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Encyclopedia > Wired Magazine

Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. It reports on how technology affects culture, the economy, and politics. A sample of Wired covers. ... San Franciscos famous fog and famous Golden Gate Bridge. ... State nickname: The Golden State Official languages English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 4. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...


Its editorial stance was originally inspired by the ideas of Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, credited as the magazine's "patron saint" in early colophons. Wired has both been admired and disliked for its strong libertarian principles, its enthusiastic embrace of techno-utopianism, and its sometimes experimental layout with its bold use of fluorescent and metallic inks. Herbert Marshall McLuhan (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar, professor of English literature, literary critic, and communications theorist, who is one of the founders of the study of media ecology and is today an honorary guru among technophiles. ... In several forms of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... In publishing, a colophon describes details of the production of a book. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that supports individual rights, private property rights, and free market capitalism. ... Techno-utopianism is any ideology based on the belief that advanced science and technology will eventually bring about ideal living conditions in the future. ...


It is no longer related to Wired News, which publishes at Wired.com. However, Wired News is responsible for reprinting Wired magazine's content online due to a business agreement made when Condé Nast Publications purchased the magazine, but not the website. Wired News, online at Wired. ... Condé Nast Publications Inc is a worldwide magazine publishing company, credited with creating the marketing strategy which emphasized magazines focused on a particular class or interest. ...

Contents


History

The magazine was founded by American journalist Louis Rossetto and his partner Jane Metcalfe in 1993 with initial backing from software entrepreneur Charlie Jackson and industry pundit Nicholas Negroponte of the MIT Media Lab, who was a regular columnist for six years, through 1998. Louis Rossetto (born 1949) is an American journalist. ... Jane Metcalfe is the former president and co-founder of Wired Ventures, creator and original publisher of Wired Magazine. ... Charlie Jackson is a National Football League defensive quality control coach for the Green Bay Packers. ... Nicholas Negroponte Nicholas Negroponte (born 1943) is an American computer scientist best known as founder and director of Massachusetts Institute of Technologys Media Lab. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a university located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is one of the worlds leading research institutions in science and technology, as well as in numerous other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... The MIT Media Lab engages in education and research in the digital technology used for expression and communication. ...


Wired was a great success at its launch and was compared to Rolling Stone for its innovation and cultural impact. The magazine won two National Magazine Awards for General Excellence and one for Design in its first four years. The Rolling Stone logo Rolling Stone is an American magazine devoted to music and popular culture. ...


At inception Wired was also often compared to a predecessor, the magazine Mondo 2000. They both shared a creative use of design, and a cyberculture subject matter. Early issues of Wired showed a clear influence of Mondo 2000, but over time the two magazines diverged as Wired developed a more distinctive style. Mondo 2000 retained its more subversive emphasis of cyberculture, while Wired shifted emphasis more and more in a mainstream direction. Wired also toned down the extremities of design that made it difficult to read. The founding executive editor of Wired, Kevin Kelly, was formerly one of the editors of the Whole Earth Catalog and the Whole Earth Review, and he brought with him many contributing writers from those publications. Six authors of the first issue, Wired 1.01 had written for Whole Earth Review, most notably Bruce Sterling and Stewart Brand. Other contributors to Whole Earth appeared in Wired, including William Gibson who was featured on Wired's cover in its first year. Mondo 2000 #13 Mondo 2000 was a glossy cyberculture magazine published in California during the 1980s and 1990s. ... Cyberculture is a frequently and flexibly used term lacking an explicit meaning. ... Kevin Kelly Kevin Kelly is the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and former publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog. ... The Whole Earth Catalog was a sizeable catalog published twice a year from 1968 to 1972, and occasionally thereafter, until 1998. ... Whole Earth Review is the former name of a magazine once known as CoEvolution Quarterly and now known as Whole Earth. ... Bruce Sterling at the Ars Electronica Festival Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... Stewart Brand speaking September 5, 2004 Stewart Brand (born December 14, 1938 in Rockford, Illinois) is an author, editor, and creator of The Whole Earth Catalog and CoEvolution Quarterly. ... Some credit William Gibson with writing the most clear-cut examples of the Science Fiction genre known as cyberpunk, as well as coining the term cyberspace. ...


