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Encyclopedia > Woodstock 1999

Woodstock 1999, held July 23-25, 1999 was the second music festival, after Woodstock '94, that attempted to emulate the success of the original Woodstock Festival of 1969. Like the previous concerts with the same name, it was held in upstate New York, this time in Rome, New York. Live coverage of the entire weekend was available on pay-per-view and excerpts from the performances were later released on compact disc and DVD. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... Woodstock 94 poster design Woodstock 94 is a rock concert that was held in order to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the original Woodstock concert of 1969. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... This article is about the state. ... Rome is a city in Oneida County, New York, United States. ... Pay-per-view is the name given to a system by which television viewers can call and order events to be seen on TV and pay for the private telecast of that event to their homes later. ... CD redirects here. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Woodstock '99 is best remembered for reports of violence, molestation, and ultimately the fires that closed down the show.

Contents

Problems of Woodstock 1999

The festival was characterized by poor planning and logistical failures at multiple levels from the start, leading to disappointment and anger among concertgoers. Ticket prices were extremely high for a festival of this type. Participants were forbidden to bring their own food or water to the show, in order to force them to buy from onsite vendors, whose merchandise many felt was grotesquely overpriced (a bag of ice sold for 15 dollars, and a bottle of water for 5).[1]


Crews were asked to work around the clock amidst what they described as demanding and threatening working conditions. There was a lack of hygiene and suitable accommodations, insufficient parking, slow transportation, and insufficient medical emergency preparedness. Lack of leadership contributed to a breakdown of security forces. In addition, the venue, a former U.S. Air Force installation (Griffiss Air Force Base), was a Superfund hazardous waste site. Seal of the Air Force. ... Griffiss Air Force Base was a U.S. Air Force base in Rome, New York. ... Checking the status of a cleanup site Superfund is the common name for the United States environmental law that is officially known as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 9601 to 9675, which was enacted by the United States Congress on December 11...


Prior to the concert the promoters of the event were determined to avoid the gate-crashing that had occurred at previous festivals, and had described the site as "defensible" and proudly described the 12-foot plywood and steel fence intended to keep out those without tickets. About 500 New York State Police Troopers were hired for security. They also recruited volunteer security from New York City, many of whom walked off the job, disappearing into the crowd. The New York State Police is the state police force of 4600 sworn Troopers for the state of New York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Poor sanitation and security, the lack of available water, and 100-degree heat with no available shade led to a dangerous environment. Recognizing the situation, many water and food vendors requested permission to sell their goods at lower costs, but the Woodstock organizers refused, stating that granting such permission would represent lost profits. This put the vendors rather than the concert organizers at risk in the event of violence.


The organizers had failed to install sufficient portable toilets for the number of attendees. Within a short time, the few facilities were unusable and overflowing onto the concert grounds. People stood in line for hours to access the fountains, until frustration impelled a few to break the pipes apart to provide water to those in the middle of the line.


Allegedly, some of the violence and looting began during Limp Bizkit's performance of the song "Break Stuff," which many critics of the concert blamed for the violence.[2] Limp Bizkit is a nu metal band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Break Stuff is a song by rapcore/nu metal band Limp Bizkit. ...


However, other reports indicated that the violence escalated in the final hours of the concert as Red Hot Chili Peppers attempted to perform their hit "Under the Bridge". A group of peace promoters led by an independent group called Pax had distributed candles to those stopping at their booth during the day, intending them for a candlelight vigil to be held during the Red Hot Chili Peppers' performance. The crowd instead used them to light bonfires. The hundreds of empty plastic water bottles that littered the lawn/dance area were found to be excellent fuel for the fires.[3] The Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


After the Red Hot Chili Peppers were finished with their set, the audience was informed about "a bit of a problem." An audio delay tower caught fire, and the fire department was called in to extinguish it. In response, the audience started to chant the chorus to the Rock Master Scott & the Dynamic Three song The Roof Is on Fire: We don't need no water, let the motherfuckers burn. Burn, motherfuckers, burn. Rock Master Scott & the Dynamic Three was an old school rap group that is best known for the single The Roof Is on Fire. The group only released one single The Roof Is on Fire (1984), which charted at #5 on the Billboard Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales at... The Roof Is on Fire was a single from Rock Master Scott & the Dynamic Three released in 1984 that charted at #5 on the Billboard magazine Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales chart. ...


Back onstage for an encore, the Chili Peppers' lead singer Anthony Kiedis remarked how amazing the fires looked from the stage, comparing them to a scene in the film Apocalypse Now.[4] The band proceeded to play their rendition of Jimi Hendrix's "Fire", followed by "Sir Psycho Sexy". Fires appeared in even greater numbers and intensity, allegedly in response to the encouragement of Kiedis. Kiedis later stated in his autobiography that Jimi Hendrix's sister asked the Chili Peppers to play "Fire" in honor of Jimi, and that they were not playing it to encourage the crowd. Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ... Fire is a song written and originally recorded by Jimi Hendrix and released on the 1967 Are You Experienced? album by The Jimi Hendrix Experience. ... Sir Psycho Sexy is an epic song by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, from their 1991 album Blood Sugar Sex Magik. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...


Many large bonfires were burning high before the band left the stage for the last time. Participants danced in circles around the fires. Looking for more fuel, some tore off panels of plywood from the supposedly inviolable security perimeter fence. ATMs were tipped over and broken into, trailers full of merchandise and equipment were forced open and burglarized, and vendor booths were looted, turned over, and set on fire. [5] A perimeter fence is a structure that circles the perimeter of an area to prevent access. ...


