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Encyclopedia > Wonder Woman
Wonder Woman

Promotional art for Wonder Woman vol. 3, #5 (2006) by Terry Dodson
Publication information
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Historical: All Star Comics #8 (December 1941)
Modern: Wonder Woman vol. 2, #1 (February 1987)
Created by William Moulton Marston
In story information
Alter ego Princess Diana of Themyscira
Team affiliations Justice League
Themyscira
Notable aliases Diana Prince
Abilities

Wonder Woman is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston and one of the three characters to be continuously published by DC Comics since the company's inception in 1944.[1] Marston's wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston, and Olive Byrne, who lived with the couple in a polyamorous relationship,[2] served as exemplars for the character and greatly influenced her creation.[3] Wonder Woman first appeared in All Star Comics #8, published in December 1941. She is a founding member of the Justice League. Wonder Woman is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Comics universe who has appeared in several media, most notably: Wonder Woman, comic series from DC Comics. ... Image File history File links WonderWomanV5. ... Terrence Terry Dodson is an American comic book artist and penciller. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... Dr. William Moulton Marston (May 9, 1893 – May 2, 1947) was a psychologist, feminist theorist, and comic book writer who created the Wonder Woman character with his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Themyscirian Amazons Art by Phil Jimenez Themyscira is a fictional island nation in the DC Comics universe. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Close Quarters Combat. ... Comic book fiction traditionally features characters with superhuman, supernatural, or paranormal abilities, often referred to as superpowers (also spelled super-powers). ... In biology, regeneration is an organisms ability to replace body parts. ... For other uses, see illusion (disambiguation). ... Mind control (or thought control) has the premise that an outside source can control an individuals thinking, behavior or consciousness (either directly or more subtly). ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity that is created from ones imagination or from an adaption of an existing entity. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Dr. William Moulton Marston (May 9, 1893 – May 2, 1947) was a psychologist, feminist theorist, and comic book writer who created the Wonder Woman character with his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... For other uses, see Wife (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth Sadie Holloway Marston (1893 - 1993) was the co-creator of the comic book character, Wonder Woman with her husband, William Moulton Marston. ... Polyamory (from Greek (, literally “multiple”) and Latin (literally “love”)) is the desire, practice, or acceptance of having more than one loving, intimate relationship at a time with the full knowledge and consent of everyone involved. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...


In addition to comic books, the character has been in the media such as the famous 1975 to 1979 television adaptation starring Lynda Carter, as well as in animation like the Super Friends and Justice League animated series, including the recent Justice League: The New Frontier animated movie and a forthcoming animated feature due out soon. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Wonder Woman is an American television series based on the DC Comics comic book character Wonder Woman (which was co-created by William Moulton Marston and Elizabeth (Sadie) Holloway Marston). ... For the two Marvel Comics nurse characters, see Night Nurse (comics). ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ...


Princess Diana is a member of a fictional tribe of Amazons, based on the Amazons of Greek mythology. Her name is reflective of the mythological character, Diana or Artemis. Her mother is Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons. When Diana leaves the Amazons to travel to the world outside, she is known as both Wonder Woman, and as Princess Diana. As Wonder Woman, she was awarded several gifts by the Olympian gods, including the Lasso of Truth created from the Golden Girdle of Gaea and indestructible bracelets formed from the shield Aegis of Athena. For several years she was described in the splash page of each story, as "beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, swifter than Hermes, and stronger than Hercules." // The Amazons were a race of immortal super-women that lived on the magical Paradise Island. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The Diana of Versailles In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt, in literature the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis, though in cult she was Italic in origin. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... Queen Hippolyta is a DC Comics superheroine, based on Hippolyte, queen of the Amazons in Greek mythology, and is the mother of Wonder Woman. ... The Olympian Gods are mythological deities who appear in the Wonder Woman, Shazam and Aquaman comics. ... Wonder Woman holding the Lasso of Truth from Wonder Woman v2 #186. ... Diana discovers the long lost Golden Girdle of Gaea. ... The magical bracelets worn by Wonder Woman, Wonder Girl, and (formerly) the rest of the Amazons have been shown to be indestructible, or nearly so. ... For other uses, see Aegis (disambiguation). ... Comics vocabulary consists of many different techniques and images which a comic book artist employs in order to convey a narrative within the medium of comics. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Publication history

