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Encyclopedia > Wisconsin
State of Wisconsin
Flag of Wisconsin State seal of Wisconsin
Flag of Wisconsin Seal of Wisconsin
Nickname(s): Badger State, America's Dairyland
Motto(s): Forward
Official language(s) None
Demonym Wisconsinite
Capital Madison
Largest city Milwaukee
Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee
Area  Ranked 23rd in the US
 - Total 65,498 sq mi
(169,790 km²)
 - Width 260 miles (420 km)
 - Length 310 miles (500 km)
 - % water 17
 - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N
 - Longitude 86° 46′ W to 92° 53′ W
Population  Ranked 20th in the US
 - Total 5,556,506
 - Density 98.8/sq mi 
38.13/km² (24th in the US)
 - Median income  $47,220 (15th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Timms Hill[1]
1,951 ft  (595 m)
 - Mean 1,050 ft  (320 m)
 - Lowest point Lake Michigan[1]
579 ft  (176 m)
Admission to Union  May 29, 1848 (30th)
Governor Jim Doyle (D)
Lieutenant Governor Barbara Lawton (D)
U.S. Senators Herb Kohl (D)
Russ Feingold (D)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Abbreviations WI Wis. US-WI
Website www.wisconsin.gov
Wisconsin Portal

Wisconsin (IPA: /wɪsˈkɒnsɨn/) (French: Ouisconsin) is a state located near the center of the North American continent. It touches two of the five Great Lakes and is one of the fifty states that constitute the United States of America. Wisconsin's capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee. Jim Doyle has been the Governor of Wisconsin since January 6, 2003. The term Wisconsin can refer to several things: Wisconsin, the U.S. state Wisconsin glaciation, a period of the Ice Age Wisconsin River, a river in the state of Wisconsin USS Wisconsin (BB-9), a ship launched in 1898 USS Wisconsin (BB-64), a ship launched in 1943 University of... Image File history File links Flag_of_Wisconsin. ... Wisconsin state seal Source http://usa. ... The Flag of Wisconsin consists of the Wisconsin state coat of arms on a dark blue background. ... The Secretary of State is the keeper of Wisconsins great seal. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_WI.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wisconsin ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... This is a list of U.S. state residents names: ^ The first name listed is the name recommended by the United States Government Printing Office Style Manual. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Location in the state of Wisconsin The Milwaukee–Racine–Waukesha metropolitan area is an urban area that the U.S. Census Bureau defines as a Combined Statistical Area centered on the city of Milwaukee and had a population of 1,708,563 people as of the 2005 U.S. Census... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Timms Hill is the the highest point in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, with an elevation of 1,951 feet (595 m) above sea level. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James Doyle, see James Doyle (disambiguation). ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Barbara Lawton (born July 5, 1951) is an American politician from Green Bay, Wisconsin. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article refers to Sen. ... Russell Dana Russ Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Wisconsin to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for the United States of America cover 50 states, 1 district, 6 outlying areas (including 9 minor outlying islands under separate ISO 3166-1 country code UM). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Portal. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Not to be confused with capitol. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... For other persons named James Doyle, see James Doyle (disambiguation). ... Governors of Wisconsin: Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Wisconsin ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Wisconsin
Painting of Jean Nicolet's 1634 discovery of Wisconsin
Painting of Jean Nicolet's 1634 discovery of Wisconsin

Wisconsin became a state on May 29, 1848, but the land that makes up the state has been occupied by humans for thousands of years. ... Image File history File links Jean_Nicolet. ... Image File history File links Jean_Nicolet. ... Jean Nicolet (born 1598 - died November 1, 1642) was a French voyageur noted for exploring the Northwest Territory. ...

Name

It may have possibly come from an ancient Ojibwe word, Miskwasiniing, meaning "Red-stone place," which was probably the name given to the Wisconsin River, and was recorded as Ouisconsin by the French. The spelling was revised to its current form in 1845 by Wisconsin's territorial legislature. The modern Ojibwe name, however, is Wiishkoonsing or Wazhashkoonsing, meaning "muskrat-lodge place" or "little muskrat place." Other theories are that the name comes from words meaning "Gathering of the Waters" or "Great Rock." Originally, Ouisconsin was applied to the Wisconsin River, and later to the area as a whole when Wisconsin became a territory. Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa or Anishinaabemoowin is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut). ... The Wisconsin River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, approximately 430 mi (692 km) long, in the state of Wisconsin in the United States. ... Political divisions of the United States as they were from 1868 to 1876, including 9 organized territories and 2 unorganized territories Territories of the United States are one type of political division of the United States, administered by the U.S. government but not any part of a U.S...


Introduction to the West

In 1634, the French Jean Nicolet was the first European to explore Wisconsin. He founded Green Bay colony. The area was mainly colonized by German, Scandinavian and Swiss settlers. France transferred the territory to Britain in 1763. The United States acquired the Wisconsin territory after the Revolution in 1783 but it remained under British administration until the War of 1812. All of this was done, of course, without the consent of the indigenous inhabitants. Jean Nicolet (born 1598 - died November 1, 1642) was a French voyageur noted for exploring the Northwest Territory. ... Green Bay is the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ...


Borders

Wisconsin, bordered by the states of Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan and Illinois, as well as Lakes Michigan and Superior, has been part of the United States' territory since the end of the American Revolution; the Wisconsin Territory (which included parts of other current states) was formed on July 3, 1836. Wisconsin ratified its constitution on March 13, 1848, and was admitted to the Union on May 29, 1848, as the 30th state. This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... This article is about military actions only. ... Wisconsin Territory became an organized territory of the United States by an act of U.S. Congress passed on April 20, 1836 which went into effect on July 3, 1836. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Economy

Wisconsin's economy was originally based on farming (especially dairy), mining, and lumbering. In the 20th century, tourism became important, and many people living on former farms commuted to jobs elsewhere. Large-scale industrialization began in the late 19th century in the southeast of the state, with the city of Milwaukee as its major center. In recent decades, service industries, especially medicine and education, have become dominant. Wisconsin's landscape, largely shaped by the Wisconsin glaciation of the last Ice Age, makes the state popular for both tourism and many forms of outdoor recreation. Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... Logging is the process in which trees are felled (cut down) usually as part of a timber harvest. ... Tourist redirects here. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... The Wisconsin (in North America), Devensian (in the British Isles), Midlandian (in Ireland), Würm (in the Alps), and Weichsel (in northern central Europe) glaciations are the most recent glaciations of the Pleistocene epoch, which ended around 10,000 BCE. The general glacial advance began about 70,000 BCE, and... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


