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Encyclopedia > Woolworth Building
Woolworth Building

Woolworth Building was the world's tallest building from 1913 to 1930.* Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2864x3658, 1406 KB) Summary TITLE: [View of Woolworth Building and surrounding buildings, New York City] CALL NUMBER: U.S. GEOG FILE - New York--New York City--Bldgs--Woolworth [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-127214 (b&w film copy neg. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ...

Preceded by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower
Surpassed by 40 Wall Street
Information
Location 223 Broadway, New York, NY, USA
Status Complete
Constructed 1910-1913
Technical Details
Floor count 60
* Fully habitable, self-supported, from main entrance to rooftop; see world's tallest structures for other listings.

The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. More than ninety years after its construction, it is still one of the fifty tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the twenty tallest buildings in New York City. The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower (also Met Life Tower) at One Madison Avenue, New York City was the worlds tallest building from 1909 to 1913, when it was surpassed by the Woolworth Building. ... 40 Wall Street is a 71-story skyscraper in New York City completed in 1930. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... While determining the worlds tallest structure has generally been straightforward, the questions of what is the worlds tallest building or the worlds tallest tower have often been controversial, both because of disputes over what counts as a building or a tower, and further disputes over how to... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest building architecturally, is located in Taipei City, Taiwan. ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... The United States is home to many of the worlds tallest skyscrapers. ... New York City has the most skyscrapers in the world with 189 buildings taller than 500 ft. ...


Constructed in neo-Gothic style by architect Cass Gilbert, who was commissioned by Frank Woolworth in 1910 to design the new corporate headquarters on Broadway, between Park Place and Barclay Street in Lower Manhattan, opposite City Hall, it opened on April 24, 1913. Originally planned to be 625 feet (190.5 meters) high, it was built to 792 feet (241 meters); construction cost was US$13,500,000, which Woolworth paid in cash. Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin Gothic Revival was an architectural movement with its origins in mid-18th century England. ... Woolworth Building (New York City), was the worlds tallest building at the time it was built, in 1909. ... Franklin Winfield Woolworth (April 13, 1852 – April 8, 1919) was an American merchant. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from the Staten Island Ferry Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ... ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... A foot (plural: feet) is any of several old units of distance or length, measuring around a quarter to a third of a meter. ... The metre, or meter (US), is a measure of length. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ...


For its splendor and resemblance to European Gothic cathedrals, it was labeled the Cathedral of Commerce by the Reverend S. Parkes Cadman during its opening ceremony. It was the tallest building in the world until the construction of 40 Wall Street (and, shortly thereafter, the Chrysler Building) in 1930. An observation deck on the 58th floor attracted visitors until 1945. See also Gothic art. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Anglican, Catholic and some Lutheran churches, which serves as the central church of a diocese, and thus as a bishops seat. ... 40 Wall Street is a 71-story skyscraper in New York City completed in 1930. ... The Chrysler Building is a skyscraper and distinctive symbol of New York City, standing 1,046 feet (319 m) high on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...


The building's tower, flush with the main frontage on Broadway, is raised on a block base that has a narrow interior court for light. The exterior decoration was cast in limestone-colored glazed architectural terra-cotta panels. Strongly articulated piers, carried — without interrupting cornices — right to the pyramidal cap, give the building its upward thrust. The Gothic detailing concentrated at the highly visible top is massively scaled, so that it reads well from the street level several hundred feet below. The ornate cruciform lobby has a vaulted ceiling, mosaics, and sculpted caricatures that include Gilbert and Woolworth. Woolworth's private office, revetted in marble in French Empire style is preserved. Glazed architectural terra-cotta is a masonry building material popular in the United States from the late 19th century until the 1930s and still one of the most common building materials found in U.S. urban enviroments. ... In architecture, a pier is an upright support for a superstructure, such as an arch or bridge. ... Example of cornice laden roof line In classical architecture the cornice is the set of projecting moldings that crown an entablature. ... In architecture, a vault is an arched structure of masonry, forming a ceiling or canopy. ... Venus de Milo, front. ... Empire is an early 19th century style of architecture and furniture design that and originates from Napoleons rule of France. ...


The engineer Gunvald Aus designed the steel frame, supported on massive caissons that penetrate to bedrock. The high-speed elevators were innovative, and the building's high office-to-elevator ratio made it profitable. Tenants included the Irving Trust bank and Columbia Records, which had its main New York recording studio in the Woolworth Building. In engineering, a caisson is a retaining, watertight structure used, for example, to work on the foundations of a bridge pier, for the construction of a concrete dam, or for the repair of ships. ... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ... A recording studio is a facility for sound recording. ...


The building was owned by the Woolworth company for 85 years until 1998, when the Venator Group (formerly the F.W. Woolworth Company) sold it to the Witkoff Group for $155 million [1]. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Foot Locker Inc NYSE: FL (formerly Z) is a United States company specialising in athletic footwear and clothing. ...


After the September 11, 2001 attacks a few blocks away, the building was without electricity and telephone service for a few weeks; but it suffered no significant damage. Increased post-attack security meant that access to most of the ornate lobby, previously a tourist attraction, was restricted to those with business in the building. The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly targeting civilians, carried out on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ...


Today the building houses, among other tenants, the New York University School of Continuing and Professional Studies' Center for Global Affairs. New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...


Images

Woolworth Building
Woolworth Building
Above the clouds
Above the clouds
Detail
Enlarge
Detail

Photo of Woolworth Building at New York City (taken June 20, 2003 by djmutex), herewith licensed under GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photo of Woolworth Building at New York City (taken June 20, 2003 by djmutex), herewith licensed under GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Woolworth_Tower_in_clouds_New_York_City_1928. ... Image File history File links Woolworth_Tower_in_clouds_New_York_City_1928. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1328 KB) Woolworth Building in New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1328 KB) Woolworth Building in New York City. ...

See also

Commons logo
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Woolworth Building

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... New York City has the most skyscrapers in the world with 50 buildings taller than 200 meters and 2 taller than 300 meters. ...

External links

  • Great Buildings on-line - the Woolworth Building
  • Medieval New York website - Construction details and photo images of the Woolworth Building
  • NYCfoto.com - Woolworth Building (before and after 9/11)
  • New York Architecture Images - THE WOOLWORTH BUILDING

  Results from FactBites:
 
Daniel's Manhattan Architecture - Woolworth Building (499 words)
The Woolworth Building was commissioned in 1910 by Frank W. Woolworth, the head of a multi-million dollar chain of five-and-ten-cent stores.
The Woolworth Building is essentially a twentieth century building clad in fifteenth century gothic details.
The Woolworth Building is indeed worthy of the title "cathedral of commerce." It is not only a monument to the Woolworth empire, but also to the guilded age of New York City commerce and architecture.
New York Architecture Images- THE WOOLWORTH BUILDING (1224 words)
Woolworth wanted his building to become the tallest in New York, and in the world, which meant that it needed to rise more than 700 feet– the height of the Metropolitan Life Tower.
Woolworth financed the skyscraper in cash, which was unusual for a project of this size and cost, and he noted that the tower would be a valuable generator of publicity for the company.
Gilbert covered most of the building in a skin of ornamental cream-colored terra cotta instead of masonry to stress that the walls themselves, despite appearances, were not load-bearing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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