MTV, which had been providing live coverage, removed its entire crew. MTV host Kurt Loder described the scene in the July 27, 1999 issue of USA Today: This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Promotional photo of Kurt Loder Kurt Loder (born May 5, 1945) is a film critic, author, and television personality. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...

"It was dangerous to be around. The whole scene was scary. There were just waves of hatred bouncing around the place, (...) It was clear we had to get out of there.... It was like a concentration camp. To get in, you get frisked to make sure you're not bringing in any water or food that would prevent you from buying from their outrageously priced booths. You wallow around in garbage and human waste. There was a palpable mood of anger."[6]

After some time, a large force of New York State Troopers, local Police, and various other law enforcement showed up. Most had crowd control gear and proceeded to form a riot-line that flushed the crowd to the northwest, away from the stage located at the eastern end of the airfield. Few in the crowd offered strong resistance and they quickly dispersed back toward the campground and out the main entrance. [7]


Police later reported that at least four rapes had occurred during the concert. [8] Seven arrests were made on the final night of the concert and, afterward, police reviewed video footage, hoping to identify and hold accountable looters who, amid the chaos, had not been arrested. Some one-dozen trailers, a small bus and a number of booths and portable toilets were burned in the fray. Six people were injured.[9]


Cultural Comparisons

Political Events

Taking place in 1969, Woodstock occurred during a troubled time in society. With the violent Vietnam War being heavily present in the public eye along with the Civil Rights Movement, peace and love were being protested for throughout the country. [10] The Civil Rights Movement was in full swing and equal rights were on the forefront of political debate. The promoters of Woodstock tried to express peace and freedom during a time in which politics were very controversial due to the war. During this time, people with long hair and shabby clothes were seen as left-wing political believers and drug users. Woodstock’s main objective was to show the country that violence, the Vietnam War, was not the only way to solve matters. For example, Bob Dylan wrote songs that related to current events and the problems that were troubling our nation. Dylan sang about certain events and how the government was turning away from them. This was not just another concert, but it was a way for people to express their feelings about the current politics and the ongoing war. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1960-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... This article is about the recording artist. ...


Woodstock of 1999 occurred during a very different climate of political events. The Columbine and Littleton school shootings happened during that year along with the Battle for Seattle’s organized protests. The types of music being played during the 1999 Woodstock were viewed as angry and senseless lyrics that were targeted to appeal to youths.[11] Political institutions were portraying the youth as being aimless and radical. Many politicians believed the evolving music around 1999 had much to do with the drugs and youths. During this time schools across the country enforced a zero tolerance policy dealing with drugs and violence. Politicians viewed Woodstock as a promotional event the used the music to promote drugs and violence to a young demographic. For other things of this name, see Columbine (disambiguation). ...


Demographics

Woodstock ’69 attracted anywhere between 450,000-500,000 people. [12]Overall, the majority of Woodstock attendees were found to be white males, in the middle- to upper-middle classes, fairly educated, and generally between the ages of seventeen to twenty-three. Regardless of this generalization, people of all ages, classes, religions and races made up the massive crowd. Many different groups of people, and although the crowd was very diverse, everyone shared a common bond which made it more community-like. According to Lawrence J. Dessner, “consciously or unconsciously the journey of so many young people to Woodstock and the high level of cooperation and community that was exhibited for three days were tied to the anti-war movement[13] In addition, they also shared views about other issues the country was currently facing, such as overt capitalism and civil inequality.


In a study using a large sample of concert attendees, it was found that 55 percent were male, while 45 percent were female. Furthermore, 95 percent identified themselves as white, 1.5 percent as African American, 1 percent as Hispanic, and 3 percent as “other.” The survey also determined the percentages of people from different socioeconomic classes; 3 percent were in the upper-class, 30 percent considered themselves to be in the upper-middle-class, 43 percent were in the middle-class, 18 percent were in the lower-middle-class, and 5 percent associated themselves with the lower-class. Surprisingly, it was also found that all regions of the country were close to being equally represented, however, the northeastern United States had the largest percentage of 30 percent. [14] Unlike the original, Woodstock ’99 only attracted around 200,000 people. While its crowd appeared to be equally diverse, the concert was not as successful overall because these concertgoers did not share the same strong bond concerning current issues in society. There were many conflicting values and beliefs, therefore preventing the bond that tied everyone together peacefully at Woodstock ’69 from being achieved at Woodstock ‘99. The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ...


Commercialization

Though the intention of Woodstock ’99 was peace, love, and understanding, they failed to capture the essence of the original Woodstock Festival. The commercialization of the event led concertgoers away from the symbolism and history of Woodstock ‘69, to things more tangible such as vendor tents and e-mail stations. [15] The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ...


Woodstock ’69 was funded by John Roberts and Joel Rosenman, two of the four original founders, whereas Woodstock ’99 was sponsored by dozens of corporations. Ticket prices rose from $18 in 1969 to $135[16] in 1999 generating enough money to pay all of the performers. The media was very involved in Woodstock ’99. MTV had cameras backstage with the performers, at campsites, and in the mosh pits. Also, unlike Woodstock ’69, you could order the whole weekend on pay-per-view, making it accessible to everyone that wanted to see it, not just those that believed in the cause. The commercialization was so profound that some critics theorize the directors may have intentionally shut off the water in order to charge $4 -$5 for a bottle of water in the middle of summer[17] fall of which money would have gone to Michael Lang. John Fiske, a researcher in popular and mass culture, says that “it is they (producers) who make a profit out of its manufacture and sale, and the consumer who is exploited insofar as the price he or she pays is inflated beyond the material cost to include as much profit as the producer is able to make”[18] The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Woodstock ’69 was “experienced as participatory, communitarian, and non-commercial.” [19] However, once the Woodstock trademark took hold it was seen as nothing more than “crass commercialization”[20] and involved “concert organizers who gouged the kids with grossly overpriced water, beer, and food”. ”[21] Morello, the guitarist for Rage Against the Machine “suggested an affinity between the looters and rapists at the event and the corporate entities that sponsored it.” [22] The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... Rage Against the Machine is an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1991. ...