Geography

Wisconsin state welcome sign
Wisconsin state welcome sign

The state is bordered by the Montreal River; Lake Superior and Michigan to the north; by Lake Michigan to the east; by Illinois to the south; and by Iowa and Minnesota to the west. The state's boundaries include the Mississippi River and St. Croix River in the west, and the Menominee River in the northeast. With its location between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River, Wisconsin is home to a wide variety of geographical features. The state is divided into five distinct regions. In the north, the Lake Superior Lowland occupies a belt of land along Lake Superior. Just to the south, the Northern Highland has massive mixed hardwood and coniferous forests including the 1.5 million acre (6,000 km²) Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, as well as thousands of glacial lakes, and the state's highest point, Timms Hill. In the middle of the state, the Central Plain has some unique sandstone formations like the Dells of the Wisconsin River in addition to rich farmland. The Eastern Ridges and Lowlands region in the southeast is home to many of Wisconsin's largest cities. In the southwest, the Western Upland is a rugged landscape with a mix of forest and farmland, including many bluffs on the Mississippi River. This region is part of the Driftless Area, which also includes portions of Iowa, Illinois, and Minnesota. This area was not covered by glaciers during the most recent ice age, the Wisconsin Glaciation. The Montreal River is a river, approximately 40 mi (64 km) long, in northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in the United States. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The St. ... The Menominee River is a river in northwestern Michigan and northeastern Wisconsin in the United States. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... In the U.S. state of Wisconsin, the Lake Superior Lowland, also known as the Superior Coastal Plain, is a geographical region located in the far northern part of the state bordering Lake Superior. ... In the U.S. state of Wisconsin, the Northern Highland is a geographical region covering the much of the state’s northern territory. ... Welcome sign The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest is a 1,519,800 acre (6,150 km²) U.S. National Forest in northern Wisconsin in the United States. ... Timms Hill is the the highest point in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, with an elevation of 1,951 feet (595 m) above sea level. ... A region in the Peoples Republic of China is also called the Central Plain In the U.S. state of Wisconsin, the Central Plain is a geographical region comprised of about 13,000 square miles of land in a v-shaped belt across the center of the state. ... This article is about the geological formation. ... Dells of the Wisconsin River The Dells of the Wisconsin River (used in the singular, and also called the Wisconsin Dells) is a 5 mi (8 km) gorge on the Wisconsin River in southern Wisconsin in the United States noted for its particular scenic beauty, in particular for its unique... In the U.S. state of Wisconsin, the Eastern Ridges and Lowlands is a geographical region in the eastern part of the state, between the Bay of Green Bay in the north and the state border with Illinois border in the south. ... In the U.S. state of Wisconsin, the Western Upland is a geographical region covering much of the western half of the state. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Driftless Area is an area of about 20,000 square miles in southwestern Wisconsin and northeastern Iowa which was by_passed by the continental glaciers. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... The Wisconsin (in North America), Devensian (in the British Isles), Midlandian (in Ireland), Würm (in the Alps), and Weichsel (in northern central Europe) glaciations are the most recent glaciations of the Pleistocene epoch, which ended around 10,000 BCE. The general glacial advance began about 70,000 BCE, and...

The Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin is characterized by bluffs carved in sedimentary rock by water from melting Ice Age glaciers.
The Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin is characterized by bluffs carved in sedimentary rock by water from melting Ice Age glaciers.

Overall, 46% of Wisconsin's land area is covered by forest. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 816 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wisconsin Midwestern United States Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 816 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wisconsin Midwestern United States Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... The Driftless Area is an area of about 20,000 square miles in southwestern Wisconsin and northeastern Iowa which was by_passed by the continental glaciers. ... Two types of sedimentary rock: limey shale overlaid by limestone. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


The varied landscape of Wisconsin makes the state a popular vacation destination for outdoor recreation. Winter events include skiing, ice fishing and snowmobile derbies. Wisconsin has many lakes of varied size; in fact Wisconsin contains 11,188 square miles (28,977 km²) of water, more than all but three other states (Alaska, Michigan and Florida). The distinctive Door Peninsula, which extends off the eastern coast of the state, contains one of the state's most beautiful tourist destinations, Door County. The area draws thousands of visitors yearly to its quaint villages, seasonal cherry picking, and ever-popular fish boils. The World Championship Snowmobile Derby is the World championship snowmobile race. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... The Door Peninsula is a peninsula in northeastern Wisconsin, seperating the Bay of Green Bay from the rest of Lake Michigan. ... Door County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ... A fish boil is a Great Lakes culinary tradition in areas of Wisconsin(USA), with large Scandinavian populations, particularly Door County and Port Wing, Wisconsin. ...


Areas under the management of the National Park Service include the following: The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

The Apostle Islands National Lakeshore is a U.S. national lakeshore made up of around 20 prominent islands and shoreline encompasing 69,372 acres (281 km²) on the northern tip of Wisconsin on the shore of Lake Superior. ... Ice Age Trail Sign, near Devils Lake State Park. ... The North Country Trail, more formally the North Country National Scenic Trail, is a 4,000-mile long-distance trail being developed that begins near Lake Champlain in New York State, and traverses New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. ... St. ... The Nicolet National Forest is a National Forest in northeastern Wisconsin. ...

Climate

The highest temperature ever recorded in Wisconsin was in the Wisconsin Dells, on July 13, 1936, and was 114 °F (46 °C). The lowest temperature ever recorded in Wisconsin was in Couderay, on both February 2 and 4, 1996, and was –55 °F (-48 °C).[2] is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various Wisconsin Cities (°F)
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Green Bay 24/7 29/12 40/23 55/34 68/45 77/54 81/59 78/56 70/48 58/37 42/26 29/13
La Crosse 26/6 32/13 45/24 60/37 72/49 81/58 85/63 82/61 74/52 61/40 44/27 30/14
Madison 25/9 31/14 43/25 57/35 69/46 78/56 82/61 79/59 71/50 60/39 43/28 30/16
Milwaukee 28/13 32/18 43/27 54/36 66/46 76/56 81/63 79/62 72/54 60/43 46/31 33/19
[1]

Demographics

Wisconsin Population Density Map
Wisconsin Population Density Map

Since its founding, Wisconsin has been ethnically heterogeneous, with people moving from New York and New England. They dominated the state's heavy industry, finance, politics and education. Large numbers of European immigrants followed them, including Germans, mostly between 1850 and 1900, Scandinavians (the largest group being Norwegian) and smaller groups of Belgians, Dutch, Swiss, Finns, Irish, Poles and others; in the 20th century, large numbers of Mexicans and African Americans came, settling mainly in Milwaukee; and after end of the Vietnam War came a new influx of Hmongs. Image File history File links Wisconsin_population_map. ... Image File history File links Wisconsin_population_map. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... A stereotypical German The Germans (German: die Deutschen), or the German people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in German: Volk), defined more by a sense of sharing a common German culture and having a German mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Language(s) Hmong/Mong Religion(s) Shamanism, Buddhism, Christianity, others The terms Hmong (pronounced ) and Mong () both refer to an Asian ethnic group in the mountainous regions of southern China. ...


Today, 42.6% of the population is of German ancestry, making Wisconsin one of the most German-American states in the United States. Numerous ethnic festivals are held throughout Wisconsin to celebrate its heritage. Such festivals are world renowned, and include Summerfest, Oktoberfest, Festa Italiana, Bastille Days, Syttende Mai (Norwegian Constitution Day), Brat(wurst) Days in Sheboygan, Cheese Days in Monroe and Mequon, African World Festival, Indian Summer, Irish Fest and many others. German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... For other uses, see Festival (disambiguation). ... Summerfest poster for 2004 Summerfest (also known as The Big Gig) is a yearly music festival held at the 75 acre Henry Maier Festival Park along the lakefront in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... The Oktoberfest is a two-week festival held each year in Munich, Germany during late September and early October. ... Festa Italiana is an annual festival, held at the Summerfest Grounds in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and visited by many fans of both Italian food and Italian music. ... The Norwegian Constitution Day is the National Day of Norway and is an official national holiday each year. ... Sheboygan is the county seat of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, United States. ... Monroe, known as the Swiss Cheese capital of the USA, is the county seat of Green County, Wisconsin, United States. ... Mequon is a city located in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. ... The Mid Gate of the Henry Maier Festival Park, during Milwaukee Irish Fest 2005. ...


