]) was an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Adorable Adrian Adonis. ... The Mouth of the South Jimmy Hart (also known as The Colonel) (born January 1, 1943 in Memphis, Tennessee) is a professional wrestling manager, executive, composer and musician. ... A bloodied Kane inside a current style WWE cage. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Edward Harrison Leslie (born April 21, 1958) is an American professional wrestler, best known for his work in the World Wrestling Federation under the ring name Brutus The Barber Beefcake. ... Image File history File links WMIIIsteamboat. ... Image File history File links WMIIIsteamboat. ... The Hart Foundation was a collective name used by various stables in the World Wrestling Federation. ... This article is about the professional wrestler. ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956), is a professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... Danny Davis Dan Marsh was a professional wrestling referee and a professional wrestler most famous as Danny Davis of the World Wrestling Federation. ... The Mouth of the South Jimmy Hart (also known as The Colonel) (born January 1, 1943 in Memphis, Tennessee) is a professional wrestling manager, executive, composer and musician. ... The British Bulldogs Dynamite Kid & Davey Boy Smith British Bulldogs were the team of Davey Boy Smith & The Dynamite Kid in Stampede Wrestling & WWE (then WWF). ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... Thomas Billington (born December 5, 1958 in Golborne, Lancashire) is a retired English professional wrestler who competed in the World Wrestling Federation, Stampede Wrestling, All Japan Pro Wrestling and New Japan Pro Wrestling in the mid- to late-1980s. ... Merced Solis (born May 10, 1953) better known by his ring name Tito Santana, is a semi-retired Mexican-American professional wrestler whose career spanned from the late 70s to the early 90s. ... Butch Reed (born Bruce Reed on July 11, 1954 in Warrensburg, Missouri) is a professional wrestler best known for his stints in the World Wrestling Federation and the National Wrestling Alliance/World Championship Wrestling. ... Kenneth Ken Johnson, better known to wrestling fans as Slick, is a former WWF manager of such wrestlers as the Iron Sheik, Nikolai Volkoff, Butch Reed, Big Boss Man, Akeem, The Warlord, Paul Roma, and others. ... Koko B. Ware & Frankie James Ware aka Koko B. Ware is former professional wrestler. ... This article is about the pinfall (or pin) as it is defined in professional wrestling. ... Merced Solis (born May 10, 1953) better known by his ring name Tito Santana, is a semi-retired Mexican-American professional wrestler whose career spanned from the late 70s to the early 90s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... George Steele, better known as George The Animal Steele, real name William James (Jim) Myers (b. ... Randall Mario Poffo (born November 15, 1952 in Columbus, Ohio), is a former American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name of Macho Man Randy Savage. ... Elizabeth Ann Hulette (November 19, 1960 – May 1, 2003), best known as Miss Elizabeth, was a U.S. professional wrestling manager. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Intercontinental Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ... A pin, a fall, or a pinfall (the last term most commonly used in professional wrestling) is a victory condition in various forms of wrestling that is met by holding an opponents shoulders or scapulae (shoulder blades) on the wrestling mat for a prescribed period of time. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Mouth of the South Jimmy Hart (also known as The Colonel) (born January 1, 1943 in Memphis, Tennessee) is a professional wrestling manager, executive, composer and musician. ... Aurelian Jake Smith, Jr. ... Alice Cooper (born February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans four decades. ... Hossein Khosrow Ali Vaziri (حسین خسرو وزیری), (born March 15, 1943 in Tehran, Iran) is a retired Iranian professional wrestler better known by his ring name The Iron Sheik. ... Nikolai Volkoff (born Josip Peruzović in October 14, 1947) is a professional wrestler who is best known for his performances for the World Wrestling Federation. ... Kenneth Ken Johnson, better known to wrestling fans as Slick, is a former WWF manager of such wrestlers as the Iron Sheik, Nikolai Volkoff, Butch Reed, Big Boss Man, Akeem, The Warlord, Paul Roma, and others. ... The Killer Bees was a tag team comprised of Jumpin Jim Brunzell and B. Brian Blair in the World Wrestling Federation from 1985 to 1988 and later on in the independent circuit. ... Brian Leslie Blair aka B. Brian Blair / Brian Blair (born January 12, 1954) is a local politician in Florida, who gained fame as a professional wrestler especially as a part of the Killer Bees. ... James Brunzell (born August 13, 1949) is a professional wrestler better known by his stage name of Jumping Jim Brunzell. ... James Stuart Duggan (born January 14, 1954), better known by his ring name Hacksaw Jim Duggan, is an American professional wrestler, currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment wrestling on its RAW brand. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... Terrence Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... André the Giant was the stage name of André René Roussimoff, (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993) a French professional wrestler and actor. ... Bobby The Brain Heenan (born Raymond Louis Heenan on November 1, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional wrestling manager and commentator. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Championship is a professional wrestling world heavyweight-grade championship in the World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ... Sean Waltman performs a leg drop on Shark Boy A Leg drop or Legdrop refers to an attack used in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler will jump and land his leg across a fallen opponents chest, throat or face. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj Powell, John. Steamboat - Savage rule WrestleMania 3. SLAM! Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  2. ^ a b c d e WrestleMania III Facts and Stats. World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  3. ^ a b Yandek, Chris (October 2003). Interview: Randy Savage. Wrestling Digest. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Eck, Kevin (December 2002). The main events: ladies and gentlemen, may we present the 25 most memorable matches in the last 25 years. Wrestling Digest. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  5. ^ a b c Shields, Brian (2006). Main Event: WWE in the Raging 80s. Simon and Schuster, pp. 26. ISBN 1416532579. 
  6. ^ a b Loverro, Thom (2006). The Rise & Fall of ECW: Extreme Championship Wrestling. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 1416510583. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Loria, Keith (April 2003). Mania madness: The top 10 matches from the fabled history of WWE's showcase event. Wrestling Digest. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  8. ^ a b Cohen, Eric. WrestleMania III. About. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  9. ^ Schramm, Chris (1999-05-07). A history of crowds. SLAM! Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  10. ^ Beekman, Scott M. (2006). Ringside: A History of Professional Wrestling in America. Greenwood Press, pp. 128. ISBN 027598401X. 
  11. ^ a b Top 22 Matches in WrestleMania History. World Wrestling Entertainment (March 2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  12. ^ a b McAvennie, Mike (2007-03-30). The Big One. World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  13. ^ a b Shields, Brian (2006). Main Event: WWE in the Raging 80s. Simon and Schuster, pp. 38. ISBN 1416532579. 
  14. ^ a b c d WrestleMania III Results. World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  15. ^ Hall of Fame Bio: Harley Race. World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  16. ^ Owens, Chris. Harley Race Page 2. Kayfabe Memories. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  17. ^ Hart Foundation's first reign. World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  18. ^ Honkey Tonk Man nearly kills Jake "The Snake" Roberts. Wrestling Gone Wrong. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  19. ^ Foley, Mick (2000). Have A Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. HarperCollins, pp. 288. ISBN 0061031011. 
  20. ^ Cohen, Eric. Roddy Piper Biography. About. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.
  21. ^ a b c d e f WrestleMania III Celebrities. World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p WrestleMania III. Pro Wrestling History. Retrieved on 2007-10-13.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i Wrestlemania III Results. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  24. ^ WrestleMania III. World Wrestling Entertainment. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  25. ^ a b c Shields, Brian (2006). Main Event: WWE in the Raging 80s. Simon and Schuster, pp. 49. ISBN 1416532579. 
  26. ^ a b Shields, Brian (2006). Main Event: WWE in the Raging 80s. Simon and Schuster, pp. 42. ISBN 1416532579. 
  27. ^ Cite error 8; No text given.
  28. ^ Shields, Brian (2006). Main Event: WWE in the Raging 80s. Simon and Schuster, pp. 57. ISBN 1416532579. 
  29. ^ WrestleMania 23. Online World of Wrestling. Retrieved on 2007-10-13.
  30. ^ WrestleMania PPV Cards. Wrestling Information Archive. Retrieved on 2007-10-13.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Shields, Brian (2006). Main Event: WWE in the Raging 80s. Pocket Books. ISBN 978-1-4165-3257-6. 

External links

WrestleMania
I 1985 • 2 1986 • III 1987 • IV 1988 • V 1989 • VI 1990 • VII 1991 • VIII 1992 • IX 1993
X 1994 • XI 1995 • XII 1996 • 13 1997 • XIV 1998 • XV 1999 • XVI 2000 • X-Seven 2001
X8 2002 • XIX 2003 • XX 2004 • 21 2005 • 22 2006 • 23 2007 • XXIV 2008

  Results from FactBites:
 
WrestleMania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1998 words)
WrestleMania is to WWE as the World Cup is to FIFA, Super Bowl is to the NFL, the World Series is to MLB, the Stanley Cup Finals is to the NHL, and the NBA Finals is to the NBA in the sense that it is the most important event of the year in sports entertainment.
WrestleMania X can also be included on this list because in 1994 Royal Rumble, both Bret Hart and Lex Luger were both declared winners and both received title shots against the current champion, Yokozuna.
WrestleMania VI and X8 are the only WrestleManias to have been held outside of the United States, both being held at SkyDome (now the Rogers Centre), in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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