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Encyclopedia > Worcester
City of Worcester
Worcester
Shown within Worcestershire
Geography
Status: City (1189)
Region: West Midlands
Admin. County: Worcestershire
Area:
- Total
Ranked 333rd
33.28 km²
Admin. HQ: Worcester
Grid reference: SO849548
ONS code: 47UE
Distance from London: 113.4m
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
Ranked 243rd
93,400
2806 / km²
Ethnicity: 96.5% White
2.0% S.Asian
Politics
Worcester City Council
http://www.worcester.gov.uk/
Leadership: Leader & Cabinet
Executive:
MP: Michael Foster

Worcester (pronounced IPA: /ˈwʊstə(r)/) listen  is a city in the West Midlands of England. With an estimated population of 94,300, Worcester is the county town of Worcestershire and it is situated some 30 miles (48 km) southwest of Birmingham and 29 miles (47 km) north of Gloucester. The River Severn runs through the middle of the city and the cathedral overlooks the river. Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Worcester County Settled 1673 Incorporated 1684 Government  - Type Council-manager also known as Plan E  - City Manager Michael V. OBrien  - Mayor Konstantina B. Lukes  - City Council Dennis L. Irish Michael C. Perotto Joseph M. Petty Gary Rosen Kathleen... Worcester, pronounced (two syllables - the first syllable has the same vowel sound as wood) is the placename used around the world: Worcester, England, the county town of Worcestershire and home of: Worcester Cathedral Worcestershire sauce (also known as Worcester sauce) The Royal Grammar School Worcester Worcester, Massachusetts Worcester, New York... Download high resolution version (1802x2589, 186 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Worcester Categories: GFDL images ... map of districts of Worcestershire File links The following pages link to this file: Worcester Categories: GFDL images ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The West Midlands is an official Region of England, covering the western half of the Midlands. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Michael John Foster (born March 14, 1963, Birmingham) is an English politician. ... Image File history File links En-worcester. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... The West Midlands is an official Region of England, covering the western half of the Midlands. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Worcestershire (pronounced ; abbreviated Worcs) is a county located in the West Midlands region of central England. ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ... “Severn” redirects here. ... A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836. ...

Contents

History

Occupation of the site of Worcester can be dated back to neolithic times, a village surrounded by defensive ramparts having been founded on the eastern bank of the River Severn here in around 400 BC. The position, which commanded a ford on the river, was in the 1st century used by the Romans to establish what may at first have been a fort on the military route from Glevum (Gloucester) to Viroconium (Wroxeter) but which soon developed — as the frontier of the empire was pushed westwards — into an industrial town with its own pottery kilns and iron-smelting plants. An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... A ford, with pedestrian footbridge, on a minor road near Weimar bei Kassel in Germany The ford at Brockenhurst, leading into the village centre, following heavy rain. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city in south-west England, close to the Welsh border. ... Viroconium Cornoviorum, or simply Viroconium, was a Roman town, one corner of which is now occupied by the small village of Wroxeter in the English county of Shropshire, about 8 km (5 miles) east-south-east of Shrewsbury. ... Charcoal Kilns, California Gold Kiln, Victoria, Australia Hop kiln. ... Smelting rhymes with melting Electric phosphate smelting furnace in a TVA chemical plant (1942) Chemical reduction, or smelting, is a form of extractive metallurgy. ...


Roman Worcester (which may have been the Vertis mentioned in the 7th century Ravenna Cosmography) was a thriving trading and manufacturing centre for some three hundred years, though by the time of the Roman withdrawal from Britain in 407 it had dwindled considerably in size and is not recorded again until the mid-7th century when documents mention the Anglo-Saxon settlement of . The fact that Worcester was chosen at this time—in preference to both the much larger Gloucester and the royal centre of Winchcombe—to be the Episcopal See of a new diocese covering the area suggests that there was a well established, and powerful, English Christian community living on the site when it fell into English hands. The Ravenna Cosmography was a 7th century map of the known world, named from the city of Ravenna in Italy where it was constructed. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ... Location within the British Isles The busy main street Winchcombe is a Cotswold town in the Local Authority District of Tewkesbury, in Gloucestershire, England. ... A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


The town was almost destroyed in 1041 after a rebellion against the punitive taxation of Harthacanute. The town was attacked several times (in 1139, 1150 and 1151) during "The Anarchy", i.e. civil war between King Stephen and Empress Matilda, daughter of Henry I. This is the background to the well-researched historical novel The Virgin in the Ice, part of Ellis Peters' "Cadfael" series, which begins with the words: Harthacanute (sometimes Hardicanute, Hardecanute; Danish Hardeknud, Canute the Hardy) (1018/1019–June 8, 1042) was a King of Denmark (1035–1042) and England (1035–1037, 1040–1042). ... The Anarchy in English history commonly names the period of civil war and unsettled government that occurred during the reign (1135–1154) of King Stephen of England. ... Stephen (c. ... Empress Matilda (February 1102 – September 10, 1167; sometimes Maud or Maude), also called Matilda, Countess of Anjou or Matilda, Lady of the English, was the daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England. ... Henry I (c. ... Edith Mary Pargeter (September 28, 1913 - October 14, 1995) was a prolific British author of works in many categories, especially history and historical fiction, and was also honored for her translations of Czech classics; she is probably best known for her murder mysteries, both historical and modern. ... Cadfael (pronounced , approximately CAD-vile) is the fictional detective in a series of murder mysteries by the late Edith Pargeter writing under the name Ellis Peters. ...