The state has always been ethnically heterogeneous. Large numbers of Germans arrived between 1850 and 1900, centering in Milwaukee, but also settling in many small cities and farm areas in the southeast. Norwegians settled in lumbering and farming areas in the northwest. Small colonies of Belgians, Swiss, Finns and other groups came to the state. Irish Catholic and Polish immigrants mostly came to the cities.[3] African Americans came to Milwaukee, especially from 1940 on. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2000, Wisconsin has a population of 5,363,675. Look up Heterogeneous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... The term Norwegians may refer to: People with a Norwegian ancestral or ethnic identity, whether living in Norway, emigrants, or the descendents of emigrants. ... Motto: Dutch: Eendracht maakt macht; French: Lunion fait la force; German: Einigkeit macht stark (English: Strength lies in unity) Anthem: The Brabançonne Capital Brussels Largest city Brussels Official languages Dutch, French, German Government King Prime Minister Constitutional Monarchy Albert II Guy Verhofstadt Independence Belgian Revolution 1830 Area  â€¢ Total... Swiss may be: Related to Switzerland: the Swiss Confederation Swiss people Swiss cheese Swiss corporations Switzerland-related topics Named Swiss: Swiss, Missouri Swiss, North Carolina Swiss, West Virginia Swiss, Wisconsin Swiss International Air Lines Swiss Re SWiSS is also used as a disparaging nickname for the Socialist Workers Student Society. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ...

Demographics of Wisconsin (csv)
By race White Black AIAN Asian NHPI
AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native — NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
2000 (total population) 91.52% 6.15% 1.30% 1.92% 0.08%
2000 (Hispanic only) 3.35% 0.17% 0.11% 0.03% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 91.00% 6.48% 1.30% 2.21% 0.09%
2005 (Hispanic only) 4.17% 0.20% 0.12% 0.04% 0.01%
Growth 2000–2005 (total population) 2.64% 8.89% 3.13% 18.59% 6.85%
Growth 2000–2005 (non-Hispanic only) 1.65% 8.53% 2.43% 18.63% 6.18%
Growth 2000–2005 (Hispanic only) 28.67% 21.23% 10.54% 16.75% 10.87%

The five largest ancestry groups in Wisconsin are: German (42.6%), Irish (10.9%), Polish (9.3%), Norwegian (8.5%), English (6.5%) Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... A Polish American is an American citizen of Polish descent. ... Norwegian Americans or (Norwegian norskamerikaner) are an ethnic group in the United States. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


Wisconsin, with many cultural remnants of its heavy German settlement, is known as perhaps the most "German-American" state in the Union. People of Scandinavian descent, especially Norwegians, are heavily concentrated in some western parts of the state. Wisconsin has the highest percentage of residents of Polish ancestry of any state. Menominee County is the only county in the eastern United States with an American Indian majority. German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... Norwegian Americans or (Norwegian norskamerikaner) are an ethnic group in the United States. ... Menominee County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ...


86% of Wisconsin's African American population lives in one of five cities: Milwaukee, Racine, Madison, Kenosha and Green Bay, while Milwaukee itself is home to nearly three-fourths of the state's African Americans. Milwaukee ranks in the top 10 major U.S. cities with the highest number of African Americans per capita. In the Great Lakes region, only Detroit and Cleveland have a higher percentage of African Americans. For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... Racine is a city in Racine County, Wisconsin, United States, located beside Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Root River. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... Location of Kenosha within Wisconsin Coordinates: , Country State County Kenosha Settled 1836 Government  - Mayor John M. Antaramian Area  - City 24. ... Green Bay is the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Cleveland redirects here. ...


33% of Wisconsin's Asian population is Hmong, with significant communities in Milwaukee, Wausau, Green Bay, Sheboygan, Appleton, La Crosse, Stevens Point, Madison, and Eau Claire. Language(s) Hmong/Mong Religion(s) Shamanism, Buddhism, Christianity, others The terms Hmong (pronounced ) and Mong () both refer to an Asian ethnic group in the mountainous regions of southern China. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... Wausau is a suburb of Merrill, WI and is the county seat of Marathon County, Wisconsin. ... Green Bay is the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Sheboygan is the county seat of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, United States. ... Appleton is a city in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, on the Fox River, 100 miles (161 km) north of Milwaukee. ... Location in the state of Wisconsin Coordinates: , Counties Government  - Mayor Mark Johnsrud Area  - City 57. ... Stevens Point is a city in and the county seat of Portage County, Wisconsin, United States. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... Location within the state of Wisconsin. ...


6.4% of Wisconsin's population was reported as under 5, 25.5% under 18, and 13.1% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 50.6% of the population.


Religion

The largest denominations are Roman Catholic, Missouri Synod, Wisconsin Synod and ELCA Lutherans. The religious affiliations of the people of Wisconsin are shown in the list below:[4] The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... LCMS redirects here. ... The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) is a North American religious denomination belonging to the Lutheran tradition within Christianity. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America or ELCA is a mainline Protestant denomination headquarted in Chicago, Illinois. ...

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Presbyterianism is a family of Christian denominations within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ...

Economy

The US Bank Center in Milwaukee is Wisconsin's tallest skyscraper.

According to the 2004 U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis report, Wisconsin’s gross state product was $211.7 billion. The per capita personal income was $32,157 in 2004. Wisconsin's state budget is facing a $652.3 million shortfall.[5] Image File history File links Milwaukee_at_night. ... Image File history File links Milwaukee_at_night. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ...


The economy of Wisconsin is driven by manufacturing, agriculture, and health care. Although manufacturing accounts for a far greater part of the state's income than farming, Wisconsin is often perceived as a farming state. It produces more dairy products than any other state in the United States except California, and leads the nation in cheese production. Wisconsin ranks second behind California in overall production of milk and butter, and it ranks third in per-capita milk production, behind Idaho and Vermont.[6] Based on poll results, Governor Jim Doyle chose for Wisconsin's 50 State Quarters design a Holstein cow, an ear of corn, and a wheel of cheese.[7] Wisconsin ranks first in the production of corn for silage, cranberries, ginseng, and snap beans for processing. Wisconsin is also a leading producer of oats, potatoes, carrots, tart cherries, maple syrup, and sweet corn for processing. Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Silage (hay) somewhere in Allschwil or Schönenbuch, near Basel, Switzerland. ... “Cranberries” redirects here. ... Species Subgenus Panax Section Panax Series Notoginseng Panax notoginseng Series Panax Panax bipinnatifidus Panax ginseng Panax japonicus Panax quinquefolius Panax vietnamensis Panax wangianus Panax zingiberensis Section Pseudoginseng Panax pseudoginseng Panax stipuleanatus Subgenus Trifolius Panax trifolius Ginseng field in Wisconsin Ginseng refers to species within Panax, a genus of 11 species... Green common beans on the plant Green beans (American English) or French beans (British English) or Mahune (South Slavic, Balkans) are the unripe fruits of any kind of bean, including the yardlong bean, the hyacinth bean, the winged bean, and especially the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), whose pods are also... Binomial name Avena sativa Carolus Linnaeus (1753) The Oat (Avena sativa) is a species of cereal grain, and the seeds of this plant. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... This article is about the cultivated vegetable. ... For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... Bottled maple syrup produced in Quebec. ... Husked sweetcorn Sweet corn (Zea mays var. ...