Authenticity

In an attempt to capitalize on the successes of the original Woodstock in 1969, the 30th anniversary music festival failed to achieve the freethinking idealism embodying the first. “Woodstock ’94 could best be described as having been all about the music of the mid-1990’s generation. The 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Festival had been all about peace, love, understanding, and the music. The thirtieth anniversary concert, Woodstock 1999, was anything but” [23] Free from “flower power” energy and the countercultural movement that marked Woodstock ’69, Woodstock ’99 sought to extract profitability from the historical profoundness of the original. The music festival in 1999 exploited the commerciality and profit potential of Woodstock ’69 and depleted it of its symbolic and historical relevance. The original concert could only be loosely used as a template because “‘Woodstock’ exists not as a single historical entity, but as a multiplicity of symbols and signs. It exists in many incarnations. It has to be understood as signifying many different experiences and ideas and moments.” [24] Woodstock III exists merely as a large-scale music event that diverged so drastically from the first that it was unable it emulate or preserve its authenticity or spirit. The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... A bus covered with Hippie slogans and flowers Flower power was a slogan used by hippies in the late 1960s and early 1970s as a symbol of the non-violence ideology. ... Counterculture (also counter-culture) is a sociological word used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day,[1] the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... Look up authenticity, authentic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Performers

The intention of Woodstock ‘99 was based on recreating the tremendous success of the first Woodstock festival in 1969. However, the performers of the ‘69 concert and the performers of the ‘99 Woodstock concert were surrounded by a different political climate and current events. Those performing at each concert had substantially contrasting experiences and world views, therefore making the two concerts distinct based merely on the performers alone (not including commercialism or audience demographics). The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ...


The original Woodstock concert was based on the politically turbulent era of the 1960s that heavily revolved around protest against military conflict, drugs and racial inequalities. The performers of that concert included people like Joan Baez, Jimi Hendrix, Country Joe & The Fish, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Jefferson Airplane, these performer’s songs and lyrics were intended to create knowledge of the Vietnam War and their disapproval of it. [25] This was especially true for Joan Baez and Creedence Clearwater Revival, as their songs revolved around protest of the Vietnam War. Creedence Clearwater Revival songs opposing the Vietnam War include "Run through the Jungle]” and their chart topper “Fortunate Son”. “Fortunate Son” has been used many times in pop culture movies like Forrest Gump and Platoon as a means to reference the Vietnam War. The other main issue of Woodstock '69 was in bringing awareness to racial inequalities and the civil rights movement. Joan Baez also touched on the civil rights movement with songs she performed at Woodstock, such as “We Shall Overcome” and “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot”. A significant disparity between the two music festivals can be attributed to the fact that the United States was in peacetime during 1999. Woodstock may refer to: Woodstock Music and Art Festival, a 1969 U.S. rock festival which inspired a 1970 Warner Bros. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Country Joe and the Fish was a rock music/folk music band known for musical protests against the Vietnam War, from 1965 to 1970. ... Creedence Clearwater Revival (commonly referred to by its initials CCR or simply as Creedence) was an American rock band, which consisted of John Fogerty (vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano), Tom Fogerty (guitar, vocals, piano), Stu Cook (bass guitar, vocals), and Doug Clifford (drums, percussion, vocals). ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Creedence Clearwater Revival (commonly referred to by its initials CCR or simply as Creedence) was an American rock band, which consisted of John Fogerty (vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano), Tom Fogerty (guitar, vocals, piano), Stu Cook (bass guitar, vocals), and Doug Clifford (drums, percussion, vocals). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Creedence Clearwater Revival (commonly referred to by its initials CCR or simply as Creedence) was an American rock band, which consisted of John Fogerty (vocals, guitar, harmonica, piano), Tom Fogerty (guitar, vocals, piano), Stu Cook (bass guitar, vocals), and Doug Clifford (drums, percussion, vocals). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Fortunate Son is an episode of Star Trek: Enterprise Fortunate Son is a song originally performed by Creedence Clearwater Revival on their Album Willy and the Poor Boys Fortunate Son was a Pulitzer Prize-winning autobiography by Lewis Puller Fortunate Son was a controversial biography of George W. Bush by... Fortunate Son is an episode of Star Trek: Enterprise Fortunate Son is a song originally performed by Creedence Clearwater Revival on their Album Willy and the Poor Boys Fortunate Son was a Pulitzer Prize-winning autobiography by Lewis Puller Fortunate Son was a controversial biography of George W. Bush by... For other uses, see Forrest Gump (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Vietnam War film. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1960-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1960-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... We Shall Overcome is a protest song that became a key anthem of the US civil rights movement. ... Swing Low, Sweet Chariot is a United States African-American Negro spiritual song. ...