"It was early in November of 1139 that the tide of civil war, lately so sluggish and inactive, rose suddenly to wash over the city of Worcester, wash away half of its lifestock, property and women, and send all those of its inhabitants who could get away in time scurrying for their lives northwards away from the marauders". (These are mentioned as having arrived from Gloucester, leaving a long lasting legacy of bitterness between the two cities.) Look up marauder in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ...

By late medieval times the population had grown to around 10,000 as the manufacture of cloth started to become a large local industry. The town was designated a county corporate, giving it autonomy from local government. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... A county corporate or corporate county was a form of local government in England and Wales. ...

Worcester Cathedral at night
Worcester Cathedral at night

Worcester was the site of the Battle of Worcester (September 3, 1651), when Charles II's attempt to regain the crown by force was decisively defeated, in the fields a little to the west and south of the city, near the village of Powick. After being defeated, Charles returned to his headquarters in what is now known as King Charles house in the Cornmarket, before fleeing in disguise to Boscobel House in Shropshire and his eventual escape to France. Worcester was one of the cities loyal to the King in that war, for which it was given the epithet "The Faithful City". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1361x1442, 1068 KB)[edit] Summary Photograph of Worcester Cathedral taken by myself in 2004. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1361x1442, 1068 KB)[edit] Summary Photograph of Worcester Cathedral taken by myself in 2004. ... Combatants English Parlimentry forces loyal to Oliver Cromwell English and Scottish Royalists loyal to King Charles II Strength 31,000 less than 16,000 Casualties 200 3,000 killed, more than 10,000 prisoners The Battle of Worcester took place on 3 September 1651 at Worcester, England and was the... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 1 - Charles II crowned King of Scotland in Scone. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Powick is a village in Worcestershire, England close to the River Teme. ... Boscobel House, on the Shropshire/Staffordshire border, England, was built around 1632, when landowner John Gifford of White Ladies Priory converted a timber-framed farmhouse into a hunting lodge, Boscobel house became one of the most evocative sites in the English historical imagination. ... Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ...


The Royal Worcester Porcelain Company factory was founded by Dr John Wall in 1750, although it no longer produces goods. A handful of decorators are still employed at the factory and the Museum is still open. The Royal Worcester Porcelain Factory was established in 1751 and manufactures fine china and in particular porcelain in Worcester, England. ...


During the 18th century Worcester's trade languished compared to more modern towns of the West Midlands. The Worcester and Birmingham Canal opened in 1815 allowing Worcester goods to be transported to a larger conurbation. The Birmingham and Worcester Canal is a canal linking Birmingham and Worcester in England. ...


The British Medical Association (BMA) is reputed to have been founded in the Board Room of the old Worcester Royal Infirmary building in Castle Street around 1860. This building has now been closed and (as of 2006) will be redeveloped as the University of Worcester city campus. // The British Medical Association (BMA) is the professional association and registered trade union for doctors in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Worcester is a university in Worcester in the United Kingdom. ...


In the 1950s and 1960s large areas of the medieval centre of Worcester were demolished and rebuilt as a result of decisions by town planners. There is still a significant area of medieval Worcester remaining, but it is a small fraction of what was present before the redevelopments.


The current city boundaries date from 1974, when the Local Government Act 1972 transferred the parishes of Warndon and St. Peter the Great County into the city. The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Warndon is a suburb in the east of Worcester, Worcestershire, England. ... St. ...


Politics

In the 2007 election the City Council went from Conservative control to No Overall Control,[1] however, the Conservative Party have the most seats overall with 17 out of 35 seats. Worcester has one member of Parliament, Michael Foster of the Labour Party, who represents the Worcester constituency. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... NOC can refer to: National Olympic Committee, a group eligible to enter athletes and teams into an Olympic Games. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Michael John Foster (born March 14, 1963, Birmingham) is an English politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Worcester is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Industry and commerce

