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Encyclopedia > Winter
In many parts of the world, winter is associated with snow and ice. Winter in Germany (above)
In many parts of the world, winter is associated with snow and ice. Winter in Germany (above)
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Part of the Nature series on
Weather
 
Seasons
Temperate

SpringSummer
AutumnWinter
Winter is one of the four seasons of the year. ... Image File history File links Photographer:Richardfabi. ... Image File history File links Photographer:Richardfabi. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about water ice. ... This article is about the physical universe. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... For other uses, see Spring. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... This article is about the temperate season. ...

Tropical

Dry season
Wet season The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ...

Storms

ThunderstormTornado
Tropical Cyclone (Hurricane)
Winter stormBlizzard For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... A typical view of a winter storm. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ...

Precipitation

FogDrizzleRain
Freezing rainSleet
HailSnow For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ... Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ... This article is about precipitation. ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ... Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ...

Topics

Meteorology
Weather forecasting
ClimateAir pollution This page has a list of meteorology topics. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ...

Portal · Project  v  d  e 

Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. Almost all English-language calendars, going by astronomy, state that winter begins on the winter solstice, and ends on the spring equinox. Calculated more by the weather, it begins and ends earlier and is the season with the shortest days and the lowest temperatures. Either way, it generally has cold weather and, especially in the higher latitudes, snow and ice. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... This article is about the astronomical event of winter solstice or midwinter. ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... Look up cold in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about water ice. ...


Depending on place and culture, start and end of winter can be defined as above or in other ways. Contemporary meteorology takes winter to be the months of June, July, and August in the Southern Hemisphere, and December, January, and February in the Northern Hemisphere. // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... Northern hemisphere highlighted in yellow. ...

Contents

Aspects

Meteorology

Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons.
Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons.

Meteorological winter is the season having the shortest days (which vary greatly according to and the lowest temperatures. Nighttime predominates the winter season, and in some regions it has the highest rate of precipitation as well as prolonged dampness due to permanent snow cover in such areas. During winter, Blizzards often develop and cause many transportation delays. A rare meteorological phenomenon encountered during winter is ice fog, which is composed of ice crystals suspended in the air and happening only at very low temperatures, below about −30 °C [1]. Image File history File links Earth-satellite-seasons. ... Image File history File links Earth-satellite-seasons. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ... For the abbreviation, see FOG. For the B-Side by Radiohead see Fog (song). ... Icicles A natural ice block in Iceland Ice is the solid form of water. ...


===Time period===we call


It is often said that, astronomically, winter starts with the winter solstice, and ends with the spring equinox. In meteorology, it is by convention counted instead as the whole months of June, July and August in the Southern Hemisphere and December, January and February in the Northern Hemisphere. While in actuality, the most accurate start and end point is simply defined by when the first major wave of cold fronts and warm fronts hit a particular area, having no universally predetermined dates. This article is about the astronomical event of winter solstice or midwinter. ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... In meteorology, a weather front is a boundary between two air masses with differing characteristics (e. ... Illustration of a warm front A warm front is defined as the leading edge of a mass of warm air. ...


In Celtic countries such as Ireland using the Irish calendar, the winter solstice is traditionally considered as midwinter, the winter season beginning November 1 on All Hallows or Samhain. Winter ends and spring begins on Imbolc or Candlemas, which is February 1 or 2. This system of seasons is based on the length of days exclusively. The three-month period of the shortest days and weakest solar radiation occurs during November, December and January in the Northern Hemisphere (May-July in the Southern). The Irish calendar does not observe the typical astronomical seasons (beginning, in the Northern Hemisphere, on the equinoxes and solstices), or the meteorological seasons (beginning on March 1, June 1, September 1 and December 1), but rather centers the seasons around the solstices and equinoxes (so that, for instance, midsummer... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Christian holiday. ... Look up Samhain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Imbolc is one of the four principal festivals of the Irish calendar, celebrated either at the beginning of February or at the first local signs of Spring. ... Candlemas (Russian: Sretenie, Spanish: Candelaria) is a Christian feast commemorating the purification of the Virgin Mary and the presentation of the infant Jesus in the Temple. ...


