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Encyclopedia > Wolverine (comics)
Wolverine

If this infobox is not supposed to have an image, please add "|noimge=yes".
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance The Incredible Hulk #180-181 (Oct.-Nov. 1974)
Created by Len Wein
John Romita, Sr.
In story information
Alter ego James Howlett
Species Human Mutant
Team affiliations X-Men
New Avengers
X-Force
S.H.I.E.L.D.
Horsemen of Apocalypse
Alpha Flight
Weapon X
Weapon Plus
Department H
HYDRA
The Hand
New Fantastic Four
Notable aliases Logan, Weapon X, Patch, Death
Abilities Regenerative healing factor
Superhuman senses, strength, stamina, agility, and reflexes
Adamantium-laced skeletal structure with retractable claws
Expert martial artist

Wolverine (born James Howlett and commonly known as Logan) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero who has been a member of several teams, including the X-Men and the New Avengers. He was created by writer Len Wein and Marvel art director John Romita Sr., who designed the character, and was first drawn for publication by Herb Trimpe.[1] Look up wolverine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... John Romita, Sr. ... A mutant within the Marvel comic books, particularly those of the X-Men mythos, is an individual who possesses a genetic trait called an X-gene that allows them to naturally develop superhuman powers and abilities. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... New Avengers is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... X-Force was a Marvel Comics superhero team, one of many spin-offs of the popular X-Men franchise. ... S.H.I.E.L.D. (originally an acronym for Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law-Enforcement Division, changed in 1991 to Strategic Hazard Intervention, Espionage and Logistics Directorate) is a fictional counterterrorism and intelligence agency in the Marvel Universe that often deals with superhuman threats. ... The Horsemen of Apocalypse are a team of fictional supervillains in the Marvel Universe that serve the ancient mutant Apocalypse as his personal strikeforce. ... Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ... Weapon X is a fictional clandestine government project in the Marvel Universe conducted by the Canadian Governments Department K (and secretly funded by the U.S. government) which turns willing and unwilling beings into living weapons. ... Weapon X a clandestine government project in the Marvel Universe, which turns mutants into living weapons. ... Department H is a fictional organization in the Marvel Universe. ... HYDRA is a fictional terrorist organization in the Marvel Universe. ... The Hand is a group of fictional supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Fantastic Four (q. ... A healing factor is a term used to describe the ability of some characters in fiction to recover from bodily injuries or disease at a superhuman rate. ... Adamantium is a fictional chemical substance and metal alloy in the Marvel comics universe. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity whose existence originates from a work of fiction. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... New Avengers is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... The term art director, is an overall title for a variety of similar job functions in advertising, publishing, film and television, the Internet, and video games. ... John Romita, Sr. ... The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov. ...


Wolverine had a cameo appearance on the last page of Incredible Hulk #180 (October 1974) and his first "full" appearance in Incredible Hulk #181 (November 1974). X-Men writer Chris Claremont played a significant role in the character's subsequent development. Frank Miller also helped to revise the character in the early 1980s with the eponymous limited series in which Wolverine's catch phrase, "I'm the best there is at what I do, but what I do isn't very nice", was first written. Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist. ...


A mutant, Wolverine possesses animal-keen senses, enhanced physical capabilities, and a healing factor that allows him to recover from virtually any wound. This healing ability enabled the supersoldier program Weapon X to bond the near indestructible metal alloy adamantium to his skeletal system. He is also a master of hand-to-hand combat and martial arts. A mutant within the Marvel comic books, particularly those of the X-Men mythos, is an individual who possesses a genetic trait called an X-gene that allows them to naturally develop superhuman powers and abilities. ... A healing factor is a term used to describe the ability of some characters in fiction to recover from bodily injuries or disease at a superhuman rate. ... For the Amalgam Comics character, see Super-Soldier. ... Weapon X is a fictional clandestine government project in the Marvel Universe conducted by the Canadian Governments Department K (and secretly funded by the U.S. government) which turns willing and unwilling beings into living weapons. ... An alloy is a homogeneous hybrid of two or more elements, at least one of which is a metal, and where the resulting material has metallic properties. ... Adamantium is a fictional chemical substance and metal alloy in the Marvel comics universe. ...


Wolverine joined the X-Men's "All New, All Different" roster in Giant-Size X-Men #1 (May 1975). Wolverine was symbolic of the many tough anti-authority anti-heroes that emerged in American popular culture after the Vietnam War;[2] his willingness to use deadly force and his brooding nature became standard characteristics for comic book anti-heroes by the end of the 1980s.[3] As a result, the character became the clear favorite for fans of the increasingly popular X-Men franchise.[4] He has been featured in his own solo comic since 1988 and he has been a central character in every X-Men adaptation, including animated television series, video games, and the live action 20th Century Fox X-Men film series, in which he is played by Hugh Jackman.[5] Cover to Giant-Size X-Men #1. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Animated series redirects here. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Hugh Michael Jackman (born 12 October 1968 in Pymble, New South Wales) is an Australian film, television and stage actor. ...

