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Encyclopedia > Women in the United States Senate
This article is part of the series:
United States Senate
Members
Current
(by seniority · by age · by class)

Former
Expelled or censured
Hill committees (DSCC, NRSC)
President pro tempore (list)
Dean · Presiding officer
Party leaders and Assistants

Democratic Caucus
(chair · secretary · policy chair)
Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Image File history File links Senate_cap. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of members in the 110th United States Congress. ... This is a classification of current U.S. Senators by seniority. ... This is a list of current U.S. Senators sorted by age. ... The three classes of US Senators, each currently including 33 or 34 Senators (since Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959, and until another state is admitted), are a means used by the United States Senate for describing the schedules of Senate seats elections, and of the expiration of the... This is an incomplete list of all people who previously served in the United States Senate. ... The United States Constitution gives the Senate the power to expel any member by a two-thirds vote. ... The Hill committees are a set of four political party committees, controlled by the Republican and Democratic caucuses in each house of the United States Congress, which work to elect members of their own party to Congress (located on Capitol Hill, the source of the name). ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... This is a complete List of Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... The Dean of the United States Senate is the longest-serving (in consecutive terms) United States Senator. ... The Presiding Officer is majority-party Senator who presides over the United States Senate and is charged with maintaining order and decorum, recognizing Members to speak, and interpreting the Senates rules, practices and precedents. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators... The Assistant Majority and Minority Leaders of the United States Senate (commonly called Senate Majority and Minority Whips) are the second-ranking members of their parties in the United States Senate. ... The Senate Democratic Caucus is the formal organization of the (currently) 44 Democratic Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Democratic caucus of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairman. ... The United States Senate Democratic Conference Secretary, also called the Caucus Secretary, is a ranking leadership position within the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Democratic members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ...


Republican Conference
(chair · vice-chair · policy chair) The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 55 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Republican conference of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairperson. ... The United States Senate Republican Conference Vice-Chair, also known previously as the Conference Secretary, is the third-ranking leadership position within the U.S. Republican Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Republican members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ...


Demographics
Women · African-Americans
Asian-Pacific Americans
The Congress of the United States has demographics that are different from America as a whole in a number of ways. ... Joseph Rainey, first black member of the US House of Representatives Since 1870 there have been 106 African American members of the United States Congress. ... This is a list of Asian Pacific Americans in the U.S. Congress. ...

Employees
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Cloture · Committees (list)
Executive session · Filibuster
History · Quorum  · Quorum call
Recess appointment · Salaries
Seal  · Standing Rules · Traditions
Unanimous consent
VPs' tie-breaking votes
Places
United States Capitol
Senate office buildings
(Dirksen · Hart · Russell)

There have been 35 women in the United States Senate since the establishment of that body in 1789, meaning that out of the 1,895 Americans [1] who have served in the United States Senate since that time, 1.85 percent of all Senators have been female. // Job description and selection Among his or her duties, the chaplains job is to open each session of the United States Senate with a prayer. ... The United States Senate Curator is an employee of the United States Senate who is responsible for developing and implementing the museum and preservation programs for the Senate Commission on Art. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with United States Senate Historical Office. ... The Senate Library is an administrative office that reports into the Secretary of the United States Senate. ... A United States Senate Page (Senate Page or simply Page) is a non-partisan federal employee serving the United States Senate in Washington, DC. In many ways, Senate Pages are similar to their House counterparts. ... The Parliamentarian of the United States Senate serves at the pleasure of the Senate Majority Leader, and functions under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate as a non-partisan employee of the Senate. ... The Secretary of the Senate, as an elected officer of the United States Senate, supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. ... The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate is the law enforcer for the United States Senate. ... US Capitol Building. ... In the Congress of the United States, a closed session (formally a session with closed doors) is a parliamentary procedure for the Senate or the House of Representatives to discuss matters requiring secrecy. ... The United States Senate has the authority for meeting in closed session, as described in the Standing Rules of the Senate. ... In parliamentary procedure, cloture (pr: KLO-cher) (also called closure, and sometimes a guillotine) is a motion or process aimed at bringing debate to a quick end. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... The Senate Committee on Budget (ca. ... An executive session is a portion of the Senates daily session in which it considers executive business. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... Debate over Compromise of 1850 in the Old Senate Chamber. ... Look up quorum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A quorum call or call to quorum is a parliamentary procedure used to delay a vote or otherwise slow down the deliberations of a parliamentary body. ... A recess appointment occurs when the President of the United States fills a vacant Federal position during a recess of the United States Senate. ... Historical information on the salaries that United States Senators have been paid: 1789-1815 -- $6. ... The Seal of the Senate, based on the Great Seal of the United States, includes a scroll inscribed with E Pluribus Unum floating across a shield with thirteen stars on top and thirteen vertical stripes on the bottom. ... The Standing Rules of the Senate detail the rules of order of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate observes a number of traditions, some formal and some informal. ... Unanimous consent, in parliamentary procedure, refers to situations in which a motion can pass if no one present objects. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate and votes only to break a tie. ... The West front of the United States Capitol. ... The largely ceremonial space within the United States Capitol is augmented by office, meeting and service spaces within the Congressional office buildings. ... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux-Arts style of architecture. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is...

