FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod
Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod
Classification Protestant
Orientation Conservative Lutheran
Polity Congregational
Origin 1850
Wisconsin
Branched from German Lutheranism
Separations Protes'tant Conference (separated 1927); Church of the Lutheran Confession (separated 1960)
Associations Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference
Geographical Area United States and 24 other countries
Statistics
Congregations 1200
Members 380,000

The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) is a North American religious denomination belonging to the Lutheran tradition within Christianity. Characterized as theologically conservative, it was founded in 1850 in Wisconsin. As of 2005, it had a membership of over 398,000 in more than 1,200 congregations, in all 50 U.S. states as well as 24 countries. It is the third largest Lutheran denomination in the United States, following Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (LCMS). a simple logo of the WELS This work is copyrighted. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Christian doctrine redirects here. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or Christian denomination. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Church of the Lutheran Confession is a conservative Christian religious body theologically adhering to confessional Lutheran doctrine. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC) is the successor to the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America except that it is international in scope rather than restricted to North America. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Christian doctrine redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... A congregation is the group of members who make up a local Christian church, Jewish synagogue, Mosque or other religious assembly. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... LCMS redirects here. ...


WELS is in fellowship with the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS), a smaller denomination based in southeast Minnesota, and is a member of the Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC), a worldwide organization of Lutheran church bodies. It should be noted that the WELS, along with the LCMS, are independent Lutheran denominations and are not a part of the ELCA, which is structured due to its size and thus has "synods" within the denomination. (The term "synod" used by the ELCA refers to administrative districts in different regions of the United States. (example: Illinois Synod of the ELCA)). The Evangelical Lutheran Synod or ELS is a US-based Protestant Christian denomination based in Mankato, Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... The Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC) is the successor to the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America except that it is international in scope rather than restricted to North America. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ...

Contents

Organization and structure

Synodical government

The WELS is headed by a president and is supported by two vice presidents elected during its synod convention for terms of four years. The president oversees the administration of the synod. The current synod president is Rev. Mark Schroeder.


Beneath the president are numerous administrative divisions addressing various areas of ministry. Among these are ministerial education, world missions, home missions, parish services, and fiscal services.


Synod conventions are held biennially in odd-numbered years and consist of elected male lay members, ordained pastors and certified male teachers. Half of all delegates are to be lay members while the remaining half is divided between pastors and teachers. Synod conventions elect synodical leaders, and discuss and vote on synodical business.


The WELS is divided into 12 geographical districts in the United States and Canada, each headed by a district president elected in district conventions held during even-numbered years. District presidents serve terms of two years.


Ministerial and other education

The WELS maintains four schools of ministerial education: two college preparatory schools Michigan Lutheran Seminary and Luther Preparatory School; a pre-seminary and teacher training college, Martin Luther College in New Ulm, Minnesota; and a seminary for training pastors, Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, located in Mequon, Wisconsin. Michigan Lutheran Seminary (MLS) is a private high school affiliated with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod located in Saginaw, Michigan. ... Luther Preparatory School (LPS or Luther Prep), established in 1995, is a residential four-year secondary school located in Watertown, Wisconsin, USA and is owned and operated by the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). ... This article deals with the WELS-affiliated tertiary institution in Minnesota. ... Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary is located in Mequon, Wisconsin and trains pastors for the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). ...


Wisconsin Lutheran College, a liberal arts college in Milwaukee, is affiliated with, though not run by, the WELS, and there are numerous area Lutheran high schools, Lutheran elementary schools, and early childhood education centers maintained by WELS congregations. Wisconsin Lutheran College is a small liberal arts college in Milwaukee, Wisconsin affiliated with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. ...


Publishing and publications

Northwestern Publishing House([1]) is the official publishing house for the WELS. It is devoted to publishing Christian literature and WELS related religious materials, as well as several WELS periodicals. Northwestern Publishing House (NPH) is the publisher for the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


Main WELS periodicals include:

  • Forward in Christ — The WELS' monthly family magazine.
  • Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly — A quarterly theological magazine.
  • The Lutheran Educator — A quarterly professional journal by WELS teachers.[2]

History

Historical background

The WELS' direct predecessor, known as The German Evangelical Ministerium of Wisconsin was founded in 1850 by several churches in and around Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Many of the early pastors were educated and trained by mission societies in Germany, and the early churches in the Wisconsin Synod had a strong German background; services and church business were conducted in German.