Contents

Publication history

Wolverine made his debut in a battle against the Hulk. The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov 1974). Art by Herb Trimpe.
Wolverine made his debut in a battle against the Hulk. The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov 1974). Art by Herb Trimpe.

Wolverine first appeared in the final "teaser" panel of The Incredible Hulk #180 (cover date October 1974) written by Len Wein and penciled by Herb Trimpe. The character then appeared in a number of advertisements in various Marvel Comics publications in early July (cover date November) before making his first major appearance in Hulk #181 (cover date November 1974) again by Wein and Trimpe. John Romita, Sr. designed Wolverine's yellow-and-blue costume. The character's introduction was ambiguous, revealing little beyond his being a superhuman agent of the Canadian government. In these appearances, he does not retract his claws, although Len Wein stated they had always been conceived of as retractable.[6] He appears briefly in the finale to this story in Hulk #182. Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Wolverine's next appearance was in 1975's Giant-Size X-Men #1, written by Wein and penciled by Dave Cockrum, in which Wolverine is recruited for a new squad. Gil Kane, who drew the cover of the comic, accidentally drew Wolverine's mask wrong, with larger headpieces. Dave Cockrum liked Kane's alteration (believing it to be similar to Batman's mask) and decided to incorporate it into his own artwork for the actual story.[7] Cockrum was also the first artist to draw Wolverine without his mask, and the distinctive hairstyle became a trademark of the character. The cover of Giant-Size X-Men #1 by Gil Kane & Cockrum, featuring characters Cockrum designed. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


A revival of X-Men followed, beginning with Uncanny X-Men #94 (August 1975), drawn by Cockrum and written by Chris Claremont. In Uncanny X-Men, Wolverine is initially overshadowed by the other characters, although he does create tension in the team as he has a crush on Cyclops' girlfriend, Jean Grey. As the series progressed, Claremont and Cockrum (who preferred Nightcrawler[8]) considered dropping Wolverine from the series;[9] Cockrum's successor, artist John Byrne, championed the character, later explaining, as a Canadian himself, he did not want to see a Canadian character dropped.[10] Byrne created Alpha Flight, a group of Canadian superheroes who try to recapture Wolverine due to the expense their government incurred training him. Later stories gradually establish Wolverine's murky past and unstable nature, which he battles to keep in check. Byrne also designed a new brown-and-tan costume for Wolverine, but retained the distinctive Cockrum cowl. For the second comic book series starring the X-Men, see X-Men (vol. ... For other uses, see Cyclops (disambiguation). ... Jean Grey-Summers (born Jean Grey) is a fictional superheroine who lives in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... This article is about the comic character. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ...


Following Byrne's departure, Wolverine remained in X-Men. The character's growing popularity led to a solo, four-issue limited series, Wolverine (Sept.-December 1982), by Claremont and Frank Miller, followed by the six-issue Kitty Pryde and Wolverine by Claremont and Al Milgrom (November 1984 - April 1985). Marvel launched an ongoing solo book written by Claremont with art by John Buscema in November 1988. It ran for 189 issues. Larry Hama later took over the series and had an extensive run. Other writers who wrote for the two Wolverine ongoing series include Peter David, Archie Goodwin, Erik Larsen, Frank Tieri, Greg Rucka, and Mark Millar. Many popular artists have also worked on the series, including John Byrne, Marc Silvestri, Mark Texeira, Adam Kubert, Leinil Francis Yu, Rob Liefeld, Sean Chen, Darick Robertson, John Romita, Jr., and Humberto Ramos. During the 1990s, the character was revealed to have bone claws, after his adamantium is ripped out by Magneto, which was inspired by a passing joke of Peter David's.[11] The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Kitty Pryde and Wolverine is a series of six comic books written by Chris Claremont, drawn by Al Milgrom, and published by Marvel Comics between November 1984 and April 1985. ... Cover to West Coast Avengers #1, Art by Milgrom Allen Al Milgrom is an American comic book writer, penciller, inker and editor. ... John Buscema, true name Giovanni Natale Buscema (December 11, 1927–January 10, 2002) was an American comic book artist and one of the mainstays of Marvel Comics in its 1960s and 1970s heyday. ... Larry Hama. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Archie Goodwin (September 8, 1937 – March 1, 1998) was an American comic book writer, editor, and artist. ... Cover to The Savage Dragon (original miniseries) #1. ... Greg Rucka is an American writer of novels and comic books. ... Mark Millar (born December 24, 1969) is a Scottish comic book writer born in Coatbridge. ... Marc Silvestri at a 2006 comic book convention. ... Cover to Black Panther: The Client TPB. Art by Texeira. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #377; Art by Adam Kubert. ... Leinil Francis Yu Leinil Francis Yu is a Filipino comic book artist, who began to work for the American market through Wildstorm Productions. ... Rob Liefeld (born October 3, 1967 in Anaheim, California) is an American comic book writer, illustrator, and publisher. ... Sean Chens first published work: Rai and the Future Force #9 by Valiant Comics Sean Chen with fellow theBLVD member Tommy Lee Edwards at the Canadian National Comic Book Convention (Sept, 2006) Sean Chen (born August 15, 1968 in Washington, D.C.) is an Asian-American comic book artist. ... Cover of Transmetropolitan: Lust for Life Darick W. Robertson is an artist from San Mateo, California, United States. ... John Salvatore Romita, Jr. ... Cover to Impulse #2. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