Despite the fact that Kelly was involved in launching the WELL, an early public access to the Internet, Wired's first issue (1.01) de-emphasized the internet, and primarily talked about interactive games, cell-phone hacking, digital special effects, military simulations, and Japanese otaku. Despite rumors to the contrary, the first issue contained many references to the internet, including a long article on online-date and internet sex, and a tutorial on installing a "bozo filter" to eliminate online posts to by trolls, among other references. The last page, a column written by Nicholas Negroponte, was written in the style of an e-mail message, but contained obviously fake, non-standard e-mail addresses. By the third issue in the fall of 1993 the 'Net Surf' column began listing interesting FTP sites, news groups, and email addresses, at a time when the numbers of these things were small and this information was still extremely novel to the public. Wired was among the first magazines to list the email address of its authors and contributors. For the Scottish football team, see Motherwell F.C. The Whole Earth Lectronic Link (or The WELL) is one of the oldest virtual communities still online. ... Fat, unshaven, wearing glasses, a ponytail and fantasizing with an anime girl doll, a popular stereotype of an otaku. ... Nicholas Negroponte Nicholas Negroponte (born 1943) is an American computer scientist best known as founder and director of Massachusetts Institute of Technologys Media Lab. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... FTP may refer to: File Transfer Protocol Foiled Twisted Pair This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... ... E-mail, or email, is short for electronic mail and is a method of composing, sending, and receiving messages over electronic communication systems. ...


The magazine was quickly followed by a companion website HotWired, a book publishing division HardWired, a Japanese edition, and a short-lived British edition, Wired UK. HotWired itself spawned dozens of websites including Webmonkey, the search engine Hotbot, and a weblog, Suck.com. In June 1998, the magazine even launched its own stock index, The Wired Index, since July 2003 called The Wired 40. HotWired was the first commercial web magazine. ... Webmonkey is an online tutorial website compromised of various articles on building webpages from the backend to frontend. ... Hotbot Hotbot was one of the early Internet search engines and was launched in May 1996 as a service of Wired Magazine. ... suck. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The fortune of the magazine and allied enterprises corresponded closely to that of the dot-com boom. In 1996, Rossetto and the other participants in Wired Ventures attempted to take the company public with an IPO. The initial attempt had to be withdrawn in the face of a downturn in the stock market, and especially the internet sector, during the summer of 1996. The second try was also unsucessful. Dot-com (also dotcom or redundantly dot. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... In financial markets, an initial public offering (IPO) is the first sale of a companys common shares to public investors. ...


Rossetto and Metcalfe lost control of Wired Ventures to financial investors Providence Equity in May 1998, who quickly sold off the company in pieces. Wired was purchased by Advance Publications, who assigned it to Advance's subsidiary, New York-based publisher Condé Nast Publications (while keeping Wired's editorial offices in San Francisco). Advance Publications is owned by the descendants of Samuel I. Newhouse. ... State nickname: The Empire State Official languages English Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Clinton (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 13. ...


After the dot-com crash

During the dot-com boom, Wired had to compete with the multitude of technology reporting and sources available on the Internet, including The Industry Standard and the Red Herring. It also faced competition from the multitude of technology reporting and sources available on the Internet. With the crash of the dot-com boom, however, Wired outlasted its competition, and found a new direction under Editor-in-Chief Chris Anderson, who took on the job in June 2001. Red Herring is an Internet technology and financial news magazine, sponsor of technology business conferences and publisher of financial research papers. ... Dot-com (also dotcom or redundantly dot. ... Chris Anderson may mean: Chris Anderson (Microsoft) is an architect at Microsoft Chris Anderson (Wired) is the Editor-in-Chief of Wired Magazine Chris Anderson (YDA) is a Young Democrats of America activist from Chattanooga, Tennessee Chris Anderson (Rugby League) is a former Rugby League winger and also coach for...