Industry is now quite varied. In the 19th and early twentieth century, Worcester was a major centre for glove manufacture, but this has declined greatly. The late-Victorian period saw the growth of ironfounders, like Heenan & Froude, Hardy & Padmore and McKenzie & Holland and the inter-war years saw the rapid growth of engineering, producing machine tools James Archdale, H.W.Ward, castings for the motor industry Worcester Windshields and Casements, mining machinery MECO and open-top cans Williamsons. Still located in the city are the Royal Worcester porcelain factory (near the cathedral), and, somewhat out of the centre, the factory that makes Worcester's most famous product, Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce. The engineering industry is still represented by Joy Mining Machinery, of the United States, which has its UK manufacturing headquarters in the St. Johns area, and by Carnaud Metalbox, part of Crown Holdings, also of the United States, which has its seaming systems division located in the Perry Wood district. The foundry heritage of the city is represented by Morganite Crucible[2] at Norton which produces graphitic shaped products and cements for use in the modern industry. The Kays[3] mail order business was founded in Worcester in the 1880's and operated from numerous premises in the city[4] until 2007. Worcester is the home of what is claimed to be the oldest daily newspaper in the world, Berrow's Worcester Journal, which traces its descent from a newssheet that started publication in 1690. The city is also a major retail centre with several covered shopping centres that has most major chains represented. Worcester Bosch Group is in Warndon Villages. Another of Worcester's long standing companies is Froude Hofmann,[5] originally named Heenan & Froude. This engineering company has occupied several sites around Worcester including buildings close to Shrub Hill railway station and Worcester City Football Club. They are currently located on Blackpole Trading Estate East. Meco (born Domenico Monardo, 29 November 1939 in Johnsonburg, Pennsylvania, U.S.) is a record producer and musician. ... The Royal Worcester Porcelain Factory was established in 1751 and manufactures fine china and in particular porcelain in Worcester, England. ... 1900 advertisement Lea & Perrins is a United Kingdom food company, originating in Worcester with a subsidiary in the United States which manufactures Lea & Perrins in New Jersey. ... 1900 advertisement Worcestershire sauce (IPA: (wuster-shur or wuster-sheer)) is a widely used fermented liquid condiment originally manufactured by Lea & Perrins, in Midland Road, Worcester, England. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Crown Holdings Incorporated, founded in 1892 by William Painter, is a Fortune 500 company based in the United States of America. ... Berrows Worcester Journal is the oldest surviving newspaper in the United Kingdom and is owned by Newsquest, the second largest publisher of regional and local newspapers in the country. ... Worcester Shrub Hill railway station is one of two stations serving the city of Worcester in Worcestershire, England. ... Worcester City Football Club is an English football team, based at St Georges Lane in the city of Worcester. ...


Major Businesses/Employers in Worcester

  • Amdac Carmichael manufacturer of fire-fighting vehicles.
  • BBT Thermotechnology, Bosch Group aka Worcester Bosch (formerly Worcester Heat Systems), manufacturer of domestic boilers and heating products.
  • Central Networks (still known locally as MEB)
  • Crown Holdings (formerly CarnaudMetalbox, still known locally as Metalbox)
  • Faithful, manufacturer of workwear and industrial protective clothing.
  • First Midland Red Buses (still known locally as Midland Red)
  • Froude Hofmann
  • Goodman Baylis, litho printers, binders and mailing services.
  • Lea & Perrins
  • Mazak, manufacturer of machine tooling.
  • Namesco Ltd, award winning web host and ISP
  • Holden Aluminium Worcester (formerly Hydro Aluminium Worcester, part of Norsk Hydro)
  • npower (UK)
  • Nutricia
  • Open G I Limited
  • Royal Mail
  • Tesco
  • University of Worcester
  • West Mercia Constabulary (HQ based on outskirts of Worcester)
  • Wolseley plc
  • Worcester City Council
  • Worcestershire County Council
  • Worcestershire Primary Care Trust (including the Worcestershire Royal Hospital)

Logo of Robert Bosch GmbH Robert Bosch GmbH is a German company which was started in 1886 by Robert Bosch. ... E.ON UK is an energy company in the United Kingdom, it is a subsidiary of the German utility giant E.ON. It was formed after the takeover of Powergen Plc by E.ON. It is a vertically integrated utility company with interests in electrical generation, electricity distribution in the... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Crown Holdings Incorporated, founded in 1892 by William Painter, is a Fortune 500 company based in the United States of America. ... Midland Red was the fleet and trading name used by the Birmingham & Midland Motor Omnibus Company (BMMO), formed in 1904, for its bus operating activities, which served the English Midlands from 1905. ... 1900 advertisement Lea & Perrins is a United Kingdom food company, originating in Worcester with a subsidiary in the United States which manufactures Lea & Perrins in New Jersey. ... Norsk Hydro ASA is a Norwegian oil and energy and integrated aluminium company, headquartered in Oslo. ... npower is a gas and electricity supply company that is based in the United Kingdom. ... Open GI is a software company based in Warndon, Worcester. ... Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... , For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... The University of Worcester is a university in Worcester in the United Kingdom. ... West Mercia Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Shropshire (including Telford and Wrekin), Herefordshire and Worcestershire in England. ... Wolseley plc is a British company based in Droitwich formerly known for the manufacture of Wolseley motor cars. ...

Retail and leisure

Retail

Like many other town and cities Worcester has the traditional ‘High Street’, though in Worcester’s case that is the actual street name of the main shopping thoroughfare. High Street is home to the major stores including Marks & Spencer, Debenhams, Boots Group, WH Smith, Superdrug, River Island, Woolworths, Next, Monsoon etc. Part of the High Street was revamped in 2005 amid much controversy, many of the issues focussing on the felling of long standing trees, the duration of the works (caused by the weather and an archaeological find) and the removal of flagstones outside the City’s 18th Century Guildhall. However, the revamped area has been mostly praised for its appearance, openness and brightness compared to the previous look. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Main Street. ... Marks & Spencer (M&S) is a British retailer, with 760 stores in more than 30 countries around the world. ... Debenhams plc (LSE: DEB) is a retailer with a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom, and franchised stores in a number of other countries. ... This article is about a former British company which has now merged to form Alliance Boots, as a result, information on this page may be out of date. ... This article is about the bookshop chain; for the businessman and politician of that name, see William Henry Smith. ... Superdrug on Oxford Street Superdrug is the UKs second largest health and beauty retail chain (behind Boots) and the sixth largest overall (behind Boots, Tesco, Sainsburys, ASDA and Morrisons). ... River Island is a male and female clotheswear chain with 197 stores located across the United Kingdom, Republic Of Ireland, Malta, Cyprus, Poland, Turkey, America and the Middle East with the name being a leader for casual fashion. ... This article is about the British Woolworths Group plc, and its stores. ... For other meanings, see Next. ... For other uses, see Monsoon (disambiguation). ...


