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Encyclopedia > Workprint

A workprint is a rough version of a motion picture, used by the film editor(s) during the editing process. Such copies generally contain original recorded sound that will later be re-dubbed, stock footage as placeholders for missing shots or special effects, and animation tests for in-production animated shots or sequences. For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... A film editor is a person/persons who practices film editing. ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ... Animation is the technique in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model unit (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result with a...


For most of the first century of filmmaking, workprints were done using second-generation prints from the original negatives. After the editor and director approved of the final edit of the workprint, the same edits were made to the negative. Modern-day workprints are often created on an Non-linear editing system using digitized footage from the original film or video sources; these early versions of films have sometimes been bootlegged and made available on the Internet. There are also Director's Cut versions of films that are only available on bootleg; for example, the workprint version of Richard Williams' The Thief and the Cobbler. Although movie studios generally do not make full-length workprints readily available to the public, there are exceptions; for example, the "Work-In-Progress" version of Beauty and the Beast. Note: Please see National Latin Examination for the standardized test that is also abbreviated NLE. A non-linear editing system is a video editing or audio editing system that can perform random access on the source material. ... This article should be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Richard Williams (born 1933) is a Canadian-born animator, film directopr, and film producer, most well known as a film title sequence designer and animator; his most famous works included the title sequences to Whats New, Pussycat (1965), title and linking sequences in The Charge of the Light Brigade... This movie should not be confused with The Arabian Knights, an animated segment of the Hanna-Barbera series The Banana Splits Adventure Hour. ... Beauty and the Beast is the thirtieth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Light Sleeper - Late Night Writings On Cinema (1280 words)
It’s rare to be able to view such a workprint, and even rarer to be able to view one from a filmmaker as influential as Coppola and for a film as significant as Apocalypse Now -- a film which could justifiably be called one of the most important American movies of the past 30 years.
On the simplest level, the workprint exudes the allure of still unseen footage, but in addition to this allure, it offers the opportunity of gaining an insight into the strangely heterogeneous mix of forces, themes, ideas and talents that were eventually distilled, and only ever partially harmonized in the ’79 and ’01 versions.
The simple answer to this question is that in editing several hours off the workprint both Coppola and the editors seem to have agreed that all those long improvisational sequences and dialogues didn’t organically connect with the central narrative/emotional movement upstream.
Workprint - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (213 words)
A workprint is a rough version of a motion picture, used by the film editor(s) during the editing process.
After the editor and director approved of the final edit of the workprint, the same edits were made to the negative.
Modern-day workprints are often created on an Non-linear editing system using digitized footage from the original film or video sources; these early versions of films have sometimes been bootlegged and made available on the Internet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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