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Encyclopedia > Wolverine
Wolverine

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Mustelidae
Genus: Gulo
Pallas, 1780
Species: G. gulo
Binomial name
Gulo gulo
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Wolverine range
Wolverine range

The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is the largest land-dwelling species of the Mustelidae or weasel family (the Giant Otter is largest overall), and is the only species currently classified in the genus Gulo (meaning "glutton"). It is also called the Glutton or Carcajou. Some authors recognize two subspecies: the Old World form Gulo gulo gulo and the New World form G. g. luscus. A third subspecies limited to Vancouver Island (G. g. vancouverensis) is also occasionally described. However craniomorphic evidence suggests that the Vancouver Island wolverines are properly included within G. g. luscus. Look up wolverine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 571 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,400 × 1,000 pixels, file size: 660 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Peter Simon Pallas (September 22, 1741 - September 8, 1811) was a German-born Russian zoologist. ... Latin name redirects here. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Binomial name Pteronura brasiliensis (Gmelin, 1788) The Giant Otter, Pteronura brasiliensis, (also known as the river wolf) is the longest of the worlds otters, as well as one of the largest mustelids[2]. It is native to South America but is endangered and is also very rare in captivity. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the zoological term. ... For other uses, see Old World (disambiguation). ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ...

Contents

Anatomy

Anatomically, (Gulo) is a stocky and muscular animal, the largest land-dwelling member of the Weasel family Mustelidae but known on occasion to eat plant material.[2] It has glossy brown hair with stripes of dull yellow along the sides. Its fur is long and dense and does not retain much water, making it very resistant to frost, which is common in the wolverine's cold habitat. (For these reasons, the fur has been traditionally popular among hunters and trappers as a lining in jackets and parkas, especially for wear in Arctic conditions). The adult wolverine is about the size of a medium dog, with a length usually ranging from 65-87 cm (25-34 inches), a tail of 17-26 cm (7-10 inches), and weight of 10-30 kg (22-66 lb). Males are as much as 30 percent larger than the females. In appearance the wolverine resembles a small bear with a long tail. It has been known to give off a very strong, extremely unpleasant odor, giving rise to the nicknames "skunk bear" and "nasty cat." Wolverines, as other mustelids, possess a special upper molar in the back of the mouth that is rotated 90 degrees, or sideways. This special characteristic allows wolverines to tear off meat from prey or carrion that has been frozen solid and also to crush bones, which enables the wolverine to extract marrow.[3][4] Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Kg redirects here. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Behavior

Wolverine at the Polar Zoo, Norway
Wolverine at the Polar Zoo, Norway

The wolverine is, like most mustelids, remarkably strong for its size. It has been known to kill prey as large as moose, although most typically when these are weakened by winter or caught in snowbanks. Wolverines inhabiting the Old World (specifically, Fennoscandia) are more active hunters than their North American cousins.[5] This may be because competing predator populations are not as dense, making it more practical for the wolverine to hunt for itself than to wait for another animal to make a kill and then try to snatch it. They often feed on carrion left by wolves, so that changes in the population of wolves may affect the population of wolverines.[6] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (960 × 1,280 pixels, file size: 288 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (960 × 1,280 pixels, file size: 288 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Old World (disambiguation). ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... North American redirects here. ... An American Black Vulture feeding on squirrel carrion For other uses, see Carrion (disambiguation). ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call...


Armed with powerful jaws and a thick hide,[7] wolverines may defend kills against larger or more numerous predators.[8] There is at least one published account of a 27-pound wolverine's attempt to steal a kill from a much larger predator—namely, a black bear (adult males weigh 400 to 500 pounds). Unfortunately for the mustelid, the bear won what was ultimately a fatal contest, crushing the wolverine's skull.[9] This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ...


Mating season is in the summer, but the actual implantation of the embryo (blastocyst) in the uterus is stayed until early winter, delaying the development of the fetus. Females will often not produce young if food is scarce. Litters of typically two or three young ("kits") are born in the spring. Kits develop rapidly, reaching adult size within the first year of a lifespan that may reach anywhere from five to (in exceptional individuals) thirteen years.[citation needed] This article is about female reproductive anatomy. ... Embryonic diapause, in mammals is a condition where pre-implantation blastocysts are maintained in a state of dormancy, often due to environmental cues, until such time as the environment improves. ... For other uses, see Fetus (disambiguation). ...


