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Encyclopedia > Work permit

Work permit is a generic term for a legal authorization which allows a person to take employment. It is most often used in reference to instances where a person is given permission to work in a country where one does not hold citizenship, but is also used in reference to minors, who in some jurisdictions require a permit in order to work. Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... “Citizen” redirects here. ...

Contents

National work permits

On the national level, work permits are usually given for a single post at a single company. It is designed to control labor coming to job markets against from outside a country or given legal jurisdiction. Most every country in the world has work permits of some form or other.


In the European Union, for a specific employee to receive a work permit a prospective employer must usually provide at the following, if not more:

  • have advertised the post and not been able to find anyone in the local labor market suitable for the position
  • show that the applicant for the permit has the necessary qualifications for the job
  • meet any quota or regulatory restrictions
  • meet any locally applicable salary, contract or labor standards requirements.

European countries may also have political or economic targets in controlling the number of work permits given out. For example, the United Kingdom, Netherlands, Germany, France and Belgium have relatively strict criteria. Italy and Spain, on the other hand, may show more flexibility in certain areas deemed important for the local economy. These work permits often go by different names, although they may carry work permission, as a work permit does.[1][2]


Work Permits in the European Union

Overview

Currently, every EU country has a different process for granting work permits to nationals of non-EU countries. To address this issue, the European Commission began work in 1999 on developing an EU-wide process for the entry of non-EU nationals into the work force.[3] In October 2007, they adopted a proposal to introduce a work permit similar to the United States' "Green Card" program, called the "Blue Card." It's very similar to the UK's Highly Skilled Immigrant Programme, with the exception that it will require an employment contract in place prior to migration. After two years in the first country, the migrant will be allowed to move and work in another EU country, and can sum the number of years spent in the EU for purposes of residency. [4]


Work Permits in the United Kingdom

There are six standard ways to apply for a work permit in the United Kingdom. The Business and Commercial Arrangements, the Training and Work Experience Arrangements, the Sportspeople and Entertainers Arrangements, Student Internships, GATS, and the Sectors Based Scheme. [5] Each of these involves its own application process, and generally requires a job offer from a UK employer.


There is also a scheme for nationals of select countries to work in the UK as Au Pairs.[6]. This scheme is only for nationals of select countries; nationals of European Economic Area countries don't need a permit to au pair in the UK.


One new way to get a work permit in the United Kingdom is through the Highly Skilled Migrant Programme.[7] Unlike most work permit systems, the HSMP does not require the applicant to have received a job offer before applying. It's a points-based application, where the applicant receives a score in four areas: Qualifications, Past Earnings, Age Assessment, and UK Experience. If the applicant meets the cutoff score, then s/he's eligible to work in the UK. The Highly Skilled Migrant Programme (HSMP) is designed to allow highly skilled people to migrate to the United Kingdom to look for work or self-employment opportunities. ...


Work Permits in Singapore

In Singapore, the work permit process is managed by the Ministry of Manpower. There are several kinds of work permit, and the type awarded generally depends on the salary range of the job. The "R Pass," or "Work Permit," is for foreigners who make less than $1,800/month. [8]


The "S Pass" is for foreigners who make more than $1,800/month. To be eligible, the applicant must achieve a minimum score on a points-based application. It takes into account salary, skills (including education), work experience, and the type of job being applied for.[9]


The Q Pass is for foreigners making $2,500 or more per month, with recognized qualifications or work experience. The P1 Pass is for foreigners making $3,500 to $7,000 per month, and foreigners making more than $7,000 per month are eligible for the P2 Pass.


Employment permits for minors

In states of the US, a work permit must be obtained by a teenager wishing to procure employment. Similar to national work permits, the idea is that someone has a limited right to work.


In some states, for example New Jersey, permits are only required for minors 14 and 15 years old, while others such as Massachusetts require (at least in theory) work permits for all minors up until they turn 18 years of age. In states that require permits for 16 and 17 year olds, enforcement is not always strict, although sometimes it is. Permits are usually issued through the school system the minor attends, and typically at a minimum, enrollment in high school with regular attendance (no chronic absenteeism, tardiness, or truancy) is required as a condition for obtaining the permit. Some states such as New York and Indiana require high school students with part time jobs to maintain a certain grade point average. Minors who are working are usually restricted in the number of hours each day or week they are permitted to work as well as the types of jobs they may hold. This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... A grade in education can mean either a teachers evaluation of a students work or a students level of educational progress, usually one grade per year (often denoted by an ordinal number, such as the 3rd Grade or the 12th Grade). This article is about evaluation of...


References

  1. ^ Living in Italy. American Embassy to Italy. Retrieved on 2007-10-31.
  2. ^ Working in Germany. American Embassy to Germany. Retrieved on 2007-10-31.
  3. ^ Towards a Common European Union Immigration Policy. European Commission. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  4. ^ EU Blue Card to encourage highly-qualified non-EU citizens to work in the EU. European Commission, Irish Press Office. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  5. ^ Working in the UK - Work Permit Arrangements. Government of the United Kingdom. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  6. ^ Working in the UK - Information about Au Pairs. Government of the United Kingdom. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  7. ^ Working in the UK - Highly Skilled Migrant Programme. Government of the United Kingdom. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  8. ^ About the R Pass. Singapore Ministry of Manpower. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  9. ^ About the S Pass. Singapore Ministry of Manpower. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Indiana Teenworker Requirements
  • Massachusetts Child Labor Laws
  • United Nations' Lowell Report on Highly Skilled Mobility

  Results from FactBites:
 
EMIRE: GERMANY - WORK PERMIT (465 words)
Permits are issued in the light of the labour market situation and the personal circumstances in each individual case.
A work permit may be issued with or without restriction to a specific form of work in a specific establishment ("Betrieb").
Employment without a work permit is punishable by a fine imposed on both employer and employee.
Thailand Visa, Company Registration & Work Permit (1205 words)
Exemption from Work Permit requirements is granted to aliens who enter the Kingdom temporarily, but in accordance with the immigration law, to perform any work of any "urgent and essential nature" for a period not exceeding 15 days.
Any alien who engages in work without a Work Permit, or in violation of the conditions of his work as stipulated in his Permit, may be punished by a term of imprisonment not exceeding three months or a fine of up to 5,000 baht, or both.
An employer who permits an alien to work in his organization without a Work Permit or to act in violation of the nature of the work specified in the Permit may be punished with imprisonment not exceeding three years or fined up to 60,000 baht or both.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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