FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > World Council of Churches

The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. Based in Geneva, Switzerland, it has a membership of over 340 churches and denominations and those churches and denominations claim about 550 million Christian members throughout more than 120 countries.[1] Archbishop Anastasios of Tirana and All Albania was unanimously elected World Council of Churches President in the 9th general assembly meeting held at the Pontifical Catholic University of Porto Alegre in Brazil in February of 2006. The council has been involved in several activities that have caused controversy and criticism, including the funding of groups engaged in violent struggle during the 1970s. Christian ecumenism is the promotion of unity or cooperation between distinct religious groups or denominations of the Christian religion, more or less broadly defined. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Anastasios Giannoulatos (Albanian: Anastas Janullatos; Greek: Αναστάσιος Γιαννουλάτος), Archbishop of Tirana, Durrës and All Albania, is the Head of the Holy Synod of the Albanian Orthodox Church. ... Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ...

Contents

History

After the initial successes of the Ecumenical Movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the Edinburgh Missionary Conference of 1910 (chaired by future WCC Honorary President John R. Mott), church leaders (in 1937) agreed to establish a World Council of Churches, based on a merger of the Faith and Order Movement and Life and Work Movement organisations. Its official establishment was deferred with the outbreak of World War II until August 23, 1948. Delegates of 147 churches assembled in Amsterdam to merge the Faith and Order Movement and Life and Work Movement. Subsequently mergers were with the International Missionary Council in 1961 and the World Council of Christian Education, with its roots in the 18th century Sunday School movement, in 1971. Christian ecumenism is the promotion of unity or cooperation between distinct religious groups or denominations of the Christian religion, more or less broadly defined. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Edinburgh Missionary Conference held in June of 1910 was both the culmination of nineteenth-century Christian missions and the formal beginning of the modern Christian ecumenical movement. ... John Raleigh Mott (May 25, 1865 - January 31, 1955) was a long-serving leader of the YMCA. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 for his work in establishing and strengthening international Christian student organizations that worked to promote peace. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... August 23 is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Heldhaftig, Vastberaden, Barmhartig (Valiant, Determined, Compassionate) Location of Amsterdam Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province North Holland Government  - Mayor Job Cohen (PvdA)  - Aldermen Lodewijk Asscher Hennah Buyne Carolien Gehrels Tjeerd Herrema Maarten van Poelgeest Marijke Vos  - Secretary Erik Gerritsen Area [1][2]  - City 219 km²  (84. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Sunday school, Indians and whites. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...


WCC member churches include most of the Orthodox Churches; numerous Protestant churches, such as the Anglican Communion, some Baptists, many Lutheran, Methodist, and Reformed, a broad sampling of united and independent churches, and some Pentecostal churches. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Eastern Christianity. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... -1...


The largest Christian body, the Roman Catholic Church, is not a member of the WCC, but has worked closely with the Council for more than three decades and sends observers to all major WCC conferences as well as to its Central Committee meetings and the Assemblies. The Vatican's Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity also nominates 12 members to the WCC's Faith and Order Commission as full members. While not a member of the WCC, the Roman Catholic Church is a member of some other ecumenical bodies at regional and national levels, for example, the National Council of Churches in Australia and the National Council of Christian Churches in Brazil (CONIC). Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church... The Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity origins are associated with the Second Vatican Council. ... The National Council of Churches in Australia (NCCA) is an ecumenical organisation bringing together a number of Australias Christian churches in dialogue and practical cooperation. ...


Delegates sent from the member churches meet every seven years in an Assembly, which elects a Central Committee that governs between Assemblies. A variety of other committees and commissions answer to the Central Committee and its staff.


These Assemblies have been held since 1948, and last met in Porto Alegre, Brazil in February 2006, under the theme "God, in your grace, transform the world". [1] 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... This article is about Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Previous Assemblies

A former president of the WCC was Rev. Martin Niemöller, the famous Lutheran anti-Nazi theologian. Municipality of Amsterdam Alternate meanings: See Amsterdam (disambiguation) Amsterdam is the capital of the Netherlands. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Culture Tourist Attractions Delhi offers a multitude of interesting places and attractions to the visitor, so much so that it becomes difficult to decide from where to begin exploring the city. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... This article is about the modern city of Uppsala. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Africa geography stubs | Capitals in Africa | Kenya ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... July 24 is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings see Canberra (disambiguation). ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Harare (formerly Salisbury), estimated population 1,485,615 (1992), is the capital of Zimbabwe. ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Lutheranism describes those churches within Christianity that were reformed according to the theological insights of Martin Luther in the 16th century. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... At Wikiversity you can learn more and teach others about Theology at: The School of Theology Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ...