Adult wolverines have no natural predators, save man, though they do come into conflict with (and may be killed by) other large predators over territory and food. Juveniles are of course more vulnerable; infants (kits) have been known on occasion to be taken by predatory birds such as eagles.[10]


Range

Wolverine on rock
Wolverine on rock

The wolverine lives primarily in isolated northern areas, for example the arctic and alpine regions of Alaska, northern Canada, Siberia and Scandinavia; they are also native to Russia and the Baltic countries. The wolverine is arguably found as far south as the Sierra Nevada[11] in California, and a few remain in the Rocky Mountains and northern Cascades of the United States.[2] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1999x1324, 685 KB)Media:Example. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1999x1324, 685 KB)Media:Example. ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... Alpine may refer to: Alpine, a breed of goat. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Population density in the wider Baltic region. ... This article is about the mountain range in the Western United States. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Mount Adams in Washington state The Cascade Range is a mountainous region famous for its chain of tall volcanos called the High Cascades that run north-south along the west coast of North America from British Columbia to the Shasta Cascade area of northern California. ...


The world's total wolverine population is unknown. The animal exhibits a low population density and requires a very large home range.[6] The range of a male wolverine can be more than 620 km² (240 sq mi) while encompassing the ranges of several females (with smaller home ranges of roughly 130-260 km² (50-100 sq mi). Adult wolverines try for the most part to keep non-overlapping ranges with adults of the same sex.[4] Radio tracking suggests an animal can range hundreds of miles in only a few months. Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ...

Country Population Area Year State of Population
Sweden 265+[12] Norrbotten[12] 1995-97[12] Stable[12]
Norway 150+[12] Snøhetta plateau and North[12] 1995-97[12] Decline[12]
Finland 115[12] Karelia and North[12] 1997[12] Stable[12]
Russia 1500[12] Taiga[12] 1970, 1990, [12] Decline[12]
Russia - Komi 885[12] - 1990[12] -
Russia - Archangelsk Oblast 410[12] Nenetsky Autonomous Area[12] 1990[12] Limited[12]
Russia - Kola Peninsula 160[12] Hunting Districts[12] 1990[12] Decline[12]
USA - Alaska[13] unknown[13] Kobuk Valley National Park[13], Selawik National Wildlife Refuge[13] 1998[13] Decline[13]
USA - Alaska[14] 3.0 (± 0.4 SE) wolverines/1,000 km2[14] Turnagain Arm and the Kenai Mountains[14] 2004[14] -[14]
USA - California[6] Unknown Tahoe National Forest[6] 2008[6] Unknown[6]
Canada - Yukon 9.7 (± 0.6 SE) wolverines/1,000 km2[14] Old Crow Flats[14] 2004[14] -[14]
Canada - Ontario[15] unclear[15] Red Lake – Sioux Lookout to Fort Severn – Peawanuck[15] 2004[15] Stable to Expanding[15]
Canada - Overall[16] 15000 to 19000[16] Overall[16] -[16] Stable[16]

This requirement for large territories brings wolverines into conflict with human development, and hunting and trapping further reduce their numbers, causing them to disappear from large parts of their former range; attempts to have them declared an endangered species have met with little success.[6] Norrbotten is the name of an unofficial Province (landskap) in Sweden, originally a part of Västerbotten, which gradually grow apart from Västerbotten after the creation of Norrbotten County in 1810. ... Snøhetta is an international architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design company based in Oslo, Norway. ... Map showing the parts Karelia is traditionally divided into. ... For other uses, see Taiga (disambiguation). ... Capital Syktyvkar Area - total - % water Ranked 15th - 415,900 km² - negligible Population - Total - Density Ranked 54th - est. ... Arkhangelsk Oblast (Russian: , Arkhangelskaya oblast) is a federal subject of Russia (an oblast). ... Flag Nenets Autonomous Okrug (Russian: ), or Nenetsia, is a federal subject of Russia (an autonomous okrug of Arkhangelsk Oblast). ... Location of Kola south of the Barents Sea. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Established in 1980 by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, Kobuk Valley National Park is a United States National Park in northwestern Alaska north of the Arctic Circle. ... Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska in the Waring Mountains was officially established in 1980 with the passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Cook Inlet, showing Knik and Turnagain Arms The Cook Inlet or Nuti Inlet is a large inlet of the Gulf of Alaska in south-central Alaska. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Tahoe National Forest is a is a U.S. National Forest located in California around Lake Tahoe. ... This article is about the Canadian territory. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Sioux Lookout is a small town in northern Ontario. ...