In addition to the Wolverine series and appearances in the various X-Men series, two other storylines expand upon the character's past: "Weapon X", by writer-artist Barry Windsor-Smith, serialized in Marvel Comics Presents #72-84 (1991); and Origin, a six-issue limited series by co-writers Joe Quesada, Paul Jenkins, and Bill Jemas and artist Andy Kubert (November 2001 - July 2002). A second solo series, Wolverine: Origins, written by Daniel Way with art by Steve Dillon, spun out of and runs concurrently with the second Wolverine solo series. Unity #0 for Valiant Comics cover by Barry Windsor-Smith // Biography Barry Windsor-Smith (formerly known as Barry Smith), born 1949 in Forest Gate, London, is a British cartoonist, comics-author, and painter best known for his work in American comic books. ... Marvel Comics Presents is a comic book anthology series published by Marvel Comics from 1989 to 1995. ... Cover to Origin #2. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ... Paul Jenkins, British comic-book writer Paul Jenkins (born 1923), U.S. abstract Expressionist painter This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Bill Jemas is a founding partner at 360ep, a management firm dedicated to cross-pollinating entertainment properties against various forms of media, such as film, video games, comic books and consumer products. ... Cover of Batman #655, the first issue of Batman & Son Andy Kubert is an American comic book artist, the son of Joe Kubert and brother of Adam Kubert, both of whom are also artists. ... Daniel Way (b. ... Steve Dillon is a British comic book artist. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ...


Wolverine's first intended origin

Co-creator Len Wein originally intended for Logan to be a mutated wolverine cub, evolved to humanoid form by the High Evolutionary.[12] In X-Men #98, a biological analysis of Wolverine suggests that he is not a full-fledged mutant, and in X-Men #103, Wolverine says he doesn't believe in leprechauns, to which the leprechaun replies, "Maybe leprechauns don't believe in talkin' wolverines, either."[13] In a reprint of Hulk #180-181, titled Incredible Hulk and Wolverine, an interview with Cockrum supports the claim Wolverine was intended to be a mutated wolverine. Cockrum said he considered having the High Evolutionary play a vital role in making Wolverine a human. He wanted Wolverine to be the age of a young adult, with superhuman strength and agility similar to Spider-Man. This changed when Cockrum saw John Romita Sr. draw a mask-less Wolverine as a hairy 40-year-old. Creator Len Wein originally intended the claws to be retractable and part of Wolverine's gloves, and both gloves and claws would be made of adamantium. This idea was later nixed by Claremont because he believed anyone could then become Wolverine by wearing the gloves. The claws are first revealed to be part of Wolverine's anatomy in X-Men #98. The High Evolutionary (Herbert Edgar Wyndham) is a fictional Marvel Comics character created by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee. ... This article is about the creature in Irish mythology. ...


Wolverine's second intended origin

Byrne said (as stated in interviews and on his website) that he drew a possible face for Wolverine - but then learned that John Romita Sr. had already drawn one for him (Wolverine's face, drawn by Cockrum, can be seen in Uncanny X-Men #98, long before Byrne started). Later, Byrne used the drawing for Sabretooth's face (an enemy of Iron Fist, who Claremont was also currently writing). Byrne then came up with the idea of Sabretooth being Wolverine's father (they both had similar healing abilities and raging tempers). Together, Byrne and Claremont came up with Wolverine being around 60 and having served in World War II after escaping from Sabretooth (who was around 120 years old and had been abusing him for decades - explaining his rages). The plan had been for Wolverine to have been almost crushed in an accident; at which point he would discover (when attempting to stand for the first time after recovering) that his healing factor does not work on bones - his legs immediately break. He then spends over a decade in a hospital bed, almost going mad (another reason for his berserker rages) when the Canadian Government approaches him with the idea of replacing his skeleton one bone at a time with solid Adamantium - the claws being an extra surprise. This origin too was never used. Sabretooth is a Marvel Comics character, an arch-enemy of the X-Men’s Wolverine. ... Iron Fist (Daniel Danny Thomas Rand-Kai) is a fictional character, a superhero martial artist in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Fictional character biography

Main article: Fictional history of Wolverine

Born in 19th century Canada to rich plantation owners, James Howlett grows into manhood on a mining colony in Northern Alberta, adopting the name "Logan." [14] Logan leaves the colony and lives for a time in the wilderness among wolves, until returning to civilization, residing with the Blackfoot Indians. Following the death of his Blackfoot paramour, Silver Fox, he is ushered into a Canadian military unit. Logan then spends some time in Madripoor, developing his "Patch" persona; before settling in Japan, where he marries and has a son. Norhern Alberta is a region located in the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Blackfoot Confederacy is a name applied to four Native American tribes in the Northwestern Plains. ... Silver Fox is a fictional character, a mutant in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Madripoor is a fictional island in Southeast Asia in the X-Men canon. ... Daken is a fictional character, a mutantDaken is the son of Wolverine and Itsu, Logans Japanese wife before he was abducted by Muramasa and eventually forcefully inducted into the Weapon X Program. ...


