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Encyclopedia > Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation
WARF company logo
WARF company logo

The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation is the nonprofit technology transfer office of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It is a significant source of research support, independent of federal grants. It currently contributes about $45 million per year, giving the university's research programs a "margin of excellence." Image File history File links WARF.gif Summary Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Logo Licensing This is a logo of a corporation, sports team, or other organization, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... Image File history File links WARF.gif Summary Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Logo Licensing This is a logo of a corporation, sports team, or other organization, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... Technology transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research. ... The University of Wisconsin–Madison is a public university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Research is often described as an active, diligent, and systematic process of inquiry aimed at discovering, interpreting and revising facts. ... In the United States Federal grants are economic aid issued by the United States government out of the general federal revenue. ...

Contents


History

WARF was founded in 1925 by Harry Steenbock, who invented the process for using ultraviolet radiation to add vitamin D to milk and other foods. Rather than leaving the invention unpatented—then the standard practice for university inventions—he patented it, worked with Quaker Oats and pharmaceutical companies to commercialize it, and used the proceeds to fund research. 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harry Steenbock (1886 - 1967) was a distinguished Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin that contributes to the maintenance of normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the bloodstream. ... A glass of cow milk Milk most often means the nutrient fluid produced by the mammary glands of female mammals. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or composition of matter (substance) (known as an invention) which is new, inventive, and... Quaker Oats Company makes many types and flavors of oatmeal. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ...


WARF was established with the donations of $100 from nine alumni of the University of Wisconsin, and verbal pledges from others. "The UW Board of Regents officially sanctioned the plan on June 22, 1925, and the organization's charter was filed with Wisconsin's Secretary of State on November 14th that same year. The new agency was named the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation to reflect both its governing body of UW-Madison alumni and its mission to support UW-Madison research. Funded by $900 in capital from the nine contributing alumni and with a governing body of five volunteer trustees, WARF officially opened for business." (quoted directly from WARF's website). The University of Wisconsin–Madison is a public university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... A Board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Alternate use, see charter airline, yacht charter, bare-boat charter or Charter Communications. ... Secretary of State is an official in the state governments of 47 of the 50 states of the United States. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining. ... This page as shown in the aol 9. ...


Since its founding, WARF has served the University of Wisconsin-Madison scientific community by patenting the discoveries of UW-Madison researchers and licensing these technologies to leading companies in Wisconsin, the United States and worldwide. In this way, WARF also facilitates the use of UW-Madison research for the maximum benefit of society. WARF distributes the income from commercial licenses to the UW-Madison, the inventors and their departments. Each year, WARF contributes over $45 million to fund additional UW-Madison research. The university refers to WARF's annual gifts as its "margin of excellence" funding. WARF currently licenses nearly 100 UW-Madison technologies each year. The University of Wisconsin–Madison is a public university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ...


As of 2003, WARF had an endowment of nearly $1.3 billion. A majority of WARF's income, around 70%, comes from Vitamin D. Endowment may refer to many things: Finance Financial endowment; relating to funds or property donated to institutions or individuals. ... Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin that contributes to the maintenance of normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the bloodstream. ...


While historically, WARF was only the technology transfer office for the University of Wisconsin-Madison, WARF has recently established WiSys to cater to the entire University of Wisconsin System. Technology transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research. ... The University of Wisconsin System is the state university system in Wisconsin, composed of fifteen institutions with twenty-six campuses. ...


Vitamin D

In 1923, Harry Steenbock discovered exposure to ultraviolet light increased the Vitamin D concentration in food. After discovering that irradiated rat food cured the rats of rickets, Steenbock sought a patent. Steenbock then assigned the patent to the newly established Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. WARF then licensed the technology to Quaker Oats for use in their breakfast cereals. In addition, WARF licensed the technology for use as a pharmaceutical, Viosterol. WARF's commercialization of Vitamin D culminated in its enrichment of milk. 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harry Steenbock (1886 - 1967) was a distinguished Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin that contributes to the maintenance of normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the bloodstream. ... Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ... X-ray of the legs in a two-year-old child with rickets Rickets is a disorder of infancy and early childhood of multiple etiologies. ... Quaker Oats Company makes many types and flavors of oatmeal. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... Ergosterol is the biological precursor to Vitamin D2. ...