The performers in Woodstock 1999 were not speaking or singing about military conflict or racial injustice. Performers in 1999 included Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Dave Matthews Band, Limp Bizkit, Kid Rock, Sheryl Crow and many others. These performer’s songs had a great mixture of topics and issues. For example, arguably the most popular band of the 1999 Woodstock concert, the Red Hot Chili Peppers performed songs about sex, drugs, politics, rebellion, aggression, and even death; whereas the performer’s content at the original Woodstock was not as diverse. [26] Also, the type of individual performers were much more diverse, not just based on the content of their music. For example, rappers DMX, Wyclef Jean, The Roots and Ice Cube performed at Woodstock '99. [27] There was even a “Christian/Faith" band, Creed, that participated in Woodstock '99. The Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... Dave Matthews Band in concert Dave Matthews Band is an American jam band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1991 by singer and guitarist Dave Matthews, bassist Stefan Lessard, Leroi Moore, who plays a wide variety of instruments from the saxophone to the flute, violin player Boyd Tinsley, drummer Carter... Limp Bizkit is a nu metal band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Robert James Ritchie (born January 17, 1971 in Romeo, Michigan), better known as Kid Rock, is an American musician. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American singer-songwriter and musician. ... The Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... DMX can mean: DMX, alias for Earl Simmons, American Rap artist DMX Krew, an electronic music producer Digital Multiplex or DMX-512, a lighting communications protocol. ... Nelust Wyclef Jean (IPA: ) (born October 17, 1972) is a Haitian-American rapper, guitarist, producer, and member of the hip hop trio The Fugees. ... The Roots, also variously known as The Legendary Roots Crew, The Fifth Dynasty, The Square Roots and The Foundation, are an influential, Grammy-winning hip-hop band based out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, famed for a heavily jazzy sound and live instrumentation. ... Media:Example. ... This article is about the American Post-Grunge band. ...


The 1999 concert and 1969 festival are two distinct concerts, however, the only similarity comes in the songs and performances about drugs, as drugs continue to have relevance within popular music despite generational gaps. Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


Performer List

Rage Against the Machine burning the American flag onstage while playing "Killing in the Name" during Woodstock 1999.
Rage Against the Machine burning the American flag onstage while playing "Killing in the Name" during Woodstock 1999.

2 Skinnee Js is the name of a musical band, sometimes characterized as nerdcore hip hop. ... Alanis redirects here. ... The Brian Setzer Orchestra is a swing band formed in 1990 by Stray Cats frontman Brian Setzer. ... Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American singer, pianist, accordion player, and songwriter. ... Buckcherry is a Grammy-nominated Los Angeles, California hard rock and glam metal band formed in 1995. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Collective Soul is an American rock band from Stockbridge, Georgia. ... Counting Crows is a rock band originating from Berkeley, California. ... Gigolo Aunts is an alternative rock band formed in 1981 in Potsdam, New York as Sniper. ... This article is about the American Post-Grunge band. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer-songwriter and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Djoliba Athletic Club is a Malian soccer club and one of the two biggest teams in Mali alongside the Stade Malien. ... Earl Simmons (born on December 18, 1970 in Mt. ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... Erykah Badu (born Erica Abi Wright, February 26, 1971, in Dallas, Texas) is an American neo-soul, R&B/hip hop artist whose work crosses over into jazz. ... Everclear is a rock band formed in Portland, Oregon, USA, in 1992. ... Everlast (born Erik Schrody, August 18, 1969 in Valley Stream, New York) is an American singer-songwriter, known for his genre-crossing mix of rap and acoustic-based rock music. ... FatBoy Slim (born Quentin Leo Cook on July 31, 1963,[1] also known as Norman Cook) is a British big beat musician. ... G. Love & Special Sauce is an alternative hip-hop band from Philadelphia. ... For other persons named George Clinton, see George Clinton (disambiguation). ... For the Alice in Chains song, see God Smack (song). ... Guster is an alternative rock band that is known for its live performances, unique sound, humor, and cult following formed by Adam Gardner, Ryan Miller, and Brian Rosenworcelin 1991 while attending Tufts University in Boston. ... Media:Example. ... Insane Clown Posse (commonly known as ICP) is an American rap duo originally from Wayne, Michigan but formed in the neighborhood of Delray. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Jamiroquai is a Grammy Award-winning English funk / soul / disco band. ... For R&B singer Jewell Caples, see Jewell (singer). ... John Alec Entwistle (October 9, 1944 – June 27, 2002) was an English bass guitarist, songwriter, singer, and horn player, who was best known as the bass guitarist for the rock band The Who. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... Robert James Ritchie (born January 17, 1971 in Romeo, Michigan), better known as Kid Rock, is an American musician. ... This article is about the band. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ... Robby Krieger (born January 8, 1946) is an American rock and roll guitarist and songwriter from Los Angeles, California. ... Limp Bizkit is a nu metal band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Look up lit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Live (IPA pronunciation: , rhymes with five)[2] (also typeset as LIVE) is an American alternative rock band from York, Pennsylvania, comprised of Ed Kowalczyk (lead vocals and guitar), Chad Taylor (lead guitar), Patrick Dahlheimer (bass guitar) and Chad Gracey (drums). ... Los Lobos is an American rock band, heavily influenced by rock and roll, Tex-Mex, country music, folk, R&B, blues, and traditional Spanish and Mexican music such as boleros and norteños. ... Megadeth is an American thrash metal band led by founder, frontman, guitarist, and songwriter Dave Mustaine. ... Marty Friedman was the lead guitarist for the thrash metal band Megadeth for a period of almost twelve years (1988 to 2000). ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Mickey Hart (born September 11, 1943) is a percussionist and musicologist. ... Michael James Ness (born April 3, 1962) is a guitarist, vocalist, and chief songwriter for the punk rock band Social Distortion. ... Moby (born Richard Melville Hall, September 11, 1965) is an American songwriter, musician and singer. ... moe. ... For other uses, see Muse (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Offspring (disambiguation). ... Oleander is a Sacramento, California-based alternative band (named the poisonous wildflower oleander), composed of Fred Nelson Jr. ... OLP redirects here. ... Particle is a jam band formed in Los Angeles in 2000. ... Rage Against the Machine is an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1991. ... Image File history File links RATM_-_Burningamp. ... Image File history File links RATM_-_Burningamp. ... Rage Against the Machine is an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1991. ... Burning the Flag of the United States Flag desecration is a blanket term applied to various acts that intentionally deface a flag, most often a national flag (though other flags can be defaced as well). ... Killing in the Name was the first single released by Rage Against the Machine from their self-titled album, and is arguably the bands signature song. ... The Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... Reveille was a nu metal/rap metal group from Harvard,Chelmsford, and Shirley Massachusetts. ... The Roots, also variously known as The Legendary Roots Crew, The Fifth Dynasty, The Square Roots and The Foundation, are an influential, Grammy-winning hip-hop band based out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, famed for a heavily jazzy sound and live instrumentation. ... Rusted Root is a band from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania known for their fusion of Grateful Dead-style bluegrass rock with a strong percussion section that draws from African, Latin, Native American, and Middle Eastern influences. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... Sevendust is an American alternative metal band from Atlanta, Georgia. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American singer-songwriter and musician. ... Spitfire may refer to: Supermarine Spitfire, a single-seat fighter plane used in World War II Triumph Spitfire, a small two-seat British sports car from Triumph Motor Company Spitfire, a slang term for a highly-excitable or passionate person, especially a woman. ... Back: Jason Hann, Michael Travis, Billy Nershi, Kieth Moseley Front: Kyle Hollingsworth, Michael Kang The String Cheese Incident, one of the bands involved in the jam movement of the mid-to-late 1990s, formed in Crested Butte, Colorado in 1993, originally playing local gigs at ski resorts in exchange for... The Tragically Hip is a Canadian rock band from Kingston, Ontario, consisting of Gordon Downie (lead vocals and occasional acoustic guitar), Paul Langlois (guitar), Rob Baker (guitar), Gord Sinclair (bass) and Johnny Fay (drums). ... The Umbilical Brothers are an Australian comedy duo, David Collins and Shane Dundas. ... // Vertical Horizon was formed in 1990 by Georgetown University undergrads Matthew Scannell and Keith Kane; after graduation in 1992 the duo relocated to Boston and, in 1992, self-released their debut album There and Back Again. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Nelust Wyclef Jean (IPA: ) (born October 17, 1972) is a Haitian-American rapper, guitarist, producer, and member of the hip hop trio The Fugees. ...