Name

The wolverine's (questionable) reputation as an insatiable glutton may be in part due to a false etymology. The animal's name in old Swedish, Fjellfräs, meaning "fell (mountain) cat", worked its way into German as Vielfraß, which means roughly "devours much". Its name in other West Germanic languages is similar (e.g. Dutch Veelvraat). The name in Old Norse, Jarfr, lives on in the regular Norwegian name jerv, regular Swedish name järv and regular Danish name jærv. A false etymology is an assumed or postulated etymology which is incorrect from the perspective of modern scholarly work in historical linguistics. ... The Ylläs fell in Finland Fell (from the Old Norse fjall, mountain) is a word used to refer to mountains, or certain types of mountainous landscape, in parts of England and Scandinavia. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ...


As a symbol

The Norwegian municipality of Bardu and Finnish municipality of Kittilä have a wolverine in their coats-of-arms. The municipality Bardu in the county of Troms, Norway, has 3,799 inhabitants as of January 1, 2002. ... Kittilä is a municipality of Finland and a popular holiday resort. ...


The U.S. state of Michigan is, by tradition, known as "The Wolverine State," and the University of Michigan takes the wolverine as its mascot. Many other educational institutions utilized the wolverine as an athletic mascot (e.g., Bronx High School of Science and Utah Valley University). A major league baseball team from the 1880s was also popularly known as the "Detroit Wolverines". The association is well and long established: for example, many Detroiters volunteered to fight during the American Civil War and George Armstrong Custer, who led the Michigan Brigade, called them the "Wolverines." The origins of this association are obscure: it may derive from a busy trade in wolverine furs in Sault Ste. Marie in the 18th century or may recall a disparagement intended to compare early settlers in Michigan with the vicious and gluttonous mammal. In any event, the animal appears no longer to be indigenous to the state (and in fact may never have been). It is, at the very least, an uncommon sight there: for example, when one was observed in February 2004[17] by hunters and biologists near Ubly, it was the first confirmed sighting of a wolverine in Michigan in about two centuries. It is unknown if that particular animal was a state native or if it migrated or had been released by humans. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... The Bronx High School of Science (commonly called Bronx Science, Bronx Sci, or just Science, and officially known as H.S. 445) is a specialized New York City public high school. ... The Detroit Wolverines were a 19th century baseball team that played in the National League from 1881 to 1888 in the city of Detroit, Michigan. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Custer redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Sault Ste. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... A biologist is a scientist devoted to and producing results in biology through the study of organisms. ... Ubly is a village in Huron County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


The European Football League (playing American football in Europe) includes the Helsinki Wolverines,[18] founded in 1995. The team plays in the Maple League, the Finnish top level. The wolverine figures prominently in the mythology of the Innu people of eastern Québec and Labrador. In at least one Innu myth, it is the creator of the world.[19] The European Football League (EFL) is a European Cup style tournament for European American Football teams affiliated to EFAF (European Federation of American Football). ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Innu flag Innu communities of Québec and Labrador The Innu are the indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of what Canadians refer to as eastern Québec and Labrador, Canada. ... During the 1960s, a terrorist group known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices. ... Labrador (also Coast of Labrador) is a region of Atlantic Canada. ...