During World War II, Logan teams with Captain America versus HYDRA, and continues a career as a soldier-of-fortune/adventurer. Logan works for the First Canadian Parachute Battalion[15] and the CIA before being recruited for Team X. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... HYDRA is a fictional terrorist organization in the Marvel Universe. ... CIA redirects here. ...


As a member of Team X, Logan is given false memory implants. He continues on the team, until he is able to break free of the mental control and joins the Canadian Defense Ministry. Logan is subsequently kidnapped by Weapon X, where he remains captive and experimented on, until his rescue by the Winter Soldier, after which he returns to the Canadian wilderness. Weapon X is a fictional clandestine government project in the Marvel Universe conducted by the Canadian Governments Department K (and secretly funded by the U.S. government) which turns willing and unwilling beings into living weapons. ... For other uses, see Bucky (disambiguation). ...


Logan is eventually discovered by James and Heather Hudson, who help him recover his humanity. Following his recovery, Logan, this time under the supervision of Department H, once again works for Canadian Intelligence. Logan becomes Wolverine, one of Canada's first superheroes. In his first mission, he is dispatched to stop the destruction caused by a brawl between the Hulk and the Wendigo. Guardian (James Mac MacDonald Hudson, a. ... For the newspaper, see The Vindicator. ... Department H is a fictional organization in the Marvel Universe. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... The Wen-Di-Go (or more commonly: Wendigo) is a man-eating creature in Marvel comics that is based on the mythical creature of the same name. ...


Professor X recruits Wolverine to a new team of X-Men.[16] Disillusioned with his Canadian intelligence work and intrigued by Xavier's offer, Logan resigns from Department H. Logan continues to adventure as a superhero, eventually recovering his memories.[17] Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ...


Powers and abilities

Wolverine is a mutant with a number of both natural and artificial improvements to his physiology. His primary mutant power is an accelerated healing process typically referred to as his mutant healing factor that regenerates damaged or destroyed areas of his body far beyond the capabilities of an ordinary human and renders him immune to nearly all toxins and diseases. Though he is virtually immune to "fatal" dosages of toxins, he does exhibit superficial or immediate reactions to harmful or toxic substances, indeed Wolverine has been shown to become intoxicated after significant dosages of alcoholic beverages, and has been "knocked out" on several occasions with "knock-out" gasses. A healing factor is a term used to describe the ability of some characters in fiction to recover from bodily injuries or disease at a superhuman rate. ...


Depictions of the speed and extent of injury to which Wolverine can heal vary. Originally, this is portrayed as accelerated healing of minor wounds, but writers have increased this ability over years to the point that he can fully regenerate nearly any damaged or destroyed bodily tissue. One of the more extreme examples of Wolverine's healing factor shows the total regeneration of his soft body tissue, within a matter of minutes, after having it incinerated from his skeleton .[18] Wolverine survives the explosion due to the protection his adamantium-laced skull provides to his brain.[19] It has been stated in the Xavier Protocols, a series of profiles created by Xavier that lists the strengths and weaknesses of the X-Men, that Wolverine's healing factor is increased to "incredible levels" and that the only way to stop him is to decapitate him and remove his head from the vicinity of his body.[20] In addition, the regenerative qualities of his healing powers dramatically alter his natural aging process to an unknown degree. However, despite being born in the late 1800s,[21] he has the appearance and vitality of a man in his physical prime. Though he now has all of his memories, his healing abilities can provide increased recovery from psychological trauma by suppressing memories in which he experiences profound duress.[22] The Xavier Protocols are a fictional set of doomsday plans in the Marvel Comics Universe created by Charles Xavier, leader of the X-Men. ... Beheading. ...


Wolverine also has superhumanly acute senses of sight, smell, and hearing. He can see with perfect clarity at greater distances than an ordinary human, even in near-total darkness. His hearing is enhanced in a similar manner, allowing him to both hear sounds ordinary humans can't and also hear to greater distances. Wolverine is able to use his sense of smell to track targets by scent, even if the scent has been eroded somewhat over time by natural factors. This sense also allows him to identify shapeshifting mutants despite other forms they may take. Comic book fiction traditionally features characters with superhuman, supernatural, or paranormal abilities, often referred to as superpowers (also spelled super-powers). ...


