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Encyclopedia > Wisbech
Wisbech
Map sources for Wisbech at grid reference TF370085
OS Grid Reference: TF460098
Lat/Lon: 52°39′N, 0°09′W
Population: 20,200 (2001 Census)
Dwellings: 9,145 (2001 Census)
Formal status: Town
Administration
County: Cambridgeshire
Region: East of England
Nation: England
Post Office and Telephone
Post town: Wisbech
Postcode: PE13, PE14
Dialling Code: 01945

Wisbech (IPA: ['wɪzbiʧ]) is a market town and inland port with a population of about 20,000 in the Fenland area of Cambridgeshire. The tidal River Nene runs through the centre of the town and is spanned by two bridges. The name is believed to mean mouth of the (River) Ouse but it has never been resolved. Image File history File links Dot4gb. ... Image File history File links Gb4dot. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... A dwelling is a structure in which humans or other animals live. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Home Nations (often written as the common noun home nations) is a term used to refer to the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom — England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland — collectively but as separate entities, distinct from the United Kingdom as a state. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK and Australian postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... A fen is a sere, a phase in the natural ecological succession from the open water of a lake to (for example) woodland. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The River Nene is a river in the east of England. ...


Prior to the Local Government Act 1972 coming into force in 1974 Wisbech was a municipal borough. It is now a civil parish in the Fenland district. The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Fenland is a local government district in Cambridgeshire, England. ...

Contents

History

A Norman castle to fortify Wisbech was built by William I, and in later Tudor times became a notorious prison. The Castle was rebuilt in the mid-17th century and again in 1816 by Joseph Medworth, who also developed the Crescent, familiar as the setting in numerous costume dramas. The major town dwelling is Peckover House with its fine walled garden, built for the Quaker/banking family in 1722 and now owned by the National Trust. Norman conquests in red. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... William I of England (c. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Peckover House (National Trust) Perfectly positioned in the centre of North Brink, Peckover House is the finest property in Wisbech. ... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ...


In the 17th century, the local inhabitants became known as the "Fen Tigers" because of their resistance to the draining of the fens, but the project turned Wisbech into a wealthy port handling agricultural produce. At this time Wisbech was on the estuary of the River Ouse, but silting caused the coastline to move north, and the River Nene was diverted to serve the town. The Wisbech Canal joining the River Nene at Wisbech was subsequently filled in and became the dual carriageway leading into the town from the east (now crossing the bypass). (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Produce on display at La Boqueria market in Barcelona, Spain. ... Ouse is the name of more than one river in Great Britain: River Ouse, Yorkshire River Great Ouse in East Anglia River Little Ouse, a tributary of the River Great Ouse River Ouse, Sussex in East Sussex There is also a town named Ouse: Ouse, Tasmania, Australia See also Rivers... The River Nene is a river in the east of England. ...


The eight-kilometre (5-mile) £6 million A47 Wisbech/West Walton Bypass opened in spring 1982. The A47 is a trunk road in England linking Birmingham to Great Yarmouth (although most of the section between Birmingham and Nuneaton has been reclassified as the B4114). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


Elgood & Sons. Ltd Brewery

The Brewery was founded in 1795, and bought soon after by the Elgood Family. It is a traditional brewery, but produices less than some modern micro-breweries, at around 90-100 barrels per week. The beers produced indlude: "Black Dog Mild", "Golden Newt", "Cambridge Bitter, "Greyhound Strong Bitter", "Old Smoothie Mild", "Old Smoothie Bitter", "Brookes Ale", "Reinbeer" and "Jingle Ale". Recently The Brewery has won champion beer of Britain for its Cambridge Bitter.


