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Encyclopedia > World population
Map of countries by population — China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than one billion, together possess more than a third of the world's population. (See List of countries by population.)
Map of countries by population — China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than one billion, together possess more than a third of the world's population. (See List of countries by population.)
Population by continent as a percentage of world population (1750-2005)
Population by continent as a percentage of world population (1750-2005)

The world population is the total number of humans on Earth at a given time. As of May 2008, the world's population is believed to be just over 6.6 billion.[1][2] In line with population projections, this figure continues to grow at rates that were unprecedented before the 20th century, although the rate of increase has almost halved since its peak, which was reached in 1963, of 2.2 percent per year. The world's population, on its current growth trajectory, is expected to reach nearly 9 billion by the year 2050. This article describes a type of political entity. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... This article is about modern humans. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... May 2008 is the fifth month of the current leap year. ... Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ...

Contents

Population figures

Censuses taken between 300–400 CE[dubious ] showed over 50 million people living in the combined eastern and western Roman empire.[citation needed](citation Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, tulane.edu)


Below is a table with historical and predicted population figures shown in millions.[3][4][5] The availability of historical population figures varies by region. (Note: These projections here are not kept up to date.) Please see World population estimates for more figures. A list of data for historical human population of planet Earth from various sources is recorded here for reference (see e. ...

World historical and predicted populations (in millions)[6]
Region 1750 1800 1850 1900 1950 1999 2050 2150
World 791 978 1 262 1 650 2 521 5 978 8 909 9 746
Africa 106 107 111 133 221 767 1 766 2 308
Asia 502 635 809 947 1 402 3 634 5 268 5 561
Europe 163 203 276 408 547 729 628 517
Latin America and the Caribbean * 16 24 38 74 167 511 809 912
Northern America * 2 7 26 82 172 307 392 398
Oceania 2 2 2 6 13 30 46 51
World historical and predicted populations by percentage distribution
Region 1750 1800 1850 1900 1950 1999 2050 2150
World 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
Africa 13.4 10.9 8.8 8.1 8.8 12.8 19.8 23.7
Asia 63.5 64.9 64.1 57.4 55.6 60.8 59.1 57.1
Europe 20.6 20.8 21.9 24.7 21.7 12.2 7.0 5.3
Latin America and the Caribbean * 2.0 2.5 3.0 4.5 6.6 8.5 9.1 9.4
Northern America * 0.3 0.7 2.1 5.0 6.8 5.1 4.4 4.1
Oceania 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
Estimated world population at various dates (in thousands)
Year World Africa Asia Europe Latin America * Northern America* Oceania Notes
70,000 BCE 2 [7]
10,000 BCE 1 000
9000 BCE 3 000
8000 BCE 5 000 [8]
7000 BCE 7 000
6000 BCE 10 000
5000 BCE 15 000
4000 BCE 20 000
3000 BCE 25 000
2000 BCE 35 000
1000 BCE 50 000 [8]
500 BCE 100 000 [8]
1 200 000 [9]
1000 310 000
1750 791 000 106 000 502 000 163 000 16 000 2 000 2 000
1800 978 000 107 000 635 000 203 000 24 000 7 000 2 000
1850 1 262 000 111 000 809 000 276 000 38 000 26 000 2 000
1900 1 650 000 133 000 947 000 408 000 74 000 82 000 6 000
1950 2 518 629 221 214 1 398 488 547 403 167 097 171 616 12 812
1955 2 755 823 246 746 1 541 947 575 184 190 797 186 884 14 265
1960 2 981 659 277 398 1 674 336 601 401 209 303 204 152 15 888
1965 3 334 874 313 744 1 899 424 634 026 250 452 219 570 17 657
1970 3 692 492 357 283 2 143 118 655 855 284 856 231 937 19 443
1975 4 068 109 408 160 2 397 512 675 542 321 906 243 425 21 564
1980 4 434 682 469 618 2 632 335 692 431 361 401 256 068 22 828
1985 4 830 979 541 814 2 887 552 706 009 401 469 269 456 24 678
1990 5 263 593 622 443 3 167 807 721 582 441 525 283 549 26 687
1995 5 674 380 707 462 3 430 052 727 405 481 099 299 438 28 924
2000 6 070 581 795 671 3 679 737 727 986 520 229 315 915 31 043
2005 6 453 628 887 964 3 917 508 724 722 558 281 332 156 32 998**

* Northern America indicates the northern countries and territories of North America: Canada, the United States, Greenland, Bermuda, and St. Pierre and Miquelon. This should not be confused with the term "North America" which typically includes Mexico. The United Nations data includes Mexico as part of Latin America. A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Northern America is a name for the parts of North America besides Mexico when Mexico is considered as Latin America. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... Northern America is a name for the parts of North America besides Mexico when Mexico is considered as Latin America. ...