Given Wisconsin's strong agricultural tradition, it is not surprising that a large part of the state's manufacturing sector deals with food processing. Some well-known food brands produced in Wisconsin include Oscar Mayer, Tombstone frozen pizza, Johnsonville brats, and Usinger's sausage. Kraft Foods alone employs over 5,000 people in the state. Milwaukee is a major producer of beer and the home of Miller Brewing Company's world headquarters, the nation's second-largest brewer. Schlitz, Blatz, and Pabst used to be cornerstone breweries within the city of Milwaukee. Today, Milwaukee's economy is more diverse with an emphasis on health care. In 2004, four of the city's ten largest employers (including the top two) were part of the health care industry.[8] Oscar Mayer is an American meat and cold cut production company, now owned by Kraft Foods, known for its hot dogs, bologna, bacon and Lunchables products. ... Tombstone pizza is a frozen pizza product. ... Johnsonville Sausage is a Wisconsin-based Sausage producer, founded in 1945 by Ralph F. & Alice Stayer. ... Bratwurst with sauerkraut and potatoes A bratwurst (IPA: ) is a sausage composed of pork, beef, and sometimes veal. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kraft Foods Inc. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Miller Brewing Company is the second largest American beermaker and is based in Milwaukee. ... Schlitz is an American beer, often considered the archetype of working-class beers brewed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... Blatz; Varndean High School Slang, mid 00s Blatz ; Varndean School slang for Blatently. ... Pabst is the name of several related people and entities: Pabst Brewing Company, a former brewery once owned by Frederick Pabst Pabst Blue Ribbon, a notable beer formerly brewed by the Pabst Brewing Company Pabst Theater, a theatrical venue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin named after the Pabst family The name Pabst... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ...


The largest employers in Wisconsin in 2007 were: 1) Wal-Mart; 2) Menards; 3) Walgreens; 4) Kohl's; 5) Kohler; 6) Marshfield Clinic; 7) Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center; 8) Quad/Graphics; 9) Target Stores; and 10) Shopko.[9] Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Menards is a chain of home improvement stores in the Midwestern United States. ... Walgreen Co. ... Kohls Corporation (NYSE: KSS) is an American department store chain headquartered in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, a suburb of Milwaukee. ... Company headquarters in Kohler, Wisconsin Kohler Design Center The American Club Entrance to The American Club The Kohler Company is a manufacturing company in Kohler, Wisconsin best known for its plumbing products. ... The Marshfield Clinic is a medical system in Wisconsin with 41 centers located in northern, central and western Wisconsin as of 2006. ... Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center is a 325 bed tertiary care facility located in La Crosse, Wisconsin. ... Quad/Graphics is an American printing company based in Sussex, Wisconsin. ... Target Stores is a division of Target Corporation. ... ShopKo Stores, Inc. ...

Badger State
State Animal: Badger
State Domesticated
Animal:
Dairy Cow
State Wild Animal: White-tailed Deer
State Beverage: Milk
State Fruit: Cranberry
State Bird: Robin
State Capital: Madison
State Dog: American Water Spaniel
State Fish: Muskellunge
State Flower: Wood Violet
State Fossil: Trilobite
State Grain: Corn
State Insect: European honey bee
State Motto: Forward
State Song: "On, Wisconsin!"
State Tree: Sugar Maple
State Mineral: Galena
(Lead sulfide)
State Rock: Red Granite
State Soil: Antigo Silt Loam
State Dance: Polka
State Symbol of
Peace:
Mourning Dove

Wisconsin is also home to several transportation equipment and machinery manufacturers. Major Wisconsin companies in these categories include the Kohler Company, Rockwell Automation, Johnson Controls, Briggs & Stratton, Miller Electric, Milwaukee Electric Tool Company, Bucyrus International, Super Steel Products Corp., Oshkosh Truck, and Harley-Davidson. Wisconsin also ranks first nationwide in the production of paper products; the lower Fox River from Lake Winnebago to the Bay of Green Bay has 24 paper mills along its 39 mile (63 km) stretch. A state animal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... COW is an acronym for a number of things: Can of worms The COW programming language, an esoteric programming language. ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... A glass of cows milk. ... “Cranberries” redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1766 The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... The American Water Spaniel is a gundog breed little known outside North America. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Muskellunge or muskie or musky (Esox masquinongy) are large, relatively rare freshwater fish of North America. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Species List of Viola species Violets (Viola) are a genus of flowering plants in the family Violaceae, with around 400-500 species throughout the world, mainly in the temperate Northern Hemisphere but also in Hawaii, Australasia, and the Andes in South America. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state dinosaurs be merged into this article or section. ... For the robot vacuum cleaner, see Electrolux Trilobite. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies North-west of Europe South-west of Europe Middle East Africa Synonyms Apis mellifica Linnaeus, 1761 The Western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... On, Wisconsin! is the fight song of the Wisconsin Badgers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Binomial name Acer saccharum Marshall The Sugar Maple Acer saccharum is a prominent tree in the hardwood forests of eastern North America. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Galena (disambiguation). ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state soils: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Antigo Soil Profile Surface layer: dark grayish brown silt loam Subsurface layer: brown silt loam Subsoil - upper: dark yellowish brown & brown silt loam Subsoil - lower: dark yellowish brown loam & brown very gravelly sandy loam Substratum: brown, stratified coarse sand & gravelly coarse sand. ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Street musicians in Prague playing a polka Polka is a fast, lively Central European dance, and also a genre of dance music. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Winter only (blue), summer only (light green), and year-round (dark green) range Subspecies See text The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) is a member of the dove family Columbidae. ... Company headquarters in Kohler, Wisconsin Kohler Design Center The American Club Entrance to The American Club The Kohler Company is a manufacturing company in Kohler, Wisconsin best known for its plumbing products. ... Rockwell Automation NYSE: ROK is leading global provider of industrial automation power, control and information solutions that help manufacturers achieve a competitive advantage for their businesses. ... Johnson Controls, Inc. ... Briggs & Stratton is the worlds largest manufacturer of air-cooled gasoline engines for primarily outdoor power equipment. ... Miller Electric is an arc welding and cutting equipment manufacturing company based in Appleton, WI. Miller Electric has grown from a one-man operation selling products in Northeast Wisconsin, to what is today the worlds largest manufacturer of arc welding and cutting equipment. ... The Milwaukee Electric Tool Company is a manufacturer of heavy-duty portable electric power tools and accessories. ... Bucyrus International is a manufacturer of heavy equipment headquartered in South Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... Logo on a 2003 Harley Davidson The Harley-Davidson Motor Company (NYSE: HDI) is a manufacturer of motorcycles based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... The Fox River is a river in Wisconsin in the United States. ... Lake Winnebago from space, July 1996. ... A Tall ship sailing into the mouth of the Fox River The Bay of Green Bay is an arm of Lake Michigan. ...


The development and manufacture of health care devices and software is a growing sector of the state's economy with key players such as GE Healthcare, Epic Systems, and TomoTherapy. GE Healthcare is a $14 billion (USD) unit of General Electric. ... Epic Systems Corporation is a privately-held healthcare IT company founded in 1979 by Judy Faulkner. ... TomoTherapy is a radiation therapy delivery system. ...


