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Encyclopedia > Winthrop University

Coordinates: 34°56′27″N 81°1′52.8″W / 34.94083, -81.031333 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Winthrop University

Image File history File links Winthroplogo. ...

Motto Veritas cum libertate
Truth with liberty
Established 1886
Type Public
President Anthony J. DiGiorgio
Faculty 255
Undergraduates 5111[1]
Postgraduates 1181[1]
Location Rock Hill, South Carolina, USA
Campus Suburban
Colors Garnet and Gold
Mascot Eagles
Website www.winthrop.edu

Winthrop University (formerly Winthrop College) is an American public, four-year liberal arts college in Rock Hill, South Carolina, within the Charlotte, North Carolina metropolitan area. In 2006-07, Winthrop University had an enrollment of 6,292 students.[1] The University is South Carolina's top-rated university according to evaulations conducted by the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. The University has been rated by the commission as "substantially exceeding standards" every year since that classification was created in 2003. The University was also named by the John Templeton Foundation as a University that "encourages character development".[2] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Public is of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; opposed to private; as, the public treasury, a road or lake. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Rock Hill is the largest city in York County, South Carolina, and a satellite city of Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Genera Several, see below. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Rock Hill is the largest city in York County, South Carolina, and a satellite city of Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... “Charlotte” redirects here. ... The John Templeton Foundation was established in 1987 by international money manager Sir John Templeton; it is usually referred to simply as the Templeton Foundation. ...

Contents

History

Winthrop was founded in 1886 in Columbia, SC by then state superintendent of schools David Bancroft Johnson as a normal school (a teacher training college), for the purpose of helping rebuild the state school system in the aftermath of the American Civil War. The founding class of 21 women met in a one-room building in Columbia. In 1895, Winthrop moved to its permanent home in Rock Hill.[3] A normal school or teachers college is an educational institution for training teachers. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The name "Winthrop" comes from the man who made the first contribution of $1,500 - Massachusetts philanthropist Robert C. Winthrop; enough to rent the original one-room building. It was integrated in 1964 and became a co-ed institution in 1972. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Robert Charles Winthrop (May 12, 1809–November 16, 1894) was an American statesman who served in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Winthrop has undergone several name changes through its history. Originally called the Winthrop Training School in 1886, it was called the South Carolina Industrial and Winthrop Normal College in 1891, the Winthrop Normal and Industrial College of South Carolina in 1894, Winthrop College (The South Carolina College for Women) in 1920, Winthrop College in 1974, and Winthrop University in 1992.[4] While the school now has a large variety of majors, it is still widely known for the quality of teachers that train and get their degree there. Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Campus

The University's campus is located in Rock Hill, South Carolina, in one of that city's five historic districts and many of Winthrop's buildings are on the National Historic Register.[5] A historic district in the United States is a group of buildings, properties or sites that have been designated by one of several entites on different levels as historically or architecturally significant. ...


Winthrop's campus is divided into two distinct areas: The main campus which houses the academic buildings, dormitories, library and student center and the larger Recreational and Research Complex located approximately one mile northeast of the main campus.


Winthrop's main campus has seen extensive development during the last decade. A new $12 million Life Science Building opened in 1999.[6] The Courtyard at Winthrop, which features apartment style residences for students, opened in 2003.[7] Currently under construction is the Lois Rhame West Health, Physical Education and Wellness Center which will serve as the new home of the University's physical education department and intramural sports.[8] This article is about the year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In addition to hosting the University's intercollegiate athletic facilities, the Recreational and Research Complex also hosts the Piedmont Wetlands Research Project, a golf course (open to faculty, students and alumni), and a world-class disc golf course (which has been the site of the United States Disc Golf Championship every year since its inception in 1999[9]) A player putting at Cass Benton Disc Golf Course; Northville, Michigan. ... This article is about the year. ...


Winthrop's campus has served as the location for numerous movies, television and other video productions, including: the films Asylum and The Rage: Carrie 2. Additionally, the Winthrop Coliseum hosted numerous television tapings of various syndicated WCW and NWA television shows in the 1980s and 1990's. Ayslum is a thriller movie from 20th Century Fox set to come out in 2007. ... WCW logo until 1999 World Championship Wrestling or WCW, was a professional wrestling promotion that existed from 1988 to 2001. ... National Wrestling Alliance logo The National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) is the largest governing body for a group of independent professional wrestling promotions and sanctions various NWA championships. ...