In an October 25, 1940 interview conducted by former student Olive Byrne (under the pseudonym "Olive Richard") and published in Family Circle, titled "Don't Laugh at the Comics", William Moulton Marston described what he saw as the great educational potential of comic books (a follow up article was published two years later in 1942).[4] This article caught the attention of comics publisher Max Gaines, who hired Marston as an educational consultant for National Periodicals and All-American Publications, two of the companies that would merge to form the future DC Comics. At that time, Marston decided to develop a new superhero. is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Interview (disambiguation). ... Family Circle is an American womens magazine published 15 times a year by Meredith Corporation. ... Dr. William Moulton Marston (May 9, 1893 – May 2, 1947) was a psychologist, feminist theorist, and comic book writer who created the Wonder Woman character with his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... Maxwell Charles Gaines a. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


In the early 1940s the DC line was dominated by superpowered male characters such as the Green Lantern, Batman, and its flagship character, Superman. According to the Fall 2001 issue of the Boston University alumni magazine, it was his wife Elizabeth's idea to create a female superhero: The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Elizabeth Sadie Holloway Marston (1893 - 1993) was the co-creator of the comic book character, Wonder Woman with her husband, William Moulton Marston. ...

William Moulton Marston, a psychologist already famous for inventing the polygraph (forerunner to the magic lasso), struck upon an idea for a new kind of superhero, one who would triumph not with fists or firepower, but with love. 'Fine,' said Elizabeth. 'But make her a woman.'[5]

Marston introduced the idea to Max Gaines, cofounder (along with Jack Liebowitz) of All-American Publications. Given the go-ahead, Marston developed Wonder Woman with Elizabeth (whom Marston believed to be a model of that era's unconventional, liberated woman).[6] In creating Wonder Woman, Marston was also inspired by Olive Byrne, who lived with the couple in a polygamous/polyamorous relationship.[7] Marston's pseudonym, Charles Moulton, combined his own and Gaines' middle names. Maxwell Charles Gaines a. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... The term polygamy (a Greek word meaning the practice of multiple marriage) is used in related ways in social anthropology, sociobiology, and sociology. ... Polyamory (from Greek (, literally “multiple”) and Latin (literally “love”)) is the desire, practice, or acceptance of having more than one loving, intimate relationship at a time with the full knowledge and consent of everyone involved. ... For other uses, see Alias. ...


Marston was the creator of a systolic blood-pressure measuring apparatus, which was crucial to the development of the polygraph (lie detector). Marston's experience with polygraphs convinced him that women were more honest and reliable than men, and could work more efficiently. This article is about the forensic instrument. ...


"Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who should, I believe, rule the world," Marston wrote.[8] Although Gloria Steinem placed Wonder Woman on the first standalone cover of Ms. in 1972, Marston, writing in an earlier time, designed Wonder Woman to represent a particular form of female empowerment. Feminism argues that women are equal to men and should be treated as such; Marston's representative of femininity is a 6-foot-tall Amazon wielding a golden lasso that forces adversaries to tell the truth. In Marston's mind, women not only held the potential to be as good as men: they could be superior to men. Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist icon, journalist and womens rights advocate. ... magazine Ms. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Feminists redirects here. ...


In a 1943 issue of The American Scholar, Marston wrote: Ralph Waldo Emerson Wikisource has original text related to this article: The American Scholar For the publication of Phi Beta Kappa, see The American Scholar (magazine) The American Scholar was a speech given by Ralph Waldo Emerson in 1837 to the Phi Beta Kappa Society in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

Not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength, and power. Not wanting to be girls, they don't want to be tender, submissive, peace-loving as good women are. Women's strong qualities have become despised because of their weakness. The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman.

