FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Wisdom" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Wisdom
Personification of wisdom (in Greek, "Σοφια" or "Sophia") at the Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey.
Personification of wisdom (in Greek, "Σοφια" or "Sophia") at the Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey.

Wisdom, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is defined as the "1 a: Accumulated philosophic or scientific learning-knowledge; b: Ability to discern inner qualities and relationships-insight; c: Good sense-judgment d: Generally accepted belief <challenges what has become accepted wisdom among many historians — Robert Darnton>. d: A wise attitude, belief, or course of action. e: The teachings of the ancient wise men"[1]. Wisdom or the Wisdom of Solomon is one of the deuterocanonical books of the Bible. ... Wisdom is a 1986 American crime film. ... Wisdom is a surname, and may refer to Jack Wisdom John Wisdom John Minor Wisdom Norman Wisdom Olli Wisdom Peter Wisdom Robert Wisdom Wisdom Categories: | ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 582 KB) Ephesus July 2005 photo by Radomil talk 21:21, 30 November 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wisdom Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 582 KB) Ephesus July 2005 photo by Radomil talk 21:21, 30 November 2005 (UTC) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wisdom Metadata This file contains... Phillipp Veits Germania (1877), a personification of Germany. ... Ruins of Celsus Library Celsus library is a monumental tomb for Gaius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus, built by his son Galius Julius Aquila in 135 in Ephesus. ... Ephesus was one one of the great cities of the Ionian Greeks in Asia Minor, located in Lydia where the Cayster river flows into the Aegean Sea (in modern day Turkey). ... Merriam-Webster, originally known as the G. & C. Merriam Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, is a United States company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries that are descendants of Noah Websters An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828). ... Robert Darnton (born May 10, 1939) is an American cultural historian, recognized as a leading expert on eighteenth century France. ...


Most psychologists regard wisdom as distinct from the cognitive abilities measured by standardized intelligence tests. Wisdom is often considered to be a trait that can be developed by experience, but not taught. When applied to practical matters, the term wisdom is synonymous with prudence. Some see wisdom as a quality that even a child, otherwise immature, may possess independent of experience or complete knowledge. The status of wisdom or prudence as a virtue is recognized in cultural, philosophical and religious sources. Some define wisdom in a utilitarian sense, as foreseeing consequences and acting to maximize the long-term common good.[citation needed] For other uses, see Intelligence (disambiguation). ... Prudence, by Luca Giordano Allegory of Prudence, by Simon Vouet Look up Prudence, prudence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Philosophy (from the Greek words philos and sophia meaning love of wisdom) is understood in different ways historically and by different philosophers. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... Utilitarianism is a suggested theoretical framework for morality, law and politics, based on quantitative maximisation of some definition of utility for society or humanity. ... For the philosophical concept of goodness see Goodness and value theory. ...


As such, in general, wisdom is looked at his/her ideals and principles that govern all actions and decisions. Applications of personal wisdom include one's ethical and social guidelines in life that determines one’s unique style of personality, the particular nature of short and long-term goal(s) pursued in life (spiritual or materialistic for example), perspective on life, social attitudes, etc.

Contents

Philosophical perspectives

A standard philosophical, (philos-sophia: literally "lover of wisdom"), definition says that wisdom consists of making the best use of available knowledge. As with any decision, a wise decision may be made with incomplete information[citation needed]. The technical philosophical term for the opposite of wisdom is folly.[citation needed] For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Propositional knowledge or declarative knowledge is knowledge that some proposition is either true or false. ... The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ... Folly may mean: Folly, in architecture, an extravagant building Stupidity Folly (band), an American skacore band Folly, fictional character in The Praise of Folly The antonym of wisdom Category: ...


In his Metaphysics, Aristotle defines wisdom as knowledge of causes: why things exist in a particular fashion. Metaphysics is one of the principal works of Aristotle and the first major work of the branch of philosophy with the same name. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ...


In addition to experience there are a variety of other avenues to gaining wisdom. For example, Freethinkers and others believe that wisdom may come from pure reason and perhaps experience, while others believe that it comes from intuition or spirituality.[citation needed] Freethought is a philosophical viewpoint that holds that beliefs should be formed on the basis of science and logical principles and not be compromised by authority, tradition, or any other dogma. ... For other uses, see Reason (disambiguation). ... Intuition is an unconscious form of knowledge. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ...