General Secretaries

Years Name Churches Nationality
1948 - 1966 W. A. Visser 't Hooft Reformed Church in the Netherlands/Swiss National Protestant Church, Geneva Netherlands
1966 - 1972 Eugene Carson Blake United Presbyterian Church (USA) USA
1972 - 1984 Philip A. Potter Methodist Church West Indies
1985 - 1992 de:Emilio Castro Evangelical Methodist Church of Uruguay Uruguay
1993 - 2003 Konrad Raiser Evangelical Church in Germany (EKD) Germany
2004 - Samuel Kobia Methodist Church in Kenya Kenya

Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Eugene Carson Blake (born: 7 November 1906, St. ... United Presbyterian Church (of Scotland). ... Rev Dr Philip A. Potter (b. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Konrad Raiser, Dr theol, is a former General Secretary of the World Council of Churches. ... Evangelical Church in Germany is a wrong translation of (German Evangelische Kirche in Deutschland, abbreviated as EKD). ... Samuel Kobia (born March 20, 1947 in Miathene, Meru, Kenya), a Methodist, was elected General Secretary of the World Council of Churches (WCC) in August 2003, and took up his new post in January 2004. ...

Commissions and Teams

There are two complementary approaches to ecumenism: dialogue and action. The Faith and Order Movement and Life and Work Movement represent these approaches [2]. These approaches are reflected in the work of the WCC in its commissions, these being:

  • Commission of the Churches on Diakonia and Development
  • Commission on Education and Ecumenical Formation
  • Commission of the Churches on International Affairs
  • Commission on Justice, Peace and Creation
  • Commission on World Mission and Evangelism
  • Faith and Order Plenary Commission and the Faith and Order Standing Commission
  • Joint Consultative Group with Pentecostals
  • Joint Working Group WCC – Roman Catholic Church (Vatican)
  • Reference Group on the Decade to Overcome Violence
  • Reference Group on Inter-Religious Relations
  • Special Commission on Orthodox Participation in the WCC

Diakonia and Development & International Relations Commissions

The WCC acts through both its member churches and other religious and social organizations to coordinate ecumenical, evangelical, and social action.


Current WCC programmes include a Decade to Overcome Violence, an international campaign to combat AIDS/HIV in Africa and the Justice, Peace and Creation initiative. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Faith and Order Commission

WCC's Faith and Order Commission has been successful in working toward consensus on Baptism, Eucharist, and Ministry, on the date of Easter, on the nature and purpose of the church (ecclesiology), and on ecumenical hermeneutics. Baptism in early Christian art. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Easter, the Sunday of the Resurrection, Pascha, or Resurrection Day, is the most important religious feast of the Christian liturgical year, observed at some point between late March and late April each year (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity), following the cycle of the moon. ... St. ... In Christian theology, ecclesiology is the study of doctrine pertaining to the Church itself as a community or organic entity, and with the understanding of what the church is —ie. ... Hermeneutics may be described as the development and study of theories of the interpretation and understanding of texts. ...


The 1952 meeting of the Faith and Order Commission, held in Lund, Sweden, produced the Lund Principle for ecumenical co-operation.   IPA: is a city in SkÃ¥ne in southern Sweden. ... The Lund Principle is an important principle in ecumenical relations between Christian churches. ...


The Commission has 120 members, including representation of churches who are not members of the World Council of Churches, among them the Roman Catholic Church. Members are men and women from around the world - pastors, laypersons, academics, church leaders nominated by their church.


Baptism, Eucharist, and Ministry (BEM) was published in 1982. It attempted to express the convergences that had been found over the years. It was sent to all member churches and six volumes of responses compiled. As a result, some churches have changed their liturgical practices, and some have entered into discussions, which in turn led to further agreements and steps towards unity.


A major study on the church (ecclesiology) is being undertaken examining the question 'What it means to be a church, or the Church?'


In particular with a focus on ecclesiology and ethics focusing on the churches/Church's 'prophetic witness and its service to those in need'. [3].


Faith and Order is collaborating with Justice, Peace and Creation to answer the questions:

  • 'How can the search for unity be a source of renewal for both the Church and the world?
  • 'What does our increasing cooperation on issues of justice, peace and the creation teach us about the nature of the Church?
  • 'What is the relationship between ethnicity, nationalism, and church unity?

Material for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity [4] is prepared annually with the Roman Catholic Church. The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity is an international Christian ecumenical observance kept annually between 18 January and 25 January. ...


Other work of the Commission includes facilitating the coordination of:

  • results from international bilateral dialogues (the Bilateral Forum),
  • movements towards local church unions.