In the movie Red Dawn, the group of teen partisans who fight the Soviet and Cuban forces call themselves the "Wolverines" based on their high school football team's mascot. For other uses, see Red dawn (disambiguation). ... Partisan may refer to: A member of a lightly-equipped irregular military force formed to oppose control of an area by a foreign power or by an army of occupation. ... Soviet redirects here. ...


In the Central Interior Hockey League, founded in 1996,[20] in British Columbia, Canada, an ice hockey team team based in Hazelton, British Columbia is named the Hazelton Wolverines.[21] Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Bulkley River (left) flowing into the Skeena River (right) near Ksan Ksan Historical Village // Hazelton is a small town located at the junction of the Bulkley and Skeena Rivers in northern British Columbia, Canada. ...


References

Wikispecies has information related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  1. ^ Mustelid Specialist Group (1996). Gulo gulo. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 11 May 2006. Listed as Vulnerable (VU A2c v2.3).
  2. ^ a b Rickert, Eve (June 28, 2007), “The perils of secrecy”, High Country News, <http://www.hcn.org/servlets/hcn.Article?article_id=17093> 
  3. ^ Pratt, Philip. Dentition of the Wolverine. The Wolverine Foundation, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-07-01.
  4. ^ a b Taylor, Ken (1994). Wolverine (HTML Public). Wildlife Notebook Series. Alaska Department of Fish & Game. Retrieved on 2007-01-21.
  5. ^ World Wildlife Fund–Sweden: 1st International Symposium on Wolverine Research and Management (PDF)
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Wolverine wonder", Grist.org, March 4, 2008; also Associated Press (2008-03-10). Student's camera snaps wolverine in California. CNN.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-11.
  7. ^ World Biomes: Wolverine
  8. ^ YouTube: Wolverine challenges bear to leave
  9. ^ Science Daily (2003-05-06). "When Predators Attack (Each Other): Researchers Document First-known Killing Of A Wolverine By A Black Bear In Yellowstone". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  10. ^ Hinterland Who’s who: Wolverine
  11. ^ Knudson, Tom (March 5, 2008), “Elusive wolverine makes its first Sierra appearance in years”, Sacramento Bee, <http://www.sacbee.com/101/story/761071.html> 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Arild Landa, Mats Lindén and Ilpo Kojola (2000). Action Plan for the conservation of Wolverines (Gulo gulo) in Europe. Nature and environment, No. 115. Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (Bern Convention). Retrieved on 2008-01-25.
  13. ^ a b c d e f Brad Shults, Gene Peltola, Jerrold Belant and Kyran Kunkel (12/17/98). population ecology of wolverines within Kobuk valley national park and Selawik national wildlife refuge. Rocky Mountain Research Station, US Department of Agriculture - Forest Service. Retrieved on 2008-01-26.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i Howard N. Goldena, J. David Henryb, Earl F. Beckera, Michael I. Goldsteinc, John M. Mortond, Dennis Frost, and Aaron J. Poef (12/17/98). Estimating wolverine Gulo gulo population size using quadrat sampling of tracks in snow. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation; Parks Canada - Kluane National Park; US Forest Service - Alaska Regional Office; United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge; North Yukon Renewable Resources Council; United States Forest Service, Chugach National Forest;. Retrieved on 2007.
  15. ^ a b c d e Dr. Audrey Magoun, Neil Dawson, Dr. Geoff Lipsett-Moore, Dr. Justina C. Ray (2004). Boreal Wolverine: A Focal Species for Land Use planning in Ontario's Northern Boreal Forest - Project Report. The Wolverine Foundation, Inc., Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Ontario Parks, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)/University of Toronto. Retrieved on 2008-01-26.
  16. ^ a b c d e Brian Slough et al. (May 2003). COSEWIC Assessment and Update Status Report on the Wolverine (Gulo gulo) - Eastern Population Western Population in Canada. COSEWIC (committee on the status of endangered wildlife in Canada) 2003. COSEWIC assessment and update status report on the wolverine Gulo gulo in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. vi + 41 pp.. Retrieved on 2008-01-26.
  17. ^ MSNBC: First Michigan wolverine spotted in 200 years
  18. ^ Helsinki Wolverines
  19. ^ Armitage, Peter (1992). "Religious ideology among the Innu of eastern Quebec and Labrador". Religiologiques 6. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.  (PDF)
  20. ^ CIHL
  21. ^ Hazelton Wolverines