Also many mainland European countries tend to recognize Martinmas, St. Martins day (November 11) as the first calendar day of winter. The day falls at midpoint between the old Julian equinox and solstice dates. Also, Valentines Day (February 14) is recognized by some countries as heralding the first rites of spring, such as flower blooming. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... In the Christian calendar, Martinmas, or November 11 is the feast of Saint Martin of Tours and one of the Scottish quarter days. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Valentines Day postcard, c. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Chinese astronomy (and other East Asian calendars), winter is taken to commence on or around November 7, with the Jiéqì known as (立冬 lì dōng, literally "establishment of winter".) The Dunhuang map from the Tang Dynasty (North Polar region). ... East Asia Geographic East Asia. ... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Jiéqì is one of 24 points spaced 15° apart along the ecliptic used by all traditional East Asian lunisolar calendars to stay synchronized with the seasons. ...


The three-month period associated with the coldest average temperatures typically begins somewhere in late November or early December in the Northern Hemisphere. If "winter" is defined as the statistically coldest quarter of the year, then the astronomical definition is too late by almost all local climate standards, and the traditional English/Irish definition of November 1 (May 1 in the Southern Hemisphere) is almost always too early to fit this standard. No matter the reckoning, winter is the only season that spans two calendar years in the northern hemisphere. (In other words, there are very few temperate climates in which the vernal equinox is on average colder than the winter solstice, and very few temperate climates in which Samhain is colder than Imbolc). Look up Samhain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Imbolc is one of the four principal festivals of the Irish calendar, celebrated either at the beginning of February or at the first local signs of Spring. ...


Causes

The tilt of the earth's axis relative to its orbital plane has a dramatic effect on the weather. The Earth is tilted at an angle of 23°27' (23 degrees 27 minutes) to the plane of its orbit, and this causes different latitudes on the Earth to directly face the Sun as the Earth moves through its orbit. It is this variation that primarily brings about the seasons. When it is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere faces the Sun more directly and thus experiences warmer temperatures than the Northern Hemisphere. Conversely, winter in the Southern Hemisphere occurs when the Northern hemisphere is tilted more toward the Sun. From the perspective of an observer on the Earth, the winter Sun has a lower maximum altitude in the sky than the summer Sun.


During winter in either hemisphere, the lower altitude of the Sun in winter causes the sunlight to hit that hemisphere at an oblique angle. In regions experiencing winter, the same amount of solar radiation is spread out over a larger area (see Effect of sun angle on climate). This effect is compounded by the larger distance that the light must travel through the atmosphere, allowing the atmosphere to dissipate more this already limited heat. Solar irradiance spectrum at top of atmosphere. ... Figure 1 This is a diagram of the seasons. ...


Exceptional cases

  • Year Without a Summer was the name for 1816, because the weather was so cold that it reminded people of winter all year.
  • In Europe, the winters of 1947,[1] 1962/63 and 1981/82 were considered abnormally cold.
  • The Winter of Discontent is the name for the British winter of 1978-79, during which there were widespread strikes. Lorry drivers, train drivers, nurses, most public sector employees, refuse collectors, and workers at Ford Motors all went on strike. Most notorious however was an unofficial strike by the gravediggers.

Development of global average temperatures during the last 1000 years. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Winter of Discontent is a nickname given to the British winter of 1978–79, during which there were widespread strikes by Trade unions demanding larger pay rises for their members. ... 2002 Ford Fiesta in the UK. The Ford Motor Company (sometimes nicknamed Fords or FoMoCo, (NYSE: F) is an automobile maker founded by Henry Ford in Detroit, Michigan, and incorporated on June 16, 1903. ... This article is about the vocation of a mortician and the death metal band; for the World Wrestling Entertainment superstar, see The Undertaker. ...