The other main thoroughfares are The Shambles and Broad Street, which between them include Argos, MK One, Evans, Ethel Austin, Milletts etc, while the The Cross (and its immediate surrounding area) is seen as the city’s financial centre with the majority of Worcester’s main bank branches located here. This article is about the city in Greece. ... Evans is a common family name of English or Welsh origin, see Evans (surname). ... Ethel Austin is a large British clothing retailer with a UK-wide network of more than 300 stores extending from Scotland to South West England, and from Wales to the South East England. ...


There are 3 main shopping centres, those being CrownGate, Cathedral Plaza and Reindeer Court. CrownGate is the largest and is split in to 2 centres. Both centres incorporate and/or back on to major stores such as House of Fraser, BHS, Debenhams etc. CrownGate also includes an outdoor market which was previously located in Cornmarket, and as such often referred to at The Corn Market despite its current location. Cathedral Plaza is the next largest and was called the Lychgate Shopping Centre prior to its revamp and current, and somewhat, controversial name. Cathedral Plaza also includes/backs on to major stores such as Next & H&M. Reindeer Court is a traditional part-open shopping centre mainly featuring local specialist retailers. House of Fraser is a British department store group with 61 stores (July 2007) across the country. ... For other uses of the abbreviation, see BHS Bhs (also trading as British Home Stores and formerly BHS and BhS) is a stalwart department store of the British High Street, selling clothing and household items (such as bedlinen, cutlery, crockery and lighting). ... Debenhams plc (LSE: DEB) is a retailer with a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom, and franchised stores in a number of other countries. ... For other meanings, see Next. ... For the former railroad, see Hudson and Manhattan Railroad. ...


Worcester’s City centre, past and previous, has been known by its residents to sometimes have more than 2 outlets of a retailer which is unusual for a settlement of its size. Currently, there are 2 Marks & Spencers, Greggs, Superdrug, 3 Cooks, Homebase, Waterstone's and Halifaxs. Marks & Spencer plc (known also as M&S or Your M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks or Marks) is a British retailer. ... Superdrug on Oxford Street Superdrug is the UKs second largest health and beauty retail chain (behind Boots) and the sixth largest overall (behind Boots, Tesco, Sainsburys, ASDA and Morrisons). ...


Also like many other towns and cities, Worcester has retail parks, the main ones being Elgar Retail Park, Blackpole Retail Park and Shrub Hill Retail Park. The first 2 are virtually next door to each other in the Blackpole area of the city, while the latter is on the outskirts of the City centre in the Tallow Hill/Shrub Hill area. All 3 retails parks consist of the traditional out-of-town stores including Comet, Homebase, Currys, Wickes, Staples, MFI, PC World and Halfords. Comet Hale-Bopp Comet West For other uses, see Comet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Homebase (disambiguation). ... Currys is an electrical retailer in the UK and Republic of Ireland, and is owned by DSG International plc. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Staples may mean: Abram Penn Staples Billy Staples Chris Staples Curtis Staples Greg Staples Isaac Staples Jim Staples (rugby player) Mavis Staples Neville Staples Peter Staples Pops Staples Sam Staples (cricketer) Todd Staples Waller Redd Staples Staples, Minnesota Staples Inc. ... MPFI may refer to: Malmö Flygindustri, see Saab MFI13 and MFI-9 Junior Media Factory, Inc. ... PC World may refer to one of two topics: The American computer magazine The British computer store chain This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Halfords Group plc (LSE: HFD) is a leading retailer of car parts, car enhancement, cycles and travel solutions in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. ...


Recently plans have been made to update the current Crowngate & Cathedral Plaza shopping centres. As well as a new Shopping centre proposed in Lowesmoor to include Worcester's first Asda.


Leisure

Whether true or not Worcester was once cited as having more pubs/bars per population than any other town/city in the country. While many closed during the 1960s and 1970s there are still a large number of pubs/bars in Worcester. Many are owned by breweries, while many in the City centre are chain pubs such as O’Neills, Pitcher and Piano, Lloyds No. 1 Bar and Postal Order (Wetherspoons). There are a few free houses around the city, while a couple of pubs are award winning promoters of real ale such as The Swan with 2 Nicks (in New Street), The Dragon (in The Tything) and The Plough (in Fish Street). Worcester's oldest pub is the Cardinal's Hat in Friar Street. The Moon Under Water in Hounslow J. D. Wetherspoon plc (LSE: JDW) (commonly referred to as Wetherspoons or spoons) is a British pub chain founded by Tim Martin. ...


There are 2 cinemas in Worcester, both located at opposite ends of the City centre, these being Vue (which encompasses nearly 80% of the Worcester Market share) and Odeon. In computing, Visual User Environment (VUE or HP-VUE) was Hewlett-Packards Desktop environment for the X Window System. ... The Odeon was a building used for musical performance in Athens built in the 5th century BC. Hence, any building in ancient Greece or the ancient Roman Empire was called an odeon. ...