Wolverine's physical appearance displays animal-like mutations, including pronounced canines and three retractable bone claws housed within each forearm. While originally depicted as surgically placed implants of the Weapon X Program ,[23], the claws are later revealed to be part of his natural, mutant anatomy.[24] The claws are much harder than normal bone and can cut substances as durable as most metals, wood, and some varieties of stone.[25] Wolverine's hands do not have openings for the claws to move through; thus, they cut through his flesh every time he extrudes them.[26]


Wolverine's entire skeleton, including his claws, is molecularly infused with adamantium, rendering it practically indestructible. Due to the adamantium coating, the claws can cut almost any known solid material. The only known exceptions are adamantium itself and Captain America's shield, which is the only substance in the Marvel Universe known to be even more durable than adamantium. Wolverine's ability to slice completely through a substance depends upon both the amount of force he can exert and the thickness of the substance. The adamantium also weights his blows, dramatically increasing the effectiveness of his punches and kicks. Captain Americas shield is a fictional item, the primary defensive and offensive piece of equipment used by the Marvel Comics superhero Captain America, and he is seldom seen without it. ... This article is about the shared universe setting used by many Marvel Comics titles. ...


Wolverine's healing factor also affects a number of his physical attributes by increasing them to superhuman levels. His stamina is sufficiently heightened to the point he can exert himself for numerous hours, even after exposure to powerful tranquilizers.[27] Wolverine's agility and reflexes are also enhanced to levels that are beyond the physical limits of the finest human athlete.[28]Due to his healing factor's constant regenerative qualities, he can push his muscles beyond the limits of the human body without injury.[29] This, coupled by the constant demand placed on his muscles by over one hundred pounds of adamantium,[30] grants him some degree of superhuman strength. Since the presence of the adamantium negates the natural structural limits of his bones, he can lift or move weight that would otherwise damage a human skeleton.[31] He is strong enough to break steel chains[32][33] and lift a dozen men above his head with one arm and throw them through a wall.[34]


Due to high level psionic shields implanted by Professor Charles Xavier, Wolverine's mind is highly resistant to telepathic assault and probing.[35] Parapsychology is the study of the evidence involving phenomena where a person seems to affect or gain information about something through a means not currently explainable within the framework of mainstream, conventional science. ...


Skills and personality

During his time in Japan and other countries, Wolverine becomes a master of virtually all forms of martial arts. He is proficient with most weaponry, including firearms, though he is partial to bladed weapons. He can defeat the likes of Shang-Chi[36] and Captain America[37] in single combat. He also has a wide knowledge of the body and pressure points.[38] He is also an accomplished pilot and highly skilled in the field of espionage and covert operations. Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Shang-Chi (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally rising of the spirit) is a Marvel Comics character, often called the Master of Kung Fu. He was created by writer Steve Englehart and artist Jim Starlin. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... For the use of pressure points in first aid, see Emergency bleeding control In the study of martial arts, practitioners do not focus just on increasing the brute strength of their strikes, but also on the target of their strikes to maximum the impact, and to achieve specific outcomes. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ...


Wolverine sometimes lapses into a "berserker rage" while in close combat. In this state he lashes out with the intensity and aggression of an enraged animal and is even more resistant to psionic attack.[39] Though he loathes it, he acknowledges that it has saved his life many times.


In contrast to his brutish nature, Wolverine is actually extremely intelligent. Due to his increased lifespan, he has traveled the world and amassed an intimate amount of knowledge of foreign languages and cultures. He can speak English, Japanese, Russian, Chinese, Cheyenne, Spanish, Arabic, and Lakota; he also has some knowledge of French, Thai, Vietnamese, German and Portuguese.[40] When Forge monitors Wolverine's vitals during a Danger Room training session, he calls Logan's physical and mental state "equivalent of an Olympic-level gymnast performing a gold medal routine while simultaneously beating four chess computers in his head."[41] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... Arabic is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Lakota (also Lakhota, Teton, Teton Sioux) is the largest of the three languages of the Sioux, of the Siouan family. ... Forge is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, a superhero associated with The X-Men. ...


Despite his apparent ease at taking lives, he does not enjoy killing or giving into his berserker rages. Logan adheres to a firm code of personal honor and morality. He is often irreverent and rebellious, particularly towards authority, though he is a reliable ally and capable leader. He has had romantic, platonic, and even paternal relationships over the decades with numerous women. Japanese samurai in armor, 1860s. ... Honor (or honor) comprises the reputation, self-perception or moral identity of an individual or of a group. ... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behavior) has three principal meanings. ...


Other versions

As one of Marvel's flagship characters, Wolverine has seen many adaptations and reimaginings. For example, an issue of Exiles featured a planet of Wolverines. In the Marvel Mangaverse, Wolverine is even the founder of the X-Men. In Marvel Zombies, Wolverine appears zombified alongside Marvel's other major players. The Ultimate Marvel line of comics sought to ingrain Wolverine into its Ultimate X-Men title from the onset. In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Wolverine has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... The Exiles are a group of fictional comic book characters from Marvel Comics. ... Cover art for Marvel Mangaverse: New Dawn #1, by Ben Dunn. ... Marvel Zombies is a set of comic book miniseries published by Marvel Comics beginning in 2005. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ...