Beginning with the ancient Greeks, European culture associates wisdom with virtue. Metis and Athene are associated with wisdom from earliest times. For example, many philosophers talk about the virtue of wisdom in relation to courage and moderation, and in the Roman Catholic church, wisdom (Prudence) stands with justice, fortitude and moderation as one of the four cardinal virtues. Plato's dialogues mention the virtue of wisdom, as knowledge about the Good and the courage to act accordingly. The Good would be about the right relations between all that exists. The Good, as a Platonic Form, would involve the perfect ideas of good government, love, friendship, community, and a right relation to the Divine. Perhaps the search or love of wisdom is more important than any proven claim. Socrates only claimed to know that he did not know, but this he was very certain of, and he showed the many contradictions in the claims of his fellow citizens[citation needed]. Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... This article is about the goddess Athena. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Prudence, by Luca Giordano Allegory of Prudence, by Simon Vouet Look up Prudence, prudence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the concept of justice. ... Four Cardinal Virtues of the Catholic Church doing bad to. ... Look up Moderation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In the Christian church, there are four cardinal virtues. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Courage (disambiguation). ... Look up good in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Holists believe that wise people sense, work with and align themselves and others to life. In this view, wise people help others appreciate the fundamental interconnectedness of life[citation needed]. Holism (from holon, a Greek word meaning entity) is the idea that the properties of a system cannot be determined or explained by the sum of its components alone. ... For other uses, see Life (disambiguation). ... Interconnectedness is one of many concepts gaining popularity as part of the terminology of a worldview which sees a oneness in all things. ...


Thoreau believed that “it is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things[citation needed].” Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 - May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau) was a noted American author and philosopher who is most famous for Walden, his essay on civil disobedience, and his call for the preservation of wilderness. ...


Nicholas Maxwell, a modern philosopher, argued that the basic aim of academic inquiry ought to be to seek and promote wisdom — wisdom being construed to be the capacity to realize what is of value in life for oneself and others, wisdom thus including knowledge and technological know-how, but much else besides.[2] // Nicholas Maxwell (b. ...


Scientific perspectives

Some may find the scientific method[3] to be a satisfactory path to a goal of gaining wisdom. Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ...


Psychological perspectives

Psychologists have gathered data on commonly held beliefs or folk theories about wisdom.[4] These analyzes indicate that although "there is an overlap of the implicit theory of wisdom with intelligence, perceptiveness, spirituality and shrewdness, it is evident that wisdom is a distinct term and not a composite of other terms."[5]


Personality theorist Erik Erikson related wisdom to the last stage of his eight-stage theory of psychosocial development. Erikson's theory spans the entire lifespan and frames each stage in the form of internally-generated questions or tensions. Erikson claimed that in the last stage of human development, from approximately 65 years to death, individuals must resolve a psychological conflict between integrity and despair. He proposed that attaining wisdom is a favorable resolution and product of this conflict. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


“Strength here takes the form of that detached yet active concern with life bounded by death,which we call wisdom… Not that each man can evolve wisdom for himself… To whatever abyss ultimate concerns may lead individual men, man as a psychological creature will face, toward the end of his life, a new edition of the identity crisis which we may state by the words 'I am what survives me'.”[6]


Thus, within Eriksonian theory, wisdom universally surfaces as an optimal potential outcome of the human experience.


In the 1970s, Vivian Clayton pioneered the academic study of wisdom. Clayton "is generally recognized as the first psychologist to ask, in even faintly scientific terms, 'What does wisdom mean, and how does age affect it?'"[7] Clayton's work caught the attention of Paul Baltes, who later founded the Berlin Wisdom Project at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany. Another wisdom researcher, sociologist Monika Ardelt, has developed a "Three-Dimensional Wisdom Scale", a test that individuals can take for a numerical assessment of their wisdom on a scale of one to five. The number of academic publications about wisdom increased significantly from 1984 to 2000. Nevertheless, according to Jacqui Smith, one of Baltes's collaborators, the subject is not completely accepted in academia.[8] Paul B. Baltes (Saarlouis, June 18, 1939 - Berlin, November 7, 2006) was a reknowned German psychologist, credited with developing the selective optimization with compensation theory and theories on successful aging as well as developing theories on lifespan and wisdom. ... The Max Planck Institute for Human Development is located in Berlin, Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous...