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External links

Gallery

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,000 × 2,000 pixels, file size: 5. ... Subfamilies Lutrinae Melinae Mellivorinae Taxidiinae Mustelinae Mustelidae is a family of carnivorous mammals. ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Families Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Mustelidae Nandiniidae Odobenidae Pinnipedia Procyonidae Ursidae Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora includes over 260 placental mammals. ... This article is about the carnivorous mammals. ... Species Aonyx capensis Aonyx cinerea Aonyx is a genus of otters, containing three species, the African Clawless Otter, Cameroon Clawless Otter and the Oriental Small-clawed Otter. ... Binomial name (Schinz, 1821) The African Clawless Otter, Aonyx capensis, also known as the Cape Clawless Otter or Groot otter, is the second largest freshwater species of otter. ... Binomial name Amblonyx cinereus (Illiger, 1815) Oriental Small-clawed Otters, (aka Asian Small-Clawed Otters) are the smallest otters in the world. ... Binomial name Enhydra lutris (Linnaeus, 1758) The Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) is a large otter native to the North Pacific, from northern Japan and Kamchatka west across the Aleutian Islands south to California. ... Binomial name Enhydra lutris (Linnaeus, 1758) The Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) is a large otter native to the North Pacific, from northern Japan and Kamchatka west across the Aleutian Islands south to California. ... Genera Amblonyx Aonyx Enhydra Lontra Lutra Lutrogale Pteronura Otters are aquatic or marine carnivorous mammals, members of the large and diverse family Mustelidae, which also includes weasels, polecats, badgers and others. ... Binomial name Lontra canadensis (Schreber, 1777) The Northern River Otter, Lontra canadensis, is a North American member of the Mustelidae or weasel family. ... Binomial name Lontra provocax The Southern river otter (Lontra provocax) is a species of otter that lives in Chile and Argentina. ... Binomial name Lontra longicaudis (Olfers, 1818) The Neotropical River Otter (or just Neotropical Otter), Lontra longicaudis, is an otter species found in Central and South America. ... Binomial name (Molina, 1782) Marine Otters (Lontra felina) are rare and poorly-understood marine mammals of the weasel family (Family Mustelidae). ... Binomial name Lutra lutra (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Otter, Lutra lutra, is a European member of the Mustelidae or weasel family, and is typical of freshwater otters. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map (note: range also includes British Isles) The Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra, also known as the Eurasian river otter, common otter, Old World otter and European otter, is a European and Asian member of the Lutrinae or otter subfamily, and is typical of freshwater otters. ... Binomial name Lutra sumatrana The hairy-nosed otter (Lutra sumatrana) is an otter thought extinct in 1998 but more were found. ... Speckle-throated otter (hydrictis maculicollis) otherwise known as the spot-necked otter hunts in rivers and lakes and has to have clear water for visual purposes. ... Speckle-throated otter (hydrictis maculicollis) otherwise known as the spot-necked otter hunts in rivers and lakes and has to have clear water for visual purposes. ... Species † Lutrogale cretensis - Cretan Otter † Lutrogale palaeoleptonyx Lutrogale perspicillata - Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale is a genus of otter, with only one extant species - the smooth-coated otter. ... Binomial name Lutrogale perspicillata (Geoffroy, 1826) The Smooth-coated Otter (Lutrogale perspicillata) is a species of otter, the only extant representative of the genus Lutrogale. ... Binomial name Pteronura brasiliensis (Gmelin, 1788) The Giant Otter, Pteronura brasiliensis, (also known as the river wolf) is the longest of the worlds otters, as well as one of the largest mustelids[2]. It is native to South America but is endangered and is also very rare in captivity. ... Binomial name Pteronura brasiliensis (Gmelin, 1788) The Giant Otter, Pteronura brasiliensis, (also known as the river wolf) is the longest of the worlds otters, as well as one of the largest mustelids[2]. It is native to South America but is endangered and is also very rare in captivity. ... For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The Eurasian or European badger, Meles meles, is a mammal indigenous to most of Europe (excluding northern Scandinavia, Iceland, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and Cyprus) and to many parts of Asia, from about 15° to 65° North, and from about 10° West to 135° East. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The Eurasian or European badger, Meles meles, is a mammal indigenous to most of Europe (excluding northern Scandinavia, Iceland, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily and Cyprus) and to many parts of Asia, from about 15° to 65° North, and from about 10° West to 135° East. ... Binomial name Melogale everetti (Thomas, 1895) The Everetts Ferret Badger (Melogale everetti), also known as the Kinabalu Ferret Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Melogale moschata The Chinese Ferret Badger Distinctive mask-like face markings distinguish the Chinese ferret badger from other oriental mustelids. ... Mydaus is a genus of Old World carnivore comprising of two species of stink badger. ... Binomial name Mydaus marchei (Huet, 1887) The Palawan stink badger is a small badger that lives on the Philippine Islands of Palawan and Busuanga. ... The Javan Stink Badger (Mydaus javanensis, also called the Teledu, Malay Stink Badger and Indonesian Stink Badger) is a member of the badger family endemic to Java. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776) The Ratel (Mellivora capensis), also known as the Honey Badger, is a member of the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... Mustelinae is a Subfamily of Family Mustelidae and includes wolverines, weasels, ferrets, martens, and similar carnivorous mammals of Order Carnivora. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 A Tayra at the Summit Botanical Gardens and Zoo, Panamá The Tayra (Eira barbara), also known as the Tolomuco or Perico ligero in Central America, is an omnivorous animal from the weasel family Mustelidae. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 A Tayra at the Summit Botanical Gardens and Zoo, Panamá The Tayra (Eira barbara), also known as the Tolomuco or Perico ligero in Central America, is an omnivorous animal from the weasel family Mustelidae. ... The hurón or grison (Spanish: ferret) refers to either of two related ferret-like mammals from Central and South America: Galictis vittatus. ... Binomial name Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782) The Lesser Grison (Spanish: Hurón Menor; Portuguese: Furão), Galictis cuja, is an animal belonging to the ferret family Mustelidae from South America. ... Binomial name Galictis vittata (Schreber, 1776) The Greater Grison, Galictis vittata, is an animal belonging to the ferret family Mustelidae from Central and South America, from southern Mexico to Brazil and Bolivia, living in savannas and rainforests, usually seen near rivers and streams. ... Binomial name Ictonyx striatus Kaup, 1835 The Striped Polecat (Ictonyx striatus, also called the African Polecat, Zoril, Zorille or Zorilla) is a member of the weasel family which somewhat resembles a skunk. ... Binomial name Ictonyx striatus Kaup, 1835 The Striped Polecat (Ictonyx striatus, also called the African Polecat, Zoril, Zorille or Zorilla) is a member of the weasel family which somewhat resembles a skunk. ... Binomial name Lyncodon patagonicus (Blainville, 1842) The Patagonian weasel is a small mustelid that is the only member of the genus Lyncodon. ... Binomial name Lyncodon patagonicus (Blainville, 1842) The Patagonian weasel is a small mustelid that is the only member of the genus Lyncodon. ... Species Martes americana Martes flavigula Martes foina Martes gwatkinsii Martes martes Martes melampus Martes pennanti Martes zibellina For the Wiltshire village see Marten, Wiltshire. ... Binomial name Martes americana (Turton, 1806) The American Marten (Martes americana) is a North American marten sometimes also called the Pine Marten, even though it is a separate species from the European Pine Marten. ... Binomial name Martes flavigula Boddaert, 1785 Subspecies M. f. ... Binomial name Martes foina (Erxleben, 1777) The Beech Marten (Martes foina) is the most common species of marten in Central Europe. ... Nilgiri marten Martes gwatkinsii Horsfield, 1851 Distribution The Nilgiri marten is endemic to Western Ghats. ... Binomial name Martes martes (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is about the European Pine Marten. ... Binomial name (Erxleben, 1777) The fisher is a North American marten, a medium sized mustelid. ... Binomial name Martes zibellina Linnaeus, 1758 The Sable (Martes zibellina) is a small mammal, closely akin to the martens, living in southern Russia near the Ural