FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > World Wide Web Consortium
World Wide Web Consortium
Type Consortium
Founded October 1994
Founder Tim Berners-Lee
Headquarters MIT/CSAIL in USA
ERCIM in France
Keio University in Japan
and many other offices around the world
Slogan To lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing protocols and guidelines that ensure long-term growth for the Web.
Website www.w3.org -- History

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is the main international standards organization for the World Wide Web (abbreviated WWW or W3). It is arranged as a consortium where member organizations maintain full-time staff for the purpose of working together in the development of standards for the W3. As of March 2007, the W3C had 441 members. It is always open for new organizations to join. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into World Wide Web Consortium. ... Image File history File links W3c_main. ... A consortium is an association of two or more individuals, companies, organisations or governments (or any combination of these entities) with the objective of participating in a common activity or pooling their resources for achieving a common goal. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, or CSAIL, is an interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, formed on July 1, 2003 by the merger of MIT Laboratory for Computer Science and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. ... The ERCIM is the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics. ... Keio University ) is one of the oldest private universities in Japan. ... Look up slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A standards organization, also sometimes referred to as a standards body, a standards development organization or SDO (depending on what is being referenced), is any entity whose primary activities are developing, coordinating, promulgating, revising, amending, reissuing, interpreting, or otherwise maintaining standards that address the interests of a wide base of... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... A consortium is an association of two or more individuals, companies, organisations or governments (or any combination of these entities) with the objective of participating in a common activity or pooling their resources for achieving a common goal. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...


W3C also engages in education and outreach, develops software and serves as an open forum for discussion about the Web.


W3C is headed by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, creator of the first web browser and the primary author of the original URL (Uniform Resource Locator), HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol) and HTML (HyperText Markup Language) specifications, the principal technologies that form the basis of the World Wide Web. Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... “URL” redirects here. ... HTTP (for HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the primary method used to convey information on the World Wide Web. ... HTML, an initialism of Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... Specification may refer to several different concepts: Specification (standards) refers to specific standards Specificatio - a legal concept Specification (regression) refers to the practice of translating theory into a regression model Category: ...

Contents

History

HTML

Character encodings
Dynamic HTML
Font family
HTML editor
HTML element
HTML scripting
Layout engine comparison
Style sheets
Unicode and HTML
W3C
Web browsers comparison
Web colors
XHTML HTML, an initialism of Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... HTML has been in use since 1991, but HTML 4. ... Dynamic HTML or DHTML is a collection of technologies used together to create interactive and animated web sites by using a combination of a static markup language (such as HTML), a client-side scripting language (such as JavaScript), a presentation definition language (Cascading Style Sheets, CSS), and the Document Object... In HTML and XHTML, a font face or font family is the typeface that is applied to some text. ... An HTML editor is a software application for creating web pages. ... In computing, an HTML element indicates structure in an HTML document and a way of hierarchically arranging content. ... The W3C HTML standard includes support for client-side scripting. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Tableless web design be merged into this article or section. ... Web pages authored using hypertext markup language (HTML) may contain multilingual text represented with the Unicode universal character set. ... The following tables compare general and technical information for a number of web browsers. ... Web colors are colors used in designing web pages, and the methods for describing and specifying those colors. ... The Extensible HyperText Markup Language, or XHTML, is a markup language that has the same depth of expression as HTML, but also conforms to XML syntax. ...

 This box: view  talk  edit 

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) was founded by Tim Berners-Lee after he left the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in October, 1991. It was founded at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Computer Science (MIT/LCS) with support from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) -- which had pioneered the Internet -- and the European Commission. CERN logo The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: ), commonly known as CERN (see Naming), pronounced (or in French), is the worlds largest particle physics laboratory, situated just northwest of Geneva on the border between France and Switzerland. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ...


W3C was created to ensure compatibility and agreement among industry members in the adoption of new standards. Prior to its creation, incompatible versions of HTML were offered by different vendors, increasing the potential for inconsistency between web pages. The consortium was created to get all those vendors to agree on a set of core principles and components which would be supported by everyone.