Railways

Wisbech once had three railway branch lines: the 1847/1848 - 1968 GER March to Watlington (junction), Norfolk (on the Ely to King's Lynn main line) via Wisbech East (Victoria Road); the 1866 - 1959 M&GN Peterborough to Sutton Bridge via Wisbech North (on Harecroft Road); and the 1883/1884 - 1966 GER Wisbech and Upwell Tramway. Also, there were two harbour quay lines either side of the River Nene - M&GN Harbour west branch and GER Harbour East branch. The Great Eastern Railway (GER) was formed in 1862 as an amalgamation of the Eastern Counties Railway; and also with several other smaller railways: Norfolk, the Eastern Union, the Newmarket, the Harwich, the East Anglian Light and the East Suffolk; among others. ... Watlington could be Watlington, Norfolk Watlington, Oxfordshire This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... The Fen Line runs from Cambridge in Cambridgeshire to Kings Lynn in Norfolk, in East Anglia, England. ... M&GNJR Badge The Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway (M&GN) was a joint railway owned by the Midland Railway (MR) and the Great Northern Railway (GNR) in eastern England. ... The Wisbech and Upwell Tramway was a rural standard gauge tramway in East Anglia. ...


The Wisbech and March Bramleyline Heritage Railway are going to fully restore and re-open the remaining March to Wisbech line as a tourist line similar to the Mid-Norfolk Railway at Dereham. Rolling stock owned by the Bramleyline are five ex-Intercity Gatwick Express BR MKIIf class 488 coaches comprising a rake of four First class and one Club class. Locomotive haulage will be supplied by one or two Class 73 electro-diesels. Until a passing loop (at Coldham) and two run-round loops (one at March and one at Wisbech) have been installed, the train will be topped and tailed by a couple of Class 73 locos. The Wisbech and March Bramleyline is an embryonic heritage railway that aims to reinstate services over the disused March to Wisbech line. ... Class 101 DMU at Dereham. ... Gatwick Express is the brand name of a National Express Group-operated railway service offering a frequent shuttle service between Victoria station in London and Gatwick Airport in South East England. ... Class 488/3, no. ... Class 73, no. ...


As the Wisbech branch is Network Rail property and is still classed as a fully functioning freight line, although the last freight service was in Summer 2000, the Bramleyline Heritage Railway will lease the track from NR on an 99-year lease. Train services, once the line has been fully re-opened following HM Rail Inspectorate approval, will run between March North (a new station adjacent to Elm Road crossing, March) and Wisbech East (a new station on Newbridge Lane, Wisbech). At Coldham, a new station is hoped to be built on the site of the old station's Down (Wisbech bound) platform. Physical help in track vegetation clearance, repair and maintainance is needed (Bramleyline P-way Team Leader must be contacted first!), along with financial support to get this important project full steam ahead. [1] Network Rail is a British not for dividend company limited by guarantee whose principal asset is Network Rail Infrastructure Limited, a company limited by shares. ...


Culture

The Angles Theatre is a thriving professional theatre, run almost entirely by volunteers and backed by many leading names including Derek Jacobi, Jo Brand and Cameron Mackintosh. It is also the home of the "Nine Lives" theatre company, a company formed as part of Performing Arts programme run by the Isle College. Sir Derek George Jacobi, CBE (IPA: ) (born 22 October 1938) is an English actor and director, knighted in 1994 for his services to the theatre. ... Jo Brand (born Josephine Grace Brand 3 May 1957, Hastings, East Sussex) is an English comedienne. ... Sir Cameron Mackintosh (born 17 October 1946) is a successful British theatrical producer. ...


Every summer a "Rose Fair" is held in St. Peter's church. The church is decorated with flower displays sponsored by local organisations and businesses. A parade of floats forms up in Queens Road and circuits the town. Strawberry and cream teas are served and stalls raise funds for local charities. Coaches bring visitors from a wide area. Details are available from the local tourist office.


Wisbech is twinned with Arles in France. This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... Coordinates Administration Country France Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (Subprefecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti  (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 0 m–57 m...


The amateur dramatic group The Wisbech Players has been performing for over 50 years. They currently perform twice a year in spring and autumn at the Angles Theatre. Millions of people throughout Great Britain support the arts by being members of local Amateur Theatre groups. ...


Amateur dramatic group The Wisbech Amateur Operatic and Dramatic Society (WAODS) have been providing musicals to the town since 1905. Until 2005 the Society performed at the Empire Theatre, but since then have been performing at the local Thomas Clarkson Community College (previously known as the Queen's School).