Justice, Peace and Creation Commission

Justice, Peace and Creation has drawn many elements together with an environmental focus. Its mandate is: In politics and other non-technical contexts, nature or (the) (natural) environment often refers to that part of the natural world that people deem important or valuable, for any reason — economic, aesthetic, philosophical, hedonistic, sentimental, etc. ...

To analyze and reflect on justice, peace and creation in their interrelatedness, to promote values and practices that make for a culture of peace, and to work towards a culture of solidarity with young people, women, Indigenous Peoples and racially and ethnically oppressed people. [5]

Focal issues have been globalization and the emergence of new social movements (in terms of people bonding together in the struggle for justice, peace and the protection of creation). A KFC franchise in Kuwait. ... The term new social movements (NSM) refers to a plethora of social movements that have come up in various western societies roughly since the mid-1960s (i. ...


Attention has been given to issues around:

  • economy [6]
  • ecology [7]
  • Indigenous Peoples [8]
  • peace [9]
  • people with disabilities [10]
  • racism [11]
  • women [12]
  • youth [13]

Special Commission on Orthodox Participation in the WCC

A Special Commission was set up by the eighth Harare Assembly in December 1998 to address Orthodox concerns about WCC membership and the Council's decision-making style, public statements, worship practices and other issues.


The Special Commission on Orthodox Participation in the WCC represents the potential for fresh and creative high-level discussion about the structure and life of the Council, a discussion which is explicitly seen as continuing the foundations laid by the process and the policy document "Towards and Common Understanding and Vision of the WCC".


Controversy

There has been controversy within the WCC about its programs and actions. Orthodox and Evangelical member churches have sought to make clear the nature of their involvement and limits on the authority of the WCC to speak on their behalf. Many churches have opted to stay out of the WCC, accusing it of being dominated by liberals and (or) leftists.


As a member based organization the WCC has needed to address the concerns raised by member churches and has done so, The Programme to Combat Racism has been changed and Orthodox concerns have been and are being addressed through the Special Commission.


Accusations of Anti-Semitism

The council has been described by some as taking anti-Semitic positions in connection with its criticisms of Israeli policy. They believe the council has focused more on activities and publications criticizing Israel than on other human rights issues. The council members have been characterized by Israel's former Justice minister Amnon Rubinstein as anti-Semitic, saying "they just hate Israel." [14] The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Amnon Rubinstein Amnon Rubinstein (born 1931) is an Israeli scholar, politician, and columnist. ...


The World Council of Churches has rejected this accusation. In 2005, the General Secretary of the WCC, Samuel Kobia, stated that anti-Semitism is a "sin against God and man" and "absolutely irreconcilable with the profession and practice of the Christian faith," quoting from the first assembly of the WCC in Amsterdam in 1948. [15] Nickname: Motto: Heldhaftig, Vastberaden, Barmhartig (Valiant, Determined, Compassionate) Location of Amsterdam Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province North Holland Government  - Mayor Job Cohen (PvdA)  - Aldermen Lodewijk Asscher Hennah Buyne Carolien Gehrels Tjeerd Herrema Maarten van Poelgeest Marijke Vos  - Secretary Erik Gerritsen Area [1][2]  - City 219 km²  (84. ...


Programme to Combat Racism during the 1970s

There was controversy over the WCC's Programme to Combat Racism (PCR), the PCR during the 1970s. It funded a number of humanitarian programs of liberation movements while those groups were involved in violent struggle, examples include:

  • In 1970, Reader's Digest suggested that the PCR was contributing to fourteen groups involved in revolutionary guerrilla activities, some of which were Communist in ideology and receiving arms from the Soviet Union (Reader's Digest, October 1971).
  • In 1977 "The Fraudulent Gospel" by Bernard Smith ISBN 0-89601-007-4 was published in the USA and Britain and carried a graphic photo on the front cover of 27 Black Rhodesians it said were "massacred by WCC-financed terrorists in Eastern Rhodesia in December 1976".
  • Donating $85,000 to the Patriotic Front of Zimbabwe (ZANU) in 1978, months after the group shot down an airliner, killing 38 of the 56 passengers on board. Members are reported to have killed 10 survivors (this was denied by the Front) [16]

This caused much controversy in the past among member churches. In a Time Magazine article entitled "Going Beyond Charity: Should Christian cash be given to terrorists?” (October 2, 1978). Further examination of WCC's political programme appeared in Amsterdam to Nairobi - The World Council of Churches and the Third World by Ernest W. Lefever (1979, Georgetown University, ISBN 0-89633-025-7 . Further criticism has also been cited by the Christian right, for example in March 1983 issue of Jerry Falwell related Fundamentalist Journal: This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Zimbabwe African National Union - Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) has been the ruling political party in Zimbabwe since independence in 1980, led by Robert Mugabe, first as Prime Minister with the party simply known as ZANU, and then as President from 1988 after taking over ZAPU and renaming the party... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The term Christian Right is used by scholars and journalists, to refer to a spectrum of right-wing Christian political and social movements and organizations characterized by their strong support of conservative social and political values. ... Jerry Falwell (born August 11, 1933) is a fundamentalist pastor and televangelist from the United States. ...