** This figure is disputed.


Rate of increase

Main article: Population growth
Population evolution in different continents. The vertical axis is logarithmic and is millions of people.
Population evolution in different continents. The vertical axis is logarithmic and is millions of people.

Different regions have different rates of population growth, but in the unusual case of the 20th century, the world saw the biggest increase in its population in human history due to medical advances and massive increase in agricultural productivity made by the Green Revolution. Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Green Revolution was the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ...


In 2000, the United Nations estimated that the world's population was then growing at the rate of 1.14% (or about 75 million people) per year,[10] down from a peak of 86 million per year in 1987. In the last few centuries, the number of people living on Earth has increased many times over. By the year 2000, there were 10 times as many people on Earth than there were 300 years ago. According to data from the CIA's 2005–2006 World Factbooks, the world human population increased by 203,800 every day.[11] The 2007 CIA factbook increased this to 211,090 people every day. UN redirects here. ... The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ...


Globally, the population growth rate has been steadily declining from its peak of 2.19% in 1963, but growth remains high in the Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa.[12] Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Satellite image of Africa, showing the ecological break that defines the sub-Saharan area Sub-Saharan Africa is a geographical term used to describe the area of the African continent which lies south of the Sahara, or those African countries which are fully or partially located south of the Sahara. ...


In some countries there is negative population growth (i.e. net decrease in population over time), especially in Central and Eastern Europe (mainly due to low fertility rates) and Southern Africa (due to the high number of HIV-related deaths). Within the next decade, Japan and some countries in Western Europe are also expected to encounter negative population growth due to sub-replacement fertility rates. Negative has meaning in several contexts: Look up negative in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... The (total) fertility rate of a population is the average number of child births per woman. ... Categories: Africa geography stubs | Southern Africa ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Sub-replacement fertility is a fertility rate that is not high enough to replace an areas population. ...


Population growth which exceeds the carrying capacity of an area or environment results in overpopulation. Conversely, such areas may be considered "underpopulated" if the population is not large enough to maintain an economic system; however, many who do not view overpopulation as a serious problem fail to consider the sustainability of economic systems, the environmental degradation caused, and the ecological footprint of the existing population. The equilibrium maximum of the population of an organism is known as the ecosystems carrying capacity for that organism. ... Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ... An economic system is a particular set of social institutions which deals with the production, distribution and consumption of goods and services in a particular society. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ... Environmental degradation is the deterioration of the environment through depletion of resources such as air, water and soil; the destruction of ecosystems and the extinction of wildlife. ...


The United Nations states that population growth is rapidly declining due to the demographic transition. The world population is expected to peak at 9.2 billion in 2075. [1] This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Demographic transition occurs in societies that transition from high birth rates and high death rates to low birth rates and low death rates as part of the economic development of a country from a pre-industrial to an industrialized economy. ...

Milestones

The following shows estimates of when each billion milestone was or will be met: A list of data for historical human population of planet Earth from various sources is recorded here for reference (see e. ...

Population 1 billion 2 billion 3 billion 4 billion 5 billion 6 billion 7 billion 8 billion 9 billion
Year 1804 1927 1961 1974 1987 1999 2011 2024 2042
Years until next billion 123 34 13 13 12 12 13 18

These numbers show that the world's population has tripled in 72 years, and doubled in 38 years up to the year 1999. Including some more estimates, the world population has been doubled or will double in the following years (with two different starting points). Note how, during the 2nd millennium, each doubling has taken roughly half as long as the previous doubling. A list of data for historical human population of planet Earth from various sources is recorded here for reference (see e. ... On the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd millennium commenced on 1 January 1001, and ended at the end of 31 December 2000. ...