Local youth organisations include the Army Cadet Force, Air Training Corps, Sea Cadets, Girls Venture Corps Air Cadets, Fire cadets and St Johns Ambulance cadets. There are numerous Scout and Girlguiding groups for boys and girls.


Sport

The local football team is Wisbech Town Football Club, nicknamed The Fenmen. Other sports present as well are Wisbech Rugby Union Football Club, Wisbech cricket club (who have an annual fixture with MCC), Wisbech Hockey club, Wisbech Squash club and a number of martial arts clubs. A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Wisbech Town F.C. are a football club based in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England. ... Wisbech Town F.C. is a football club based in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England. ...


Swimming: The nine mile river swim between Wisbech and Sutton Bridge in the River Nene was won four times in the 1930's by Ernie (Bunny) Bunning. When the swim was moved to the swimming pool as a 220 yard race David Bunning, his son, won the cup four times in the 1960's.


Notable buildings

  • St. Peter and St. Paul's, the parish church.
  • Octavia Hill Birthplace Museum where she was born before her family's move to London.
  • Wisbech Museum ; extensive collections of local records and other items.Notable artifacts include: Napoleon's Sèvres breakfast service, said to have been captured at the Battle of Waterloo; Thomas Clarkson's chest, containing examples of 18th century African textiles, seeds and leatherwork which he used to illustrate his case for direct trade with Africa; and the original manuscript of Great Expectations.

Peckover House & Garden is a National Trust property located in North Brink, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England. ... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... The Clarkson Memorial, located in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England, is a memorial to Thomas Clarkson MA, one of the earliest campaigners against slavery in England. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Octavia Hill (Wisbech, 1838 - 1912) was an English social reformer, particularly concerned with the welfare of the inhabitants of cities, specifically London, in the second half of the 19th century. ...

Famous people associated with Wisbech

  • William Godwin, (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political writer and novelist, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. Born in Wisbech. Godwin's daughter, Mary, married the poet Shelley - she became Mary Shelley, the famed author of Frankenstein.
  • John Feckenham, last Abbot of Westminster. He was, like many other Catholic clergymen including several bishops, imprisoned in Wisbech Castle and died there.
  • Robert Catesby and Francis Tresham, two of the key participants in the Gunpowder Plot, were imprisoned in Wisbech Castle's infamous dungeons during the late 1500's.
  • Thomas Clarkson, the anti-slavery campaigner, was from Wisbech and was educated at Wisbech Grammar School. The Clarkson Memorial was built to commemorate his life, and is situated on the south bank of the Nene, near to the old bridge.Also the failing local comprehensive school (The Queen's School) is set to be re-opened under the name Thomas Clarkson Community College.
  • John Clarkson, younger brother of Thomas, another key figure in the British abolitionist movement. He organized the voluntary migration of former slaves, freed by the British as part of a deal to reward their loyalty to the Crown during the American War of Independence, to Sierra Leone, where he became Governer.
  • Octavia Hill, co-founder of the National Trust, was born in Wisbech.
  • Octavia Hill's sister Miranda Hill, probably also born at Wisbech, founded the influential Kyrle Society, a progenitor of the National Trust.
  • Sir Harry Kroto, 1996 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, for the discovery of fullerenes.
  • Anton Rodgers, actor, born in Wisbech.
  • Rev. W. Awdrey the creator of Thomas the Tank Engine
  • Toby the Tram Engine, one of the Rev.W. Awdrey's characters, is based on the small steam trams that used to transport farm produce on the Strawberry Line between Wisbech and Upwell. See Wisbech and Upwell Tramway
  • Charles Dickens. The original manuscript of Great Expectations resides at the Wisbech and Fenland Museum. The manuscript can be viewed on the first Saturday of each month.
  • Jesse Pye. Professional football player, who scored two goals in 1949 FA Cup Final, and who represented England at international level, became player-manager for Wisbech Town F.C. from 1960-1966. He scored the goal that knocked Colchester out of the First Round of the F.A Cup in the 1959/60 season.
  • Tony Martin while living in an isolated Norfolk farmhouse just outside Wisbech, gained notoriety for shooting and killing one of two young men, both from a travelling community, who were burgling his home one night. Although he was convicted and imprisoned for murder, he became somewhat of a local celebrity, as the Fenland population, feeling victimized by the high levels of burglary and theft, particularly in the rural areas, saw the Tony Martin incident as a symbol of rough justice.
  • Cambridgeshire Regiment Members recruited locally seeing active service won military honours and battle honours include:-