Character History

Main article: Fictional history of Wonder Woman

Introduced in All Star Comics #8 in December 1941, Wonder Woman has endured multiple interpretations and adaptions since her inception. The details of her abilites, relationships and orgin have changed and evolved over time. Intitially, Wonder Woman is an Amazon champion, armed with bulletproof bracelets, magic lasso, and Amazonian training, who wins the right to return Steve Trevor to "Man's World" and fight the evil of the Nazis. While Wonder Woman fights both Nazis and crime, her appearances had a noted sexual subtext, leading to debates over whether it provided an outlet for Dr. Marston's sexual fantasies or whether it was meant to appeal or influence, the developing sexuality of young readers.[9] This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... It has been suggested that bulletproof (reliability) be merged into this article or section. ... The magical bracelets worn by Wonder Woman, Wonder Girl, and (formerly) the rest of the Amazons have been shown to be indestructible, or nearly so. ... Wonder Woman holding the Lasso of Truth from Wonder Woman v2 #186. ... // The Amazons were a race of immortal super-women that lived on the magical Paradise Island. ... Steve Trevor is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, as a member of Wonder Womans supporting cast. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Subtext is content of a book, play, film or television series which is not announced explicitly by the characters (or author) but is implicit or becomes something understood by the reader / viewer as the production unfolds. ...


During this period Wonder Woman joined the Justice Society of America [10] as the first female member; albeit as the group's secretary, despite being one of the most powerful members. The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ...


During the Silver Age, Wonder Woman's origin was revamped [11], along with other characters during the era. The new orgin story [12], increased the characters Hellenistic roots, receiving the blessing of each deity in her crib, Diana is destined to become "beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, stronger than Hercules, and swifter than Mercury". Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... The Hellenistic period of Greek history was the period between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic society and culture, which... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ...


At the end of the 1960s, under the guidance of Mike Sekowsky, Wonder Woman surrenders her powers to remain in "Man's World" rather than accompany her fellow Amazons to another dimension. A mod boutique owner, the powerless Diana Prince acquires a Chinese mentor named I Ching. Under I Ching's guidance, Diana learns martial arts and weapons skills, and engages in adventures that encompassed a variety of genres, from espionage to mythology. The cover of Brave and the Bold #28, 1960, featuring the first appearance of the Justice League and art by Mike Sekowsky. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... I Ching is the blind martial arts instructor who guided Diana Prince during the time she relinquished her role as Wonder Woman. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ...


The character would later return to her super-powered roots and the World War II-era, (due to the popularity of the Wonder Woman TV series), in Justice League of America and the eponomys title, respectively. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


Following Crisis on Infinite Earths, Pérez and Potter wrote Wonder Woman as a feminist character, a princess and emissary from Themyscira to Patriarch's world. The four part "Sacrifice" storyline ended with Diana breaking the longstanding do-not-kill code. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue American comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 to simplify their then-55-year-old continuity. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... Themyscirian Amazons Art by Phil Jimenez Themyscira is a fictional island nation in the DC Comics universe. ...


Powers and abilities

After a brief interrogation, Diana places the head of To-Choi Industries in a state of slumber.
After a brief interrogation, Diana places the head of To-Choi Industries in a state of slumber.

Image File history File links Ww-sleep_power. ... Image File history File links Ww-sleep_power. ...

Before Crisis on Infinite Earths

Originally, Wonder Woman was able to will a tremendous amount of brain energy into her muscles and limbs by Amazon training which endowed her with extraordinary strength and agility. The TV series show took up this notion; "... we are able to develop our minds and physical skills ..." ["Fausta:The Nazi Wonder Woman" 1976]; and in the first episode of Super Friends [1973] Diana states to Aquaman "... the only thing that can surpass super strength is the power of the brain". In early Wonder Woman stories,[13] Amazon training involves strengthening this ability using pure mental energy. Her powers would be removed in accordance with Aphrodite's Law if she allowed herself to be bound or chained by a male.[14] Wonder Woman is an American television series based on the DC Comics comic book character Wonder Woman (which was co-created by William Moulton Marston and Elizabeth (Sadie) Holloway Marston). ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ...


With the inclusion of Wonder Girl and Wonder Tot in Diana's backstory, writers provided new explanations of her powers; the character became capable of feats which her sister Amazons could not equal. Wonder Woman Volume One #105,[15] reveals that Diana was formed by clay by the Queen of the Amazons and was imbued with the attributes of the Greek gods by Athena - "beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, swifter than Hermes, and stronger than Hercules."[16] This article is about the superhero Wonder Girl. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ...