Ninety (90%) percent of freshman and Forty-two (42%) percent of all undergraduate students live on-campus.[10]


Academics

The University grants undergraduate degrees through four colleges: The College of Arts & Sciences, College of Business, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and the College of Visual and Performing Arts. In all the University offers 37 undergraduate and 25 graduate degrees. An undergraduate degree (sometimes called a first degree or simply a degree) is the most common and primary academic degree available and is normally studied at a higher education institution, such as a university. ... This article is about academic degrees. ...


According to the University, "(i)n addition to full institutional accreditation, the university has achieved 100 percent national accreditation in all eligible programs." Currently, the student-faculty ratio is 15:1.[11]


Faculty

The University currently employs 273 full-time and 270 part-time faculty members; 61 of whom are classified as minorities and 299 of whom are women. Of the 543 faculty members, 277 has earned their terminal degree, 197 have a non-terminal Master's degree and 37 have a non-terminal Bachelor's degree.[12]


The University currently has 298 employees who earn $50,000 or more per year (and are thus publicly disclosed pursuant to the state's Freedom of Information Act).[13] Nearly sixty countries around the world have implemented some form of freedom of information legislation, which sets rules on governmental secrecy. ...


Undergraduate Studies

The University offers the following undergraduate degrees:[14]

In addition, the University offers the following pre-professional programs: pre-dentistry, pre-engineering, pre-law, pre-medicine, pre-pharmacy, pre-physical therapy and pre-veterinary science. A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... Environmental studies is the systematic study of human interaction with their environment. ... History studies time in human terms. ... Mass communication is the term used to describe the academic study of various means by which individuals and entities relay information to large segments of the population all at once through mass media. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... “B.S.” redirects here. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... The updated USDA food pyramid, published in 2005, is a general nutrition guide for recommended food consumption for humans. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Professional social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Management information systems (MIS) are information systems, typically computer-based, that are used within an organization. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Entrepreneurship is the practice of starting new organizations, particularly new businesses generally in response to identified opportunities. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... Human resource management (HRM) is the strategic and coherent approach to the management of an organizations most valued assets - the people working there who individually and collectively contribute to the achievement of the objectives of the business. ... This article or section may contain external links added only to promote a website, product, or service – otherwise known as spam. ... For other uses, see Management (disambiguation). ... For the magazine, see Marketing (magazine). ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Infant playing with a book. ... Primary or elementary education consist of the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ... This article is about educating students with disabilities or behavioral problems. ... Sport management is a field of education and vocation concerning the business aspect of sport. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Art education is the area of learning that is based upon the visual, tangible arts—drawing, painting, sculpture, and design in jewelry, pottery, weaving, fabrics, etc and design applied to more practical fields such as commercial graphics and home furnishings. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... Ceramics can refer to: Ceramic, a type of material Ceramics (art), a fine art. ... It has been suggested that Interior decoration be merged into this article or section. ... “Painter” redirects here. ... Photography [fÓ™tÉ‘grÓ™fi:],[foÊŠtÉ‘grÓ™fi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ... Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Graphics are often utilitarian and anonymous,[1] as these pictographs from the US National Park Service illustrate. ... Buskers perform in San Francisco A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which one group of people (the performer or performers) behave in a particular way for another group of people (the audience). ... This article is about the dental profession. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... A pre-law degree is one preparing for law school. ... A pre-medical Degree is one preparing for medical school. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... Physical therapy (or physiotherapy[1]) is the provision of services to people and populations to develop, maintain and restore maximum movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan. ... A veterinary school is a tertiary educational institution, or part of such an institution, which is involved in the education of future veterinary practitioners (veterinarians). ...


Graduate Studies

The University offers over 40 graduate programs which are coordinated through the University's Office of Graduate Studies.[15]All post-graduate degrees offered by the University are on the Master's level. The University offers the following graduate degrees:[16] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • College of Arts and Sciences
    • Master of Arts
      • English, History, and Spanish.
    • Master of Liberal Arts
    • Master of Science
    • Master of Social Work
      • Social Work
    • Specialist in School Psychology
      • School Psychology
        • In addition, the College offers a certificate program in Gerontology and Human Nutrition.
  • College of Business
    • Master of Business Administration
      • Business Administration (with emphasis in Accounting, Executive program, Finance, International Business or Software Project Management.
        • In addition, the College offers a certificate program in Software Project Management
  • The Richard W. Riley College of Education
    • Master of Arts in Teaching
      • Education (with emphasis in Art, Biology, Business/Marketing, English, French, Family and Consumer Sciences, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, Social Studies and Spanish).
    • Master of Education
      • Counseling and Development, Curriculum and Instruction, Education Leadership, Middle Level Education, Reading and Special Education.
    • Master of Science
      • Physical Education
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts
    • Master of Arts
      • Arts Administration and Art Education.
    • Master of Fine Art
      • Art and Design.
    • Master of Music
    • Master of Music Education
      • Music Education.