Population 250 million 500 million 1 billion 2 billion 4 billion 8 billion
Year CE 950 1600 1804 1927 1974 2024
Years until next doubling 650 204 123 47 50
Population . . . 375 million 750 million 1.5 billion 3 billion 6 billion
Year 1420 1720 1875 1961 1999
Years until next doubling 300 155 86 38

Population distribution

Population density map of the world in 1994, when the world's population was at 5.6 billion; Observe the high densities in the Indo-Gangetic and North China Plains, the Sichuan Basin, the Nile river delta, Southern Japan, Western Europe, the Indonesian island of Java, Central America (especially El Salvador, the Americas' most densely populated nation), and the United States' BosWash megalopolis.
Population density map of the world in 1994, when the world's population was at 5.6 billion; Observe the high densities in the Indo-Gangetic and North China Plains, the Sichuan Basin, the Nile river delta, Southern Japan, Western Europe, the Indonesian island of Java, Central America (especially El Salvador, the Americas' most densely populated nation), and the United States' BosWash megalopolis.

Asia accounts for over 60% of the world population with almost 3.8 billion people. People's Republic of China and India alone comprise 20% and 16% respectively. Africa follows with 840 million people, 12% of the world population. Europe's 710 million people make up 11% of the world's population. North America is home to 514 million (8%), South America to 371 million (5.3%), and Australia 21 million. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4320x2160, 914 KB) This image shows the number of people per square kilometer around the world in 1994. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4320x2160, 914 KB) This image shows the number of people per square kilometer around the world in 1994. ... Schematic map of the Indo-Gangetic Plain The Indo-Gangetic Plain also known as The Kathwiarschi plains is a large and fertile plain encompassing most of northern and eastern India, the most populous parts of Pakistan, and virtually all of Bangladesh. ... The North China Plain (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), also called the Central Plain(s) (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is based on the deposits of the Huang He (Yellow River) and is the largest alluvial plain of eastern Asia. ... The Sichuan Basin is a basin in middle eastern China. ... NASA satellite photograph of the Nile Delta (shown in false colour) The Nile Delta (Arabic:دلتا النيل) is the delta formed in Northern Egypt where the Nile River spreads out and drains into the Mediterranean Sea. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... This article is about the Java island. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... The BosWash or Bosnywash or Boshington or Northeast Corridor or simply Northeast megalopolis is the name for a group of metropolitan areas in the northeastern United States, extending from Boston, Massachusetts, to Washington, D.C., including Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford and New Haven and Stamford, Connecticut; New York, New York... Megalopolis (Greek: large city, great city) can mean: The town of Megalópoli (Μεγαλοπολη), Megalopolis, Greece. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


The 15 most populous nations

Population by region, 2007
Population by region, 2007
The 15 most populous nations
The 15 most populous nations

From DSW-Datareport 2006 ("Deutsche Stiftung Weltbevölkerung"): Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 370 pixelsFull resolution (1357 × 628 pixel, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: image/png) (All user names refer to de. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 370 pixelsFull resolution (1357 × 628 pixel, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: image/png) (All user names refer to de. ...

  1. China: 1.32 billion (19.84%)
  2. India: 1.13 billion (16.96%)
  3. United States: 304.0 million (4.56%)
  4. Indonesia: 231.6 million (3.47%)
  5. Brazil: 186.5 million (2.8%)
  6. Pakistan: 163 million (2.44%)
  7. Bangladesh: 158.6 million (2.38%)
  8. Nigeria: 148 million (2.22%)
  9. Russia: 142 million (2.13%)
  10. Japan: 127.8 million (1.92%)
  11. Mexico: 106.5 million (1.6%)
  12. Philippines: 88.7 million (1.33%)
  13. Vietnam: 87.4 million (1.31%)
  14. Germany: 82.2 million (1.23%)
  15. Ethiopia: 77.1 million (1.16%)

Approximately 4.3 billion people live in these 15 countries, representing roughly two-thirds of the world's population. If added together, all nations in the European Union, with 494 million people – about 7.3% of world's population in 2006 – would be third in the list above.