Although Wonder Woman’s mythos was returned to its original interpretation between 1966 and 1967, new abilities were added: super breath (to blow jet streams or transform water into snow); ventriloquism; imperviousness to extremes of heat and cold; ride the air currents as if flying; mental telepathy (even to project images); microscopic vision; the ability to vibrate into another dimension, and others which are listed in the Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes, Volume Two (1976).[17]


Depending on the writer, Diana's invulnerability and power varied greatly with the story needs.


After Crisis on Infinite Earths

Diana possesses a host of superhuman powers granted to her by the gods and goddesses of Olympus, gifts which have been stated to be equal to their own abilities.[18] Primary among these are superhuman strength and stamina, which she draws from a mystical link to the Earth itself granted by Demeter.


Diana is one of the strongest and most powerful superheroes in the DC Universe. Her stamina affords her an incredible degree of resistance to blunt force trauma. However, Diana's skin is not invulnerable and can be pierced by sharp projectiles.


Diana has heightened resistance to magical attacks and manipulation. She is experienced in battling foes who use sorcery as a weapon. She heals at an accelerated rate due to her superhuman metabolism. She is a master of armed and unarmed combat, proficient with nearly every weapon of her culture, especially the bow and the javelin. She has at times engaged in battle with beings such as Superman, Darkseid, or the Olympian Gods and held her own against them. This article is about the projectile weapon bow. ... Reconstruction of a post-Marian pilum A Roman coin showing Antoninianus of Carinus holding pilum and globe. ... Darkseid is a fictional comic book supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Olympian Gods are mythological deities who appear in the Wonder Woman, Shazam and Aquaman comics. ...


She has enhanced senses, as well as being able to communicate with all forms of animals.


The God Hermes gifted Diana with the powers of super-human speed and unassisted flight. She possesses the "sight of Athena", or the gift of increased insight, allowing her to sense others' emotions, and is now fully immune to mind control.


Diana possesses great wisdom and intelligence, giving her heightened proficiency with languages, being able to speak her native Themysciran, Ancient and Modern Greek, English, Portuguese, Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese (she expressed "difficulty" with the tones of Cantonese during an interview with Lois Lane), Russian, and Hindi. For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ...


Wonder Woman is an accomplished strategist and tactician, leader, and diplomat. She has been shown to astrally project herself into various lands of myth.[19] In some cases, she has shown the ability to place individuals into a state of sleep while under the power of her golden lasso.[20] Queen Hippolyta used this technique on Diana herself during the Our Worlds at War event. This article is about the paranormal concept. ... Queen Hippolyta is a DC Comics superheroine, based on Hippolyte, queen of the Amazons in Greek mythology, and is the mother of Wonder Woman. ... Cover to JLA: Our Worlds at War #1. ...


Weapons

Diana has numerous powerful weapons at her disposal, but her signature weapons are her indestructible bracelets and the Lasso of Truth. The Bracelets were formed from the remnants of Zeus's legendary Aegis shield, and Diana's superhuman reflexes and senses allow her to deflect or reflect projectiles and bullets, including automatic weapons fire, as well as energy blasts, including multi-vector attacks. Wonder Woman holding the Lasso of Truth from Wonder Woman v2 #186. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aegis (disambiguation). ... M2 Browning machine gun An automatic firearm is a firearm that automatically extracts and ejects the fired cartridge case, and loads a new case, usually through the energy of the fired round. ...


The Lasso of Truth is absolutely unbreakable and has restrained beings as powerful as Superman, Captain Marvel, and the gods Ares and Hades. The Lasso burns with a magical aura called the Fires of Hestia, forcing anyone within the Lasso's confines to be truthful. The Fires can restore lost memories, dispel illusions, renew the wielder's body, protect those encircled by it from magical and nonmagical attacks, and even cure insanity.


Wonder Woman's golden tiara has also doubled as a throwing weapon, used for long-distance attack or defense.


Diana used the Sandals of Hermes to cross the dimensional impasse between Themyscira and the outside world, but they were passed on first to Artemis, and later to Wonder Girl. Diana also once wielded the Gauntlet of Atlas, which magnifies the physical strength and stamina of the wearer by a factor of ten.


The Golden Age and Silver Age Wonder Woman used an invisible airplane that could be mentally controlled. It was variously described as being either a creation of Amazon technology or the legendary winged horse Pegasus transformed into an aircraft. Its appearance varied as well, originally having a propeller and later being drawn as a jet aircraft, resembling a fighter plane. For other uses, see Pegasus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Propeller (disambiguation). ...