Tourism is also a major industry in Wisconsin – the state's third largest, according to the Department of Tourism. This is largely attributed to the 90 attractions in the Wisconsin Dells family vacation destination area, which attracts nearly 3 million visitors per year. Tourist destinations such as the House on the Rock near Spring Green and Circus World Museum in Baraboo also draw thousands of visitors annually, and festivals such as Summerfest and the EAA Oshkosh Airshow draw national attention along with hundreds of thousands of visitors. Door County is a popular destination for boaters due to the large number of natural harbors, bays and ports on the Bay of Green Bay and Lake Michigan side of the peninsula that forms the county. Location of Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin Lower Dells Intersection between Downtown & The Strip Wisconsin Dells is a city located in south-central Wisconsin, in the United States. ... The House on the Rock is a complex of architecturally unique rooms, streets, and gardens built mostly by Alex Jordan, Jr. ... Spring Green is a village located in Sauk County, Wisconsin. ... The Circus World Museum is a museum devoted to circus-related history. ... Baraboo is a city in Sauk County, Wisconsin, along the Baraboo River. ... Summerfest poster for 2004 Summerfest (also known as The Big Gig) is a yearly music festival held at the 75 acre Henry Maier Festival Park along the lakefront in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... Aerobatic team performs at EAA AirVenture The Oshkosh Airshow (officially EAA AirVenture Oshkosh) is an annual gathering of aviation enthusiasts held each summer at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. ... Door County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ...


Wisconsin collects personal income tax based on four income-level brackets, which range from 4.6% to 6.75%. The state sales and use tax rate is 5%. Fifty-nine counties have an additional sales/use tax of 0.5%.[10] The counties surrounding Milwaukee County have an additional 0.1% tax imposed upon them to fund the new baseball stadium, Miller Park, which was constructed around the turn of the century. Retailers who make sales subject to applicable county taxes must collect 5.6% tax on their retail sales. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        A use tax is a type of excise tax levied in the United States. ... Milwaukee County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ... This article is about the sport. ... Miller Park is a baseball stadium located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ...


The most common property tax assessed on Wisconsin residents is the real property tax, or their residential property tax. Wisconsin does not impose a property tax on vehicles but does levy an annual registration fee. Property taxes are the most important tax revenue source for Wisconsin's local governments, as well as major methods of funding school districts, vocational technical colleges, special purpose districts and tax incremental finance districts. Equalized values are based on the full market value of all taxable property in the state, except for agricultural land. In order to provide property tax relief for farmers, the value of agricultural land is determined by its value for agricultural uses, rather than for its possible development value. Equalized values are used to distribute state aid payments to counties, municipalities, and technical colleges. Assessments prepared by local assessors are used to distribute the property tax burden within individual municipalities. Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


Wisconsin does not assess a tax on intangible property. Wisconsin does not collect inheritance taxes. Wisconsin's estate tax is decoupled from the federal estate tax laws; therefore the state imposes its own estate tax on certain large estates [2]. Intangible property, also known as incorporeal property, describes something which a person or corporation can have ownership of and can transfer ownership of to another person or corporation, but has no physical substance. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Inheritance tax, also known in some countries outside the United States as a death duty and referred to as an estate tax within the U.S, is a form of tax levied upon the bequest that a person may make in their will to a living person or organisation. ...


Law and government

The capital is Madison. For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ...

State Executive Officers Download high resolution version (1144x1144, 250 KB)The state capitol of Madison, WI Source:Image taken by Dori License:Dual GFDL CC File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1144x1144, 250 KB)The state capitol of Madison, WI Source:Image taken by Dori License:Dual GFDL CC File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Wisconsin State Capitol, in Madison, Wisconsin, houses both chambers of the Wisconsin legislature along with the state Supreme Court and the Office of the Governor. ...

See also: James Edward (Jim) Doyle (born November 23, 1945) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party. ... Barbara Lawton (born July 5, 1951) is an American politician from Green Bay, Wisconsin. ... J. B. Van Hollen (born 1966 in Chetek, Wisconsin) is the State Attorney General-elect for the state of Wisconsin. ... Douglas LaFollette (born June 6, 1940) is a United States academic, environmental activist, and politician in the state of Wisconsin. ... Dawn Marie Sass (born 1959 in Wisconsin) is the current Treasurer of Wisconsin. ...

Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of Wisconsin Wikisource has original text related to this article: Rejected Constitution of the State of Wisconsin The Wisconsin Constitution is the governing document of the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Governors of Wisconsin: Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Wisconsin ... The Wisconsin State Legislature, based in Madison, is bicameral and is composed of the Wisconsin State Assembly and the Wisconsin State Senate. ... The Wisconsin State Senate, based off of the U.S. Senate, is the upper house of the Wisconsin State Legislature, smaller than the Wisconsin State Assembly. ... The Wisconsin State Assembly is the lower house of the Wisconsin Legislature. ... The Wisconsin Supreme Court is the highest appellate court in the state of Wisconsin. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Wisconsin to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... Wisconsin was admitted to the Union on May 29, 1848. ...

Politics

The Little White Schoolhouse of Ripon
The Little White Schoolhouse of Ripon

During the period of the Civil War, Wisconsin was a Republican and pro-Union stronghold. Ethno-religious issues in the late 19th century caused a brief split in the Republican coalition. Through the first half of the 20th century, Wisconsin's politics were dominated by Robert La Follette and his sons, originally of the Republican Party, but later of their own Progressive Party. Since 1945, the state has maintained a close balance between Republicans and Democrats. Republican Senator Joe McCarthy was a controversial national figure in the early 1950s. Recent leading Republicans include former Governor Tommy Thompson and Congressman F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr.; prominent Democrats include Senators Herb Kohl and Russ Feingold, and Congressman David Obey.[11] Download high resolution version (1110x788, 251 KB)A photograph of the Little White Schoolhouse of Ripon, WI. Taken November 4, 2004 by User:Laharl. ... Download high resolution version (1110x788, 251 KB)A photograph of the Little White Schoolhouse of Ripon, WI. Taken November 4, 2004 by User:Laharl. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Republican Party of the United States was established in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... The Republican Party of Wisconsin is the affiliate of the Republican Party in Wisconsin. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1924 was a national ticket created by Robert M. La Follette, Sr. ... The Democratic Party of Wisconsin is the affiliate of the Democratic Party in Wisconsin. ... Joseph McCarthy This article is about the American politician. ... For other people with similar names, see Thomas Thompson. ... Frank James Sensenbrenner, Jr. ... This article refers to Sen. ... Russell Dana Russ Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... David Ross Obey (born October 3, 1938) is an American politician. ...


In Wisconsin, pencils are used to mark the election ballots, and the public is not allowed to be present when the votes are tallied. However, in select communities, some voters are still allowed to use a proper marker.[12]


Much of the state's political history involved coalitions among different ethnic groups. The most famous controversy dealt with foreign language teaching in schools. This was fought out in the Bennett Law campaign of 1890, when the Germans switched to the Democratic Party because of the Republican Party's support of the Bennett Law, which led to a major victory for the Democrats. The Bennett Law was a highly controversial state law passed in Wisconsin in 1889, that required the use of English in most schools. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ...