Ethnicity

Main article: List of ethnic groups

The world is made up of hundreds of thousands of ethnic groups, and due to mass immigration across the planet over millenia, it is impossible to tell how many people belonging to a certain ethnic group inhabit the earth. The single largest ethnic group on the planet by far is Han Chinese, which represents 19.73% of the global population, for comparison 6.06% of the planet's population is of full or partial Spanish ancestry, and on a wider scale 14.2% of earth's population is of Sub-Saharan descent (those identifying as 'Black'). This is a list of ethnic groups. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... Language(s) Chinese languages Religion(s) Predominantly Mahayana Buddhism and Taoism. ... Spaniard redirects here. ... Sub-Saharan Africa, Africa south of the Sahara Desert, is the term used to describe those countries of Africa that are not part of North Africa. ...


Demographics of youth

According to the 2006 CIA World Factbook, around 27% of the world's population is below 15 years of age.[13] The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ...


Before adding mortality rates, the 1990s saw the greatest number of raw births worldwide, especially in the years after 1995, despite the fact that the birth rate was not as high as in the 1960s. In fact, because of the 160 million-per-year raw births after 1995, the time it took to reach the next billion reached its fastest pace (only 12 years), as world population reached 6 billion people in 1999, when at the beginning of the decade, the reaching was designated for the year 2000, by most demographers. People aged 7 through 17 make up these births, today. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ...


1985–1990 marked the period with the fastest yearly population change in world history. Even though the early 1960s had a greater growth rate than in the mid and late 1980s, the population change hovered around 83 million people in the five-year period, with an all-time growth change of nearly 88 million in 1990. The reason is because the world's population was greater in the mid and late 1980s (around 5 billion) than in the early 1960s (around 3 billion), which meant that the growth rate in the 1980s was no factor on the dramatic population change. People aged 17 to 22 make up these births, today. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... This article is about the year. ...


Forecast of world population

See also: UN population projections

In the long run, the future population growth of the world is difficult to predict. Birth rates are declining slightly on average, but vary greatly between developed countries (where birth rates are often at or below replacement levels), developing countries, and different ethnicities. Death rates can change unexpectedly due to disease, wars and catastrophes, or advances in medicine. The UN itself has issued multiple projections of future world population, based on different assumptions. Over the last 10 years, the UN had consistently revised these projections downward, until the 2006 revision issued March 14, 2007 revised the 2050 mid range estimate upwards by 273 million. Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ... Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... Mortality rate is the annual number of deaths per 1000 people. ... This false-colored electron micrograph shows a malaria sporozoite migrating through the midgut epithelia. ... This is a list of lists of wars, sorted by country, date, region, and type of conflict. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Alternately, the United States Census Bureau issued a revised forecast for world population that increased its projection for the year 2050 to above 9.4 billion people (which was the UN's 1996 projection for 2050), up from 9.1 billion people. The latest Census Bureau estimates for the same upcoming years are as follows:[14]

Year Population
(in billions)
2010 6.8
2020 7.6
2030 8.3
2040 8.9
2050 9.4

Other projections of population growth predict that the world's population will eventually crest, though it is uncertain exactly when or how. In some scenarios, the population will crest as early as the mid-21st century at under 9 billion, due to gradually decreasing birth rates, (the "low variant" of [3]), The "high variant" from the same source gives a population between 10 and 11 billion in 2050.


In other scenarios, disasters triggered by the growing population's demand for scarce resources will eventually lead to a sudden population crash, or even a Malthusian catastrophe (also see overpopulation and food security). A Malthusian catastrophe (sometimes called a Malthusian check, Malthusian crisis, Malthusian dilemma, Malthusian disaster, Malthusian trap, Malthusian controls or Malthusian limit) is a return to subsistence-level conditions as a result of population growth outpacing agricultural production. ... Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ... Subsistence farmers with a Treadle Pump. ...


Below is a table of predicted population figures (in thousands).[3][15][16] Please see World population estimates for more figures. A list of data for historical human population of planet Earth from various sources is recorded here for reference (see e. ...