In the past several years, Wired has produced some agenda-setting articles, including the April 2003 "Welcome to the Hydrogen Economy" story, the November 2003 "Open Source Everywhere" issue (which put Linus Torvalds on the cover and articulated the idea that the open-source method was taking off outside of software, including encyclopedias as evidenced by Wikipedia), the February 2004 "Kiss Your Cubicle Goodbye" issue (which presented the outsourcing issue from both American and Indian perspectives), and a October 2004 article by Chris Anderson, which coined the popular term Long Tail. Linus Torvalds Linus Benedict Torvalds (born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of Linux. ... Brockhaus Konversations-Lexikon, 1902 An encyclopedia (alternatively encyclopaedia) is a written compendium of knowledge. ... The Wikipedia logo. ... The phrase The Long Tail (as a proper noun with capitalized letters) was first coined by Chris Anderson in a 2004 article in Wired magazine [1] to describe certain business and economic models such as Amazon. ...


The November 2004 issue of Wired was published with The Wired CD. All of the songs on the CD were released under various Creative Commons licenses, an attempt to push alternative copyright into the spotlight. Most of the songs were contributed by major artists, including the Beastie Boys, My Morning Jacket, Paul Westerberg, David Byrne, and Le Tigre. The Wired CD is an album that was released in 2004 as a collaborative effort between Wired magazine, Creative Commons, and sixteen musicians and groups. ... Version 2 of Some Rights Reserved logo Some Rights reserved logo No Rights reserved logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-12-02, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Beastie Boys; from left to right, Ad-Rock, Mike D, MCA. The Beastie Boys are an American hip-hop music group from New York City (Brooklyn and Manhattan). ... My Morning Jacket is an American rock band with classic rock and southern rock influences, who, with the release of their latest album, Z, have developed a genre all their own. ... Paul Westerberg is the former lead singer and songwriter of The Replacements, one of the seminal indie rock bands of the 1980s. ... David Byrne. ... This article deals with the band. ...


In 2005 the magazine won the National Magazine Award for General Excellence in the category of 500,000 to 1,000,000 subscribers. That same year Anderson won Ad Age's editor of the year award.


Recent promotional events by the magazine in conjunction with Wired advertisers include 2005's Wired NextFest presented by General Electric at Navy Pier in Chicago and the Wired Store in SoHo, NY.