There has been an 'enormous disturbance' in British churches, says one Executive Committee member. As for West Germany — which now provides 42 percent of the budget for the financially pressed WCC — official protests are muted, but one top churchman reports 'bitter reaction in our churches.'… In the U.S., important elements in such WCC member groups as the United Methodist Church, the United Church of Christ and the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese are upset[17].

Successes

Some of the notable successes of the World Council of Churches are in the area of increased understanding and acceptance between Christian groups and denominations. Mutual understanding has developed through the Faith and Order related activities; the Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry process has been positive.


The WCC has not sought the organic union of different Christian denominations — it has however facilitated dialogue and supported local, national, and regional dialogue and cooperation.


Regional/national councils

It should be noted that membership in a regional or national council does not mean that the particular group is also a member of the WCC.

The Christian Conference of Asia is a regional ecumenical organisation representing 15 National Councils and over 100 churches in Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia, Bangladesh, Burma, Cambodia, East Timor, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Laos, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Taiwan and Thailand. ... The National Council of Churches in Australia (NCCA) is an ecumenical organisation bringing together a number of Australias Christian churches in dialogue and practical cooperation. ... The Conference of European Churches (CEC) was founded in 1959 to promote reconciliation, dialogue and friendship between the churches of Europe at a time of growing Cold War political tensions and divisions. ... Coat of arms of the Canton of Geneva Coat of arms of the City of Geneva Geneva (French: Genève, German: Genf, Italian: Ginevra, Romansh Genevra, Spanish: Ginebra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland (after Zurich), located where Lake Geneva (French: Lac de Genève or Lac L... After many years of preliminary moves, the Middle East Council of Churches was inaugurated in May 1974 at its First General Assembly in Nicosia, Cyprus. ... The Canadian Council of Churches/le conseil canadien des églises is an ecumenical Christian forum of churches in Canada. ... The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (usually identified as National Council of Churches, or NCC) is an association of 35 Christian faith groups in the United States with 100,000 local congregations and more than 45,000,000 adherents. ... Suva is the capital city of Fiji. ...

See also

John Raleigh Mott (May 25, 1865 - January 31, 1955) was a long-serving leader of the YMCA. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 for his work in establishing and strengthening international Christian student organizations that worked to promote peace. ... Christian ecumenism is the promotion of unity or cooperation between distinct religious groups or denominations of the Christian religion, more or less broadly defined. ...

References

  1. ^ Who are we?. World Council of Churches (2003). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • World Council of Churches official website
  • World Council of Churches - list of member churches
  • WCC Central Committee Toronto statement on The Church, the Churches, and the World Council of Churches
  • WCC Justice, Peace and Creation home page
  • Special Commission to address Orthodox concerns set up by the eighth assembly in December 1998
  • National Council of Churches USA
  • The Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity
  • Press release for 9th Assembly: Consensus: a colourful farewell to majority rule at the Assembly in Porto Alegre in February 2006
  • Official Site for 9th Assembly

  Results from FactBites:
 
World Council of Churches (429 words)
In 1937, church leaders from 147 different churches, mostly Protestant and predominantly from Europe and North America agreed to establish a World Council of Churches (WCC), but its official organization was deferred by the outbreak of the Second World War until August 1948, when representatives assembled in Amsterdam to constitute the WCC.
On that ancient promise, and in that urgent hope, the World Council of Churches serves as a witness to reconciliation among churches.
The prayer of the churches which belong to the council is, "in one faith and in one Eucharistic fellowship, expressed in worship and common life in Christ, through witness and service to the world.” This prayer is for the renewal and faithful response of the people of God in witness and service to the world.
World Council of Churches - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1763 words)
Subsequently mergers were with the International Missionary Council in 1961 and the World Council of Christian Education, with its roots in the 18th century Sunday School movement, in 1971.
The Special Commission on Orthodox Participation in the WCC represents the potential for fresh and creative high-level discussion about the structure and life of the Council, a discussion which is explicitly seen as continuing the foundations laid by the process and the policy document "Towards and Common Understanding and Vision of the WCC".
WCC Central Committee Toronto statement on The Church, the Churches, and the World Council of Churches
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m