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Encyclopedia > Wonder Stories

Wonder Stories was a science fiction pulp magazine which published 66 issues between 1930 and 1936, edited by Hugo Gernsback. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Pulp can refer to: Soft shapeless substances in general. ... Hugo Gernsback (August 16, 1884 - August 19, 1967) was born in Luxembourg, and immigrated to the United States in 1905. ...


There have been other magazines containing Wonder Stories in their name, which are closely related to this one.


Gernsback founded Air Wonder Stories and Science Wonder Stories in 1929, after he lost control of Amazing Stories. These published 11 and 12 issues respectively, before Air Wonder Stories merged with Science Wonder Stories, which was then renamed just Wonder Stories (beginning with Volume 2 No 1). Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of S.F. in the U.S. Created by Hugo Gernsback, it appears to todays eyes as a classic pulp magazine, printed on cheap paper with...


In 1936, Wonder Stories was sold to Standard Publishing. To match with their other pulps (e.g. Thrilling Western, Thrilling Detective) the title was changed to Thrilling Wonder Stories. This is considered to be a continuation of Wonder Stories since it began with Volume 8 No 1. This published a further 112 issues, closing in 1955.


The Gernsback Wonder Stories were all oversized, premium, pulp magazines with covers by Frank R. Paul and with a similar editorial slant to Amazing Stories. Thrilling Wonder Stories was standard pulp size and took a more junior slant, shown especially with a "Sergeant Saturn" policing the letters page. However it was to publish many major figures, including Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, A. E. Van Vogt, Theodore Sturgeon, L. Sprague de Camp and Henry Kuttner. Frank Rudolph Paul (April 18, 1884 - June 29, 1963) was an illustrator of US pulp-magazines in the science fiction field. ... Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of S.F. in the U.S. Created by Hugo Gernsback, it appears to todays eyes as a classic pulp magazine, printed on cheap paper with... Arthur C. Clarke Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (born December 16, 1917) is a British author and inventor, probably most famous for his science-fiction novel 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Robert A. Heinlein Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most influential authors in the science fiction genre. ... Alfred Elton van Vogt (April 26, 1912 - January 26, 2000) was a Canadian-born science fiction author. ... Theodore Sturgeon (February 26, 1918 Staten Island, New York - May 8, 1985) was an American science fiction author. ... Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907-November 6, 2000) was a science fiction and fantasy author born in New York City. ... Henry Kuttner (April 7, 1915 - February 4, 1958) was a science fiction author born in Los Angeles, California. ...


Related publications included British and Canadian reprints, Science Wonder Quarterly (3 issues), Wonder Stories Quarterly (14 issues), Wonder Stories Annual (4 issues) and two reprint issues from 1957 and 1963.


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