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Encyclopedia > Women's basketball
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Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005
Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005

Women's basketball is one of the few sports which developed in tandem with men's. It became popular, from the east coast of the United States, to the west coast, in large part via women's colleges. Image File history File links Wiki_letter_w. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1222x1225, 908 KB) Description: Three point shoot by Sara Giauro (Phard Vomero Napoli) during FIBA Europe Cup Women Finals 2005 Source: self-made Location: Naples, Italy Photographer: Massimo Finizio File links The following pages link to this file: Basketball Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1222x1225, 908 KB) Description: Three point shoot by Sara Giauro (Phard Vomero Napoli) during FIBA Europe Cup Women Finals 2005 Source: self-made Location: Naples, Italy Photographer: Massimo Finizio File links The following pages link to this file: Basketball Metadata This... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 In basketball, a three-point field goal, three-pointer, three-point shot, or simply three is a field goal made from beyond the three point line, a designated semi-ellipsoid arc radiating from the basket. ... The International Basketball Federation (French: Fédération Internationale de Basketball), more commonly known by the French acronym FIBA (pronounced ), is an association of national organizations which governs international competition in basketball. ...

Contents

History

Early women's basketball

Women's basketball began in 1892, at Smith (a women's college), when Senda Berenson, a physical education teacher, modified the rules to a game James Naismith made up and taught it in her classes. Basketball's early adherents were affiliated with YMCAs and colleges throughout the United States, and the game quickly spread through the country. By 1896, it was well established at several other women's colleges. Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States. ... Senda Berenson Abbott (b. ... James Naismith, M.A., M.D., D.D, (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the Canadian inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ...


College basketball and early leagues

Berenson's freshmen played the sophomore class in the first women's collegiate basketball game, March 21, 1893. The doors were locked at the Smith College gym and men were not allowed to watch Berenson's students compete. University of California and Miss Head's School, had played the first women's extramural game in 1892. Also in 1893, Mount Holyoke and Sophie Newcomb College (coached by Clara Gregory Baer) women began playing basketball. By 1895, the game had spread to colleges across the country, including Wellesley, Vassar and Bryn Mawr. The first intercollegiate women's game was on April 4, 1896. Stanford women played Berkeley, 9-on-9, ending in a 2-1 Stanford victory. Clara Gregory Baer is famous for her pioneering role in womens sports. ...


U.S. high school basketball

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Women's National Basketball Association

International basketball

Though it was originally an American sport, it quickly spread internationally and outstanding players and teams are found today all over the world.


FIBA, the world governing body for the sport, has organized a World Championship for Women since 1953. It is currently held every four years in even-numbered non-Olympic years. The International Basketball Federation (French: Fédération Internationale de Basketball), more commonly known by the French acronym FIBA (pronounced ), is an association of national organizations which governs international competition in basketball. ... The Basketball World Championship for Women (official name: FIBA World Championship for Women) is a world basketball tournament for womens national teams held quadrennially. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ...


Women's basketball has been contested in the Summer Olympics since 1976. Basketball has been played consistently on the Summer Olympics since 1936, with a demonstration event in 1904. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were held in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


Rules and regulations

History and Development

The modern rules for women's basketball become more similar to men's each year. Though, many women have used the same rules as men from the beginning. In 1892, Berenson was taking risks simply in teaching the game to women. And, in order to keep it "acceptable" for women to play at all, she taught modified rules. This included a court divided into three areas and six players per team. Two players were assigned to each area (guard, center, forward) and could not cross the line into another area. The ball was moved from section to section by passing or dribbling. Players were limited to three dribbles and could hold the ball for three seconds. No snatching or batting the ball away from a player was allowed. A center jump was required after each score. Peach baskets and the soccer ball were the equipment. Variations of Berenson’s rules spread across the country via YMCAs and colleges.


Playing regulations

Women's basketball is played with the same court and rules as men, with a few exceptions. The standard court size is 94 feet long by 50 feet wide. The three-point line is 20 feet and 6.25 inches (6.25 m) from the middle of the basket in WNBA and FIBA competition. The regulation WNBA ball is a minimum 28.5 inches (72.4 cm) in circumference, 1.00 inch (2.54 cm) smaller than the NBA ball. As of 2004, this size is used for all senior-level women's competitions worldwide. Also, there is no block/charge arc under the basket. The WNBA shot clock was recently changed from 30 to 24 seconds. Women's NCAA college basketball uses a 30 second shot clock. Most high school and college games are played in two separate 20 minute halves, while WNBA and FIBA games are played in four 10 minute quarters.


Equipment

The standard equipment for a women's basketball game, that already has a hoop, is the regulation sized 28.5 basketball.


Violations

Common techniques and practices

Positions and structures

Shooting

Passing

Dribbling

Height

Referencess

See also

External links


 
 

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