Religious perspectives

Further information: Sophia (wisdom)
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Some religions have specific teachings relating to wisdom. In Mesopotamian Religion and Mythology Enki, also known as Ea, was the God of wisdom and intelligence. Wisdom was achieved by restoring balance. Sophia (Σoφíα, Greek for wisdom) is a central term in Hellenistic philosophy and religion, Gnostic Christianity and Orthodox Christianity. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Mesopotamian mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian mythologies from the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Iraq. ... Enki (DEN.KI(G)) was a deity in Sumerian mythology, later known as Ea in Babylonian mythology, originally chief god of the city of Eridu. ...


In Norse mythology, the god Odin is especially known for his wisdom, often acquired through various hardships and ordeals involving pain and self-sacrifice. In one instance he plucked out an eye and offered it to Mímir, guardian of the well of knowledge and wisdom, in return for a drink from the well.[9] In another famous account, Odin hanged himself for nine nights from Yggdrasil, the World Tree that unites all the realms of existence, suffering from hunger and thirst and finally wounding himself with a spear until he gained the knowledge of runes for use in casting powerful magic.[10] He was also able to acquire the mead of poetry from the giants, a drink of which could grant the power of a scholar or poet, for the benefit of gods and mortals alike.[9] Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... For other meanings of Odin,Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ... For other uses, see Yggdrasil (disambiguation). ... This article is about the religious motif. ... Norse cosmology, as it is described in Norse mythology, recognizes the existence of multiple worlds and the World Tree Yggdrasill. ... Rune redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... In Norse mythology, the mead of poetry is a beverage that gives anyone who drinks it the talent of poetry. ... The giants Fafner and Fasolt seize Freyja in Arthur Rackhams illustration to Richard Wagners version of the Norse myths. ... The skald was a member of a group of courtly poets, whose poetry is associated with the courts of Scandinavian and Icelandic leaders during the Viking age, who composed and performed renditions of aspects of what we now characterise as Old Norse poetry. ... In Old Norse, the Æsir (singular Ás, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur, Anglo-Saxon Ós, from Proto-Germanic *Ansuz) are the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse mythology. ...


In Islam, according to the Qur'an Prophet Muhammed was chosen by God to represent his wisdom. The Prophet Muhammad said that: "Fearing God in your actions and intentions, and knowing that Almighty God is watching you wherever and whenever you are is the head/peak of wisdom"[citation needed]. In addition, Islam also mentions that a wise man with the name of Luqman once told his son to: "Sit with the learned men and keep close to them. Allah gives life to the hearts with the light of wisdom as Allah gives life to the dead earth with the abundant rain of the sky"[1]. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... For other people named Muhammad, see Muhammad (disambiguation). ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Luqman (Arabic: ‎) is the name of a person mentioned in the sura named after him, Sura Luqman, but it is unclear whether he is a prophet or a wali. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...


In the Christian Bible, the magi (or "wise men") are sent by God to give the newly born Jesus three types of gifts. Wisdom is also represented by the sense of justice of the lawful and wise king Solomon, who asks God for wisdom in 1 Kings 3. Proverbs 9:10 says: "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom," and 8:13 "To fear the Lord is to hate evil;". The Catholic and Orthodox deuterocanonical books of the Bible include the Book of Wisdom (Wisdom of Solomon). Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... For other uses, see Magi (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... (Redirected from 1 Kings) The Books of Kings (also known as [The Book of] Kings in Hebrew: Sefer Melachim &#1502;&#1500;&#1499;&#1497;&#1501;) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ... Deuterocanonical books is a term used since the sixteenth century in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Christianity to describe certain books and passages of the Christian Bible, in contrast to the protocanonical books which are contained in the Hebrew Bible. ... Wisdom or the Wisdom of Solomon is one of the deuterocanonical books of the Bible. ...