"Enriching milk with vitamin D posed a significant challenge to WARF and its industry partners. Cereals and pharmaceuticals could be easily fortified by adding irradiated yeast or activated lipids (ergosterol) to them as sources of vitamin D. But strict pure foods laws at the time prohibited the addition of anything to milk, even chocolate. In order to produce vitamin D in milk, the milk itself would have to be irradiated. " (quote from site) A glass of cow milk Milk most often means the nutrient fluid produced by the mammary glands of female mammals. ... Closeup of yeast cells Yeasts are single-celled (unicellular) fungi, a few species of which are commonly used to leaven bread, ferment alcoholic beverages, and even drive experimental fuel cells. ... Figure 1: Structure of a Lipid. ... Ergosterol (ergosta-5,7,22-trien-3β-ol), a sterol, is the biological precursor to Vitamin D2. ... Chocolate most commonly comes in dark, milk, and white varieties, with cocoa solids contributing to the brown coloration. ...


By the time the patent expired in 1945, rickets was all but nonexistent.


Through innovations from Hector DeLuca, Vitamin D continues to be a large percentage of WARF's income, around 70%. Hector F. DeLuca is a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor and former chairman of the universitys biochemistry department. ...


Warfarin

Warfarin (Coumadin) is named for WARF, and the story of its discovery is emblematic of the "Wisconsin Idea" and the relationship of the university to the Wisconsin public. In 1933 a farmer from Deer Park showed up unannounced at the School of Agriculture and walked into a professor's laboratory with a milk can full of blood which would not coagulate. In his truck, he had also brought a dead heifer and some spoiled clover hay. He wanted to know what had killed his cow. In 1941, Karl Paul Link successfully isolated the anticoagulant factor, which found commercial application as a rodent-killer and is used in medicine for treating thrombosis. Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin® and Marevan®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally. ... The Wisconsin Idea is a philosophy embraced by the University of Wisconsin, which holds that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state, and that research conducted at the University of Wisconsin should be applied to solve problems and improve health, quality of life, the environment... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Deer Park is a village located in St. ... Families See Classification Section The order Rodentia is the most numerous of the branches on the mammal family tree. ... Thrombosis is the formation of a clot or thrombus inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. ...


Stem cells and WiCell

More recently, WARF was assigned the patents for non-human primate and human embryonic stem cells. The stem cells were first isolated and purified by James Thomson. In October 1999, WARF established the non-profit subsidiary WiCell in order to license its stem cell lines. Thomson was appointed as WiCell's scientific director. Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... James A. Thomson, V.M.D., Ph. ... WiCell is the nonprofit subsidiary of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation created in 1998 to license and promote research in human embryonic stem cells. ...


Startup companies

WARF has also helped establish more than a thirty startup companies including Nimblegen, Tomotherapy, Deltanoid Pharmaceuticals, Quinntessence, Neoclone, Third Wave Technologies, Cambria Biosciences, and OpGen, Inc..


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The College’s landmark accomplishments (1603 words)
In 1938, University of Wisconsin biochemists Conrad Elvehjem and Frank Strong isolated and identified the B vitamin, niacin, and demonstrated that pellagra was caused by niacin deficiency.
University of Wisconsin biochemists Edwin B. Hart and Harry Steenbock in 1917 confirmed the cause of goiter.
In 1893 the College of Agriculture's emerging science-based approach to agriculture was emphatically demonstrated to farmers and Wisconsin citizens by the postmortem verification of a tuberculosis test for cattle.
Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (777 words)
WARF was founded in 1925 by Harry Steenbock, who invented process for using ultraviolet radiation to add vitamin D to milk and other foods.
WARF was established with the donations of $100 from nine alumni of the University of Wisconsin, and verbal pledges from others.
Warfarin (Coumadin) is named for WARF, and the story of its discovery is emblematic of the "Wisconsin idea" and the relationship of the university to the Wisconsin public.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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