Year World Africa Asia Europe Latin America US and Canada Oceania
2010 6 830 283 984 225 (14.4%) 4 148 948 (60.7%) 719 714 (10.5%) 594 436 (8.7%) 348 139 (5.1%) 34 821 (0.5%)
2015 7 197 247 1 084 540 (15.1%) 4 370 522 (60.7%) 713 402 (9.9%) 628 260 (8.7%) 363 953 (5.1%) 36 569 (0.5%)
2020 7 540 237 1 187 584 (15.7%) 4 570 131 (60.6%) 705 410 (9.4%) 659 248 (8.7%) 379 589 (5.0%) 38 275 (0.5%)
2025 7 851 455 1 292 085 (16.5%) 4 742 232 (60.4%) 696 036 (8.9%) 686 857 (8.7%) 394 312 (5.0%) 39 933 (0.5%)
2030 8 130 149 1 398 004 (17.2%) 4 886 647 (60.1%) 685 440 (8.4%) 711 058 (8.7%) 407 532 (5.0%) 41 468 (0.5%)
2035 8 378 184 1 504 179 (18.0%) 5 006 700 (59.8%) 673 638 (8.0%) 731 591 (8.7%) 419 273 (5.0%) 42 803 (0.5%)
2040 8 593 591 1 608 329 (18.7%) 5 103 021 (59.4%) 660 645 (8.0%) 747 953 (8.7%) 429 706 (5.0%) 43 938 (0.5%)
2045 8 774 394 1 708 407 (19.5%) 5 175 311 (59.0%) 646 630 (7.4%) 759 955 (8.7%) 439 163 (5.0%) 44 929 (0.5%)
2050 8 918 724 1 803 298 (20.2%) 5 217 202 (58.5%) 653 323 (7.3%) 767 685 (8.6%) 447 931 (5.0%) 45 815 (0.5%)

Predictions based on our growing population

In 1798, Thomas Malthus incorrectly predicted that population growth would eventually outrun food supply in the middle of the 19th century, resulting in catastrophe. In 1968, Paul R. Ehrlich reignited this argument with his book The Population Bomb, which helped give the issue significant attention throughout the 1960s and 1970s. The dire predictions of Ehrlich and other neo-Malthusians were vigorously challenged by a number of economists, notably Julian Simon. Thomas Robert Malthus FRS (13 February 1766 – 23 December 1834),[1] was a political economist and British demographer. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Ralph Ehrlich (born May 29, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a Stanford University professor and a renowned entomologist specializing in Lepidoptera (butterflies). ... The Population Bomb (1968) is a book written by Paul R. Ehrlich. ... Neo-malthusianism is a set of doctrines derived from Thomas Malthuss theory that limited resources keep populations in check and reduce economic growth. ... This article is about the economist Julian Simon. ...


On the opposite end of the spectrum there are a number of people who argue that today's low fertility rates in Europe, North America, Japan and Australia, combined with mass immigration, will have severe negative consequences for these countries.[17] The (total) fertility rate of a population is the average number of child births per woman. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ...


Child poverty has been linked to people having children before they have the means to care for them.[18] More recently, some scholars have put forward the Doomsday argument applying Bayesian probability to world population to argue that the end of humanity will come sooner than we usually think.[19] The Doomsday argument (DA) is a probabilistic argument that claims to predict the future lifetime of the human race given only an estimate of the total number of humans born so far. ... Bayesian probability is an interpretation of probability suggested by Bayesian theory, which holds that the concept of probability can be defined as the degree to which a person believes a proposition. ...


It should be noted that between 1950 and 1984, as the Green Revolution transformed agriculture around the globe, world grain production increased by 250%. The energy for the Green Revolution was provided by fossil fuels in the form of fertilizers (natural gas), pesticides (oil), and hydrocarbon fueled irrigation.[20] The peaking of world hydrocarbon production (Peak oil) may test Malthus and Ehrlich critics.[21][22] As of May 2008, increased farming for use in biofuels,[23] world oil prices at over $120 a barrel,[24] global population growth,[25] climate change,[26] loss of agricultural land to residential and industrial development,[27][28] and growing consumer demand in China and India[29] have pushed up the price of grain.[30] Food riots have recently taken place in many countries across the world.[31][32][33] The Green Revolution was the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ... Fossil fuels are hydrocarbon-containing natural resources such as coal, petroleum and natural gas. ... Fertilizers are chemicals given to plants with the intention of promoting growth; they are usually applied either via the soil or by foliar spraying. ... the plane is spreading pesticide. ... A 3-dimensional rendered Ball-and-stick model of the methane molecule. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil usually for assisting in growing crops. ... For other uses, see Peak oil (disambiguation). ... Bio-energy redirects here. ... Oil price in 2003-2005 The price of light, sweet crude oil on NYMEX has been above $40/barrel since late July 2004. ... Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 450,000 years For current global climate change, see Global warming. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... The word grain has several meanings, most being descriptive of a small piece or particle. ...