There are 2 10-pin bowling centres in Worcester, these being Worcester Tenpin Bowling and Bowl Xtreme. There was a 3rd - Westside Bowl - but it closed down in 2006


Along with a number of fitness centres/gymnasiums there are currently 3 City council-run sports complexs, these being Perdiswell Leisure Centre, Nunnery Wood Sports Centre and St. Johns Sports Centre.


Education

University

Worcester is home to the University of Worcester, which was awarded university status in 2005. From 1997 to 2005 it was known as University College Worcester (UCW) and prior to 1997 it was known as Worcester College of Higher Education. The University of Worcester is a university in Worcester in the United Kingdom. ...


State sixth forms and colleges

Worcester Sixth Form College on Spetchley Road in Swinesherd, Worcester (close to the M5) was founded on the site of the Worcester Grammar School for Girls following reorganisation in 1983. ... Worcester College of Technology is a Further Education College situated in the city of Worcester in the United Kingdom. ...

State high schools

  • Bishop Perowne Performing Arts College CE
  • Blessed Edward Oldcorne Catholic College
  • Christopher Whitehead Language College[6]
  • Elgar Technology College
  • Nunnery Wood High School[7]

The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...

Private schools

Worcester is also the seat of a number of public schools: The Royal Grammar School Worcester has existed continuously since 1291 and The King's School, Worcester was re-founded in 1541 under King Henry VIII. Both lay claim to having roots in the 8th Century ecclesiastical school based around the site of the present cathedral. The Alice Ottley School and Saint Mary's Convent School are other private schools in the area. The Royal Grammar School and Alice Ottley School have recently merged to form the new and improved Royal Grammar and Alice Ottley School, Worcester aka RGSAO. The Royal Grammar School Worcester (RGS Worcester) is one of the oldest British independent schools, founded before 1291. ... The Kings School, Worcester (KSW) is an independent British Public School founded by Henry VIII in 1541. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... The Alice Ottley School (AO) is an all-girl school in Worcester, and is situated next-door to the Royal Grammar School Worcester. ... Saint Marys Convent School is one of the two all-female secondary schools in Worcestershire, with the other being The Alice Ottley School. ... This article is about the current RGSAO (2007-?). For the old RGSW (1291-2007), see Royal Grammar School Worcester. ...


New College

New College Worcester (RNIB) caters for blind and partially sighted students from the ages of 11 to 18.[8] New College Worcester (or NCW; formerly RNIB New College; and previously Worcester College for the Blind) is a secondary grammar school in the historic British city of Worcester. ... The Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB) is a United Kingdom charity, which was set up to lobby for and help people who are blind or partially sighted. ...


Famous citizens

The statue of Edward Elgar at the end of Worcester High Street
The statue of Edward Elgar at the end of Worcester High Street

Probably Worcester's most famous citizen was composer Sir Edward Elgar, whose father ran a music shop at the end of the High Street; a statue of Elgar stands near the original location of that shop. His birthplace is a short way outside Worcester in the village of Broadheath. Download high resolution version (509x1354, 1563 KB)Statue of Edward Elgar in Worcester File links The following pages link to this file: Edward Elgar Categories: Images with unknown source ... Download high resolution version (509x1354, 1563 KB)Statue of Edward Elgar in Worcester File links The following pages link to this file: Edward Elgar Categories: Images with unknown source ... Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... Broadheath could be Broadheath, Greater Manchester (a suburb in the Trafford borough) Broadheath, Worcestershire (a parish) This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...


Hannah Snell, famous for impersonating a man and being enlisted in the Royal Marines in the 18th century was born and raised here. Hannah Snell (1723-1792) was an Englishwoman who took a mans role to become a soldier. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ...


Sir Charles Hastings, founder of the British Medical Association lived in Worcester for most of his life - the newly built Worcestershire Royal Hospital stands in a road named in his honour. Sir Charles Hastings (1794 - 1866) was a medical surgeon and a founder of the British Medical Association, the BMA. He was also a notable lifelong philanthropist, investing his own money in new housing designed to improve public health and founding a natural history museum. ... // The British Medical Association (BMA) is the professional association and registered trade union for doctors in the United Kingdom. ...


Philip Henry Gosse, naturalist, was born in the city in 1810. Philip Henry Gosse (April 6, 1810 – August 23, 1888) was an English naturalist and science popularizer, now best known for his attempt to reconcile biblical literalism with uniformitarianism but also known for his invention of the sea-water aquarium and marine biology studies. ...


Sir Thomas Brock, a sculptor most famous for the Imperial Victoria Memorial in London was born here in 1847. Sir Thomas Brock (March 1, 1847 - August 22, 1922) was a British sculptor. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ...


Civil engineer Edward Leader Williams, designer of the Manchester Ship Canal, was born and raised in Worcester, residing at Diglis House (now the Diglis House Hotel) with his brother, noted landscape artist Benjamin Williams Leader. William Morris, Lord Nuffield, automobile manufacturer, spent the first three years of his life in the city. A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering. ... Sir Edward Leader Williams (1828-1910) was an English civil engineer, chiefly remembered as the designer of the Manchester Ship Canal, but also heavily involved in other canal projects in north Cheshire. ... The canal at its Manchester end, looking towards Old Trafford. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Benjamin Williams Leader (1833-1923) was an English artist. ... William Richard Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield GBE CH (10 October 1877–22 August 1963) was the founder of the Morris Motor Company and a philanthropist. ...