The Post-Crisis Wonder Woman has at her disposal a small lightweight disc of alien (Lansinar) technology that, when triggered by her thoughts, transforms into a transparent version of whatever object or vehicle is appropriate for her needs. However, following the One Year Later continuity jump, Diana was given a new invisible plane, created by Wayne Industries. This does not cite any references or sources. ...


Diana occasionally uses additional weaponry in formal battle, such as ceremonial golden armor complete with golden wings, war-skirt and chest-plate, and a golden helmet in the shape of an Eagle's head. Her deadliest piece of battle-gear is a magically forged sword (again a gift from Hephaestus), so sharp that it can "carve the electrons off an atom". Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek HÄ“phaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ...


Representations in cinema

Individual film

In January 2001, producer Joel Silver approached Todd Alcott to write a Wonder Woman screenplay, with Silver Pictures backing the project.[21] Early gossip linked actresses such as Mariah Carey, Sandra Bullock, and Catherine Zeta-Jones to the role of Wonder Woman.[22] Leonard Goldberg, speaking in a May 2001 interview, named Sandra Bullock as a strong candidate for the project.[23] Bullock claimed that she was approached for the role, while Lucy Lawless and Chyna both expressed interest. Lawless indicated that she would be more interested if Wonder Woman was portrayed as a "flawed hero."[24] The screenplay then went through various drafts written by Alcott, Jon Cohen, Becky Johnston, and Philip Levens.[25] By August 2003, Levens was replaced by screenwriter Laeta Kalogridis.[26] Joel Silver (born July 14, 1952) is a successful Hollywood film producer. ... Silver Pictures is a movie production company founded by Hollywood producer Joel Silver In 1987. ... This article is about the singer. ... Sandra Annette Bullock (born July 26, 1964) is a German-American film actress. ... Catherine Zeta-Jones (born 25 September 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress based in the United States. ... Leonard J. Goldberg (born January 24, 1934 in New York) is an American film producer and television producer. ... Lucy Lawless (born Lucille Frances Ryan on March 29, 1968 in Mount Albert) is a New Zealand actress and singer best known for her role as Xena on the television series Xena: Warrior Princess from 1995 to 2001. ... Chyna[2] (born Joan Marie Laurer on December 27, 1969)[1] is an American actress and retired professional wrestler. ...

"Besides [Wonder Woman's] great origin story, there's nothing from the comics that felt right 100 percent, no iconic canon story that must be told. Batman has it made — he's got the greatest rogues gallery ever, he's got Gotham City. The Bat writes himself. With Wonder Woman, you're writing from whole cloth, but trying to make it feel like you didn't. To make it feel like it's existed for 60 years, even though you're making it up as you go along. But who she, and what the movie, is about, thematically, has never been a problem for me. But the steps along the way, it could be so easy for them to feel wrong. I won't settle. She wouldn't let me settle."
— Joss Whedon in November 2006, explaining the delay in developing a proper script.[27]

In March 2005, Warner Bros. and Silver Pictures announced that Joss Whedon would write and direct the film adaptation of Wonder Woman.[28] Whedon's salary was reported to be between $2 to $3 million.[29] Since Whedon was directing Serenity at the time, and required time to research Wonder Woman's background, he did not begin the screenplay until late 2005.[30] According to Joel Silver, the script would cover Wonder Woman's origin and include Steve Trevor: "Trevor crashes on the island and they go back to Man's World."[31] Silver wanted to film Wonder Woman in Australia once the script was completed.[32] While Whedon stated in May 2005 that he would not cast Wonder Woman until he finished the script,[33] Charisma Carpenter[34] and Morena Baccarin[35] expressed interest in the role. Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Batman. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Joss Hill Whedon (born Joseph Hill Whedon[3] on June 23, 1964 in New York) is an Academy Award-nominated American writer, director, executive producer, and creator of the well-known television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and Firefly. ... Serenity is a 2005 science fiction space western/epic film written and directed by Joss Whedon. ... Steve Trevor is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, as a member of Wonder Womans supporting cast. ... Charisma Lee Carpenter (born July 23, 1970) is an American actress. ... Morena Baccarin (born June 2, 1979) is a Brazilian actress of Italian origins, best known for her role as Inara Serra in the short-lived sci-fi television series Firefly and the follow-up movie Serenity. ...