Cancellations

This article is about the singer. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... This article is about the band. ... Sugar Ray is a rock band from Newport Beach, Orange County, California. ... Geoffrey Arnold (Jeff) Beck (born June 24, 1944 to Arnold and Ethel Beck in Wallington, Greater London) is an English rock guitarist. ...

Album

The festival is resumed on a two-disc set, Woodstock 1999. The album features 32 performing artists, and was released on Epic Records in October 1999. Woodstock 1999 is a two-disc set, which documents the Woodstock 1999 festival. ... Epic Records is an American record label, owned and operated by Sony BMG. // Epic was launched originally as a jazz and classical music label in 1953 by CBS. Its bright-yellow, black and blue logo became a familiar trademark for many jazz and classical releases. ...


See also

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... Woodstock 79 was a rock concert that took place in 1979, in honor of the 10th Anniversary of the original Woodstock Festival. ... Woodstock 89 was a rock concert that took place in August 1989 on the site of the original Woodstock concert of 1969 as a spontaneous celebration of the events 20th anniversary. ... Woodstock 94 poster design Woodstock 94 is a rock concert that was held in order to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the original Woodstock concert of 1969. ... Przystanek Woodstock, Żary 2003 Przystanek Woodstock, Kostrzyn nad Odrą 2005 Przystanek Woodstock (Polish for Woodstock Gathering; English-language materials often refer simply to the Woodstock Festival) is an annual free rock music festival in Poland, inspired by and named for the Woodstock Festival, that has taken place since 1995. ...

References

  1. ^ Woodstock '99: What the Hell Happened?. U.S. Music Vault (1999-07-26). Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  2. ^ Jeff Stark (1999-07-27). What A Riot. Salon. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  3. ^ Seven arrested in connection with Woodstock '99 fracas. CNN (1999-07-26). Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  4. ^ Steven Rochlin (1999). Woodstock 99. enjoythemusic.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  5. ^ 'Not the real Woodstock; they messed up'. CNN (1999-07-26). Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  6. ^ MTV's Loder flees out of control fest. USA Today (1999-07-27). Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  7. ^ Repeated Violence. The Lantern. Retrieved on 2007-09-05.
  8. ^ Bill Wyman (1999-07-29). "Three Days of Peace, Love and Rape.". Salon. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  9. ^ Police investigate alleged rapes at Woodstock '99. CNN (1999-07-29). Retrieved on 2007-09-05.
  10. ^ Tiber, Elliot. “1969 Woodstock Festival & Concert”. Retrieved on 2008-04-24.
  11. ^ “The Players-Woodstock Music Festival-Interview”. Retrieved on 2008-04-24.
  12. ^ Bennet, Andy (2004), Remembering Woodstock, England: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., p. 54 
  13. ^ Perone, James (2005), Woodstock: An Encyclopedia of the Music and Art Fair, Conneticut: Greenwood Press, p. 27 
  14. ^ Perone, James (2005), Woodstock: An Encyclopedia of the Music and Art Fair, Conneticut: Greenwood Press, p. 115 
  15. ^ Maglitta, Joseph (1999), "Woodstock '99: Think E-Commerce, Dude", Computerworld 33 (33): 42 
  16. ^ Bennet, Andy (2004), Remembering Woodstock, England: Ashgate Publishing Limited, p. 36 
  17. ^ Caldwell, Christopher (1999), "When in Rome…", National Review 51 (16): 29 
  18. ^ Fiske, John (1989), Understanding Popular Culture, London and New York: Routledge, p. 11 
  19. ^ Bennet, Andy (2004), Remembering Woodstock, England: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., p. 36 
  20. ^ Gottdiener, Mark (2000), New Forms of Consumption: Consumers, Culture, and Commodification, Rowman & Littlefield, p. 220 
  21. ^ Gottdiener, Mark (2000), New Forms of Consumption: Consumers, Culture, and Commodification, Rowman & Littlefield, p. 220 
  22. ^ Gottdiener, Mark (2000), New Forms of Consumption: Consumers, Culture, and Commodification, Rowman & Littlefield, p. 220 
  23. ^ Perone, James (2005), Woodstock: An Encyclopedia of the Music and Art Fair, Conneticut: Greenwood Press, p. 85 
  24. ^ Bennet, Andy (2004), Remembering Woodstock, England: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., p. 30 
  25. ^ Woodstock 1969.
  26. ^ Biography Red Hot Chili Peppers.
  27. ^ Woodstock 1999 Album.