Poet and author Reverend Geoffrey Anketell Studdert Kennedy, famously known as "Woodbine Willy", was for some time the Vicar of St. Pauls Church in the city. He rose to fame during World War I when he became an army chaplain, his sermons and poetry helping boost morale to the troops. He acquired his nickname from his habit of handing out "Woodbine" cigarettes to the men in the trenches. The Reverend Geoffrey Anketell Studdert Kennedy (June 27, 1883 - 1929), was an Anglican priest and poet. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Writers Mrs. Henry Wood and Fay Weldon were born here. Mrs. ... Fay Weldon (born September 22, 1931) is a British novelist, short story writer, playwright and essayist whose work has been associated with the cause of feminism. ...


Worcester is home to electronic music producer and Aphex Twin collaborator Mike Paradinas and his record label Planet Mu. For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Aphex Twin (born Richard David James on August 18, 1971 in Limerick, Ireland) is an electronic music artist, credited with pushing forward the genres of techno, ambient, acid and drum and bass. ... Mike Paradinas, who works primarily under the name µ-ziq (pronounced like the word music), is a British musician in the field of electronic music. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Planet Mu is an electronic music record label run by Mike Paradinas. ...


Cyclist Ernest Payne was born in Worcester and rode for the local Worcester St Johns Cycling Club. He won a gold medal in the team pursuit at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. Ernest (Ernie) Payne (born 23 December 1884 in Worcester, England – died 10 September 1961) was a British track cycling racer. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Worcester is also the home town of aviatrix Sheila Scott. For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... Sheila Scott before her 1971 record-breaking trip Sheila Scott (April 27, 1922 in Worcester, Worcestershire, England – October 20, 1988 in London, England), was a British aviatrix. ...


Culture and arts

Festivals and shows

Every three years, Worcester becomes home to the Three Choirs Festival, which dates back to the 18th century and is credited with being the oldest music festival in Europe. The location of the festival rotates each year between the Cathedral Cities of Gloucester, Hereford and Worcester. Famous for its championing of English music, especially that of Elgar, Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst, Worcester is next scheduled to host the festival in August 2008. The Three Choirs Festival is a British music festival, held each August alternately at the cathedrals of Hereford, Gloucester and Worcester and originally featuring their three choirs, which remain central to the week-long programme. ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ...


The Worcester Festival is a relatively new venture established in 2003. Held in late August, the festival consists of a variety of music, theatre, cinema and workshops, as well as the already established Beer Festival, which now runs under the Worcester Festival name. A Beer Festival is an organised event during which a variety of beers (and often other alcoholic drinks) are available for tasting and purchase. ...


The Victorian-themed Christmas Fayre is a major source of tourism every December.

A map of Worcester in 1806.
A map of Worcester in 1806.

Elton John came to the Worcestershire Cricket Ground, New Road on Saturday 9 June 2006. Download high resolution version (626x769, 140 KB)A map of Worcester in 1806 (engraved by J.Roper from a drawing by G.Cole). ... Download high resolution version (626x769, 140 KB)A map of Worcester in 1806 (engraved by J.Roper from a drawing by G.Cole). ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The 8th CAMRA Worcester Beer and Cider festival took place for three days from the 17 August 2006[9] and was held as usual on Pitchcroft Race Course. On entry there is a choice between a (free) half or pint glass, with this year's having orange writing. The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is an independent, voluntary, consumer organisation in the United Kingdom whose main aim is promoting real ale and the traditional British pub. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Theatre, music and cinema

Famous 18th century actress Sarah Siddons made her acting debut here at the Theatre Royal in Angel Street. Her sister, the novelist Ann Julia Kemble Hatton,[10] otherwise known as Ann of Swansea, was born in the city. Matilda Alice Powles, better known as Vesta Tilley, a leading male impersonator and music hall artiste was born in Worcester. Sarah Siddons as the Tragic Muse by Sir Joshua Reynolds (The Huntington, San Marino, California) Sarah Siddons (July 5, 1755 – June 8, 1831) was a British actress, the best-known tragedienne of the 18th century. ... Vesta Tilly (May 13, 1864 – September 16, 1952) was an English male impersonator. ...


In present-day Worcester the Swan Theatre[11] stages a mixture of professional touring and local amateur productions. The Countess of Huntingdon's Hall[12] is a historic church now used as venue for an eclectic range of musical performances, while the Marrs Bar[13] is a venue for gigs and stand-up comedy. Worcester also boasts two multi-screen cinemas (a six screen Vue Cinema complex located on Friar Street and an Odeon Cinema[14], boasting seven screens, at the heart of the city on Forgate Street).


In the northern suburbs of the city is the Art Deco Northwick Cinema. Built in 1938 it contains one of the only two remaining interiors in Britain designed by John Alexander (the original perspective drawings are still held by RIBA). It was a Bingo Hall from 1966 to 1982 and then empty until 1991; it was then run as a music venue until 1996, and was empty again until Autumn 2006 when it became an antiques and lifestyle centre, owned by Grey's Interiors, who were previously located in The Tything. Asheville City Hall. ... John Alexander may refer to: John Alexander VC (d. ... The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects in the United Kingdom. ... Housie is a gambling game played in New Zealand, Australia and the UK, where it is called Bingo. ...