There is an oppositional element in Christian thought between secular wisdom and Godly wisdom. The apostle Paul states that worldly wisdom thinks the claims of Christ to be foolishness. However, to those who are being saved Christ represents the wisdom of God. (1 Corinthians 1:17-31) Also, Wisdom is one of the Seven gifts of the Holy Spirit. This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... A 19th century picture of Paul of Tarsus Paul of Tarsus (originally Saul of Tarsus) or Saint Paul the Apostle (fl. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... (Redirected from 1 Corinthians) See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... This article is about seven Gifts of the Holy Spirit in the High Church Christian tradition. ...


The seventh verse of the first chapter of the Jewish Proverbs states "Fear of God is the beginning of Wisdom" (Proverbs 1:7). The beginning of fear of God is hating evil, the ways of evil, arrogance, pride and a duplicitous mouth (Proverbs). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ...


Confucius stated that wisdom can be learned by three methods: Reflection (the noblest), imitation (the easiest) and experience (the bitterest). According to "Doctrine of the Mean," Confucius also said, "Love of learning is akin to wisdom. To practice with vigor is akin to humanity. To know to be shameful is akin to courage (zhi,ren,yi..three of Mengzi's sprouts of virtue)." Compare this with the beginning of the Confucian classic "Great Learning" which begins with "The Way of learning to be great consists in manifesting the clear character, loving the people, and abiding in the highest good" one can clearly see the correlation with the Roman virtue "prudence," especially if one transliterates clear character as clear conscience. (Quotes from Chan's Sources of Chinese Philosophy). Confucius (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu), lit. ...


Buddha taught that a wise person is endowed with good bodily conduct, good verbal conduct & good mental conduct (AN3:2) and a wise person does actions that are unpleasant to do but give good results and doesn’t do actions that are pleasant to do but give bad results (AN4:115). This is called karma. The Buddha has much to say on the subject of wisdom including: Media:Example. ... The Anguttara Nikaya (Gradual Collection) is the fourth of the five nikayas, or collections, in the Sutta Pitaka, which is one of the three baskets that compose the Pali Tipitaka. ... For other uses, see Karma (disambiguation). ...

  • He who arbitrates a case by force does not thereby become just (established in Dhamma). But the wise man is he who carefully discriminates between right and wrong.[11]
  • He who leads others by nonviolence, righteously and equitably, is indeed a guardian of justice, wise and righteous.[12]
  • One is not wise merely because he talks much. But he who is calm, free from hatred and fear, is verily called a wise man.[13]
  • By quietude alone one does not become a sage (muni) if he is foolish and ignorant. But he who, as if holding a pair of scales, takes the good and shuns the evil, is a wise man; he is indeed a muni by that very reason. He who understands both good and evil as they really are, is called a true sage.[14]

In Taoism Practical Wisdom may be described as knowing what to say and when to say it. The word dharma (Sanskrit; &#2343;&#2352;&#2381;&#2350; in the Devanagari script) or dhamma (Pali) is used in most or all philosophies and religions of Indian origin, Dharmic faiths, namely Hinduism (Sanatana Dharma), Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism. ... A wise old man: Philosopher in Meditation by Rembrandt The wise old man (or Senex) is an archetype as described by Carl Jung. ... Taoism (or Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical traditions and concepts. ...


Quotations about wisdom

"Wise men say nothing in dangerous times." ― Aesop Aesop, as conceived by Diego Velázquez Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel in 1493. ...


"When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years." ― Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...


"I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." ― Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


"Patience is the companion of wisdom." ― St. Augustine Patience, engraving by Hans Sebald Beham, 1540 Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: patience Patience is the ability to endure waiting, delay, or provocation without becoming annoyed or upset, or to persevere calmly when faced with difficulties. ... Augustinus redirects here. ...


"Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something." ― Plato For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ...


"Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers." ― Alfred Lord Tennyson Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ...


"It requires wisdom to understand wisdom: the music is nothing if the audience is deaf." ― Walter Lippmann Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 - December 14, 1974) was an influential American writer, journalist, and political commentator. ...