Wartofsky, Alona (1999-07-27). Woodstock '99 Goes Up in Smoke. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-09-05. Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... Woodstock 79 was a rock concert that took place in 1979, in honor of the 10th Anniversary of the original Woodstock Festival. ... Woodstock 89 was a rock concert that took place in August 1989 on the site of the original Woodstock concert of 1969 as a spontaneous celebration of the events 20th anniversary. ... Woodstock 94 poster design Woodstock 94 is a rock concert that was held in order to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the original Woodstock concert of 1969. ... Poster promoting the festival The Monterey International Pop Music Festival took place from June 16 to June 18, 1967. ... The Schaefer Music Festival was a music festival which had been held in the summers between 1967 and 1976 at the Trump Wollman Skating Rink in New York Citys Central Park. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Atlantic City Pop Festival took place in 1969 on August 1, 2 and 3rd at the Atlantic City race track, two weeks before the better known Woodstock Festival. ... The 1969 Isle Of Wight Festival was held on August 30 - August 31, 1969. ... For other uses, see Altamont. ... Poster from the movie Festival Express The Festival Express was a 1970 tour of Canada by several musical acts, including The Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, and The Band. ... The Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music was a music festival held at the Bath and Wells Showground on the 27-28th June 1970. ... Poster for the event The second Atlanta International Pop Festival was a music festival held at the Middle Georgia Raceway in Byron, Georgia. ... Poster for the Isle of Wight Festival 1970 - Artist: David Fairbrother Roe The 1970 Isle of Wight Festival was held on August 26 - 31, 1970. ... Wattstax DVD Cover Wattstax was a festival at the Los Angeles Coliseum on August 20, 1972 organized by Memphiss Stax Records to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the Watts riots. ... Poster for the event The Summer Jam at Watkins Glen, also sometimes referred to as the Watkins Glen Festival, was a 1973 rock festival which received the Guinness Book of World Records entry for Largest audience at a pop festival. Up to 600,000 people came to the Watkins Glen... California Jam was a rock music festival concert held at the Ontario Motor Speedway in Ontario, California on April 6, 1974. ... The World Series of Rock was originally a recurring day-long multi-act concert performed in Cleveland Municipal Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio, on Lake Erie, from 1974 through 1980,[1] except for two concerts held in 1976 in Chicago, Illinois. ... Heatwave promotional poster Heatwave was a rock festival August 23, 1980, outside of Toronto, Canada at Mosport Park, Bowmanville, Ontario. ... The US Festivals were two early 1980s music and culture festivals sponsored by Steve Wozniak of Apple Computer, and broadcast live on Pay Per View TV. The first was held Labor Day weekend in September 1982 and the second was Memorial Day weekend in May 1983. ... A benefit concert is a concert featuring musicians, comedians, or other performers that is held for a charitable purpose, often directed at a specific and immediate humanitarian crisis. ... This article is about the concert and film. ... Concerts for the People of Kampuchea was a series of concert and also is a double album from Wings, The Who, Queen, Elvis Costello, The Pretenders, The Clash and many more artists of the higlights from series of concerts in Hammersmith Odeon to raise money for the victims of Pol... Party in the Park is the generic name given to popular music concerts organised by Capital Radio Group in the UK, typically in various large parks during the summer. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ... Farm Aid started as a benefit concert on September 22, 1985, in Champaign, Illinois, held to raise money for family farmers in the United States. ... The Nelson Mandela 70th Birthday Tribute was a concert event held on June 11, 1988 at the Wembley Stadium, London. ... The Moscow Music Peace Festival was a one-time gathering of high-profile hard rock acts who put on a concert for the people in Moscow, Soviet Union in 1989 to promote world peace and establish international cooperation in fighting the drug war in Russia. ... Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert poster The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert for AIDS Awareness was an open-air concert held on Easter Monday, April 20, 1992 at Londons Wembley Stadium, televised live worldwide to an estimated audience of one billion viewers. ... NetAid was a largely unsuccessful concert event that took place on October 9, 1999, hoping to harness the power of the Internet to raise money and awareness for the Jubilee 2000 campaign. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... America: A Tribute to Heroes was a benefit concert organized in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and United States television networks. ... The Party at the Palace was a pop concert held in London in 2002. ... Molson Canadian Rocks for Toronto is a benefit rock concert that was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on July 30, 2003. ... 