There are also a number of Arts organisations in Worcester, one of which is C&T.[15] Based at the University and also Bishop Perowne Performing Arts College is C&T [formerly Collar & TIE]. C&T is an educational theatre company that specialises in theatre for young people tackling topical issues through a unique blend of drama and new media technologies.


Places of interest

Parks and Open Spaces

There are 3 main parks in Worcester, these being Cripplegate Park, Gheluvelt Park and Fort Royal Park, the latter being on one of the battles sites of the English Civil War. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ...


Gheluvelt Park was opened as a memorial to commemorate the Worcestershire Regiment's 2nd Battalion after their part in the Battle of Gheluvelt, during World War I. The Worcestershire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the line in the British Army, formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot and the 36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot. ... Combatants United Kingdom France Germany Commanders John French Ferdinand Foch Erich von Falkenhayn Strength UK: 7 infantry divisions, 3 cavalry divisions France: ? 4th Army, 6th Army Casualties UK: 58,000 France: 50,000 130,000 The First Battle of Ypres, also called the Battle of Flanders, was the last major... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


There are also two large woodlands in the city, those being Perry Wood, at 12 hectares, and Nunnery Wood, covering 21 hectares. Perry Wood is often said to be the place where Oliver Cromwell met and made a pact with the devil. Nunnery Wood is an integral part of the adjacent and popular Worcester Woods Country Park, itself next door to County Hall on the east side of the city. For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ...


Buildings

Probably the most famous landmark in Worcester is its imposing Worcester cathedral. The current building, formally named The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary, was begun in 1084 while its crypt dates from the 10th Century. The chapter house is the only circular one in the country while the cathedral also has the distinction of having the tomb of King John. A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836. ... This article is about the King of England. ...


Religion

Worcester contains a diverse range of religious groups, as well as both Catholic and Church of England centres, there is also an Islamic mosque, a large centre for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), a Baptist Church and a number of smaller interest groups regarding Eastern Religions such as Buddhism and the Hare Krishna's.[16] The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Hare Krishna Mantra in Devanagari The Hare Krishna mantra, also referred to reverentially as the Maha Mantra (Great Mantra), is a sixteen-word Vaishnava mantra made well known outside of India by the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (commonly known as the Hare Krishnas)[1]. It is believed by practitioners...


Sport

Entrance to the Worcester King George's Field
Entrance to the Worcester King George's Field

Image File history File linksMetadata King_George's_Fields_SO8656. ... Image File history File linksMetadata King_George's_Fields_SO8656. ... Entrance to the KGV field in Worcester A King Georges Field is a public open space in the United Kingdom dedicated to the memory of King George V (3 June 1865–20 January 1936). ... Worcestershire County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Worcestershire. ... This article is about a road in London. ... The Football Conferences logo Conference North (often referred to as Nationwide North for sponsorship reasons) is a division of the Football Conference in England, taking its place immediately below the Conference National. ... Worcester City Football Club is an English football team, based at St Georges Lane in the city of Worcester. ... St Georges Lane is the home of semi-pro football club Worcester City Football Club. ... Official website www. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Sixways Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Worcester, England. ... The Worcester Wolves is a basketball team from the city of Worcester, which plays in the British Basketball League. ... This article is about the sport. ... “BBL” redirects here. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... There are 471 King George V Playing Fields[1] in the United Kingdom, all part of an enormous memorial to King George V, each of which is an individual registered charity[2]. This is the page for Worcestershire. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...

Suburbs

Here is a list of suburbs: Astwood, Arboretum, Barbourne, Battenhall, Bevere, Blackpole, Blanquettes Estate, Brickfields, Cherry Orchard, Claines, Copperfields, Diglis, Dines Green, Fort Royal, Henwick, Henwick Park, Merrimans Hill, Perdiswell, St Peter the Great, St John's, Tolladine, Trotshill, Red Hill, Rainbow Hill, Lower Wick, Shrub Hill/Tallow Hill, Spetchley Estate, Ronkswood, Northwick, Warndon Villages, Warndon, Woodgreen. Henwick, Lower Wick and St John's are on the opposite site of the River Severn from the city centre. Claines is a small village just to the north of Worcester, England, on the left bank of the River Severn. ... St. ... Ronkswood is a suburb of Worcester, Worcestershire, England. ...


Transport

Road

Worcester almost sits on the M5 motorway and is served by junctions 6 and 7. This makes the city easily accessible to most parts of the country, including London which is only 120 miles/1 & half hours away (via the M5, M42 and M40). The M5 near J28, Devon This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ... For other uses of the term M42, please see M42. ... The M40 motorway is a motorway in the English transport network that connects London to Birmingham. ...


Several A roads pass through the city. The A449 road runs south-west to Malvern and north to Kidderminster. The A44 runs south-east to Evesham and west to Leominster and provides the main city centre road bridge. The A38 trunk road runs south to tewkesbury and Gloucester and north-north-east to Droitwich and Birmingham. The A4103 goes west-south-west to Hereford. The A422 heads east to Alcester, branching from the A44 a mile east of the M5. The A449 is a major road in the United Kingdom. ... The A44 is a major road in the United Kingdom. ... A38 passing under M50 in Worcestershire The A38 is a major trunk road in England. ... The A4103 The A4103 is a major road in England, which runs west-south-west through rural surroundings from Worcester to just east of Hereford where it joins the A465. ... The numbering zones for A-roads in Great Britain List of A roads beginning with 4 in Great Britain starting north of the A4 and south/west of the A5. ...