Contents

History

Throughout most of the Senate's history, the body was almost entirely male. Perhaps in keeping with the notion of the Senate as a more 'elite' body than the House of Representatives, few women ran for the Senate and even fewer were elected. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ...


The first woman in the Senate was Rebecca Latimer Felton who served for 1 day in 1922. Rebecca Ann Latimer Felton (June 10, 1835 – January 24, 1930) was an American writer, teacher, reformer, and briefly a politician who became the first woman to serve in the United States Senate, filling an appointment on November 21, 1922, and serving until the next day. ...


No women served between 1922 to 1931, 1945 to 1947, and 1973 to 1978. However, since 1978, there has always been at least one woman in the Senate.


There were still few women in the Senate far into the 20th century, long after women began to make up a significant portion of the membership of the House. As late as 1992, in fact, only two women (Nancy Kassebaum of Kansas and Barbara Mikulski of Maryland) were serving in the Senate. Nancy Landon Kassebaum Baker (born July 29, 1932) represented the state of Kansas in the United States Senate from 1978 to 1997. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Barbara Ann Mikulski (born July 20, 1936), a member of the Democratic Party, is the current Class 3 United States Senator representing the State of Maryland. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33...


This began to change with the election of the 103rd Congress in 1992, which commentators dubbed the "Year of the Woman." Five women were elected to the Senate to join the two already there, significantly diminishing the popular perception of the Senate as an exclusive "boys' club." The taboo having been broken, many more women in both the Democratic and Republican parties began to run for the Senate in subsequent years, and several have been elected since then. The 103rd United States Congress met from January 5, 1993 to January 3, 1995. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1992 was an election for the United States Senate in which the victory of Bill Clinton in the presidential election was not accompanied by major Democratic gains in the Senate. ... The Year of the Woman was a popular label attached to 1992 after the election of a number of female Senators in the United States. ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ...


22 female senators have been Democrats while 13 have been Republicans. Of the 16 female senators currently serving, 11 are Democrats and 5 are Republicans.


Currently

As of the 2006 elections, there are 16 women serving.  Republican hold  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup  Independent hold  Independent pickup Elections for the United States Senate were held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ...


Election, selection and family

Prior to 2001, numerically speaking, the most common way for a woman to ascend to the U.S. Senate was to have been appointed there following the death or resignation of a husband or father who previously held the seat. However, with the election of three women in 2001, the balance shifted: More women have now entered service as a U.S. Senator by winning their seats outright than by being appointed to the body.