In February 2007, Whedon departed from the project, citing script differences with the studio.[36] Whedon reiterated: "I never had an actress picked out, or even a consistent [sic] front-runner. I didn't have time to waste on casting when I was so busy air-balling on the script." Whedon stated that with the Wonder Woman project left behind, he would focus on making his film Goners.[36]

"I would go back in a heartbeat if I believed that anybody believed in what I was doing. The lack of enthusiasm was overwhelming."[37]

A day before Whedon's departure from Wonder Woman, Warner Bros. Pictures and Silver Pictures purchased a spec script written by Matthew Jennison and Brent Strickland. Set during World War II, the script impressed executives at Silver Pictures.[38] However, Silver has made clear that he purchased the script because he didn't want it floating around in the industry; although it has good ideas, he doesn't wish for the Wonder Woman film to be a period piece.[39] By April 2008, Silver hired Jennison and Strickland to write a new (modern day) script that would not depict Wonder Woman's origin, but explore Paradise Island's history.[40] A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... In the performing arts, a period piece is a work set in a particular era. ...


Undeveloped Justice League film

A Justice League film was slated for a 2009 release, before being put on indefinite hiatus in April 2008. It was based upon the DC Comics publication, the Justice League which has included a number of superheroes in the past including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Flash, Green Lantern, Aquaman, Green Arrow, Atom, Hawkman, Black Canary, and Captain Marvel.[41] An 29 October 2007 article quoted Joel Silver as stating that due to the impending release of Justice League, the Wonder Woman film will be placed on moratorium: For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Superheroes are fictional heroes who possess abilities beyond those of normal human beings. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Aquaman is a fictional comic book superhero who appears in DC Comics. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... // History The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science-fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

'They're going to make the Justice League movie, and we're kind of pausing on Wonder Woman now [...] Let them go ahead and do that picture [first]' [...] The Amazon superhero from the DC Comics series will be a major part of the upcoming JLA. 'And if that comes together, Wonder Woman will be a part of that story,' Silver said. 'And then we'll see where we go from there. But we struggled with it for a while. I hope that we can solve it and make it one day.'[42]

A number of actresses had reportedly been under consideration for the role of Wonder Woman in the Justice League film. Jessica Biel was approached for the role, but passed on it,[43] while Missy Peregrym,[44] Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Teresa Palmer, Shannyn Sossamon, and Christina Milian[45] expressed interest. It had been reported that Australian supermodel Megan Gale was cast as the heroine.[46][47] In early January 2008, it was reported that production of the JLA film was delayed due to the 2007–2008 Writers Guild of America strike.[48] When asked if the film would still affect the solo Wonder Woman movie in April 2008, Silver said it would not as the Justice League film had been shelved.[49] Jessica Claire Biel (born March 3, 1982) is an American actress and former fashion model best known for appearing in several Hollywood films such as Summer Catch, the remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Illusionist, as well as for her early television role of Mary Camden in the... Missy Peregrym (born Melissa Peregrym on June 16, 1982 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian actress and former fashion model. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Teresa Edwina Palmer (born February 26, 1986) is an Australian actress born in Adelaide, South Australia. ... Shannon Marie Sossamon (born October 3, 1978), better known as Shannyn Sossamon, is an American actress, musician and dancer. ... Christina Milian (born Christine Marie Flores; September 26, 1981) is an American R&B and pop singer-songwriter, record producer, dancer, actress, and former MTV VJ. Milian debuted as a singer in 2000 when she appeared on Ja Rules Between Me and You, while also co-writing songs for... Megan Gale (born August 7, 1976) is an Australian supermodel and actress who has achieved considerable fame, first in Italy but now equally so in her native Australia. ...


See also

This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Wonder Woman. ... This article is about examples of woman warriors in a number of contexts. ... // Amazons Baroness Paula von Gunther Donna Troy Etta Candy Gen. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of the alternate versions of Wonder Woman from all media, including DC Comics multiverse, Elseworlds, television and film. ... Women have been portrayed in in comic books since the mediums beginning, with their portrayals often the subject of controversy. ... Wonder Woman is an American television series based on the DC Comics comic book character Wonder Woman (which was co-created by William Moulton Marston and Elizabeth (Sadie) Holloway Marston). ...