The cities of Wisconsin have been active in organizing themselves to provide for greater government transparency by increasing the availability of legislative information on the internet. Currently three out of the top five most populous cities in Wisconsin provide their constituents with internet based access of all public records directly from the cities’ databases. Wisconsin cities started to make this a priority after Milwaukee began doing so, on their page, in 2001. One such city, Madison, has been named the Number 1 digital city by the Center for Digital Government in consecutive years. Nearly 18 percent of Wisconsin’s population has the ability to access their municipality’s information in this way. This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ...


Lawmakers in Wisconsin

1984 was the last election that Wisconsin supported a Republican Presidential candidate. However, both the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections were close, with Wisconsin receiving heavy doses of national advertising because it was a "swing" or pivot state. Al Gore carried the presidential vote in 2000 by only 5,700 votes, and John Kerry won Wisconsin in 2004 by 11,000 votes. Republicans had a stronghold in the Fox Valley but elected a Democrat, Steve Kagen, of Appleton, for the 8th Congressional District in 2006. Republicans have held Waukesha County). The City of Milwaukee itself heads the list of Wisconsin's Democratic strongholds which also includes Madison and the state's Native American reservations. Wisconsin's largest Congressional district, the 7th Congressional district has been a strong Democratic hold since 1969, and has re-elected Congressman David Obey with 62% of the vote. Rep. Obey chairs the powerful House Appropriations Committee. The Fox River is a river in Wisconsin in the United States. ... Waukesha County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... BIA map of Indian reservations in the continental United States. ...

  • Wisconsin's political history encompasses, on the one hand, "Fighting Bob" La Follette and the Progressive movement; and on the other, Joe McCarthy, the controversial anti-Communist censured by the Senate during the 1950s.
  • In the early 20th century, the Socialist Party of America had a base in Milwaukee. The phenomenon was referred to as sewer socialism because the elected officials were more concerned with public works and reform than with revolution (although revolutionary socialism existed in the city as well). It faded out in the late 1950s, largely due to the red scare and racial tensions.[13] The first Socialist mayor of a large city in the United States was Emil Seidel, elected mayor of Milwaukee in 1910; another Socialist, Daniel Hoan, was mayor of Milwaukee from 1916 to 1940; and a third, Frank P. Zeidler, from 1948–1960. Socialist newspaper editor Victor Berger was repeatedly elected as a U.S. Representative, although he was prevented from serving for some time due to his opposition to the First World War.
  • William Proxmire, a Democratic Senator (1957–89) dominated the Democratic party for years; he was best known for attacking waste and fraud in federal spending.
  • Democrat Russ Feingold was the only Senator to vote against the Patriot Act in 2001.
  • Democrat Tammy Baldwin from Madison was the first, and is currently the only, openly lesbian U.S. Representative.[14]
  • In 2004, Gwen Moore, a Democrat from Milwaukee, became Wisconsin's first African-American U.S. Representative.

The 2006, Democrats gained in a national sweep of opposition to the Bush administration, and the Iraq War. The retiring GOP 8th District Congressman, Mark Green, of Green Bay, ran against the former Attorney General, Jim Doyle. Green lost by 8% statewide. Doyle became the first Democratic Governor to be re-elected in 32 years. The Republicans lost control of the state Senate with three Republicans losing their seats and a pick-up of an open seat. The Democrats gained eight seats in the state Assembly, but the Republicans retained a five vote majority in that house. Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... Progressive Movement is the term used to refer collectively to several various movements around the world that adhere to progressivism. ... This article is about the U.S. senator from Wisconsin (1947-1957). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) is a socialist political party in the United States. ... Sewer Socialism was a Socialist movement that began in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and existed from around 1892 to 1940. ... Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. ... Emil Seidel (December 13, 1864 – June 24, 1947) was the mayor of Milwaukee from 1910 to 1912. ... Daniel Webster Hoan (1881 - 1961) was a United States politician. ... Frank P. Zeidler (born 1912) was a socialist mayor of Milwaukee, Wisconsin from 1948 to 1960. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... Victor Luitpold Berger (February 28, 1860 - August 7, 1929) was a United States politician and a founding member of the Socialist Party of America. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Edward William Proxmire (November 11, 1915 – December 15, 2005) was a member of the Democratic Party who served in the United States Senate for the state of Wisconsin from 1957 to 1989. ... Russell Dana Russ Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article needs cleanup. ... Tammy Suzanne Green Baldwin (born February 11, 1962), American politician, is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1999, representing the Second Congressional District of Wisconsin (map). ... Gwendolynne Sophia Moore (born April 18, 1951) a Democrat from Wisconsin, is a Congresswoman representing Wisconsins 4th Congressional district (map). ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ...


Important municipalities

Wisconsin counties

Wisconsin's self-promotion as "America's Dairyland" sometimes leads to a mistaken impression that it is an exclusively rural state. However, Wisconsin contains cities and towns of all sizes. Over 68% of Wisconsin residents live in urban areas and the Greater Milwaukee area is home to roughly one-third of the state's population.[15] Milwaukee is slightly larger than Boston and is the beginning of a largely developed string of cities that stretches down the western edge of Lake Michigan into greater Chicago and also into northwestern Indiana. With over 602,000 residents Milwaukee proper is also the 22nd-largest city in the country.[16] This string of cities along the western edge of Lake Michigan is generally considered to be an example of a megalopolis. Madison's dual identity as state capital and college town gives it a cultural richness unusual in a city its size. Madison is also a very fast-growing city, that has around 220,000 people. Medium-size cities dot the state and anchor a network of working farms surrounding them. Cities and villages are incorporated urban areas in Wisconsin. Towns are unincorporated minor civil divisions of counties. Download high resolution version (811x865, 61 KB) SOURCE: http://www. ... Download high resolution version (811x865, 61 KB) SOURCE: http://www. ... Location in the state of Wisconsin The Milwaukee–Racine–Waukesha metropolitan area is an urban area that the U.S. Census Bureau defines as a Combined Statistical Area centered on the city of Milwaukee and had a population of 1,706,077 people as of the 2006 U.S. Census... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about megacities in general. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the Wisconsin differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the Wisconsin differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the Wisconsin differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... Minor civil division (MCD) is a term used by the United States Census Bureau to designate the primary governmental and/or administrative subdivisions of a county, such as a civil township, precinct, or magisterial district. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the Wisconsin differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ...


Cities in Wisconsin with population of 50,000 or more (as of the 2005 census estimate) include:

See also: List of municipalities in Wisconsin by population and Political subdivisions of Wisconsin

Education

Colleges and universities

Wisconsin, along with Minnesota and Michigan, was among the Midwestern leaders in the emergent American state university movement following the Civil War in the United States. By the turn of the century, education in the state advocated the "Wisconsin Idea," which emphasized purpose for service to the people and epitomized progressive movements within colleges and universities at the time.[17] Today, public education in Wisconsin includes both the 26-campus University of Wisconsin System, headquartered in Madison, and the 16-campus Wisconsin Technical College System which coordinates with the University of Wisconsin. Notable private colleges and universities include Marquette University, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Medical College of Wisconsin, Edgewood College, Beloit College, and Lawrence University, among others. Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Wisconsin Idea is a philosophy embraced by the University of Wisconsin, which holds that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state, and that research conducted at the University of Wisconsin should be applied to solve problems and improve health, quality of life, the environment... The University of Wisconsin System is the state university system in Wisconsin, composed of fifteen institutions with twenty-six campuses. ... Wisconsin Technical College System is a group of 16 technical college (community colleges) in Wisconsin. ... Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... MSOE redirects here. ... The Medical College of Wisconsin (www. ... Edgewood College is a small Catholic liberal arts college in Madison, Wisconsin, in the Diocese of Madison. ... Beloit College is a liberal arts college in Beloit, Wisconsin and a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. ... Lawrence University, located in Appleton, Wisconsin, is a private undergraduate college founded in 1847. ...