South Africa 1900-01 William Godwin William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political and miscellaneous writer, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. ... Utilitarianism is a suggested theoretical framework for morality, law and politics, based on quantitative maximisation of some definition of utility for society or humanity. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... John Feckenham (c. ... The Abbey at night, from Deans Yard. ... Robert Catesby (1573 – November 18, 1605), born in Lapworth, Warwickshire, or possibly in Northamptonshire, to a strongly Roman Catholic family, was the leader of a group of Roman Catholic conspirators (the most notable of whom was Guy Fawkes) who endeavoured to blow up the Houses of Parliament in England in... Francis Tresham (c. ... <imagemap>: no valid link was found at the end of line 11 The Gunpowder Plot of 1605 was a failed attempt by a group of provincial English Catholics to kill King James I of England, his family, and most of the Protestant aristocracy in a single attack by blowing up... Thomas Clarkson (28 March 1760 - 26 September 1846), born at Wisbech in Cambridgeshire, England, was a leading campaigner against the slave trade in the British Empire. ... Wisbech Grammar School is an independent school in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire for ages five to 18. ... The Clarkson Memorial, located in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England, is a memorial to Thomas Clarkson MA, one of the earliest campaigners against slavery in England. ... 1905 photograph of baseball player John Clarkson. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775&#8211;1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Octavia Hill (Wisbech, 1838 - 1912) was an English social reformer, particularly concerned with the welfare of the inhabitants of cities, specifically London, in the second half of the 19th century. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... Miranda Hill (1836-1910), English social reformer. ... Sir Harold Walter Kroto KBE FRS (born October 7, 1939) is an English chemist. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Buckminsterfullerene (C60) Fullerenes are molecules composed entirely of carbon, taking the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, or tube. ... Anton Rodgers (born 10 January 1933, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire) is a British actor. ... Wilbert Vere Awdry, OBE, (June 15, 1911 – March 21, 1997), better known as the Reverend W. Awdry, was a clergyman, railway enthusiast and childrens author. ... Thomas the Tank Engine This article is about the fictional tank engine. ... Toby the Tram Engine. ... The Wisbech and Upwell Tramway was a rural standard gauge tramway in East Anglia. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Great Expectations (disambiguation). ... Jesse Pye (December 22, 1919 – February 19, 1984) was an English footballer. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Wisbech Town F.C. are a football club based in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England. ... There are several notable people named Tony Martin: Tony Martin (entertainer), American actor and singer Tony Martin (rock singer), singer with Black Sabbath Tony Martin (comedian), New Zealand comedian and pornographic actor Tony Martin (farmer), English farmer who was imprisoned for fatally shooting a burglar Tony Martin (professor), professor at... Th Cambridgeshire Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Army; it was solely a territorial unit, and did not contain a regular battalion. ...


The Great War (4 battalions): Ypres 1915 '17, Gravenstafel, St. Julien, Frezenberg, Somme 1916 '18, Thiepval, Ancre Heights, Ancre 1916, Pilckem, Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, St. Quentin, Rosières, Lys, Kemmel, Scherpenberg, Amiens, Albert 1918, Bapaume 1918, Hindenburg Line, Épéhy, St. Quentin Canal, Pursuit to Mons, France and Flanders 1915-18


The Second World War: Johore, Batu Pahat, Singapore Island, Malaya 1942


In film and television

Wisbech is noted for its unspoilt Georgian architecture, particularly along North Brink and The Crescent. It has been used in BBC One's 1999 adaptation of Charles Dickens' David Copperfield and ITV1's Micawber, starring David Jason. A Wisbech Rock Festival appears in the film Still Crazy. A Georgian house in Salisbury Georgian architecture is the name given in English-speaking countries to the architectural styles current between about 1720 and 1840, named after the four British monarchs named George. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... David Copperfield is a two part BBC television drama adaptation of Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... David Copperfield or The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (which he never meant to be published on any account)[1] is a novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1850. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ... Micawber was a 2001 ITV comedy drama series starring David Jason. ... Sir David Jason, OBE (born February 2, 1940) is a highly regarded English actor, admired equally for his dramatic work as for his comedy roles. ... Still Crazy is a 1998 comedy film about a fictional 70s rock band named Strange Fruit, who, after being split up for several years, are convinced to get back together to perform at a reunion of the same concert venue where they played their last gig. ...