It was originally intended that CERN host the European branch of W3C; however, CERN wished to focus on particle physics, not information technology. In April 1995 the Institut national de recherche en informatique et en automatique (INRIA) became the European host of W3C, with Keio University becoming the Japanese branch in September 1996. Starting in 1997, W3C created regional offices around the world; as of October 2007 it has sixteen World Offices covering Australia, the Benelux countries (the Netherlands, Luxemburg, and Belgium), China, Finland, Germany and Austria, Greece, Hungary, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Korea, Morocco, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The Institut national de recherche en informatique et en automatique (INRIA) is a French national research institution focusing on computer science, control theory and applied mathematics. ... The Institut national de recherche en informatique et en automatique (INRIA) is a French national research institution focusing on computer science, control theory and applied mathematics. ... Keio University ) is one of the oldest private universities in Japan. ... Luxembourg - a small country in west Europe Luxembourg (city) - the capital city of the country Luxembourg (district) - a district in the country Luxembourg, province of Belgium Luxemburg, Iowa - a city in the USA Luxemburg, Wisconsin - a village in the USA Luxembourg Garden, Paris, France Luxemburg Township, Minnesota - a township in... This article is about the Korean civilization. ...


In January 2003, the European host was transferred from INRIA to the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM), an organization that represents European national computer science laboratories. ERCIM is an acronym for European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics. ... The ERCIM is the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics. ...


Recommendations and certifications

In accord with the W3C Process Document, a Recommendation progresses through five maturity levels:

  1. Working Draft (WD)
  2. Last Call Working Draft
  3. Candidate Recommendation (CR)
  4. Proposed Recommendation (PR)
  5. W3C Recommendation (REC)

A Recommendation may be updated by separately published Errata until enough substantial edits accumulate, at which time a new edition of the Recommendation may be produced (e.g., XML is now in its fourth edition). W3C also publishes various kinds of informative Notes which are not intended to be treated as standards. A W3C Recommendation is the final stage of a ratification process of the W3C working group concerning the standard. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ...


W3C leaves it up to manufacturers to follow the Recommendations. Many of its standards define levels of conformance, which the developers must follow if they wish to label their product W3C-compliant. Like any standards of other organizations, W3C recommendations are sometimes implemented partially. The Recommendations are under a royalty-free patent license, allowing anyone to implement them.


Unlike the ISOC and other international standards bodies, the W3C does not have a certification program. A certification program is a process which has benefits and drawbacks; the W3C has decided, for now, that it is not suitable to start such a program owing to the risk of creating more drawbacks for the community than benefits. The Internet Society or ISOC is an international organization that promotes Internet use and access. ...


Administration

The Consortium is jointly administered by the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) in the USA, the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM) (in Sophia Antipolis, France), and Keio University (in Japan). The W3C also has World Offices in fifteen regions around the world. The W3C Offices work with their regional Web communities to promote W3C technologies in local languages, broaden W3C's geographical base, and encourage international participation in W3C Activities... The Stata Center houses CSAIL and has very unusual architecture. ... ERCIM is an acronym for European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics. ... Sophia Antipolis is a technology park north-west of Nice, France. ... Keio University ) is one of the oldest private universities in Japan. ...


Standards

W3C/IETF Standards (over Internet protocol suite):      The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) develops and promotes Internet standards, cooperating closely with the W3C and ISO/IEC standard bodies; and dealing in particular with standards of the TCP/IP and Internet protocol suite. ... The Internet protocol suite is the set of communications protocols that implement the protocol stack on which the Internet and most commercial networks run. ...