In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Educational psychology or school psychology is the psychological science studying how children and adults learn, the effectiveness of various educational strategies and tactics, and how schools function as organizations. ... Gerontology is the study of aging. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ...

Cost

Winthrop's tuition for the 2006-07 academic year is $16,150 per year for out-of-state undergraduate students and $8756 for in-state undergraduate students. Room and board is currently $5352. Four-thousand five-hundred eighty-seven (4,587) undergraduate students currently receive some form of financial aid.[17]


Rankings

Winthrop has been ranked in numerous college rankings. In 2007, it was named one of the top ten regional public universities in the south.[18] It has routinely been ranked by US News, Consumer Reports, Barron's Best Buys and the Princeton Review as one of the best values in higher education. In 2006, it was ranked the 8th best Public University in the Southeast by US News and World Report.[19] In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of educational institutions in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... Historic Southern United States. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Student Population

The University is comprised of 6,292 students.[1] Students come from 44 states and 45 countries.[20] As of 2003, the average age of an undergraduate student was 21.4 years, while the average age of a graduate student was 34.4 years.[citation needed] The term state may refer to: a sovereign political entity, see state unitary state nation state a non-sovereign political entity, see state (non-sovereign). ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ...


Of the student population, 5,111 are undergraduate students while 1,181 are graduate students. The University has 1,424 male students and 3,197 female students. The University has 1,409 African-American students, 23 Native American students, 69 Asian students, 79 Hispanic students and 3424 non-Hispanic white students. Seventy-four (74%) of 2005 freshman returned in 2006.[1] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The University's average class size is 17 to 26 students, with freshman classes averaging 23 students. All freshman and second-year students are required to live on campus, unless they live at home with their parents or legal guardians.[20]


Student Life

Winthrop's Dinkins Student Union Program Board has been ranked the best Program Board in the nation three times for the quality and variety of programming, including both lecturers and entertainers. The trade publication Campus Activities Magazine has named the university as having the “Best Campus Program” in the nation three times: 1995, 2002 and 2004. Winthrop is the only university in the nation to be on the ballot every year since this award was inaugurated in 1995.[2]


In addition to completing the academic requirements of their chosen degree, full-time Winthrop undergraduates, in order to graduate, are required to attend three cultural events for every 20 semester hours.[21] The university maintains an extensive calendar of events that qualify as being "cultural events".[1]


Cultural events are typically on a wide variety of subjects, and have included in the past:

  • Films (both in English and foreign languages)
  • Plays
  • Concerts (Chamber, Orchestral, and on the university's Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ)
  • Sculpture and art exhibitions
  • Technology Lectures

The university has over 150 student organizations. It has eight campus ministries, seven club sports teams, 14 clubs associated with an academic department, 17 Greek organizations, 21 Honor Societies, 54 special interest clubs and groups, 18 professional groups, 10 non-ministry religious groups and nine residence hall councils.[22] Æolian-Skinner Organ Company, Inc. ... The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by forcing pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ...


In addition, the university hosts many events that are available free of charge or at a reduced rate for full-time students. Events typically include concerts, shows, comedy routines and other forms of student-oriented entertainment. One of these events is the annual Big Man on Campus Pagaent, an all-male beauty contest to raise money for the speech and hearing impaired. Different student organizations, historically Greek, sponsor contestants.


Athletics

The university is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and competes on the Division 1 level. Additionally, Winthrop University President Anthony DiGiorgio serves on the Board of Directors of the NCAA.[23] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ...


Winthrop is a charter member of the Big South Conference.[24] Winthrop's teams are known as the Eagles and their colors are garnet and gold.[25] The Big South Conference is a College Athletic Conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division I-AA in football and Division I in all other sports; it was founded in 1983. ... Genera Several, see below. ...


The university sponsors 15 intercollegiate teams (7 Men's and 8 Women's) in the sports of baseball, basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, tennis and track on the Men's side, and basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track and volleyball on the Women's side.[25] This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... This article is about the sport. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...