Wisbech in the News

On 27 June 1970, the heaviest point rainfall was recorded in Wisbech, when 50.8 mm (2 in) fell in just twelve minutes during the Rose Fair.[2]


On September 21st, 1979, two Harrier jump jets on a training exercise collided over Wisbech. Both crashed - one into a field, and the other into a residential area. Two houses and a bungalow were demolished on Ramnoth Road, causing the death of Bob Bowers, his two-year-old son Jonathan Bowers, and Bill Trumpess. BBC Archive The BAE Systems/Boeing Harrier II (GR5, GR7, and GR9 series) is a second generation vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) jet aircraft used by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and, since 2006, the Royal Navy. ...


The 'Rabbits on the Roundabout' caused locals considerable discussion. A number of rabbits took up residence on a town centre roundabout, causing damage to the flowers and shrubs. Despite calls to remove them, local opposition prevailed and the 'Wisbech Warren' is a popular local tourist attraction.


According to a study looking into immigration patterns, Wisbech has been identified as the seventh "most English" town in Britain. Sky News


There are two free newspaper distributed within the town, the Wisbech Standard (owned by Archant) and the Fenland Citizen. Archant is a publishing company, based in Norwich, Norfolk, England. ...


Education

Wisbech's two secondary schools (11-18) are the comprehensive The Thomas Clarkson Community College (formerly the Queens School, which itself was the amalgamation of the Queens Girls and Queens Boys school), and the independent Wisbech Grammar School, which was founded in 1379, making it one of the oldest schools in the United Kingdom. There is also a Further Education centre, the College of West Anglia, in the town. Many find that after seeking higher education the area is unable to offer suitable employment and subsequently many are forced to move from the area. A Comprehensive school is a type of school providing secondary level education in England or Wales. ... Wisbech Grammar School is an independent school in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire for ages five to 18. ... This list is a work-in-progress, as it is built from various sources. ...


Primary schools in Wisbech include; Clarkson Infants, St Peters Juniors, The Orchards, Peckover, Nene Infants, Ramnoth Junior School and Elm Road County Primary School. There is also a school for children with special learning needs, Meadowgate School.


See also

This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the county of Cambridgeshire, England. ...

External links

  • 2001 Census
  • Fenland Citizen Web site of local newspaper
  • Fenland District Council District councils web site

  Results from FactBites:
 
WELCOME TO WISBECH - CAPITAL OF THE FENS. (0 words)
Wisbech, Capital of the Fens, with a population of about 20,200, and situated about 25 miles to the northeast of Peterborough, is a market town of great character and historical importance.
The draining of the Fens brought prosperity to Wisbech when the produce of the rich agricultural land flowed through the port.
Wisbech landowners and merchants grew wealthy and built their rows of elegant houses along the banks of the River Nene.
Wisbech, Cambridgeshire (2384 words)
The branch line of the London and North Eastern railway from the main line to Wisbech harbour has materially assisted the development of the timber and coal trade of the town, and there is also a steam tramway from Wisbech station to Upwell for the conveyance of goods and passengers.
Peter and Paul is an edifice of stone in the Early Norman and Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, double nave, lady chapel, north and south aisles, south porch and a large embattled tower at the north-west angle containing a clock and 10 fine-toned bells; the clock was erected in 1866 by Mr.
Richard Loake, by will in 1701, gave £200 to the capital burgesses of Wisbech, the interest of £100 to be annually expended in clothing five poor widows or housekeepers, and of the other £100 to be distributed by the churchwardens amongst the poor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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