                In web development, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a stylesheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in a markup language. ... The Common Gateway Interface (CGI) is a standard protocol for interfacing external application software with an information server, commonly a web server. ... Hierarchy of objects in an example HTML DOM - Document Object Model The Document Object Model (DOM) is a platform- and language-independent standard object model for representing HTML or XML and related formats. ... GRDDL is a markup format for Gleaning Resource Descriptions from Dialects of Languages; that is, for getting RDF data out of XML and XHTML documents using explicitly associated transformation algorithms, typically represented in XSLT. It is currently undergoing standardization in the W3C. microformats RDFa [1] World Wide Web GRDDL Specification... HTML, an initialism of Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... The Web Ontology Language (OWL) is a language for defining and instantiating Web ontologies. ... Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata model but which has come to be used as a general method of modeling information, through a variety of syntax formats. ... SVG redirects here. ... A collection of decorative soaps used for human hygiene purposes. ... SMIL (pronounced or smile), the Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, is a W3C Recommended XML markup language for describing multimedia presentations. ... Speech Recognition Grammar Specification (SRGS) is an W3C recommendation that defines syntax for representing grammars for use in speech recognition so that developers can specify the words and patterns of words to be listened for by a speech recognizer. ... Speech Synthesis Markup Language is a W3C recommendation and is designed to provide a rich, XML-based markup language for assisting the generation of synthetic speech in Web and other applications. ...

VoiceXML (VXML) is the W3Cs standard XML format for specifying interactive voice dialogues between a human and a computer. ... WSDL redirects here. ... XACML stands for eXtensible Access Control Markup Language. ... The Extensible HyperText Markup Language, or XHTML, is a markup language that has the same depth of expression as HTML, but also conforms to XML syntax. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ... www. ... XForms is two things: 1. ... XML Information Set (Infoset) is a W3C recommendation. ... An XML schema is a description of a type of XML document, typically expressed in terms of constraints on the structure and content of documents of that type, above and beyond the basic syntax constraints imposed by XML itself. ... XPath (XML Path Language) is an expression language for addressing portions of an XML document, or for computing values (strings, numbers, or boolean values) based on the content of an XML document. ... XQuery is a query language (with some programming language features) that is designed to query collections of XML data. ... ...

See also

Device Independence is a special track of the W3C. Its aim is for a unified web which is accessible from many types of devices. ... Pocket Internet Explorer displaying the Wikipedia main page on a PDA Opera Mini displaying the Wikipedia portal The Mobile Web refers to the World Wide Web as accessed from mobile devices such as cell phones, PDAs, and other portable gadgets connected to a public network. ... In internetworking and computer network engineering, Request for Comments (RFC) documents are a series of memoranda encompassing new research, innovations, and methodologies applicable to Internet technologies. ... W3Cs Semantic Web logo The Semantic Web is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which web content can be expressed not only in natural language, but also in a format that can be read and used by software agents, thus permitting them to find, share and... WAI may stand for: Otaku Web Accessibility Initiative Wai (倭) is the Cantonese pronunciation of an ancient name of Japan, transcribed as Wei from Mandarin Chinese, and Wa from Japanese. ... A screenshot of a web page. ... The inside/front of a Dell PowerEdge web server The term Web server can mean one of two things: A computer program that is responsible for accepting HTTP requests from clients, which are known as Web browsers, and serving them HTTP responses along with optional data contents, which usually are... A web service is a collection of protocols and standards used for exchanging data between applications. ... A web template is an element of a web template system that is used to rapidly generate and mass-produce web pages through a pre-defined schematic, layout, or finite number of programming language instructions. ... XMLHttpRequest (XHR) is an API that can be used by JavaScript, and other web browser scripting languages to transfer XML and other text data to and from a web server using HTTP, by establishing an independent and asynchronous communication channel between a web pages Client-Side and Server-Side. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
World Wide Web Consortium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (657 words)
The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is an international consortium where member organisations, a full-time staff, and the public, work together to develop standards for the World Wide Web.
The Consortium is headed by Tim Berners-Lee, the original creator of the World Wide Web and primary author of the URL (Uniform Resource Locator), HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol) and HTML (HyperText Markup Language) specifications, the principal technologies that form the basis of the Web.
The Consortium is jointly administered by the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) in the USA, the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM) (in Sophia Antipolis, France), and Keio University (in Japan).
World Wide Web Consortium - definition of World Wide Web Consortium in Encyclopedia (257 words)
The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is a consortium that produces standards—"recommendations", as they call them—for the World Wide Web.
The Consortium is headed by Tim Berners-Lee, the original creator of URL (Uniform Resource Locator), HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol) and HTML (HyperText Markup Language), the principal technologies that form the basis of the Web.
The Consortium's headquarters is at present on the fifth floor of the Gates Tower in the Stata Center at MIT.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m