46664 is the prisoner number of Nelson Mandela from his imprisonment in 1964 to his release in 1990, and the title used for a series of AIDS charity concerts (the motto: Aids is not a disease it is a human rights issue). Mandela is sometimes referred to, reverently, as prisoner... Tsunami Aid: A Concert of Hope was a worldwide benefit held for the tsunami victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake. ... WaveAid was a fund raising concert held on Saturday the 25th of January, 2005 as a means for raising funds for the victims of the Boxing Day Tsunami. ... Official Live8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 was a series of concurrent benefit concerts that took place on 2 July 2005, in the G8 states and in South Africa. ... A Concert for Hurricane Relief was an hour-long, music and celebrity driven live benefit broadcast, sponsored by the NBC Universal Television Group, in response to the hurricane Katrina tragedy in USA, in 2005. ... From the Big Apple to the Big Easy were NYCs Concerts for the Gulf Coast. ... Concert for Diana was a concert held at the new Wembley Stadium in London, United Kingdom in honour of the late Diana, Princess of Wales on 1 July 2007, which would have been her 46th birthday; 2007 is also the 10th anniversary of her death. ... Live Earth was a series of worldwide concerts held on 7 July 2007, that initiated a three-year campaign to combat climate change. ... Musicians United for Safe Energy was a group founded in 1979 by Jackson Browne, Graham Nash, Bonnie Raitt, and John Hall of Orleans. ... A Conspiracy of Hope was a short tour of six benefit concerts on behalf of Amnesty International that took place in the United States during June 1986. ... Human Rights Now! was a worldwide tour of twenty benefit concerts on behalf of Amnesty International that took place over six weeks in 1988. ... Concept Vote for Change was a politically motivated American popular music concert tour that took place in October 2004. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... A concert comprises a performance, usually involving some degree of formality, and particularly a performance featuring music. ... All Tomorrows Parties logo projected at festival. ... Acoustic Christmas (short title: Acoustic X-Mas) is an annual concert run by the Los Angeles, California radio station KROQ. Since its inception in 1990, the concert has attracted increasingly popular alternative rock bands and singers. ... The Austin City Limits Music Festival is an annual three-day music and art festival in Austin, Texass Zilker Park. ... The Bamboozle is an annual rain-or-shine, two-day music festival held in New Jersey. ... Memphis in May is a month long festival held in Memphis, Tennessee. ... The FIB or Festival Internacional de Benicàssim (Benicàssim International Festival) is a famous music festival held in Benicàssim (Spain). ... The Big Day Out (BDO) is an annual music festival that tours Australia and New Zealand which originated in Sydney in 1992. ... The Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival is a four day annual music festival created and produced by Superfly Productions and AC Entertainment , first held in 2002. ... Look up bumbershoot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the annual music and arts festival. ... The Main Stage of Cornerstone has hosted such acts as Five Iron Frenzy, Pedro the Lion, P.O.D., MxPx,Underoath, Blindside and Switchfoot. ... Aerial view of the Creation Northeast festival Creation Festival is a series of popular Christian music festivals held in the United States. ... The Download Festival is a three day music festival held annually at the spiritual home of rock music in England: Donington Park (which hosted the Monsters of Rock Festivals between 1980 and 1996, and 2002s Ozzfest). ... The Edgefest summer tour was first established by Toronto radio station CFNY in the late 1980s and took place at Molson Park in Barrie, Ontario. ... Electric Picnic is an annual music festival which has been staged since 2004 in Stradbally Hall, Stradbally, County Laois in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Eurockéennes de Belfort is one of Frances largest rock music festivals. ... EXIT (also known as State of EXIT) is an annual summer music festival in Petrovaradin fortress of Novi Sad, Serbia. ... The Family Values Tour was created by the band Korn in 1998 to be an annual nu metal, Alternative Metal, Heavy Metal, Hard Rock and Rap tour. ... Fuji Rock Festival is an annual rock festival organized by Smash Japan, held in Naeba, Japan. ... G3 is an almost annual live music show and concert tour featuring three select guitarists of the generation; hence its name. ... The Get Happy Tour is a regular concert package tour that takes place in the United States and the United Kingdom. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury or Glasto, is the largest[1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ... Graspop Metal Meeting is a metal festival in Dessel, Belgium that has taken place each year since 1996. ... For other uses, see Horde. ... Hellfest Summer Open Air is an extreme music festival held annually in Clisson (France) since 2006. ... The Hurricane Festival, also just Hurricane, is a music festival that takes place in Scheeßel near Bremen, Germany, usually every June. ... Inland Invasion Invasion is an annual rock festival organized by KROQ radio first held in 2001. ... The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... This article details all the concerts held to date in the grounds of Knebworth House in the village of Knebworth. ... Le Zénith is the name of a number of famous concert venues in France. ... Lilith Fair was a concert tour and traveling music festival, founded by musician Sarah McLachlan, that featured female musicians; it ran from 1997 to 1999. ... Lollapalooza is an American music festival featuring rock, alternative rock, hip hop, and punk rock bands, dance and comedy performances, and craft booths. ... The entrance to the Lowlands festival ground in 2004. ... Metalcamp is a heavy metal music festival held annually in Slovenia since 2004. ... The Michigan Womyns Music Festival (MWMF) is an international feminist music festival occurring every year in August in Hart, Michigan. ... Monsters of Rock was an annual rock music festival in England held every August at the Castle Donington racetrack from 1980–1996 (with the odd exception, and a one-off comeback in 2006). ... The Montreux Jazz Festival is the best-known music festival in Switzerland. ... The North East Art Rock Festival, or NEARfest for short, is a two-day event celebrating the resurgence of art rock and eclectic music in the United States and around the world. ... The Opener Festival, commonly called Heineken Opener Festival in the name of its main sponsor, is a contemporary music festival held in Gdynia, Poland. ... Oxegen is an annual music festival, held since 2004, sponsored by Heineken International. ... Witnness was a music festival sponsored by Guinness which ran in the Republic of Ireland from 2000 to 