In other media

Main article: Wolverine in other media

Wolverine is the only X-Men character to be included in every media adaptation of the X-Men franchise, including film, television, computer and video games, and is the only one to have starred in his own video games (e.g., X2: Wolverine's Revenge). Wolverine is the only X-Men character to be included in every media adaptation of the X-Men franchise, including film, television, computer and video games, and is the only one to have starred in his own video games. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ...


Marvel Studios recently announced that an X-Men spin-off movie based on Wolverine, titled X-Men Origins: Wolverine, is currently in production and will have Hugh Jackman reprise his role as Wolverine. Gavin Hood will be directing the film, which will be released worldwide on May 1, 2009. Troye Mellet will play the young Wolverine.[42] Marvel Studios is an American television and motion picture studio based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Gavin Hood is a South African actor, writer, producer and director, best known for winning the Academy Award for Foreign Language Film at the 78th Academy Awards for the 2005 film Tsotsi. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the game Marvel Ultimate Alliance Wolverine stars as one of the four main heroes. // Marvel Ultimate Alliance This game is an Action/RPG being made by RavenSoft (Published by Activision), and is the same vein as the previous two X-Men Legends games by the two companies. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Green Skin's Grab-Bag: "An Interview with Herb Trimpe", p. 2: "That was John Romita's design. I drew him first in Hulk #181 [sic]. But it was Romita's vision based on Len's idea".
  2. ^ Wright, Bradford W. Comic Book Nation. Johns Hopkins, 2001. Pg. 265
  3. ^ Wright, pg. 277
  4. ^ Wright, pg 263, 265
  5. ^ X-Men IMDb. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  6. ^ "CONvergence I, Len Wein", Jonathan Woodward, July 8, 2005. 
  7. ^ Brian Cunningham, "Dressed to Kill", Wizard Tribute to Wolverine, 1996.
  8. ^ X-Men Companion
  9. ^ X-Men Companion
  10. ^ DeFalco, Tom. Comic Creators on X-Men. Titan, 2006. Pg. 110
  11. ^ Brian Cronin. "Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #96", Comic Book Resources, 2007-03-29. Retrieved on 2007-04-03. 
  12. ^ CBR.cc: Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #21. Retrieved on 2007-08-19.
  13. ^ X-Men #103, p.14, panel 3
  14. ^ Origin #1 vol.1
  15. ^ "Wolverine vol. 2 #34", Marvel Comics. 
  16. ^ Giant-Size X-Men #1
  17. ^ House of M #1
  18. ^ Wolverine vol3. #43
  19. ^ Wolverine vol.3 #48
  20. ^ Excalibur vol.1 #100
  21. ^ Origin mini-series
  22. ^ Wolverine vol.2 #175
  23. ^ Wolverine vol.1 #2
  24. ^ Wolverine vol.2 #75
  25. ^ Wolverine vol.2 #91 and #101
  26. ^ Wolverine vol.2 # 77
  27. ^ X-Men vol.2 #5
  28. ^ Wolverine: Origins #5, Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Wolverine 2004
  29. ^ Wolverine vol.2 #1
  30. ^ Wolverine vol.2 #57
  31. ^ Official Handbook to the Marvel Universe: Wolverine 2004 vol.1 #1
  32. ^ Uncanny X-Men vol.1 #111
  33. ^ Wolverine vol.3 #51
  34. ^ Wolverine vol.2 #1
  35. ^ Wolverine vol.3 #46
  36. ^ X-Men Vol.2 #62
  37. ^ Wolverine Origins #4-5
  38. ^ X-Men vol.2 #108/Wolverine vol.3 #20
  39. ^ Wolverine vol.2 #168
  40. ^ "List of languages present on Marvel.com (excluding German, mentioned in Wolverine vol.2 #37, and Portuguese, mentioned in "Wolverine: Saudade" - Cedex: Panini, 2006.)", Marvel Comics. 
  41. ^ "Wolverine vol. 1 #51", Marvel Comics. 
  42. ^ Smit-McPhee is Young Logan in Wolverine - Superhero Hype!