The university has labeled itself, "The Campus of Champions," as its intercollegiate athletic teams have experienced success in recent years. Specifically, the University has won numerous Big South Conference championships in the following sports: Baseball (3 since 1995), Men's Baskebtall (8 since 1988), Men's Cross Country (2 since 2000), Men's Soccer (2 since 2002), Men's Tennis (4 since 1997), Women's Tennis (10 since 1994), Softball (3 since 1989) and Women's Volleyball (4 since 2002).[25] Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


Facilities

At the heart of the University's athletic facilities is the Winthrop Coliseum. In addition to serving as the home venue of the Men's and Women's basketball and volleyball teams, the University's athletic department offices are located in the Coliseum. The arena features 6,100 permanent seats and hosts numerous non-University shows and events in addition to Winthrop athletic contests.[26] The Coliseum also served as the temporary practice site of the NFL's Carolina Panthers until completion of the team's facilities in Charlotte.[27] For other uses, see Arena (disambiguation). ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Charlotte, North Carolina Other nicknames The Cardiac Cats Team colors Black, Carolina Blue, and Silver Head Coach John Fox Owner Jerry Richardson General manager Marty Hurney Mascot Sir Purr League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) National Football Conference (1995-present) NFC West (1995-2001) NFC South (2002...


The Winthrop baseball team plays in the Winthrop Ballpark, a multi-million dollar 1,989-seat baseball stadium which opened in 2003. Currently, the facility is undergoing a major upgrade with the construction of permanent locker rooms, team offices and batting cages.[28]


Opened in 2005, the university's track and field teams compete on the $2.8 million Irwin Belk Track Complex. The facility hosts numerous Division 1 meets.[29]


The university's soccer teams compete at the recently completed Winthrop Soccer Complex. The facility, considered by many to be one of the top intercollegiate facilities in the country, features 1,800 permanent seats, a press box, field house and a Daktronics LCD scoreboard. In addition, the playing field is a Tifway 419 hybrid Bermuda grass with Eagle Blend and Sun Star.[30] LCD redirects here. ...


The softball team competes at the Winthrop Softball Complex which opened in 2001. The facility includes four fields, locker rooms and an indoor batting cage.[31].


The tennis teams compete at the Winthrop Tennis Complex which opened in 2003. The complex includes 12 lighted courts, seating for 300 and a club house with public restroom facilities, locker rooms and offices.[32]


Men's Basketball

Perhaps the University's most well-known athletic team is the Men's basketball team which has earned a berth in seven NCAA Division 1 Men's Basketball Tournaments since 1999. Additionally, they have won the Big South Conference Championship in 1988, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006 and 2007.[33] Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2007 Big South Mens Basketball Tournament marked the conclusion of the 2006-07 Big South Conference mens basketball season. ...



On March 5, 2007 the Winthrop Eagles Men's Basketball team was ranked in the Top 25 of both major college basketball polls for the first time in school.[34] The Eagles ranked #22 in the USA TODAY/ESPN Top 25 poll and #24 on the Associated Press (AP) Top 25 poll. Later that spring on March 16, 2007 the Winthrop Eagles defeated Notre Dame for the first NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament win in school history.[35] This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ...


All of the Men's Basketball team's championships and national rankings came during Gregg Marshall's tenure as head coach. Marshall recently left Winthrop to become the head coach at Wichita State University. Marshall's assistant at Winthrop, Randy Peele, was recently named as Marshall's successor.[36] Gregg Marshall is the head mens basketball coach at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC . ... Wichita State University (WSU) is an American state-supported university located in the middle-size city of Wichita, Kansas, in the south central part of the state. ... Randy Peele is the head mens basketball coach at Winthrop University. ...


Notable Alumni

  • Martha Thomas Fitzgerald, first woman elected to South Carolina House of Representatives as a full-term legislator.
  • Chip Higgins, (1987), member of South Carolina House[2]
  • Dr. Mary Gaulden Jagger]], one of the founding members of the National Organization for Women.
  • Reginald Lloyd, (1989), US District Attorney for South Carolina.
  • Cecily Truett Lencit, Emmy Award-winning educational television producer (Reading Rainbow).
  • Bessie A. Moody-Lawrence, (1971), member of South Carolina House[3]
  • Denny W. Neilson, (1975), member of South Carolina State House[4]
  • Linda H. Short, member of South Carolina State Senate[5]
  • J. Gary Simrill, (1991), member of South Carolina State Senate[6]
  • Frances Patton Statham, historical and romance novelist.
  • Ida Crawford Stewart, former Vice-President of Estee Lauder Cosmetics.
  • Lois Rhame West, wife of former South Carolina Governor, John C. West.
  • Actress Andie MacDowell attended Winthrop in 1977 (as Winthrop College) but dropped out as a sophomore in 1978 to sign with Elite Model Management.
  • Eugene Everett Benfield, III (1998), top optometrist in Caswell County, North Carolina
  • Marco Reda, Professional soccer player Toronto FC