The city is encompassed by a partial ring road (A4440) which is formed, rather inconsistently, by single and dual carriageways. The A4440 provides a second road bridge across the Severn (Carrington Bridge) just west of the A4440-A38 junction. This is a lists some of the crossings of the River Severn in Great Britain, in order from source to mouth. ...


Rail

The city is served by 2 stations, Worcester Foregate Street and Worcester Shrub Hill. Although featuring 2 tracks Foregate Street actually consists of 2 single working tracks, one of which forms part of the Birmingham-Malvern-Hereford line while the other is the end of the Cotswold Line, which Shrub Hill also serves. Both stations frequently serve Birmingham and nearby towns/cities. London is also served by both stations via the Cotswold Line and, infrequently, via the Birmingham-Bristol/Gloucester-Swindon and Bristol-London lines. Worcester Foregate Street railway station is situated in the centre of the city of Worcester, in Worcestershire, England. ... Worcester Shrub Hill railway station is one of two railway stations serving the city of Worcester in Worcestershire, England. ... A First Great Western Link Network Express Turbo unit at Evesham station on 19th September 2004, with a service for London Paddington. ...


Although connected to a mainline only 2 miles away, in this case the Birmingham-Bristol 'Cross-Country' line, Worcester is not served by Inter City 'Cross-Country' services. This, bizarely, makes Worcestershire the only county in England where 'Cross-Country' services pass through but do not stop in during normal scheduled timetables.


Being the bigger of the 2 stations, and due to its location, Shrub Hill is often used as a stabling point and a through route for freight trains.


Public transport

The main operator of bus services in and around the city is First which prior to mergers and acquistions was Midland Red West, itself one of the companies that formed part of the huge Midland Red operation before Midland Red was split into 5 companies in preparation for dereglation. A handful of other smaller operators provide services in Worcester, most notably Astons and Bromyard Omnibus Company. The terminus/interchange for many bus services in Worcester is CrownGate Bus Station. First also operate the Worcester Express, part of the Worcester North Park and Ride Scheme. The service operates on a circular route through Worcester, also serving the Park and Ride site at Perdiswell which offers out of town parking. FirstGroup plc (LSE: FGP) is a Scottish transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen. ...


See also

Bishops of Worcester Bosel 680 Oftfor 691 Egwin 693 Wilfrith I 718 Milred about 743 Waermund 775 Tilhere 777 Heathured (AEthelred) 781 Denebeorht 798 Heahbeorht (Eadbert) 822 Ealhhun (Alwin) about 845 Waerfrith 873 AEthelhun 915 Wilfrith II 922 Koenwald 929 St. ...

References and footnotes

  1. ^ http://www.worcesternews.co.uk/display.var.1706462.0.beaten_tory_keeps_a_low_profile.php
  2. ^ Morganite Crucible
  3. ^ kays.com
  4. ^ Kays Heritage
  5. ^ Froude Hofmann
  6. ^ Christopher Whitehead Language College
  7. ^ Nunnery Wood High School
  8. ^ New College
  9. ^ From camra.org.uk
  10. ^ Ann Julia Kemble Hatton
  11. ^ The Swan Theatre
  12. ^ Huntington Hall
  13. ^ The Marrs Bar official site
  14. ^ The Odeon Worcester Page on MySpace
  15. ^ Term Time Drama in Worcester
  16. ^ BBC Hereford & Worcester feature on the Hare Krishna movement (ISKCON)

The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) is a new religious movement based on Bengali, or more specifically Gaudiya, Vaishnavism founded by A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, referred to by followers as His Divine Grace, in New York in 1966. ...

External links

  • Worcester City
  • Worcester City Council
  • LocalHistories.org - Brief History of Worcester
  • A Few Views of Worcester in Old Postcards
  • Official Worcester Tourist information guide
  • Cape Winelands Tourism - your guide to Winelands accommodation, holiday and visitor information
  • Worcester Web Design
  • Worcester satellite view

Local Media

  • Worcester Standard - The Local Worcester Newspaper

Coordinates: 52.19123° N 2.22231° W This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 372 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (663 × 1069 pixels, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 372 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (663 × 1069 pixels, file size: 113 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 372 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (663 × 1069 pixels, file size: 113 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Lisburn UK Parliament: Lagan Valley European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: (+44) 02892 Post Town: Lisburn Postal District(s): BT27, BT28 Population (2001) 71,465 Website: www. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Worcester City FC - Official Website > Home (701 words)
WORCESTER City have been handed a tough-looking away trip to Guiseley in the FA Trophy.
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Worcester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1438 words)
Worcester was the site of the Battle of Worcester (September 3, 1651), in which Charles II's attempt to retake the country from Cromwell and the Parliamentarians was decisively defeated, in the fields a little to the west and south of the city, near the village of Powick.
Worcester was one of the cities loyal to the King in that war, for which it was given the epithet "The Faithful City".
Worcester is also the seat of the famous public schools the Royal Grammar School Worcester founded ante 1291, and the Worcester Cathedral School which was founded in 1541 under King Henry VIII as The King's School, Worcester.The Alice Ottley School and Saint Mary's Convent School are others in the area.
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