Recent examples of the selection side of things include Jean Carnahan and Lisa Murkowski. In 2000, Jean Carnahan (D-MO) was appointed to fill the Senate seat won by her dead husband, Mel Carnahan. Carnahan—even though dead—defeated the incumbent Senator, John Ashcroft. Carnahan's widow, in the tradition of the Senate, was named to fill his seat by the Missouri Governor, Roger Wilson. However, in 2002, she did not win reelection. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), however, was appointed by her father Alaska Governor Frank Murkowski to serve out the remainder of his term in the Senate. Murkowski narrowly defeated her opponent in her reelection bid in 2004. Jean Carpenter Carnahan (born December 20, 1933) is an American politician and writer who served in the United States Senate from 2001 to 2002. ... Lisa Ann Murkowski (born May 22, 1957) is an American politician. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 2000 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as president. ... Jean Carpenter Carnahan (born December 20, 1933) is an American politician and writer who served in the United States Senate from 2001 to 2002. ... Melvin Eugene Mel Carnahan (February 11, 1934 – October 16, 2000) was an American politician who was Governor of Missouri from 1993 to 2000. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... The Governors of Missouri since its statehood in 1820 are: Categories: | ... Sophie Wilson, formerly Roger Wilson, is a British computer scientist. ...  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 2002 was a fiercely-contested race that resulted in a victory for the Republican Party, which gained two seats and thus a narrow majority from the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ... This is a list of the governors of the U.S. state of Alaska, of Alaska Territory and of the District of Alaska, and the military commanders of the District of Alaska, as well as the governors of Russian America. ... Francis Hughes Murkowski (born March 28, 1933) is an American politician and a member of the Republican Party. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 2004 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of George W. Bush as president and the United States House election, as well as many state and local elections. ...


Two current members of the Senate (Senators Elizabeth Dole and Hillary Clinton) bring with them a combination of name recognition resulting from the political careers of their famous husbands and their own substantial experience in public affairs. The first, Senator Elizabeth Dole (R-NC), is wife to former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, and served as Secretary of Transportation under President Ronald Reagan and as Secretary of Labor under President George H. W. Bush. The other, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) is a former First Lady of the United States, and former First Lady of Arkansas. Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician that served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator representing the state of North Carolina. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Former female Senators with very famous political family names include Muriel Humphrey (D-MN), the widow of former Senator and U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey. She was appointed to fill out the last year of her deceased husband's Senate term and did not seek reelection when the term ended. Muriel Humphrey Muriel Buck Humphrey (February 20, 1912 – September 20, 1998) was the wife of Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, and a United States Senator. ... Dick Cheney 46th and current Vice President (2001- ) The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ...


Another famous name, or names, is Nancy Landon Kassebaum Baker. Better known by her married name from her first marriage (Kassebaum), Baker is wife now to former Senator Howard Baker (R-TN), whom she married after retiring from the Senate. She is the daughter of former Kansas governor (and presidential candidate) Alf Landon. Kassebaum Baker served the Senate with the distinction of being the first female Senator to be elected to the Senate with no previous Congressional experience (and having not succeeded a dead husband in his seat). Her three terms in the Senate mark her time there as the third-longest tenure (after Margaret Chase Smith and Barbara Mikulski) for a woman in the Senate. Nancy Landon Kassebaum Baker (born July 29, 1932) represented the state of Kansas in the United States Senate from 1978 to 1997. ... Sen. ... Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 – October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, who was defeated in a landslide by Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1936 presidential election. ... Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897–May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history. ... Barbara Ann Mikulski (born July 20, 1936), a member of the Democratic Party, is the current Class 3 United States Senator representing the State of Maryland. ...


Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME) arrived in the Senate in 1995, having previously served in the House of Representatives and both houses of the Maine state legislature. She and Debbie Stabenow of Michigan are the only women (it is rare even for male politicians) to serve in both houses of a state legislature and both houses of the Federal Legislature. Olympia Jean Bouchles Snowe (born February 21, 1947 in Augusta, Maine) is a Republican politician and the senior United States Senator from Maine. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The Maine Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maine. ... Deborah Ann Debbie Stabenow (born April 29, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ...