Mountains through Siberia and Mongolia to Hokkaidō in Japan. ... For other uses, see Weasel (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Desmarest, 1818 The Tropical Weasel or Amazon Weasel (Mustela africana) is a South American weasel, which has been recorded in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. ... Binomial name Mustela altaica Pallas, 1811 The Mountain Weasel, also known as the Pale Weasel, is a species of weasel that lives in mountainous parts of Asia from Kazakhstan, Tibet and the Himalayas through to Mongolia, northeastern China, southern Siberia and Korea. ... Ermine redirects here. ... Binomial name (Lesson, 1827) The Steppe Polecat (Mustela eversmannii) is a small carnivore and is one of several species of weasel that belong to the genus Mustela. ... Species Mustela felipei Colombian Weasel (Comadreja Colombiana) is a mammal originary of south america, specially Colombia , but some specimens have been found in northern Ecuador. ... Binomial name Mustela frenata Lichtenstein, 1831 The Long-tailed Weasel (Mustela frenata) is the most widely distributed mustelid in the New World. ... Binomial name Hodgson, 1835 The Yellow-bellied Weasel (Mustela kathiah) is a species of mammal in the Mustelidae family. ... Binomial name Mustela lutreola (Linnaeus, 1761) The European Mink, Mustela lutreola, is a European member of the Mustelidae family found in some regions of Spain, France, Romania, Sweden, Poland and the greater part of Russia, though not found east of the Ural Mountains. ... The Indonesian Mountain Weasel (Mustela lutreolina) is only found on the islands of Java and Sumatra at elevations over 1,000 metres. ... Binomial name (Audubon & Bachman, 1851) The Black-footed Ferret (Mustela nigripes) is a small carnivorous North American mammal closely related to the Steppe Polecat of Russia, and a member of the diverse family Mustelidae which also includes weasels, mink, polecats, martens, otters, and badgers. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1766 The Least Weasel, is the smallest member of the genus Mustela, and indeed in the entire order carnivora. ... Binomial name Mustela putorius (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is about one species of mammal referred to as Polecat. For other uses, see Polecat (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Mustela sibirica Pallas, 1773 The Siberian Mountain Weasel, also known as the Siberian Weasel, Kolinsky or Himalayan Weasel, is a rust coloured relative of the weasel. ... Trinomial name Mustela strigidorsa xxxx (AuthorLastname, XXXX) The Back-striped weasel (Lat. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1777) The American Mink is a trademark of the American Legend Cooperative The American Mink, Neovison vison, is a North American member of the Mustelidae family found in Alaska, Canada and most of the United States. ... Binomial name Vormela peregusna (Güldenstädt, 1770) The marbled polecat () is a small mammal belonging to the monotypic genus Vormela within the Mustelinae subfamily. ... Binomial name Vormela peregusna (Güldenstädt, 1770) The marbled polecat () is a small mammal belonging to the monotypic genus Vormela within the Mustelinae subfamily. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Wolverine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (633 words)
The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is the largest terrestrial species of the Mustelidae or weasel family, and is also called the glutton or carcajou.
Wolverines mate in the summertime, but implantation in the uterus is delayed until early winter, which delays the development of the fetus.
The present worldwide wolverine population is unknown, although it appears that the animal has a very low population density throughout its range, possibly as a result of illegal hunting.
Wolverine (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8847 words)
Wolverine has strong memories of loving the Native American woman, Silver Fox, and living with her in a cabin before they are recruited into Team X, but whether or not these memories are true would tantalize him for a long time before he finally learns the truth.
Wolverine took it upon himself to watch over the daughter, Amiko, who to this day Logan tries to visit, although she is currently under the care of his close friend and sometimes lover Yukio.
Wolverine is then captured by a restarted Weapon X program under the leadership of Director Malcolm Colcord, a soldier Wolverine disfigured when he escaped from the original Weapon X facility.
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