"All I know is that I know nothing." ― Socrates This page is about the Classical Greek philosopher. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Wisdom, Merriam-Webſter.
  2. ^ MAXWELL, Nicholas.
  3. ^ William Stanley Jevons (1873, 1877) The Principles of Science: a treatise on logic and scientific method Dover edition, with a new preface by Ernest Nagel (1958)
  4. ^ Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Implicit theories of intelligence, creativity, and wisdom. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49, 607–62.
  5. ^ Brown, S. C., & Greene, J. A. (2006). The Wisdom Development Scale: Translating the conceptual to the concrete. Journal of College Student Development, 47, 1–19.
  6. ^ Erikson, E. (1968). Identity: Youth and crisis (pp. 140–41). New York: Norton.
  7. ^ Hall, Stephen S. (May 6, 2007), "The Older-and-Wiser Hypothesis", The New York Times Magazine: 61, <http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/magazine/06Wisdom-t.html?ex=1336104000&en=4b4959cf047f61fe&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss>
  8. ^ Hall, Stephen S. (May 6, 2007), "The Older-and-Wiser Hypothesis", The New York Times Magazine: 62, <http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/magazine/06Wisdom-t.html?ex=1336104000&en=4b4959cf047f61fe&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss>
  9. ^ a b Faulkes, Anthony (transl. and ed.) (1987). Edda (Snorri Sturluson). Everyman. ISBN 0-460-87616-3
  10. ^ Larrington, Carolyne (transl. and ed.) (1996). Poetic Edda. Oxford World's Classics. ISBN 0-19-283946-2
  11. ^ Dhammapada v.256
  12. ^ Dhammapada v.257
  13. ^ Dhammapada v.258
  14. ^ Dhammapada v.268-9

[William Stanley Jevons] William Stanley Jevons (September 1, 1835 - August 13, 1882), English economist and logician, was born in Liverpool. ... Ernest Nagel (November 16, 1901, Prague, Austro-Hungarian Empire -- September 22, 1985, New York City) was among the most important philosophers of science of his time. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... A statue of Snorri Sturluson by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland was erected at Reykholt in 1947. ... Everymans Library is a series of reprinted classic literature currently published by Alfred A. Knopf (a division of Random House) in the United States, and Weidenfeld and Nicolson in the United Kingdom. ... Look up Poetic Edda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Oxford Worlds Classics is an imprint of Oxford University Press. ... The Dhammapada (Pali, translates as Path of the Dharma. ...

Further reading

  • Miller, James, L., "Measures of Wisdom: The Cosmic Dance in Classical and Christian Antiquity", University of Toronto Press, 1986. ISBN 0802025536

See also

Wisdom or the Wisdom of Solomon is one of the deuterocanonical books of the Bible. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: &#1497;&#1492;&#1493;&#1491;&#1497;) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The term ecological wisdom, or ecosophy, is a philosophy of ecological harmony or equilibrium. ... For other uses, see Intelligence (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Regret was a famous racehorse, foaled in 1912 to Broomstick and sired by Jersey Lightning. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Streetwise has a number of different meanings: Streetwise was a small hatchback made by the MG Rover Group, called the Rover Streetwise, Wisdom in a particular subject. ... The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter Than the Few and How Collective Wisdom Shapes Business, Economies, Societies and Nations, first published in 2004, is a book written by James Surowiecki about the aggregation of information in groups, resulting in decisions that, he argues, are often better than... Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... Wisdom literature is the a genre of literature common in the Ancient Near East. ... Theosophy is a word and a concept known anciently, commonly understood in the modern era to describe the studies of religious philosophy and metaphysics originating with Helena Petrovna Blavatsky from the 1870s. ...

External links

Look up Wisdom in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Wisdom Quotes (547 words)
It is [our] ingenuity, rather than [our] animal nature, that has given [our] fellow creatures such a bitter earthly fate.
Sign up to receive periodic wisdom quotes by email from this site
February 99: this site chosen as a "Best of the Net" site by the MiningCo.com Guide to Quotations (now About.com).
The Wisdom Page --- a site devoted to wisdom resources (4061 words)
Wisdom, Intuition, and Ethics by Trevor Curnow is a valuable resource for anyone wanting to explore the history of wisdom, its nature, and wisdom's relationship to ethics.
Wisdom and the Academic Enterprise a short introduction by Copthorne Macdonald to the issue of wisdom acquisition as an academic focus, and the work of British scholar Nicholas Maxwell.
Wisdom at Work by Let Davidson is an essay that discusses how Davidson has been applying the principles and techniques of the wisdom tradition to the workplace in his role as consultant and trainer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m