The world population has grown by about four billion since the beginning of the Green Revolution and most believe that, without the Revolution, there would be greater famine and malnutrition than the UN presently documents (approximately 850 million people suffering from chronic malnutrition in 2005).[34] <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... Percentage of population affected by malnutrition by country, according to United Nations statistics. ...


Number of humans who have ever lived

Estimates of the total number of people who have ever lived range approximately from 45 billion to 125 billion[citation needed]. Many of the more robust estimates fall into the range of 90 to 110 billion humans[citation needed]. It is impossible to make a precise count of the number of human beings who have ever lived for the following reasons:

  • The set of specific characteristics which define a human being and distinguish early Homo sapiens from earlier or related species continues to be a subject of intense research and debate. It is thus not possible to know when to begin the count, nor which hominids to include.
  • Even if the scientific community reached wide consensus regarding which characteristics distinguished human beings, it would be nearly impossible to pinpoint the time of their first appearance to even the nearest millennium because the fossil record is simply too sparse. Only a few thousand fossils of early humans have been found, most no bigger than a tooth or a knucklebone. These bone fragments are used to extrapolate the population distribution of millions of early human beings spread across the continents.
  • Robust statistical data only exists for the last two or three centuries. Until the late 18th century, few nations, kingdoms, or empires had ever performed an accurate census. In many early attempts, the focus was on counting merely a subset of the people for purposes of taxation or military service[citation needed]. Even with the advent of agencies such as the United States Bureau of the Census, reliable census methods and technologies continue to evolve. All estimates of population sizes preceding the 18th century are estimates, and thus the margin of error for the total number of humans who have ever lived should be in the billions, or even tens of billions of people.

"Guesstimating the number of people ever born... requires selecting population sizes for different points from antiquity to the present and applying assumed birth rates to each period..."[35] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


According to one set of calculations based on 2002 data:[35]

  • The number who have ever been born is around 106 000 000 000.
  • The world population in mid-2002 was approximately 6 215 000 000
  • The percentage of those ever born who were living in 2002 was approximately 5.8%

The claim that more than half the humans ever born are alive today is, in all probability, not accurate.


References

  1. ^ CIA's The World Factbook (see also The World Factbook)
  2. ^ World POPClock Projection, U.S. Census Bureau
  3. ^ a b c World population prospects: the 2004 revision population database
  4. ^ The World at un.org
  5. ^ Population Growth over Human History
  6. ^ UN report 2004 data
  7. ^ http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=080425101050.cni2ks3u&show_article=1
  8. ^ a b c an average of figures from different sources as listed at the US Census Bureau's Historical Estimates of World Population; see also *Kremer, Michael. 1993. "Population Growth and Technological Change: One Million B.C. to 1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics 108(3): 681-716.
  9. ^ The range of figures from different sources as listed at the US Census Bureau's Historical Estimates of World Population put the population at 1 CE between 170 million to 400 million.
  10. ^ census.gov
  11. ^ Current world population (ranked)
  12. ^ Ron Nielsen, The little green handbook, Picador, New York (2006) ISBN 0-312-42581-3
  13. ^ Age structure of the world — 2006 CIA World Factbook
  14. ^ U.S. Census Bureau - International Data Base (IDB)
  15. ^ The World at Six Billion
  16. ^ Population Growth over Human History
  17. ^ The Death of the West: How Dying Populations and Immigrant Invasions Imperil Our Country and Civilization (ISBN 0-312-30259-3), by Patrick Buchanan, The Empty Cradle: How Falling Birthrates Threaten World Prosperity (ISBN 0-465-05050-6), by Longman, and Fewer: How the New Demography of Depopulation Will Shape Our Future (ISBN 1-56663-606-X), by Wattenberg
  18. ^ Population bomb still ticking away - 20 Mar 2007 - NZ Herald
  19. ^ DIE OFF - a population crash resource page
  20. ^ Eating Fossil Fuels |EnergyBulletin.net
  21. ^ Peak Oil: the threat to our food security
  22. ^ Peak Oil And Famine:Four Billion Deaths
  23. ^ 2008: The year of global food crisis
  24. ^ The global grain bubble
  25. ^ Food crisis will take hold before climate change, warns chief scientist
  26. ^ Global food crisis looms as climate change and fuel shortages bite
  27. ^ Experts: Global Food Shortages Could ‘Continue for Decades'
  28. ^ Has Urbanization Caused a Loss to Agricultural Land?
  29. ^ The World's Growing Food-Price Crisis
  30. ^ The cost of food: Facts and figures
  31. ^ Riots and hunger feared as demand for grain sends food costs soaring
  32. ^ Already we have riots, hoarding, panic: the sign of things to come?
  33. ^ Feed the world? We are fighting a losing battle, UN admits
  34. ^ The limits of a Green Revolution?
  35. ^ a b How Many People Have Ever Lived on Earth? by Carl Haub, 2002; calculated from a start date of 50 000 years BCE.