Ecology

The Snowshoe Hare is one animal that changes color in winter.
The Snowshoe Hare is one animal that changes color in winter.

To survive the harshness of winter, many animals have developed different behavioral and morphological adaptations: Image File history File links Snowshoe_hare. ... Image File history File links Snowshoe_hare. ... Binomial name Lepus americanus Erxleben, 1777 The Snowshoe Hare (Lepus americanus) is a species of hare found in North America. ...

  • Migration[disambiguation needed] is a common effect of winter upon animals, notably birds. However the majority of birds do not migrate, the cardinal for example. Some butterflies also migrate seasonally.
  • Hibernation is a state of reduced metabolic activity during the winter. These animals "sleep" during winter and only come out as warm weather returns. For example, gophers, bears, frogs, snakes and bats hibernate.
  • Some animals store food for the winter and live upon it instead of hibernating completely. This is the case of squirrels, beavers, skunks, badgers and raccoons.
  • Resistance is observed when an animal endures winter, but changes in ways such as color and musculature. The color of the fur or plumage are changed to white in order to be confused with snow and thus, to retain their cryptic coloration year round. Examples are the ptarmigan, the arctic fox, the weasel, the white-tailed jack rabbit or the mountain hare.
  • Some fur-coated mammals grow a heavier fur coat during the winter. This improves the heat-retention qualities of the fur. The coat is then shed following the winter season to allow better cooling. The heavier winter coat made this season a favorite for trappers who sought more profitable skins.
  • Snow also affects the ways animals behave, as many take advantage of the insulating properties of snow by burrowing in it. Mice and voles typically live under the snow layer.

Annual plants never survive the winter. As for perennial plants, many small ones profit from the insulating effects of snow by being buried in it. Larger plants, particularly deciduous trees, usually let their upper part go dormant, but their roots are still protected by the snow layer. Few plants bloom in the winter, though exceptions include the flowering plum (which flowers in time for Chinese New Year). For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Genera Periporphyrus Saltator Caryothraustes Parkerthraustes Rhodothraupis Cardinalis Pheucticus Cyanocompsa Guiraca Passerina Spiza The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds found in North and South America. ... This article refers to the process of hibernation in biology. ... Structure of the coenzyme adenosine triphosphate, a central intermediate in energy metabolism. ... Look up gopher, gofer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... “Chiroptera” redirects here. ... This article is about the animal. ... For other uses, see Beaver (disambiguation). ... Polecat redirects here. ... Genera  Arctonyx  Melogale  Meles  Mellivora  Taxidea For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Common Raccoon native range in red, feral range in blue. ... For other uses of Muscles, see Muscles (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fur (disambiguation). ... Closeup on a single white feather A feather is one of the epidermal growths that forms the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on a bird. ... (this page is about animals that hide or use camouflage. ... Binomial name Lagopus mutus (Montin, 1781) The Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) is a small (31-35 cm) bird in the grouse family. ... This article is about the animal. ... For other uses, see Weasel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Lepus timidus Linnaeus, 1758 The Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) is a hare, which is largely adapted to polar and mountainous habitats. ... The human activity of trapping consists of hunting for animals to obtain their furs, which are then used for clothes and other artifacts, or sold / bartered (see fur trade). ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the animal. ... For other uses, see Vole (disambiguation). ... Peas are an annual plant. ... Red Valerian, a perennial plant. ... For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc. ... Chinese New Year (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), or Spring Festival or the Lunar New Year (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. ...


Activities

Snowboarder in the halfpipe
Snowboarder in the halfpipe
Main article: Winter sport

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ...