Over the years, Wired's writers have included, among many others, Paulina Borsook, Paul Boutin, Stewart Brand, Po Bronson, Chip Bayers, Denise Caruso, Douglas Coupland, Joshua Davis, J. Bradford DeLong, Patrick Di Justo, Cory Doctorow, Esther Dyson, Mark Frauenfelder, Simson Garfinkel, William Gibson, George Gilder, Katie Hafner, John Heilemann, Xeni Jardin, Steven Johnson, Bill Joy, Leander Kahney, Mitch Kapor, Jon Katz, Patrick Kroupa, Lawrence Lessig, Jaron Lanier, Steven Levy, Jeff Mann, Pamela McCorduck, Oliver Morton, Adam Penenberg, Charles Platt, Randall Rothenberg, Phil Patton, Spencer Reiss, Rudy Rucker, Joshua Quittner, Paul Saffo, Sandy Sandfort, Peter Schwartz, R. U. Sirius, Neal Stephenson, Bruce Sterling, and Gary Wolf. Paul Boutin (born 1961 in Lewiston, Maine) is a freelance magazine writer who writes about technology in a pop-culture context. ... Stewart Brand speaking September 5, 2004 Stewart Brand (born December 14, 1938 in Rockford, Illinois) is an author, editor, and creator of The Whole Earth Catalog and CoEvolution Quarterly. ... Po Bronson is an American journalist and author. ... Douglas Coupland (born December 30, 1961) is a Canadian author and cultural commentator, raised in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Joshua Davis, a. ... J. Bradford DeLong (born June 24, 1960), a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, writes a popular blog, Brad DeLongs Semi-Daily Journal which covers political, technical, and economic issues as well as criticism of their coverage in the media. ... Patrick Di Justo (born April 11, 1964) is a freelance magazine writer who writes about science and technology. ... Cory Doctorow at the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Cory Doctorow (born July 17, 1971) is a blogger, journalist and science fiction author in favor of liberalizing copyright laws, and a proponent of Creative Commons. ... Esther Dyson (born 14 July 1951) is the daughter of Freeman Dyson and a noted consultant and philosopher in the field of emerging digital technology. ... Mark Frauenfelder Mark Frauenfelder is a weblogger, illustrator, and journalist. ... Simson L. Garfinkel is a journalist and writer specializing in the field of computer security, who has written fourteen books on computing. ... Some credit William Gibson with writing the most clear-cut examples of the Science Fiction genre known as cyberpunk, as well as coining the term cyberspace. ... George Gilder (born 1939, in New York City) is a libertarian, right-wing, American philosopher, futurologist, and author. ... Katie Hafner is a journalist who writes books and articles about technology. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Steven Berlin Johnson is an American popular science author. ... William Nelson Joy (born 1954), commonly known as Bill Joy, co-founded Sun Microsystems in 1982 along with Vinod Khosla, Scott McNealy and Andy Bechtolsheim, and served as chief scientist at the company until 2003. ... Mitch Kapor Mitchell David Kapor (born 1950) is the founder of Lotus Development Corporation and the designer of Lotus 1-2-3, the killer application often credited with making the personal computer ubiquitous in the business world in the 1980s. ... Jonathan Katz (born 1947) is a U.S. journalist and writer. ... Patrick K. Kroupa, 2005. ... Lawrence Lessig Lawrence Lessig (born June 3, 1961) is an American academic. ... Jaron Lanier is an artist, musician, inventor, virtual reality developer, film director, public speaker, and member of the Global Business Network. ... Steven Levy is an American journalist who has written several books on computers, technology, cryptography, the Internet, cyber security and privacy. ... Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (August 4, 1823–November 1, 1877) was a U.S. politician of the Republican Party. ... Adam L. Penenberg is an investigative journalist best known for uncovering the journalistic fraud of The New Republic reporter Stephen Glass in 1998. ... Charles Platt is the author of 40 fiction and nonfiction books, including science-fiction novels such as The Silicon Man (endorsed by William Gibson as A plausible, well-crafted narrative exploring cyberspace in a wholly new and very refreshing way) and Protektor (recently published in paperback by Avon Books). ... Spencer Reiss (born New York 1952) is a former Newsweek foreign correspondent, now a contributing editor at Wired magazine. ... Rudy von Bitter Rucker (born March 22, 1946) is an American computer scientist and science fiction author, often included in lists of cyberpunk authors. ... Paul Saffo is Research Director and the Roy Amara Fellow at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, California. ... Peter Schwartz is a writer and journalist who follows the philosophy of Ayn Rand. ... R. U. Sirius R. U. Sirius (born Ken Goffman) is an American writer, musician, and cyberculture icon best known as co-founder and original Editor-In-Chief of Mondo 2000. ... Neal Stephenson (b. ... Bruce Sterling at the Ars Electronica Festival Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... Gary Wolf is the creater of the fictional Roger Rabbit universe in which toons and humans coexist. ...


References

  • Wolf, Gary (2003). Wired: A Romance, New York: Random House. ISBN 0375502904.
  • Borsook, Paulina (2000). Cyberselfish: A Critical Romp Through the Terribly Libertarian Culture of High Tech, PublicAffairs. ISBN 1891620789.

External links

  • Wired Digital websites
  • Deconstructing Wired, an article assessing the magazine's style and target demographic
  • Rewired, The English Ideology and WIRED Magazine
  • Japanese edition of Wired
  • Early backer Charlie Jackson

Condé Nast Publications Inc is a worldwide magazine publishing company, credited with creating the marketing strategy which emphasized magazines focused on a particular class or interest. ...

Wired UK


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wired (magazine) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1061 words)
Wired has both been admired and disliked for its strong libertarian principles, its enthusiastic embrace of techno-utopianism, and its sometimes experimental layout with its bold use of fluorescent and metallic inks.
The magazine was founded by American journalist Louis Rossetto and his partner Jane Metcalfe in 1993 with initial backing from software entrepreneur Charlie Jackson and industry pundit Nicholas Negroponte of the MIT Media Lab, who was a regular columnist for six years, through 1998.
The fortune of the magazine and allied enterprises corresponded closely to that of the dot-com boom.
Louis Rossetto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (582 words)
Wired was greatly admired for its bold design and its coverage of "digital culture".
The magazine exuded a counterculture ethos -- and was even compared to Rolling Stone as a barometer of the zeitgeist of the era.
Since Wired, Rossetto has mostly avoided the public eye, although he assisted with a 2001 redesign of Reason Magazine and defended the invasion of Iraq in its pages.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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