The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ... Michael Kremer is a development economist and is currently the Gates Professor of Developing Societies at Harvard University. ... The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ... Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), usually known as Pat Buchanan, is an American conservative journalist and a well known television political commentator. ...

Further resources

  • There is a map that is rescaled in order to display every country according to its population size. It is available at the University of Sheffield 'Worldmapper'[2] site.[1]
  • Population patterns and trends can be explored on the GeoHive interactive world atlas.[2]

See also

For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ... Depopulation is a term used to describe any great reduction in a human population. ... The Doomsday argument (DA) is a probabilistic argument that claims to predict the future lifetime of the human race given only an estimate of the total number of humans born so far. ... The end of civilization or the end of the world are phrases used in reference to human extinction scenarios, doomsday events, and related hazards which occur on a global scale. ... Oral contraceptives. ... Subsistence farmers with a Treadle Pump. ... The Green Revolution was the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ... This article is about the measure of remaining life. ... Christianity - Percentage by country Islam - Percentage by country Buddhism - Percentage by country Hinduism - Percentage by country The table above is compiled from the relevant Wikipedia pages listing Religions by Country. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... [[Image:Population other political entities by population growth rate, with estimates taken from the 2006 edition of the CIA World Factbook. ... Map of countries and territories by fertility rate Graph of Total Fertility Rates vs. ... This is an incomplete list of major famines, ordered by date. ... Children reading. ... Medieval demography is the study of human demography in Europe during the Middle Ages. ... The one-child policy is the current birth control policy of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ... Population control is the practice of limiting population increase, usually by reducing the birth rate. ... Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BC – AD 2000. ... The Population Reference Bureau is a non-governmental organization, founded in 1929 by Guy Irving Burch, with support of Raymond Pearl. ... The United Nations Population Fund designated October 12, 1999 as the approximate day on which world population reached six billion. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 This is a list of the 100 largest urban agglomerations in the world according to the United Nations World Urbanization Prospects report (2005 revision). ... A list of data for historical human population of planet Earth from various sources is recorded here for reference (see e. ...

External links

  • World Population
  • The Population Project
  • Optimum Population Trust
  • State of World Population 2007 report 27 June, 2007 - United Nations Population Fund
  • World Population Day United Nations: 11 July
  • The Day of 6 Billion official homepage
  • World Population Prospects. URL accessed on April 7, 2005.
  • World Population Counter
  • Trend of growth rate with total global population
  • The World in Balance Transcript of two-part PBS' Nova on World Population
  • BBC (1999). UN chief welcomes six billionth baby. URL accessed on March 7, 2005.
  • Central Intelligence Agency (2004). CIA The World Factbook 2004. URL accessed on February 13, 2005.
  • United Nations (2001). United Nations Population Information Network. URL accessed on February 13, 2005.
  • United States Census Bureau (2004). Historical Estimates of World Population. URL accessed on February 13, 2005.
  • PopulationData.net (2005). PopulationData.net - Information and maps about populations around the world.
  • GeoHive GeoHive.com - World Statistics including population and future predictions.
  • Population Reference Bureau www.prb.org - News and issues related to population.
  • (French) World Population Clock (2005). WorldPopClock.com - World population clock.
  • Population Counter. Real time counter..
  • Population Information on population, population growth, population problems, population statistics, and population figures.
  • World maps, including maps of population from Year 1 to Year 2300
  • Live World Population
  • World Population from the US Census Bureau in an interactive Excel dashboard
For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... CIA redirects here. ... UN redirects here. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...

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