Senator Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) holds several distinctions for women in the U.S. Congress: She served the Senate (to date) longer than any woman has (24 years); she was the first woman ever elected to both the U.S. House and Senate (she was first elected to the House in 1940 after the unexpected death of her husband, who himself was a member of the House of Representatives, and served there for eight years before winning the Senate seat by a landslide); she was the first woman to hold a Senate Leadership position; and she also won her 1960 race for Senate in the nation's first ever race pitting two women against each other for a Senate seat. Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897–May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history. ... The U.S. House election, 1940 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1940 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts re-election to an unprecedented third term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1960 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of John F. Kennedy as president. ...


In 2000, Stabenow (D-MI) and Maria Cantwell (D-WA) became the first women to defeat an incumbent senator, unseating Senators Spencer Abraham and Slade Gorton respectively. In 2006, Claire McCaskill (D-MO) became the third by defeating Jim Talent. Deborah Ann Debbie Stabenow (born April 29, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ... Maria E. Cantwell (born October 13, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Washington state and is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Edward Spencer Abraham (born June 12, 1952 in East Lansing, Michigan) is an American politician, of Lebanese Christian extraction. ... Slade Gorton Thomas Slade Gorton III (born January 8, 1928) is an American politician. ... Claire McCaskill (born July 24, 1953) is an American Democratic politician, currently the junior United States Senator from the state of Missouri and former State Auditor of Missouri. ... James Matthes Jim Talent (born October 18, 1956) is an American politician and former Senator from Missouri. ...


First concurrent service

The first female U.S. Senators from a single state to serve concurrently were Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, both elected in 1992, with Feinstein taking office that same year (as the result of a special election) and Boxer taking office in 1993. Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is currently the senior U.S. Senator from California, having held office as a Senator since 1992. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ...


Statistics by state

     Female Republican Senator(s)      Female Democratic Senator(s)
     Female Republican Senator(s)      Female Democratic Senator(s)

Twenty-two states have been represented by female Senators. No state has been represented by female Senators from more than one party. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Official language(s) None (English de facto; French is also an administrative language) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area Greater St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... Official language(s) none Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... NY redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...

List of female U.S. Senators

Name State From To Party
Rebecca Latimer Felton Georgia 1922 1922 Democrat
Hattie Wyatt Caraway Arkansas 1931 1945 Democrat
Rose McConnell Long Louisiana 1935 1937 Democrat
Dixie Bibb Graves Alabama 1937 1938 Democrat
Gladys Pyle South Dakota 1938 1939 Republican
Vera Cahalan Bushfield South Dakota 1948 1948 Republican
Margaret Chase Smith Maine 1949 1973 Republican
Eva Kelley Bowring Nebraska 1954 1954 Republican
Hazel Hempel Abel Nebraska 1954 1954 Republican
Maurine Brown Neuberger Oregon 1960 1967 Democrat
Elaine Edwards Louisiana 1972 1972 Democrat
Muriel Humphrey Minnesota 1978 1978 Democrat
Maryon Allen Alabama 1978 1978 Democrat
Nancy Kassebaum Kansas 1978 1997 Republican
Paula Hawkins Florida 1981 1987 Republican
Barbara Mikulski Maryland 1987 Present Democrat
Jocelyn Burdick North Dakota 1992 1992 Democrat
Dianne Feinstein California 1992 Present Democrat
Barbara Boxer California 1993 Present Democrat
Carol Moseley-Braun Illinois 1993 1999 Democrat
Patty Murray Washington 1993 Present Democrat
Kay Bailey Hutchison Texas 1993 Present Republican
Olympia Snowe Maine 1995 Present Republican
Sheila Frahm Kansas 1996 1996 Republican
Susan Collins Maine 1997 Present Republican
Mary Landrieu Louisiana 1997 Present Democrat
Blanche Lincoln Arkansas 1999 Present Democrat
Maria Cantwell Washington 2001 Present Democrat
Jean Carnahan Missouri 2001 2002 Democrat
Hillary Rodham Clinton New York 2001 Present Democrat
Debbie Stabenow Michigan 2001 Present Democrat
Lisa Murkowski Alaska 2002 Present Republican
Elizabeth Dole North Carolina 2003 Present Republican
Amy Klobuchar Minnesota 2007 Present Democrat
Claire McCaskill Missouri 2007 Present Democrat