In 1871 the Wisconsin Synod formally declared fellowship (in this context, an agreement recognizing doctrinal unity) with the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod to form the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America, commonly called the "Synodical Conference." The Synodical Conference was later joined by the ELS in 1917. The fellowship union included full communion among members, the sharing of educational facilities, joint mission and benevolence work, and open pulpit between pastors of the different synods. This fellowship relationship would last for 90 years. The Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America was a Lutheran joint fellowship (in this sense, a declaration of unity of belief) organization between the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS), the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod (LCMS) and the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS). ...

Rev. Paul Mayerhoff lived in this tent for six months in 1896 at the beginning of his Call as a Wisconsin Synod missionary to the Apache. He catechized children, learned their language, and translated parts of Luther's Small Catechism into Apache.
Rev. Paul Mayerhoff lived in this tent for six months in 1896 at the beginning of his Call as a Wisconsin Synod missionary to the Apache. He catechized children, learned their language, and translated parts of Luther's Small Catechism into Apache.

In 1893, two Wisconsin Synod missionaries began work in Arizona at Peridot and Old San Carlos among the Apache people. Congregations were soon established. Currently there are eight Wisconsin Synod congregations on the reservation.[3] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


In 1917 the Wisconsin Synod joined with several sister synods in neighboring states, including the Minnesota Synod, the Michigan Lutheran Synod, and the Nebraska Synod, to become the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. By 1930, the merger and other factors had pushed the WELS to become a primarily English-speaking synod.


From 1926-29, a small group of persons and congregations were expelled or voluntarily left the WELS in an incident known as the "Protes'tant Controversy." They formed the Protes'tant Conference. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Doctrinal differences among the synods of the Synodical Conference, especially concerning the doctrine and practice of church fellowship, surfaced during the 1940s and '50s. Problems began when the LCMS began exploratory talks with leaders of the American Lutheran Church (ALC). The ALC differed on their doctrine of Predestination and therefore did not share doctrinal fellowship with the Synodical Conference. Since there had been no recent change on the ALC's doctrinal position, the LCMS was then charged by some within the Synodical Conference of changing its position on church fellowship. After years of continued talks, the ELS severed its fellowship relations with the LCMS in 1955 and withdrew from the Synodical Conference. Two years later the WELS publicly recognized the same doctrinal disagreements with the LCMS, but did not officially break fellowship with the LCMS until 1961. In this time period, the WELS instead decided to "admonish" the LCMS to return to its former doctrine and practice. Dissatisfaction over this decision led about 70 pastors and a similar number of congregations to leave the WELS and form the Church of the Lutheran Confession (CLC). Their chief complaint was that the WELS misapplied the principles of Christian fellowship by not breaking immediately with the Synodical Conference and the LCMS after it had publicly recognized doctrinal disagreements. To this day the CLC and the WELS remain at odds regarding this issue. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Church of the Lutheran Confession is a conservative Christian religious body theologically adhering to confessional Lutheran doctrine. ...


In 1993 the ELS and WELS, working with a number of other Lutheran synods around the world -- some of which had been founded through mission work by both synods -- founded a new fellowship organization which is the theological successor of the Synodical Conference: the Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC). The Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC) is the successor to the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America except that it is international in scope rather than restricted to North America. ...


WELS Presidents, past and present

The following is a list of Presidents of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod from 1850 to the present.

  • 1850 – 1860 Johannes Muehlhaeuser
  • 1860 – 1864 John Bading
  • 1864 – 1865 Gottlieb Rein
  • 1865 – 1867 William Streissguth
  • 1867 – 1887 John Bading
  • 1887 – 1908 Phillip von Rohr
  • 1908 – 1933 G.E. Bergemann
  • 1933 – 1953 John Brenner
  • 1953 – 1979 Oscar Naumann
  • 1979 – 1993 Carl Mischke
  • 1993 – 2007 Karl R. Gurgel
  • 2007 – present Mark Schroeder

Karl R. Gurgel is the current serving president of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS), having filled that position since his election in 1993. ...

Beliefs and practice

Core beliefs

The WELS teaches that the Bible is the only authoritative and error-free source for doctrine. It subscribes to the Lutheran Confessions (the Book of Concord) not in-so-far-as but because it is an accurate presentation of what Scripture teaches. It teaches that Jesus is the center of Scripture and the only way to eternal salvation, and that the Holy Spirit uses the gospel alone in Word and Sacraments (Baptism and Holy Communion) to bring people to faith in Jesus as Savior and keep them in that faith, strengthening them in their daily life of sanctification. The Book of Concord or Concordia is a compilation of the major theological documents of early Lutheranism. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ...


Differences from LCMS (Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod)

The main facets of doctrinal difference between WELS and the LCMS include: LCMS redirects here. ...