Bibliography

  • Wonder Woman (Vol. 1) # 1 - 329 (Summer, 1942 - February 1986)
  • Wonder Woman (Vol. 2) # 1 - 226 (February 1987 - April 2006), #0 (October 1994), #1,000,000 (November 1998)
    • Annuals 1 - 8 (1988-1999)
    • Special 1 (1992)
  • Wonder Woman Vol. 3 # 1- (August 2006-present)
    • Annual 1 (November 2007)
  • Les Daniels, Wonder Woman: The Complete History, (Chronicle Books, 2000).
  • Michael L. Fleisher (with the assistance of Janet E. Lincoln), The Original Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes Volume 2: Wonder Woman, (DC Comics, 2007; orig. pub. 1976).
  • Joshua Glen, "Wonder-working Power," Boston Globe, 4 April 2004.
  • Malcom, Andrew H."She's Behind the Match For That Man of Steel". New York Times. 18 February 1992.
  • Marguerite Lamb, "Who Was Wonder Woman? Long-ago LAW alumna Elizabeth Marston was the muse who gave us a superheroine," Boston University, Fall 2001.
  • Richard, Olive. Our Women Are Our Future. Family Circle, 14 August 1942.

Les Daniels (born 1943) is an American writer of historical horror fiction. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Family Circle is an American womens magazine published 15 times a year by Meredith Corporation. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Hendrix, Grady. "Out for Justice". The New York Sun December 11, 2007
  2. ^ Les Daniels, Wonder Woman: The Complete History, (DC Comics, 2000), pp. 28-30.
  3. ^ Bostonia (Fall 2001): "Who Was Wonder Woman?" by Marguerite Lamb
  4. ^ Richard, Olive. Our Women Are Our Future.
  5. ^ 'Who Was Wonder Woman?
  6. ^ 'Who Was Wonder Woman?
  7. ^ Les Daniels, Wonder Woman: The Complete History, (DC Comics, 2000), pp. 28-30.
  8. ^ Hendrix, Grady. "Out for Justice". The New York Sun December 11, 2007
  9. ^ Bunn, Geoffrey C. "The lie detector, Wonder Woman, and liberty: the life and work of William Moulton Marston," History of the Human Sciences Vol. 10, No. 1 (1997): 91-119.
  10. ^ All Star Comics #12
  11. ^ Wonder Woman #98
  12. ^ Wonder Woman #105
  13. ^ Wonder Woman Vol. 1, #1, #98 to 329 (1942 - 1986)
  14. ^ Example of Aphrodite's Law
  15. ^ Wonder Woman Vol. 1, #105 (1942 - 1986)
  16. ^ Hendrix, Grady. "Out for Justice". The New York Sun December 11, 2007
  17. ^ Michael L. Fleisher, The Original Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes, Volume 2, Wonder Woman, (DC Comics, 2007; orig. pub. 1976)
  18. ^ 52 Week 12 — "The Origin of Wonder Woman"
  19. ^ Wonder Woman Vol. 2, #56, #75, #77, and #97; Wonder Woman Special #1; and Artemis Requiem mini-series #1.
  20. ^ Wonder Woman Vol. 2 #20 suggests that this power is in direct correlation to Morpheus, the God of Dreams.
  21. ^ Brian Linder. "Wonder Woman Scribe Chosen", IGN, 2001-01-24. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  22. ^ Hank Stuever. "Wonder Woman's Powers", Washington Post, 2001-04-18. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  23. ^ Brian Linder. "Estrogen Explosion", IGN, 2001-05-03. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  24. ^ William Keck. "Wonder Girls", Entertainment Weekly, 2001-05-14. Retrieved on 2007-10-14. 
  25. ^ Rob Worley. "Wonder Woman Scribe", Comic Book Resources, 2003-05-06. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  26. ^ Rob Worley. "Wonder Woman", Comic Book Resources, 2003-08-12. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  27. ^ Jeff Jensen. "Buffy's Back!", Entertainment Weekly, 2006-11-22. Retrieved on 2006-11-22. 
  28. ^ "Silver Pictures and Warner Bros. Pictures Sign Joss Whedon to Write & Direct DC Comics' Wonder Woman", Warner Bros., 2005-03-17. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  29. ^ Borys Kit; Tatiana Siegel. "Joss Whedon exits ‘Wonder Woman’ pic", MSNBC, 2007-02-05. Retrieved on 2007-02-12. 