2003. ... Ozzfest is an annual tour of the United States (and in some years, Europe) featuring performances by many heavy metal and hard rock musical groups. ... Paléo Festival de Nyon - 2005. ... Pentaport Rock Festival is the rock festival which is held in Incheon, Korea during July 28 ~ 30, 2006 for the first time. ... The Phoenix festival was set up by Mean Fiddler as an alternative to the established Glastonbury Festival. ... Pinkpop Festival or Pinkpop in short, is an annual rock festival held at Landgraaf, Netherlands. ... The Pitchfork Music Festival is an annual summer music festival organized by Pitchfork Media held in Union Park, Chicago. ... Project Revolution redirects here. ... Przystanek Woodstock, Żary 2003 Przystanek Woodstock, Kostrzyn nad Odrą 2005 Przystanek Woodstock (Polish for Woodstock Gathering; English-language materials often refer simply to the Woodstock Festival) is an annual free rock music festival in Poland, inspired by and named for the Woodstock Festival, that has taken place since 1995. ... Pukkelpop is an annual music festival taking place near Hasselt, Belgium. ... Radio 1s Big Weekend (previously known as One Big Weekend) is a music festival run by BBC Radio 1. ... Leeds Festival redirects here. ... Queen at Rock in Rio (1985) Rock in Rio is a series of rock festivals held in Brazil and later in Portugal. ... RockNess is an annual dance concert staged by Loudsound and Slingshot. ... Rock Werchter is a music festival in the village of Werchter in Belgium. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Sasquatch! Festival is a music festival held annually at the Gorge Amphitheatre in George, Washington. ... Red Hot Chili Peppers at Slane Castle Slane Concert (often referred as just Slane) is a concert held most years since 1981 in Slane Castle in Slane village, County Meath, in the Republic of Ireland. ... Downtown Austin, Texas, where SXSW is held each spring Bloc Party performing at Stubbs BBQ in 2007 Carrie Rodriguez, a SXSW 2007 performer Morrissey at SXSW 2006 South by Southwest (SXSW) is a set of interactive, film, and music festivals and conferences that have taken place every spring in... Street Scene is a music festival held each summer in San Diego, California. ... TMN Sudoeste is a large, four-day music festival that began in 1996 and takes place every August near Zambujeira do Mar, in southern Portugal. ... The Summer Sonic Festival is an annual 2 day rock festival held at the same time in Osaka and near Tokyo. ... History: (Timeline and Samples) Genres Classical - Folk - Hardcore - Hip hop - Opera - Operett - Pop - Reggea - Rock - Wedding pop - Wedding rock Organisations Mahasz Awards Golden Giraffe Charts MAHASZ TOP 40 album, MAHASZ Kislemez TOP 10, Dance TOP 40 Festivals Sziget, Mayday, Táncháztalálkozó, Miskolc Opera Festival Media Radio Petőfi... T in the Park is a major music festival that has been held annually in Scotland since 1994. ... T On The Fringe, sponsored by Tennents Lager, is a music festival which runs as part of the Edinburgh Festival. ... For the North American spin-off of the rock festival, see Virgin Festival For the Australian spin-off, see V Festival (Australia) The V Festival is an annual music festival in England, the first to be held simultaneously at two sites - currently Hylands Park in Chelmsford and Weston Park in... For the original rock festival held in England, see V Festival Virgin Festival is a rock festival held in the United States and Canada, a spin-off from the V Festival held in the UK. In North America the Virgin name is used in full to increase brand association, compared... The 2005 Vegoose Logo Vegoose is an annual Halloween music and arts festival that first took place in 2005 in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... Since its 1999 debut, the VOODOO MUSIC EXPERIENCE (http://www. ... Vicentico performing on Vive Latino 2005 Vive Latino is an annual rock music festival held in Mexico City. ... For the German town, see Wacken, Schleswig-Holstein. ... Wakarusa Music and Camping Festival is a four-day weekend music festival held annually in early June just outside of Lawrence, Kansas at Clinton State Park. ... Warped Tour is a touring music and extreme sports festival. ... Wave-Gotik-Treffen (German das Treffen means meeting) is an annual festival for music and arts in Leipzig, Germany. ... Weenie Roast is a multi-artist alternative rock concert, presented annually by the Los Angeles, California, USA radio station KROQ, beginning in 1993. ... The O2 Wireless Festival is a music festival in England that takes place every year in both Hyde Park, London and at Harewood House, Leeds. ... The festivals logo, the Womad lion World of Music, Arts and Dance (WOMAD) is a festival started in Shepton Mallet, England in 1982. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Woodstock 1999 - Uncyclopedia (489 words)
Woodstock 1999 was the image of Peace and Love that had originally been invisioned by its creator, Gatsby.
This was due to the riots of the 1969 Woodstock.
Woodstock was not only enjoyed by the people who attended it, but by the general public because of MTV's quality coverage of the event (MTV's coverage of the 1969 Woodstock had to be cut short due to violent riots of the third kind).
Woodstock Festival - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2586 words)
The festival bears the name "Woodstock", because it was originally scheduled to take place in the town of Woodstock, in Ulster County; however, the town offered no appropriate site to host such a large event due to their belief that over a million people would attend.
Woodstock did have some amount of crime and other misbehavior, as well as a fatality from drug overdoses, an accidental death caused by an occupied sleeping bag being run over by a tractor, and one participant died from falling off a scaffold.
Woodstock began as a profit-making venture; it only became a free festival after it became obvious that the concert was drawing hundreds of thousands more people than the organizers had prepared for, and that the entry gates erected had been torn down by eager arrivals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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