See also: List of colleges and universities in Wisconsin
See also: List of high schools in Wisconsin
See also: List of school districts in Wisconsin

The following is a list of colleges and universities in Wisconsin. ... // This is a current list of high schools in the state of Wisconsin. ... This is a complete listing of school districts in the State of Wisconsin. ...

Sports

Main article: Sports in Wisconsin

Wisconsin is represented by major league teams in three sports: American football, baseball, and basketball. Lambeau Field, located in Green Bay, Wisconsin is home to the National Football League's Green Bay Packers. The Packers have been part of the NFL since the league's second season in 1921 and currently hold the record for the most NFL titles, earning the city of Green Bay the self-given nickname "Titletown". The Green Bay Packers are one of the most successful small-market professional sports franchises in the world and have won 12 NFL championships, including the first two AFL-NFL Championship games (Super Bowls I and II) and Super Bowl XXXI. The city fully supports their team, as evidenced by the 60,000 person waiting list for season tickets to Lambeau Field, which is referred to as the "frozen tundra" and is considered by many football enthusiasts to be "hallowed ground." The Milwaukee Brewers, the state's major league baseball team, are based out of Miller Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Before Miller Park was opened in 2001, the Brewers played their home games at County Stadium. In 1982, the Brewers won the American League Championship, marking their most successful season. The Milwaukee Bucks of the National Basketball Association play home games at the Bradley Center. The Bucks won the NBA Championship in 1971. The state also has minor league teams in hockey (Milwaukee Admirals) and baseball (the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers, based in Appleton.) Wisconsin is represented by major league teams in the three most popular spectator sports in the United States: American football, baseball, and basketball. ... Lambeau Field is an outdoor football stadium in Green Bay, Wisconsin, the home of the NFLs Green Bay Packers. ... Green Bay is the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... NFL redirects here. ... Packers redirects here. ... Date January 26, 1997 Stadium Louisiana Superdome City New Orleans, Louisiana MVP Desmond Howard, Kick Returner/Punt Returner Favorite Packers by 14 National anthem Luther Vandross Coin toss Past Super Bowl winning coaches: Hank Stram, Mike Ditka, Tom Flores, Tom Landry, Chuck Noll, George Seifert Referee Gerald Austin Halftime show... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Miller Park is a baseball stadium located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... County Stadium was a ballpark in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from 1953 to 2000. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Bradley Center is an indoor arena in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... The Milwaukee Admirals are a professional ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Wisconsin Timber Rattlers are a Class A minor league baseball team, affiliated with the Seattle Mariners, that plays in the Midwest League. ... Appleton is a city in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, on the Fox River, 100 miles (161 km) north of Milwaukee. ...


In addition to professional teams, Wisconsin is home to many successful college sports programs. The Wisconsin Badgers, teams based out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, hold many NCAA division championship titles in their respective sports. This includes a historic dual-championship in 2006 when both the women's and men's hockey teams won national titles. The Wisconsin football team has also seen much success after the hiring of Barry Alvarez as head coach. Alvarez lead the Badgers to three Rose Bowl victories, including back to back victories in the years 1999 and 2000. The Badgers football program, playing at Camp Randall Stadium, enjoys similar loyalty to the Packers; both teams are known to sell out their entire schedules far in advance. The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Barry Alvarez Barry Alvarez (born December 30, 1946, Langeloth, Pennsylvania) is a retired college football head coach and current Director of Athletics at the University of Wisconsin. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Camp Randall Stadium was built in 1917 and is the current home of the Wisconsin Badgers football team. ...


The Marquette Golden Eagles of the Big East Conference are the state's other major collegiate program. They are known nationally for their Men's Basketball team which, under the direction of Al McGuire, won the NCAA National Championship in 1977. The team, led by Dwayne Wade, returned to the Final Four in 2003. Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... The Marquette Golden Eagles (formerly known as the Marquette Warriors) is the name of the various sports teams of Marquette University. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... Al McGuire was the coach who led the Marquette University Mens Basketball team from 1964-1977. ... Dwyane Wade (born January 17, 1982 in Chicago, Illinois) currently plays professional basketball for the NBAs Miami Heat. ...


Miscellaneous topics

USS Wisconsin was named in honor of this state. Two ships of the United States Navy have been named USS Wisconsin in honor of the 30th state. ...

The Milwaukee Art Museum
The Milwaukee Art Museum

Known as "America's Dairyland," Wisconsin is also known for cheese. Citizens of Wisconsin are referred to as Wisconsinites, although a common nickname (sometimes used pejoratively) among non-residents is "Cheeseheads." This is due to the prevalence and quality of cheesemaking in the state, and for the novelty hats made of yellow foam in the shape of a triangular block of cheese. Cheese curds are an extremely popular treat, exported as gifts throughout the country. The state is also known for its alcohol production and consumption, and it is historically home to a large number of breweries and bars per capita. A lesser known, but still significant nickname for Wisconsin is "The Copper State," referring to the copper mines in the northwestern part of the state. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x800, 154 KB)Copyright © 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x800, 154 KB)Copyright © 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Cheesehead is a nickname (sometimes used derogatorily) referring to a person from either Wisconsin or the Netherlands, referring to the large volume of cheese production in those locales. ... A bowl of Wisconsin cheese curds Cheese curds are the fresh curds of cheddar cheese. ...


Wisconsin is very popular for outdoor activities especially hunting and fishing. One of the most popular game animals is the Whitetail deer. In 2005, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources reported the population of Wisconsin's deer herd to be about 1.4-1.5 million. It is common for over 600,000 deer hunting licenses to be sold each year.[18] Visitors to Wisconsin during the Thanksgiving holiday will see many hunters in rural areas wearing blaze orange gear for Wisconsin's gun-deer hunting season. ... A safety orange-colored warning sign for road construction sites. ...

Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin
Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin

The Milwaukee Art Museum in Milwaukee is known for its unique architecture. The Milwaukee County Zoological Gardens cover over 200 acres (800,000 m²) of land on the far west side of the city. Madison is home to the Vilas Zoo which is free for all visitors, and the Olbrich Gardens conservatory, as well as the hub of cultural activity at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It is also known for Monona Terrace, a convention center that was designed by Taliesin Architect Anthony Puttnam, based loosely on a 1930s design by Frank Lloyd Wright, a world-renowned architect and Wisconsin native who was born in Richland Center.[19] Wright's home and studio in the 20th century was at Taliesin, south of Spring Green. Decades after Wright's death, Taliesin remains an architectural office and school for his followers. Image File history File linksMetadata Taliesin600. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Taliesin600. ... Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin was the summer home of American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright. ... The Milwaukee Art Museum The Milwaukee Art Museum (MAM) is located on Lake Michigan in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... The Milwaukee County Zoological Gardens is a zoo in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area. ... Henry Vilas Zoo is a moderately-sized public zoo for the Madison, Wisconsin area. ... Olbrich Botanical Gardens is located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... Monona Terrace Monona Terrace (view from the lake) Frank Lloyd Wright inspired the design of Monona Terrace, a community and convention center on the shores of Lake Monona in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher from Oak Park, Illinois. ... Richland Center is a city located in Richland County, Wisconsin. ... Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin was the summer home of American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright. ...