  30. ^ Jim Kozak. "Serenity Now!", In Focus, August/September 2005. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  31. ^ "SDCC - Wonder Woman Update", The Kingdom, 2006-07-22. Retrieved on 2006-07-22. 
  32. ^ Australian Associated Press. "Aussie Wonder Woman", The Age, 2005-05-11. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  33. ^ Scott Collura. "Whedon Talking Wonder", Now Playing, 2005-05-20. Retrieved on 2006-08-07. 
  34. ^ Matt Mitovitch. "Mars Bombshell Is Still Wonder-ing", TV Guide, 2006-09-06. Retrieved on 2006-09-06. 
  35. ^ Rebecca Murray. "Morena Baccarin on "Serenity," Joss Whedon, and "Wonder Woman"", About.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. 
  36. ^ a b Joss Whedon. "Satin Tights No Longer.", Whedonesque, 2007-02-02. Retrieved on 2007-02-03. 
  37. ^ Hendrix, Grady. "Out for Justice". The New York Sun December 11, 2007
  38. ^ Tatiana Siegel; Borys Kit. "Another 'Wonder Woman' for WB", The Hollywood Reporter, 2007-02-01. Retrieved on 2007-02-02. 
  39. ^ Ryan Rotten, Edward Douglas. "Joel Silver's Wonder Woman Update", SuperHeroHype.com, 2007-03-25. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  40. ^ Stephanie Sanchez. "Wonder Woman Still in Development says Joel Silver", IESB, 2008-04-18. Retrieved on 2008-04-18. 
  41. ^ IMDB: Justice League of America
  42. ^ SciFi Wire, 10/29/07
  43. ^ Nicole Sperling. "Biel Passes on Wonder Woman role", Entertainment Weekly, 2007-09-27. Retrieved on 2007-09-28. 
  44. ^ Mel Caylo. "MISSY PEREGRYM WANTS TO PLAY WONDER WOMAN", Wizard, 2007-07-29. Retrieved on 2007-10-11. 
  45. ^ Shawn Adler. "Mary Elizabeth Winstead Envisions Bulking Up For Wonder Woman", MTV, 2007-10-26. Retrieved on 2007-10-27. 
  46. ^ Gale to play Wonder Woman | NEWS.com.au
  47. ^ Justice League of America: Batman & Wonder Woman Cast! | 2snaps.tv - Pop culture for the masses
  48. ^ Robert Sanchez, "Justice League of America has been delayed, IESB.net, January 7, 2008 (accessed January 13, 2008)
  49. ^ Justice League IS Mortal... As In: Dead - Screen Rant

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External links

  • Wonder Woman's Official Website
  • Wonder Woman's Origin @ DC Comics
  • Alan Kistler's History of Wonder Woman

  Results from FactBites:
 
Wonder Woman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6585 words)
Wonder Woman's "magic lasso" was forged from the Magic Girdle of Aphrodite, which Queen Hippolyta (Wonder Woman's mother) was granted by the Goddess.
Wonder Woman's Silver Age past is restored, and it is revealed that she has also served as a founding member of the Justice League.
Wonder Woman has at her disposal a small lightweight disc of alien (Lansinar) technology that, when triggered by her thoughts, transforms into a transparent version of whatever object or vehicle is appropriate for her needs.
Wonder Woman (TV series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6707 words)
Wonder Woman's first appearance on TV screens in live-action form was via a television movie made in 1974 for the ABC Network, starring athlete-turned-actress Cathy Lee Crosby as a blonde non-superpowered Amazon, pitted against a debonair villain played by Ricardo Montalban.
Wonder Woman herself was occasionally defeated by the Nazis, but she always came back in the second half of the show to save the day.
Wonder Woman's magic belt is stolen by the rustlers, who lock her in an abandoned jail cell, and the orphan kids retrieve her belt and come to her rescue.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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