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Encyclopedia > Wooden iron

Wooden Iron is a polemical term often used in philosophic rhetoric to describe the impossibility of an opposing argument. The term is a German proverbial oxymoron or sideroxylon which synthesizes the concept of the "wooden", which is organic, with the concept of "iron" which is inorganic. Such a contradictio in adjecto is a logical inconsistency. It occurs when a modifying adjective opposes its noun, as in "square circle," "freezing fire," "boiling snow," or "hard liquid." Look up Polemic on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Polemic is the art or practice of inciting disputation or causing controversy, for example in religious, philosophical, or political matters. ... Rhetoric (from Greek ρήτωρ, rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is the art or technique of persuasion, usually through the use of language. ... Look up Oxymoron in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Sideroxylon grandiflorum Tambalacoque (also called the dodo tree) Sideroxylon grandiflorum formerly Calvaria major, is a long-lived tree in the family Sapotaceae, endemic to Mauritius. ... Organic life Organic life is life which is cellular, carbon-and-water-based with complex organization, having a metabolism, a capacity to grow, respond to stimuli, reproduce and—through natural selection—adapt. ... Inorganic chemistry is the branch of chemistry concerned with the properties and reactions of inorganic compounds. ...


Arthur Schopenhauer used the term extensively in The World as Will and Representation (1819) in his critiques of Immanuel Kant. For his argument against absolutes he sarcastically wrote "... the categorical imperative leaps into the world, in order to command there with its unconditioned ought—a scepter of wooden iron." (See Payne's trans., WWR 1:523.) His chapter titled "On the Fundamental View of Idealism" further describes his postion on subjectivity by using the term to demonstrate the difference between "the representation of the intellect" and the "subject" itself. In this dialogue between intellect and matter he wrote: "Whoever thinks me away, and then believes he can still think of you, is involved in a gross delusion; for your existence outside my representation is a direct contradiction, a wooden-iron." (See Payne's trans., WWR 2:17.) Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher. ... The World as Will and Representation (original German title, Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung; sometimes translated as The World as Will and Idea) is the central work of Arthur Schopenhauer and one of the most important philosophical works of the 19th century. ... Immanuel Kant (22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804), was a German philosopher from Königsberg in East Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia). ... This article is in need of attention. ...


Friedrich Nietzsche, who was an avid Schopenhauer scholar, continued to employ the term throughout his writings in the latter half of the 19th century. Nietzsche's experience with philology also brought new meaning to the term. He attacked Moritz Carrière's so-called "real idealism" (see Notebooks Fall 1873—Winter 1873-74 30[16]). He used it to describe Richard Wagner's "infinite melody" (see Notebooks Fall 1881 11[198]). He also considered "unegoistic actions" and "unegoistic drives" to be examples Wooden Iron (see Notebooks Summer-Fall 1884 26[224]). He similarly dismissed philosophical concepts of "pure knowledge" and "thing in itself" (see Notebooks Summer-Fall 1884 26[413]). The term was also employed in his poetic attempts to criticize socialism and the building of a "free society" (see Book 5 of The Gay Science, §356). Philology is the study of ancient texts and languages. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... The Gay Science (German: Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (la gaya scienza)), which has been canonically translated thus by contemporaneous academia as instated by Walter Kaufmann since the 1960s, is a book written by Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1882 and followed by a second edition. ...


Hegel's writings abound in such self-contradictions. However, he openly affirmed them and considered the law of thought "a is not not-a" to inadequately reflect reality. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (August 27, 1770 - November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher born in Stuttgart, Württemberg, in present-day southwest Germany. ... There were four classic laws of thought recognised in European thought of the seventeenth and eighteenth century, which held sway also during nineteenth century (while subject to greater debate). ...


See also

Edmund Husserl Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859 - April 26, 1938, Freiburg) was a German philosopher, known as the father of phenomenology. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher. ... Immanuel Kant (22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804), was a German philosopher from Königsberg in East Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up Oxymoron in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Sideroxylon grandiflorum Tambalacoque (also called the dodo tree) Sideroxylon grandiflorum formerly Calvaria major, is a long-lived tree in the family Sapotaceae, endemic to Mauritius. ...

External links

  • "Wooden Iron? Husserlian Phenomenology Meets Cognitive Science"
  • "The Nietzsche Channel Message Board"

 
 

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