Snow activities

Many winter activities involve the use of snow in some form (which sometimes may still be manmade, via snow cannons): For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • Bobsledding - a winter sport in which teams make timed runs down narrow, twisting, banked purpose-built iced tracks in a gravity-powered, steerable sled.
  • Skiing - the activity of gliding over snow using what is now fiberglass planks called skis that are strapped to the skiers' feet with ski bindings.
  • Sledding - a downhill activity where the user uses a sled to glide down the hill.
  • Snowball fight - a physical game in which snowballs are thrown with the intention of hitting someone else.
  • Snowboarding - an increasingly common sport where participants strap a composite board to their feet and slide down a snow-covered mountain.
  • Snowshoeing - a means of travel in which one is able to walk on top of the snow by increasing the surface area of their feet.
  • Snowman building - creating a man-like model out of snow.
  • Snow castle building - for example constructions such as the SnowCastle of Kemi, the largest in the world.

Bobsleigh is a winter sport in which teams make timed runs down narrow, twisting, banked purpose-built iced tracks in a gravity-powered, steerable sled. ... A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ... Scene from winter nearly anywhere snow may fall on a handy hill—Children at play sledding. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... In skiing, a ski binding is an attachment which anchors the ski boot to the ski. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Scene from winter nearly anywhere snow may fall on a handy hill—Children at play sledding. ... Four college students from Montclair State University attack their friend during a snowball fight. ... For other uses, see Game (disambiguation). ... Snowboarder in a half-pipe Snowboarder riding off cornice Snowboarding contributes greatly to the economies of ski resorts Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a snow-covered slope on a snowboard that is attached to ones feet using a boot/binding interface. ... Snowshoers in Bryce Canyon Snowshoes are a form of footwear devised for travelling over snow. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... A classic snowman. ... A snow fort made from piled snowballs A snow fort or snow castle is a usually open topped temporary structure made of snow walls that is used for recreational purposes. ... SnowCastle in 2006 Snow Restaurant The SnowCastle of Kemi is the biggest snow castle in the world. ...

Ice activities

Bandy, an early form of ice hockey.

Many other winter activities and sports focus on ice, which however need not necessarily be natural (see ice rink). Image File history File links DSC04358. ... Image File history File links DSC04358. ... Look up bandy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about water ice. ... Rockefeller Centre ice rink An ice rink is a frozen body of water where people can ice skate or play winter sports. ...

  • Ice skating - a means of traveling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices molded into special boots (or, more primitively, without boots, tied to regular footwear).
  • Ice boating - a means of travel in a specialized boat similar in appearance to a sailboat but fitted with skis or runners (skates) and designed to run over ice instead of (liquid) water.
  • Ice biking - The continuation of regular cycling activities in the winter and cold weather.
  • Ice fishing - the sport of catching fish with lines and hooks through an opening in the ice on a frozen body of water.
  • Ice diving - a type of penetration diving where the dive takes place under ice.
  • Ice sculpture - elaborate sculptures are carved out of blocks of ice.
  • Ice Hockey - A team sport played on the ice with skates, sticks and a puck. The goal is to send the puck in the adversary team's net more often than they send it in yours during 60 minutes of play.
  • Curling - A team sport using brooms and stones. The object of the game is to slide your stones in a bullseye and get your opponent's stones out of it.
  • Ice climbing - The recreational activity of climbing ice formations such as icefalls, and great frozen waterfalls.

Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is travelling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without boots, tied to regular footwear). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Parabolic figure skating blades were first introduced by HD Sports in order to employ new scientific developments in the creation of figure skating blades, which are mounted on the bottoms of skates. ... For other senses of this word, see boot (disambiguation). ... High-heeled shoe Footwear consists of garments worn on the feet. ... An ice boat (more commonly spelled as one word - iceboat, once called an ice scooter) is a boat or purpose-built framework similar in appearance to a sail boat but fitted with skis or runners (skates) and designed to run over ice instead of (liquid) water, known in the sport... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ... Ice fishing in the Finnish Miljoonapilkki fishing competition. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Ice diving is a type of penetration diving where the dive takes place under ice. ... Penetration diving or no clear surface diving is a type of diving where the SCUBA diver enters a confined space from which there is no direct, purely vertical ascent to the safety of breathable air of the atmosphere at the surface. ... Ice sculpting on the streets of Gamla Stan, Stockholm Ice sculpture is a form of sculpture that uses ice as the raw material. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Ice climbing is the recreational activity of climbing ice formations such as icefalls, and frozen waterfalls. ...