Wisconsin has sister-state relationships with the Germany's Hesse, Japan's Chiba Prefecture, Mexico's Jalisco, China's Heilongjiang, and Nicaragua.[20] Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density... Chiba Prefecture ) is located in the Greater Tokyo Area of Honshu Island, Japan. ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 126 Largest City Guadalajara Government  - Governor Emilio González Márquez (PAN)  - Federal Deputies PAN: 18 PRI: 1  - Federal Senators Eva Contreras (PAN) Héctor Pérez (PAN) Ramiro Hernández (PRI) Area Ranked 6th  - State 30,534. ... Heilongjiang (Simplified Chinese: 黑龙江省; Traditional Chinese: 黑龍江省; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Postal System Pinyin: Heilungkiang) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. ...


See also

Map of Wisconsin, showing major cities, rivers, and roads
Map of Wisconsin, showing major cities, rivers, and roads

File links The following pages link to this file: Wisconsin Categories: National Atlas images | Wisconsin maps ... File links The following pages link to this file: Wisconsin Categories: National Atlas images | Wisconsin maps ... The Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAAP or Badger) or Badger Ordnance Works (B.O.W.) is an excess, non-BRAC, US Army facility located in Baraboo, Sauk County, Wisconsin, United States. ... List of cities in Wisconsin, arranged in alphabetical order. ... List of 72 counties in the U.S. state of Wisconsin: Categories: | ... State Flag of Wisconsin This is a list of prominent people from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... The following television shows are set in the U.S. state of Wisconsin: Happy Days (set in suburban Milwaukee) Laverne & Shirley (set in Milwaukee) Step by Step (set in Port Washington) A Whole New Ballgame (set in Milwaukee) The George Wendt Show (set in Madison) A Minute with Stan Hooper... Here is a following list of broadcast television stations in Wisconsin. ... Towns in Wisconsin are similar to civil townships in other states. ... List of villages in Wisconsin, arranged in alphabetical order. ... The state of Wisconsin enrolled 91,379 men total for service in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... List of Wisconsin State Highways Wisconsin State Highway 16, originally US-16. ... Current common carriers Amtrak (AMTK) [1] (federally owned by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation) Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) [2] Canadian National Railway (CN) [3] Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) [4] Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway (DMIR) Duluth, Winnipeg and Pacific Railway (DWP) East Troy Electric Railroad (METW) [5... This is a list of rivers in the U.S. state of Wisconsin Bad River Bark River Black River, tributary of the Mississippi, flowing through Taylor, Clark, Jackson, and Lacrosse counties Black River, tributary of Lake Superior in Douglas county Black River, tributary of Lake Michigan, Sheboygan county Black River... This is a list of Wisconsin state parks. ... Boy Scout Lane in Stevens Point Scouting in Wisconsin has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined 8 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 15 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 13 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of Wisconsin. ... The Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member teams are located in the state of Wisconsin; in fact, all of its members are campuses in the University of Wisconsin System. ... The Wisconsin Local History and Biography Articles Collection is a decades-long project of the Wisconsin Historical Society. ... Wisconsin State Patrol logo The Wisconsin State Patrol is the state police force of Wisconsin. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-09.
  2. ^ Benedetti, Michael. Climate of Wisconsin. The University of Wisconsin-Extension. Retrieved on 2007-03-16.
  3. ^ Miller, Frank Hayden. "The Polanders in Wisconsin." Parkman Club Publications No. 10. Milwaukee, Wis.: Parkman Club, 1896); Online facsimile at: http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1336; Visited on: 1/29/2008
  4. ^ Carroll, Brett E. (2000-12-28). The Routledge Historical Atlas of Religion in America, Routledge Atlases of American History. Routledge. ISBN 0415921376. 
  5. ^ Budget shortfall projected at $650 million, The Daily Cardinal
  6. ^ "2001 Milk Production" (PDF), Marketing Service Bulletin, United States Department of Agriculture, February 2002. Retrieved on 2007-03-16. 
  7. ^ Walters, Steven. "Doyle flips decision, puts cow on quarter", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. 
  8. ^ Schmid, John. "Out of steam: Decline of railroad sidetracked hopes of many", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2004-12-06. Retrieved on 2007-05-18. 
  9. ^ Wisconsin's Large Employer Search Results
  10. ^ County Sales Tax Distribution-2007. Wisconsin Department of Revenue (2007-03-06). Retrieved on 2007-03-24.
  11. ^ Conant, James K. (2006-03-01). "1", Wisconsin Politics and Government: America's Laboratory of Democracy. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0803215487. 
  12. ^ http://elections.state.wi.us/docview.asp?docid=872 Election Worker Manual, p11
  13. ^ Smith, Kevin D. (Spring 2003). "From Socialism to Racism: The Politics of Class and Identity in Postwar Milwaukee". Michigan Historical Review 29 (1): 71–95. 
  14. ^ Bull, Chris. "Take a seat - openly lesbian Representative Tammy Baldwin", The Advocate, LPI Media, 1999-02-16. Retrieved on 2007-03-16. 
  15. ^ Naylor. Number and Percent of Total Population by Urban/Rural Categories for Wisconsin Counties: April 1, 2000 (PDF). State of Wisconsin, Department of Administration. Retrieved on 2007-03-16.
  16. ^ Davis, Chase; Rick Romell. "City drops out of top 20", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Journal Communications. Retrieved on 2007-03-16. 
  17. ^ Rudolph, Frederick (1990). The American College and University: A History.. The University of Georgia Press, Athens and London. 
  18. ^ Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (2005-11-12). "A Chronology Of Wisconsin Deer Hunting From Closed Seasons To Antlerless Permits". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-03-16.
  19. ^ Pure Contemporary interview with Anthony Puttnam
  20. ^ Sister-States and Cities. International Wisconsin (2006-03-20). Retrieved on 2007-03-16.

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Bibliography

  • Michael Barone and Richard E. Cohen. The Almanac of American Politics, 2006 (2005)
  • Richard Current, Wisconsin: A History (2001)
  • Larry Gara; A Short History of Wisconsin 1962
  • Holmes, Fred L. Wisconsin (5 vols., Chicago, 1946), detailed popular history and many biographies
  • Robert C. Nesbit, Wisconsin: A History (rev. ed. 1989)
  • Pearce, Neil. The Great Lakes States of America (1980)
  • Quaife, Milo M. Wisconsin, Its History and Its People, 1634–1924 (4 vols., 1924), detailed popular history & biographies
  • Raney, William Francis. Wisconsin: A Story of Progress (1940)
  • Arthur H. Robinson and J. B. Culver, ed., The Atlas of Wisconsin (1974)
  • Richard Sisson ed. The American Midwest: An Interpretive Encyclopedia (2006)
  • I. Vogeler, Wisconsin: A Geography (1986)
  • WPA, Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State 1941; detailed guide to every town and city, and cultural history

See additional books at History of Wisconsin Wisconsin became a state on May 29, 1848, but the land that makes up the state has been occupied by humans for thousands of years. ...

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This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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