The National Organization for Women (NOW) is an American feminist group, founded in 1966, with 500,000 contributing members and 550 chapters in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. ... The Reading Rainbow logo used between 1999 and 2007. ... Estée Lauder Companies Inc. ... John C. West (August 27, 1922-March 21, 2004), U.S. Democratic Party politician, He served as Governor of South Carolina from 1971 to 1975. ... Andie MacDowell (born Rosalie Anderson MacDowell on April 21, 1958 in Gaffney, South Carolina) is an American screen actress. ... Elite is a French modeling agency founded in Paris in 1972 by Gerald Marie, John Casablancas and Alain Kittler. ... Marco Reda (born 22 June 1977 in Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian international soccer player who last played for the Sogndal Fotball team in the Norwegian second division but has been acquired by Toronto FC of Major League Soccer. ... Year founded 2006 League Major League Soccer Nickname TFC, Reds, Roys Stadium BMO Field Coach Mo Johnston Owner MLSE First Game C.D. Chivas USA 2-0 Toronto FC (Home Depot Center; April 7, 2007) Largest Win Toronto FC 4-0 FC Dallas (BMO Field; June 17, 2007) Worst Defeat...

External links

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Common Data Set 2006-07, Part B: ENROLLMENT AND PERSISTENCE (pdf). Wintrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  2. ^ a b Institutional Achievements. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  3. ^ General Information, History. Wintrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  4. ^ The Winthrop Name. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  5. ^ Welcome to the Winthrop Virtual Tour!. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  6. ^ Master of Science in Biology. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  7. ^ Courtyard at Winthrop. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  8. ^ Peabody Gymnasium. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  9. ^ Tournament History. United States Disc Golf Championship. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  10. ^ Common Data Set 2006-07, Part B: STUDENT LIFE (pdf). Wintrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  11. ^ Academics. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  12. ^ Common Data Set 2006-07, Part I: INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY AND CLASS SIZE (pdf). Wintrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  13. ^ State Salary Database. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  14. ^ Degree Programs (Majors). Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  15. ^ Academics. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  16. ^ Graduate Degree Programs. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  17. ^ Common Data Set 2006-07, Part G: ANNUAL EXPENSES (htm). Wintrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  18. ^ 2006-07 Accomplishments and Awards. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  19. ^ Winthrop University Listed Among Best Southeastern Public Universities In US News "America's Best Colleges". Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.
  20. ^ a b Frequently Asked Questions. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  21. ^ The Cultural Events Requirement. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  22. ^ Clubs & Organizations. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  23. ^ Dr. Anthony Joseph DiGiorgio, President. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  24. ^ Big South Conference History. Big South Conference. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  25. ^ a b c Winthrop Athletics. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  26. ^ Winthrop Coliseum. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  27. ^ Carolina Panthers History. National Football League. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  28. ^ Winthrop's New Ballpark Is A 'Jewel'. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  29. ^ The Irwin Belk Track. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  30. ^ Winthrop University Soccer Complex. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  31. ^ Winthrop Softball Complex. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  32. ^ Winthrop Tennis Complex. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  33. ^ Men's Basketball. Winthrop University. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  34. ^ "Winthrop Cracks The Top 25 In Men's Basketball National Rankings", Winthrop University, 2007-03-05. Retrieved on 2007-07-27. 
  35. ^ "Winthrop Upsets No. 6 Seed Notre Dame 74-64 In NCAA First Round", Winthrop University, 2007-03-16. Retrieved on 2007-07-27. 
  36. ^ "Peele Takes Over After Four Years As Assistant Coach", Winthrop University, 2007-03-16. Retrieved on 2007-07-27. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Winthrop University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (578 words)
Winthrop was founded in 1886 in Columbia, SC by then superintendent David Bancroft Johnson as a teacher training college to help build the state school system in the aftermath of the American Civil War.
Winthrop has undergone several name changes through its history, Winthrop Training School, 1886, South Carolina Industrial and Winthrop Normal College in 1891, Winthrop Normal and Industrial College of South Carolina in 1894, Winthrop College (The South Carolina College for Women) in 1920, Winthrop College in 1974, and Winthrop University in 1992.
Winthrop University athletic teams compete on the NCAA Division 1 level and are a member of the Big South Conference.
College Profiles - Winthrop University (1755 words)
The University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; telephone: 404-697-4501) to award bachelor's, master's, and specialist degrees.
Winthrop students enjoy recreational sports and NCAA Division I intercollegiate competition in men's and women's basketball, cross-country, golf, indoor and outdoor track, soccer, and tennis; women's softball and volleyball; and men's baseball.
Winthrop carefully reviews each applicant on an individual basis and the admissions process is designed to determine the right match between high-achieving students and the distinctive educational opportunities offered by Winthrop.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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