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Encyclopedia > Worcester Cathedral
A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836.
Worcester Cathedral West Window

Worcester Cathedral is the cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (396x648, 44 KB)A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836 (engraved by B.Winkles after a drawing by Benjamin Baud). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (396x648, 44 KB)A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836 (engraved by B.Winkles after a drawing by Benjamin Baud). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 752 pixel, file size: 173 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Taken by Merlin Cooper 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 752 pixel, file size: 173 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Taken by Merlin Cooper 2005. ... A cathedral is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishops seat, and thus as the central church of a diocese. ... Worcester (pronounced ) is a city in the Midlands of England, and the county town of Worcestershire. ... “Severn” redirects here. ...

Contents

History

Copy of St. Benedict's rule of the 8th century that belonged to the Benedictine library at Worcester. It is now kept as MS. Hatton 48 at the Bodleian Library.
Copy of St. Benedict's rule of the 8th century that belonged to the Benedictine library at Worcester. It is now kept as MS. Hatton 48 at the Bodleian Library.

The Cathedral was founded in 680 with Bishop Bosel as its head. The first cathedral was built in this period but nothing now remains of it. The existing crypt of the cathedral dates from the 10th century and the time of St Oswald, bishop of Worcester. The current cathedral is 12th and 13th century. The Cathedral was a Benedictine Priory before the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and was then re-established as a cathedral of secular clergy. It was subject to major restoration work by Sir George Gilbert Scott and A E Perkins in the 1860s. Both men are buried at the cathedral. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (901 × 599 pixel, file size: 121 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (901 × 599 pixel, file size: 121 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Entrance to the Library, with the coats-of-arms of several Oxford colleges The Bodleian Library, the main research library of the University of Oxford, is one of the oldest libraries in Europe, and in England is second in size only to the British Library. ... Saint Oswald may also refer to Oswald of Northumbria, King of Northumbria in the 7th century Saint Oswald of Worcester was Archbishop of York from 972 to his death in 992. ... Munichs city symbol celebrates its founding by Benedictine monks—the origin of its name A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... dissolution see Dissolution. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ...

Altar of Worcester Cathedral

The Cathedral has the distinction of having the tomb of King John in its chancel. Before his death in Newark in 1216, John had requested to be buried at Worcester. He is buried between the shrines of St Wulstan and St Oswald (now destroyed). The cathedral has a memorial, Prince Arthur's Chantry, to the young prince Arthur Tudor, who is buried here. Arthur's younger brother and next in line for the throne was Henry VIII. Worcester Cathedral was doubtless spared destruction by Henry VIII during the English Reformation because of his brother's Chantry in the cathedral. An image of the cathedral's west face is featured on the reverse of the Bank of England £20 note Series E, issued between 1999 and 2007. It accompanies a portrait of the composer Edward Elgar who spent the majority of his life in Worcester. The first performance of his Enigma Variations took place at the cathedral during the 1899 Three Choirs Festival. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 631 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 631 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... John deer hunting, from a manuscript in the British Library. ... This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... Newark (also Newark-on-Trent) is a town in Nottinghamshire, located on the River Trent. ... // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... Arthur Tudor (19 September/20 September 1486- 2 April 1502) was the first son and, therefore, heir of King Henry VII of England and Wales, and Elizabeth of York. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Headquarters London Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 â€“ 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... Variations on an Original Theme for orchestra, Op. ... The Three Choirs Festival is a British music festival, held each August alternately at the cathedrals of Hereford, Gloucester and Worcester and originally featuring their three choirs, which remain central to the week-long programme. ...


Monuments

South Transept

Organs and Organists

The Cathedral organ

Worcester Cathedral has a long history of organs dating back to at least 1417. There have been many re-builds and new organs in the intervening period, including work by Thomas Dallam, William Hill and most famously Robert Hope-Jones in 1896. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 3008 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 3008 pixel, file size: 2. ... Events Antipope Benedict XIII is deposed, and Pope Martin V is elected. ... Robert Hope-Jones (9 February 1859 in Hooton Grange, Cheshire – 13 September 1914 in Rochester, New York, USA)) is considered to be the inventor of the theatre organ. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ...


The Hope Jones organ was heavily re-built in 1925 by Harrison & Harrison, and then regular minor works kept it in working order until Wood Wordsworth and Co were called in 1978. New organ at St Davids Cathedral built by Harrison & Harrison in 2000. ...


It is a large 4 manual organ with 61 speaking stops. It has a large gothic case with heavily decorated front pipes.

  • Details of the main organ in the National Pipe Organ Register
  • Details of the Handel organ in the National Pipe Organ Register
  • 1240 Thomas the Organist*
  • 1415 T. Hulet*
  • 1468 Richard Grene
  • 1484 John Hampton
  • 1522 Daniel Boyse
  • 1541 Richard Fisher
  • 1569 John Golden
  • 1581 Nathaniel Giles
  • 1585 Robert Cotterell
  • 1590 Nathaniel Patrick
  • 1595 John Fido
  • 1596 Thomas Tomkins
  • 1649 Vacant
  • 1661 Giles Tomkins
  • 1662 Richard Browne
  • 1664 Richard Davis
  • 1686 Vaughan Richardson
  • 1688 Richard Cherington
  • 1724 John Hoddinott
  • 1731 William Hayes
  • 1734 John Merifield
  • 1747 Elias Isaac
  • 1793 Thomas Pitt
  • 1806 Jeremiah Clarke
  • 1807 William Kenge
  • 1813 Charles Clarke
  • 1844 William Done
  • 1895 Hugh Blair
  • 1897 Ivor Atkins
  • 1950 David Willcocks
  • 1957 Douglas Guest
  • 1963 Christopher Robinson
  • 1974 Donald Hunt
  • 1996 Adrian Lucas

Thomas Tomkins (1572 – June 9, 1656) was a Welsh-born composer of the late Tudor and early Stuart period. ... Hugh Blair (1864–1932) was an English musician, composer and organist. ... Sir Ivor Atkins (born Llandaff 29 November 1869, died Worcester 26 November 1953) was the choirmaster and organist at Worcester Cathedral for over 50 years. ... Sir David Willcocks (b. ...

Famous Burials

Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603 ) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... James Stuart (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old. ... John Gauden, (1605 - May 23, 1662), was an English bishop and writer, and the reputed author of the Eikon Basilike. ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ...

References

  1. ^ The Buildings of England: Worcestershire, Nikolaus Pevsner, 1968 p312

See also

Aldred, or Ealdred (d. ... Arms of the Bishop of Worcester Worcester Cathedral - the seat of the Bishop of Worcester The Bishop of Worcester is the ordinary in the see of Worcester and has his seat in Worcester Cathedral. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Worcester Cathedral
List of Anglican Cathedrals in the United Kingdom and Ireland
Anglican Communion

  Results from FactBites:
 
Worcester Cathedral (810 words)
Worcester Cathedral is blessed with one of the most pleasing locations of any English cathedral, with the possible exception of Durham.
The cathedral sits on level ground beside the River Severn, and seen from the river - the favoured viewpoint for guidebook photographers - the aspect is of timeless serenity.
Worcester Cathedral is home of the famous Three Choirs Festival, an annual choral event which is rotated between the cathedrals of Gloucester, Hereford, and Worcester.
Worcester Cathedral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (202 words)
Worcester Cathedral is the cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn.
The current cathedral is 12th and 13th century with major restoration work done by Sir George Gilbert Scott and A E Perkins in the 1860s.
Worcester Cathedral was doubtlessly spared destruction by Henry VIII during the English Reformation because of his brother's Chantry in the cathedral.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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