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Comic Book Resources logo Comic Book Resources is a website dedicated to the coverage of comic book-related news and discussion. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... The X-Men are a group of superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Astonishing X-Men is the name of three X-Men comic books from Marvel Comics, the first two of which were limited series and the third an ongoing series. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character Nathan Summers. ... For the second comic book series starring the X-Men, see X-Men (vol. ... X-Factor Investigations is a fictional detective agency created by writer Peter David in the Marvel Comics comic book series X-Factor. ... X-Force was a Marvel Comics superhero team, one of many spin-offs of the popular X-Men franchise. ... The Exiles are a group of fictional comic book characters from Marvel Comics. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Cable & Deadpool is a comic book published by Marvel Comics beginning in 2004. ... Excalibur is a Marvel Comics superhero group, an offshoot of the X-Men, usually based in the United Kingdom. ... Generation X was a Marvel Comics superhero team, a 1990s-era X-Men junior team. ... New Mutants may also refer to the genetically engineered superhumans of Mutant X (TV series). ... New X-Men refers to two superhero comic books published by Marvel Comics within the hugely popular X-Men franchise. ... X-Men: The Hidden Years is a comic book series in the Marvel Comics universe starring the companys popular superhero team the X-Men. ... Promotional art for issue #11, as drawn by Mike Deodato X-Men Unlimited was the title of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... X-Treme X-Men was a comic book published by Marvel Comics beginning in 2001 and ending in 2004. ... Dark Phoenix on the cover of the Dark Phoenix TPB; art originally from Uncanny X-Men #135, by John Byrne. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #141. ... The Mutant Massacre or the Morlock Massacre was a major Marvel Comics crossover, which took place during the summer of 1986. ... Cover to the Fall of the Mutants TPB. The Fall of the Mutants was a crossover event by Marvel Comics, during the summer of 1987. ... For other uses, see Inferno (comics). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... X-Cutioners Song is crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in twelve parts from the November 1992 to early 1993. ... Xavier mindwipes Magneto. ... The Phalanx Covenant was a crossover event that ran through Marvel Comics X-Men family of books in September and October 1994. ... The Age of Apocalypse is a popular X-Men story arc. ... Onslaught is a fictional character, a psionic entity in the Marvel Comics universe created from the consciousness of two characters: Professor Charles Xavier, founder and leader of the X-Men, and the villainous mutant known as Magneto. ... New X-Men #114, the first issue of E is For Extinction. Art by Frank Quitely. ... Cover to trade paperback Here Comes Tomorrow is the climactic eighth story arc in Grant Morrisons run on the Marvel Comics series New X-Men, which ran from issues #151-154. ... House of M was an eight-part comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2005. ... Decimation event logo, as shown on the covers of tie-in comics Decimation is the name of the late 2005 Marvel Comics storyline spinning out of the House of M limited series, that focuses on the ramifications of the Scarlet Witchs stripping nearly all of the mutant population of... Warren Kenneth Worthington III is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Beast (disambiguation). ... Bishop (Lucas Bishop), is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero who is a member of the X-Men. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character Nathan Summers. ... Cannonball (Samuel Zachary Guthrie) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, associated with the X-Men. ... Colossus (Piotr Nikolaievitch Rasputin) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero in the X-Men. ... For other uses, see Cyclops (disambiguation). ... Dazzler (Alison Blaire) is a Marvel Comics superheroine, associated with the X-Men. ... Emma Grace[1] Frost, formerly known as the White Queen, is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Forge is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, a superhero associated with The X-Men. ... Gambit (Remy LeBeau) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero that has been a member of the X-Men. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... Iceman (Robert Bobby Louis Drake) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... Jean Grey-Summers (born Jean Grey) is a fictional superheroine who lives in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Jubilee (Jubilation Lee) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superheroine associated with the X-Men. ... This article is about the comic character. ... Polaris (Lorna Dane) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... Psylocke (Elizabeth Betsy Braddock, sometimes misspelled, even in the published comics, as Elisabeth) is a Marvel Comics superhero, sister to Captain Britain, and often associated with the X-Men. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... Rachel Grey (born Rachel Summers) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superheroine created by writer Chris Claremont and artist/co-writer John Byrne. ... Rogue (Anna Marie[1]) is a Marvel Comics superheroine, a member of the X-Men. ... Shadowcat (Kitty Pryde) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... This article is about the X-Men character. ... X-Men - 2006 Line-Up The X-Men are a team of fictional comic book mutant superheroes, as published by Marvel Comics. ... Apocalypse (En Sabah Nur) is a fictional comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Avalanche (Dominic Szilard Janos Petros) is a Marvel Comics supervillain, an enemy of the X-Men. ... For other uses, see Blob (disambiguation). ... The Brood are a race of insect-like, parasitic, extraterrestrial beings that appear in the comic books published by Marvel Comics, especially Uncanny X-Men. ... The Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, also known as The Brotherhood and Brotherhood of Mutants, is a fictional character group, Marvel Comics supervillain team devoted to mutant superiority over normal humans. ... Cassandra Nova is a fictional enemy of the X-Men in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Hellfire Club is a Marvel Comics supervillain team that frequently battles the X-Men. ... The Juggernaut (Cain Marko) is a fictional comic book character from the Marvel Comics universe. ... Lady Deathstrike (real name Yuriko Oyama) is a Marvel Comics supervillain, a foe of the X-Men, especially Wolverine. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Mikhail Nikolaievitch Rasputin is a Marvel Comics supervillain, best known as the brother of the X-Mens Colossus. ... Mister Sinister (Nathaniel Essex) is a fictional character appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Mojo is a Marvel Comics supervillain, an enemy of the X-Men, primarily Longshot. ... Mystique (Raven Darkholme) is a Marvel Comics character associated with the X-Men franchise. ... Omega Red (Arkady Rossovich) is a comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe and a foe of the X-Men. ... The Purifiers, also known as the Stryker Crusade, are a fictional paramilitary/terrorist organization in the Marvel Comics universe and enemies of the X-Men. ... Pyro (St. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... Sabretooth is a Marvel Comics character, an arch-enemy of the X-Men’s Wolverine. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... The Sentinels are fictional robots in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... For the band of the same name, see Shadow King (band). ... Stryfe is a Marvel Comics supervillain, an adversary of the X-Men and related characters, especially Cable and X-Force. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Vulcan (Gabriel Summers) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Key (y) indicates the actor portrayed the role in a flashback scene as a child. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... X2 is a 2003 superhero film based on the fictional characters the X-Men. ... The X-Men film series currently consists of three superhero films based on the fictional Marvel Comics team of the same name. ... Pryde of the X-Men is a one-shot animated television pilot from 1989 featuring the X-Men. ... X-Men is an American animated series which debuted on October 31, 1992 on the Fox Network as part of its Fox Kids Saturday morning lineup. ... On February 20, 1996, the Fox Broadcasting Company aired a made-for-television telefilm based on the Marvel Comics series Generation X. The film (produced by Marvel Entertainment) featured Banshee and Emma Frost as the headmasters of Xaviers School for Gifted Youngsters and M, Skin, Mondo, Jubilee and two... X-Men: Evolution is an animated series containing the original cast of X-Men, mostly depicted as teenagers and some as adults. ... Wolverine and the X-Men is an animated TV series that has been confirmed by Avi Arad. ... Otherworld is a fictional dimension in the Marvel Comics Marvel Universe. ... Asteroid M, from X-Men (Second Series) #-1 (July 1997). ... In the Marvel Comics universe, Cerebro (Spanish and Portuguese for brain) is a device that the X-Men (in particular, their leader, Professor Charles Xavier) use to detect mutants. ... The Crimson Dawn is a fictional mystical substance found in the comic book X-Men and part of the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Danger Room is a fictional training facility built for the X-Men of Marvel Comics. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Colossus and Wolverine executing the fastball special move. ... Flag of Genosha under Magnetos reign. ... In the fictional Marvel Universe, the Legacy Virus was a devastating plague that ripped through the mutant population, killing hundreds and mutating so that it affected baseline humans as well, until it was cured almost overnight by the sacrifice of the superhero Colossus, a member of the X-Men. ... In the fictional Marvel Comics Universe, the MKraan Crystal (pronounced EM-kron or MA-Cran/MA-crayon as in Marvel: Ultimate Alliance the video game) is a gigantic crystalline artifact that lies at the nexus of all realities. ... Madripoor is a fictional island in Southeast Asia in the X-Men canon. ... Muir Island is a small, fictional island off of the northern coast of Scotland in the Marvel Comics universe. ... A mutant within the Marvel comic books, particularly those of the X-Men mythos, is an individual who possesses a genetic trait called an X-gene that allows them to naturally develop superhuman powers and abilities. ... Providence from Cable & Deadpool #10 Art by Patrick Zircher Providence is a fictional island featured in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... The Savage Land is a hidden prehistoric land within the fictional Marvel Comics Universe. ... X-Men - 2006 Line-Up The X-Men are a team of fictional comic book mutant superheroes, as published by Marvel Comics. ... The Xavier Protocols are a fictional set of doomsday plans in the Marvel Comics Universe created by Charles Xavier, leader of the X-Men. ... X-Jet in the 2006 film X-Men: The Last Stand. ... In the fictional Marvel Comics universe, the X-Mansion, the common name for the Xavier Mansion, is the base of operations and training site of the X-Men and the location of a school for mutant teenagers, the Xavier Institute for Higher Learning, formerly Xaviers School for Gifted Youngsters. ... This text deals with the history of the popular Marvel Comics franchise, the X-Men. ... This is a list of computer and video games starring the X-Men. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Wolverine (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (9358 words)
Wolverine has strong memories of loving the Native American woman, Silver Fox, and living with her in a cabin before they are recruited into Team X, but whether or not these memories are true would tantalize him for a long time before he finally learns the truth.
Wolverine reveals to her that he is able to fluently speak Japanese, surprising her with the contrast to his often savage exterior.
Wolverine took it upon himself to watch over the daughter, Amiko, who to this day Logan tries to visit, although she is currently under the care of his close friend and sometimes lover Yukio.
Wolverine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (617 words)
The wolverine is extremely strong for its size and has been known to kill animals as large as moose.
Wolverines mate in the summertime, but implantation in the uterus is delayed until early winter, which delays the development of the fetus.
The present worldwide wolverine population is unknown, although it appears that the animal has a very low population density throughout its range, possibly as a result of illegal hunting.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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