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Encyclopedia > Word play

Word play or play on words is a literary and narrative technique in which the nature of the words used themselves become part of the subject of the work. Puns, phonetic mixups such as spoonerisms, obscure words and meanings, clever rhetorical excursions, oddly formed sentences, and telling character names are common examples of word play. Wordplay can mean: Word play, a literary technique in which the nature of the words used themselves become part of the subject of the work (e. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... A literary technique or literary device may be used in works of literature in order to produce a specific effect on the reader. ... For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral, visual, or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


Word play is quite common in oral cultures as a method of reinforcing meaning. Oral culture is a tradition all over the world. ...


Interestingly enough, strictly visual orthographic word play is much less predominant than sound-based word play in alphabetically written literatures. This may be due to the fundamental orality of written communication in those literatures, as compared with word play in ideographically written literatures such as the Chinese. Proper spelling is the writing of a word or words with all necessary letters and diacritics present in an accepted standard order. ... Orality can be defined as thought and its verbal expression in societies where the technologies of literacy (especially writing and print) are unfamiliar to most of the population. ... A Chinese character. ...


Most writers engage in word play to some extent, but certain writers are particularly adept or committed to word play. Shakespeare's "quibbles" have made him a noted punster. P.G. Wodehouse was also hailed as a "comic genius recognized in his lifetime as a classic and an old master of farce" for his ingenious wordplay. James Joyce, author of Ulysses and Finnegans Wake, is another noted word-player. For example, Joyce's phrase "they were yung and easily freudened" clearly conveys the meaning "young and easily frightened," but it also makes puns on the names of two famous psychoanalysts, Jung and Freud. Shakespeare redirects here. ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... For the street ballad which the novel is named after, see Finnegans Wake. ... Today psychoanalysis comprises several interlocking theories concerning the functioning of the mind. ... Jung redirects here. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ...


Other writers closely identified with word play include:

The Apocryphal book of Susanna has elements of word play in its original Greek. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Willard Richardson Espy (11 December 1910–20 February 1999) was a U.S. editor, language author, philologist, writer, and poet. ... This page is about the novelist. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Van Dyke Parks (born January 3, 1943) is an American composer, arranger, producer, musician, singer, and actor. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... Flann OBrien (October 5, 1911, Strabane, County Tyrone Ireland – April 1, 1966 Dublin) is a pseudonym of the twentieth century Irish novelist and satirist Brian ONolan (in Irish Brian Ó Nuallain), best known for his novels An Béal Bocht, At Swim-Two-Birds and The Third Policeman. ... Jasper Fforde (born in London on 11 January 1961) is an English novelist. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist. ... This article is about the novel On the Road. ... Categories: Literature stubs | Novels of Jack Kerouac ... The biblical apocrypha includes texts written in the Jewish and Christian religious traditions that either were accepted into the biblical canon by some, but not all, Christian faiths, or are frequently printed in Bibles despite their non-canonical status. ... Susanna and the Elders by Artemisia Gentileschi Susanna or Shoshana (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Egyptian loan: lily) is considered apocryphal by Protestants, but is included in the Book of Daniel (as chapter 13) by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. ...


Plays can enter common usage as neologisms. A neologism is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (or coined), often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ...


Word play is closely related to word games, that is, games in which the point is manipulating words. See also language game for a linguist's variation. The Hungarian term for wordplay, occasionally used in the circle for its diaeres is Szójáték. A word game or word puzzle can be of several different types: // [edit] Letter arrangement games The goal is to form words out of given letters. ... A language-game is a philosophical concept developed by Ludwig Wittgenstein, referring to simple examples of language use and the actions into which the language is woven. ...


A taxonomy of word play together with record-holding words in each category is available here: Taxonomy of Wordplay


See also

Etymologies redirects here. ... A figure of speech, sometimes termed a rhetoric, or locution, is a word or phrase that departs from straightforward, literal language. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... A simile is a comparison of two unlike things, typically marked by use of like, as, than, or resembles. Common examples are Curley was flopping like a fish on a line(extract of Mice and Men) etc. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Word play - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (262 words)
Word play is a literary technique in which the nature of the words used themselves become part of the subject of the work.
Puns, phonetic mixups such as spoonerisms, obscure words and meanings, clever rhetorical excursions, oddly formed sentences, and telling character names are common examples of word play.
Word play is closely related to word games, that is, games in which the point is manipulating words.
Play (activity) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (768 words)
For example, play is defined as nonserious activity; yet when watching children at play, one is impressed at the seriousness with which they engage in it.
This type of play could be considered stunt play, whether engaging in play frighting, sky-diving, or riding a device at high speed in an unusual manner.
Play is recognised as an important aspect of Child development and is explicitly recognised in Article 31 of The Convention on the Rights of the Child (adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations, November 29, 1989).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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