Rebecca Ann Latimer Felton (June 10, 1835 – January 24, 1930) was an American writer, teacher, reformer, and briefly a politician who became the first woman to serve in the United States Senate, filling an appointment on November 21, 1922, and serving until the next day. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Hattie Ophelia Wyatt Caraway (February 1, 1878 - December 21, 1950) was the first woman elected to serve as a United States Senator. ... Arkansas was admitted to the Union on June 15, 1836. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Senate Photo Rose McConnell Long (April 8, 1892 – May 27, 1970) was a United States Senator and the wife of Huey Long. ... Louisiana was admitted to the Union on April 30, 1812. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Dixie Bibb Graves (July 26, 1882–January 21, 1965) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama. ... Alabama was admitted to the Union on December 14 1819. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Gladys Pyle was the first female senator from South Dakota; born in Huron, Beadle County, South Dakota, October 4, 1890. ... The following is a list of United States Senators from South Dakota. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Vera Cahalan Bushfield (August 9, 1889–April 16, 1976) was a U.S. Senator from South Dakota. ... The following is a list of United States Senators from South Dakota. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897–May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Eva Kelly Bowring (January 9, 1892–January 8, 1985) was a U.S. Senator from Nebraska. ... Nebraska was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1867. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Hazel Hempel Abel (July 10, 1888–July 30, 1966) was an American politician. ... Nebraska was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1867. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Maurine Brown Neuberger in 1962 Maurine Brown Neuberger (January 9, 1907–February 22, 2000) was an American Senator for the State of Oregon from 1960 to 1967, she was the third woman to be elected to the Senate. ... This is a List of United States Senators from Oregon, in the United States of America. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Elaine Schwartzenburg Edwards (born March 8, 1929) was a member of the United States Senate and the wife of Edwin Edwards. ... Louisiana was admitted to the Union on April 30, 1812. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Muriel Humphrey Muriel Buck Humphrey (February 20, 1912 – September 20, 1998) was the wife of Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, and a United States Senator. ... Minnesota was admitted to the Union on May 11, 1858. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Maryon Pittman Allen (born November 30, 1925) was a United States Senator from Alabama. ... Alabama was admitted to the Union on December 14 1819. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Nancy Landon Kassebaum Baker (born July 29, 1932) represented the state of Kansas in the United States Senate from 1978 to 1997. ... Kansas was admitted to the Union on January 29, 1861. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Paula Hawkins (born January 24, 1927) is an American politician. ... Florida was admitted to the Union on March 3, 1845. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Barbara Ann Mikulski (born July 20, 1936), a member of the Democratic Party, is the current Class 3 United States Senator representing the State of Maryland. ... Maryland ratified the Constitution on April 28, 1788. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Categories: People stubs ... North Dakota was admitted to the Union on November 2, 1889. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is currently the senior U.S. Senator from California, having held office as a Senator since 1992. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into U.S. Congressional Delegations from California. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into U.S. Congressional Delegations from California. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Carol Moseley Braun (born August 16, American politician and lawyer, was the first (and to date only) black woman elected to the United States Senate (representing Illinois). ... Illinois was admitted to the Union on December 3, 1818. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Patricia Lynn Murray (known as Patty Murray) (born October 11, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Washington. ... Washington was admitted to the Union on November 11, 1889. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Kathryn Ann Bailey Hutchison, usually known as Kay Bailey Hutchison (born July 22, 1943, in Galveston, Texas), is the senior United States Senator from Texas. ... Texas was admitted to the Union on December 29 1845. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Olympia Jean Bouchles Snowe (born February 21, 1947 in Augusta, Maine) is a Republican politician and the senior United States Senator from Maine. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Sen. ... Kansas was admitted to the Union on January 29, 1861. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... With fellow Maine Senator Olympia Snowe Susan Margaret Collins (born December 7, 1952 in Caribou, Maine) is an American politician, the junior U.S. Senator from Maine and a Republican. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Mary Loretta Landrieu (born November 23, 1955) is the senior Democratic United States Senator for the state of Louisiana. ... Louisiana was admitted to the Union on April 30, 1812. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Blanche Lambert Lincoln (born September 30, 1960) is a Democratic United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... Arkansas was admitted to the Union on June 15, 1836. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Maria E. Cantwell (born October 13, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Washington state and is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Washington was admitted to the Union on November 11, 1889. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Jean Carpenter Carnahan (born December 20, 1933) is an American politician and writer who served in the United States Senate from 2001 to 2002. ... Missouri was admitted to the Union on August 10, 1821. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... The state of New York ratified the Constitution on July 26, 1788, thereby becoming the eleventh state. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Deborah Ann Debbie Stabenow (born April 29, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ... Michigan was admitted to the Union on January 26, 1837. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Lisa Ann Murkowski (born May 22, 1957) is an American politician. ... Alaska was admitted to the Union on January 3, 1959. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician that served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator representing the state of North Carolina. ... United States Senate House of Representatives Congress District 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 1st* (1789-1791) John Baptista Ashe John Steele Hugh Williamson Timothy Bloodworth John Sevier 2nd* (1791-1793) William Barry Grove Nathaniel Macon 3rd* (1793-1795) William J. Dawson Matthew... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Amy Jean Klobuchar (pronounced KLOH-buh-shar) (born May 25, 1960) is the junior United States Senator from Minnesota. ... Minnesota was admitted to the Union on May 11, 1858. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Claire McCaskill (born July 24, 1953) is an American Democratic politician, currently the junior United States Senator from the state of Missouri and former State Auditor of Missouri. ... Missouri was admitted to the Union on August 10, 1821. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Timeline of female U.S. Senators (1922-present)

Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ...


External links

  • U.S. Senate History: Women in the Senate
United States Congress
Members House: Current, Former, Districts (by area) | Senate: Current (by seniority, by age), Former (expelled/censured), Classes
Leaders House: Speaker, Party leaders, Party whips, Dem. caucus, Rep. conference, Dean | Senate: President pro tempore (list), Party leaders, Assistant party leaders, Dem. Caucus (Chair, Secretary, Policy comm. chair), Rep. Conference (Chair, Vice-Chair, Policy comm. chair), Dean
Groups African Americans, Asian Pacific Americans, Hispanic Americans, Caucuses, Committees, Demographics, Senate Women
Agencies, Employees & Offices Architect of the Capitol, Capitol guide service (board), Capitol police (board), Chiefs of Staff, GAO, Government Printing Office, Law Revision Counsel, Librarian of Congress, Poet laureate | House: Chaplain, Chief Administrative Officer, Clerk, Doorkeeper, Emergency Planning, Preparedness, and Operations, Historian, Page (board), Parliamentarian, Postmaster, Reading clerk, Recording Studio, Sergeant at Arms | Senate: Chaplain, Curator, Historian, Librarian, Page, Parliamentarian, Secretary, Sergeant at Arms
Politics & Procedure Act of Congress (list), Caucuses, Committees, Hearings, Joint session, Oversight, Party Divisions, Rider | House: Committees, History, Jefferson's Manual, Procedures | Senate: Committees, Filibuster, History, Traditions, VPs' tie-breaking votes
Buildings Capitol Complex, Capitol, Botanic Garden | Office buildings – House: Cannon, Ford, Longworth, O'Neill, Rayburn, Senate: Dirksen, Hart, Russell
Research Biographical directory, Congressional Quarterly, Congressional Record, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, The Hill, Roll Call, THOMAS
Misc Mace of the House, Power of enforcement, Scandals, Softball League

  Results from FactBites:
 
WIC - Women's History in America (4166 words)
Higher education particularly was broadened by the rise of women's colleges and the admission of women to regular colleges and universities.
Great Britain passed a ten-hour-day law for women and children in 1847, but in the United States it was not until the 1910s that the states began to pass legislation limiting working hours and improving working conditions of women and children.
Women in the United States during the 19th century organized and participated in a great variety of reform movements to improve education, to initiate prison reform, to ban alcoholic drinks, and, during the pre-Civil War period, to free the slaves.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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