  • Fellowship — WELS teaches that all forms of Christian fellowship require complete unity in matters of doctrine. The LCMS, meanwhile, teaches that there are different levels of fellowship among Christians, so that altar fellowship (sharing in the Eucharist together), pulpit fellowship (exchange of preaching privileges among ministers of various congregations), and other manifestations of Christian fellowship (such as fellowship in prayer), are distinct. Thus, according to LCMS doctrine, members of different church bodies can engage in greater or lesser degrees of fellowship depending on the extent of their doctrinal disagreement.
  • Doctrine of the ministry — The WELS believes that there are many different forms of one, divinely established Ministry. These forms of the Ministry include pastor, Christian day-school teacher, staff-minister and others. The LCMS teaches that only the pastoral office is divinely established, while all other church offices are human institutions.
  • Role of women in the church — The LCMS and WELS agree that Scriptures reserve the pastoral office for men. In "This We Believe," published in 1999, WELS states that "women may participate in offices and activities of the public ministry except where that work involves authority over men (1 Timothy 2:11,12). This means that women may not serve as pastors nor participate in assemblies of the church in ways that exercise authority over men (1 Corinthians 11:3; 14:33-35)."WELS beliefs. WELS does not allow women suffrage in congregational matters. LCMS teaches that women may take on roles of lay authority in the church, such as voting in church elections and serving in "humanly established offices" such as congregation president, reader, or member of church councils, including elected executive roles in the church.

For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ...

Differences from ELCA (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America)

  • Scriptural interpretation — WELS confesses that the Bible is the inspired and inerrant Word of God and follows an Historical-Grammatical approach to interpretation. The meaning of a portion of Scripture is discerned by paying careful attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary and context. In this regard, the historical setting forms part of the context of Scripture, the text itself indicating how important a part. The ELCA, on the other hand, has been open to Historical-Critical Methods of Biblical interpretation which seek to understand the scriptures with primary reference to historical and social context. Most other specific doctrinal differences between the two churches stem from this overarching disagreement.
  • Creationism — WELS teaches that the account of creation given in Genesis 1-3 is a factual, historical account[4], while the ELCA has not enforced an official position, allowing members to embrace positions ranging from strict creationism to Theistic evolution.
  • Sexuality — WELS teaches that extramarital sex and homosexual relations are sins, while the ELCA and its predecessor churches have been somewhat open to multiple viewpoints on these matters. The ELCA does (since 2007) allow the ordination of non-celibate homosexuals or same-sex unions, although there have recently been sharp divisions within the church over these issues.
  • Fellowship — WELS teaches that churches must agree on all doctrines of Scripture before they can enjoy any form of fellowship with each other, while the ELCA teaches that agreement on all aspects of doctrine is not necessarily required as a prerequisite for fellowship. It thus practices fellowship with a handful of other mainline Protestant denominations.
  • Role of women in the church — WELS holds that, according to Scripture, women may not serve as clergy nor vote within their congregations (see above), while the ELCA’s three predecessor churches began ordaining women into the ministry in the 1970s.

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... Higher criticism is a branch of literary analysis that attempts to investigate the origins of a text, especially the text of the Bible. ... Creationism is a religious belief that humanity, life, the Earth, and the universe were created in their original form by a deity or deities (often the Abrahamic God of Judaism, Christianity and Islam), whose existence is presupposed. ... Theistic evolution, or the less common term, Evolutionary Creationism, is the general belief that some or all classical religious teachings about God and creation are compatible with some or all of the scientific theory of evolution. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In the United States... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...

Ecumenical relations

Fellowship between the WELS and other church groups are established only upon investigation and confirmation that both church groups hold complete unity in scriptural doctrine and practice.


The WELS is in fellowship with the members of the Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference, all of which meet this requirement. The Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC) is the successor to the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America except that it is international in scope rather than restricted to North America. ...


Address

The headquarters of the denomination is located at 2929 N. Mayfair Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53222.


See also

The Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC) is the successor to the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America except that it is international in scope rather than restricted to North America. ... Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary is located in Mequon, Wisconsin and trains pastors for the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). ... Northwestern Publishing House (NPH) is the publisher for the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2204 words)
The Church is divided into one non-geographical synod (the Slovak Zion Synod) and 64 regional synods or dioceses in the United States and the Caribbean, each headed by a synodical bishop and council.
The Church is a result of a merger between the Lutheran Church in America (LCA), the American Lutheran Church (ALC) and the Association of Evangelical Lutheran Churches (AELC), all of which had formally agreed in 1982 to unite after several years of discussions.
As a Lutheran church body, the ELCA professes belief in the "priesthood of all believers", or that all baptized persons are true ministers of the Church.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m