Psychology

Long, harsh winters are believed to have affected the Russian national character.
Long, harsh winters are believed to have affected the Russian national character.

Passing seasons change the habits and moods of people. During the winter months in the northern hemisphere, a gloominess nicknamed "winter blues", "February blahs", "Holiday depression", or doldrums, is informally noted amongst people. The severest cases of this type of depression is diagnosed as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Symptoms include sleeping more, tiredness, depression, and physical aches. Although causes include genetic disposition and stress, the prevailing environmental influence is decreased exposure to light due to the angle of the sun and the increased amount of clothing that must be worn to keep warm. ImageMetadata File history File links Skoropud. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Skoropud. ... In everyday language depression refers to any downturn in mood, which may be relatively transitory and perhaps due to something trivial. ... Light therapy lamp for Seasonal Affective Disorder Seasonal affective disorder, also known as winter depression, is an affective, or mood, disorder. ... For other uses, see Light (disambiguation). ...


Symbolism

Winter is highly symbolic of many things to many people and has been used to represent various things by artists in all media. Some use winter to suggest death, as in Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening". Some use it to suggest the absence of hope, as in C. S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, where it was always winter but never Christmas. Winter is one concerto in Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons"; and there are many examples of four paintings, all showing the same scene in different seasons. Ursula K. LeGuin's novel The Left Hand of Darkness is set on a planet named Winter. In Alex Raymond's comic strip, Flash Gordon, there is a land called Frigia, where it is always winter. The land of Frigia is also featured in the serial Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe. Other uses of winter in the graphic arts occur in Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland. There are many films in which a winter setting plays an important role, Fargo being an example. In addition to this, novels such as Ethan Frome also use a winter setting to mirror the bleak, frozen feelings that the characters harbor. The film Requiem for a Dream concludes with Act III: Winter, in which the movie reaches its hellish and chilling climax. Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening was written in 1922 by Robert Frost, and was published in 1923 in his New Hampshire volume. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... This article is about the novel. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... “Vivaldi” redirects here. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Alex Raymond (October 2, 1909- September 6, 1956) was an American comic strip artist, best known for his work on Flash Gordon. ... For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe is a 1940 twelve episode serial film about Flash Gordon. ... Winsor McCay Winsor McCay (September 26, 1867(?) – July 26, 1934) was a prolific artist and pioneer in the art of comic strips and animation. ... Little Nemo is the main fictional character in a series of weekly comic strips by Winsor McCay (1887-1934) that appeared in the New York Herald and William Randolph Hearsts New York American newspapers from October 15, 1905- April 23, 1911 and April 30, 1911-1913 respectively. ... Fargo is a 1996 American crime-comedy-drama film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers. ... Requiem for a Dream is a 2000 film adaptation of a 1978 novel of the same name. ...


Mythology

In various cultures

In Greek mythology, Hades kidnapped Persephone to be his wife. Zeus ordered Hades to return her to Demeter, the goddess of the earth and her mother. However, Hades tricked Persephone into eating the food of the dead so Zeus decreed Persephone would spend six months with Demeter and six months with Hades. During the time when her daughter is with Hades, Demeter becomes depressed and causes winter. In Welsh Mythology, Gwyn ap Nudd abducted a maiden named Creiddylad. On May Day her lover Gwythr ap Greidawl fought Gwyn to win her back. The battle between them represented the contest between summer and winter. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Persephónē) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... Welsh mythology, the remnants of the mythology of the pre-Christian Britons, has come down to us in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin and the Book of Taliesin. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwyn or Gwynn ap Nudd was the ruler of Annwn (the Underworld). ... In Welsh mythology, Creiddylad was a goddess, daughter of Llyr. ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwythr ap Greidawl was a rival of Gwynn, the god of the underworld. ...


Personifications

Father Winter (Old Man Winter), like the elfish creature Jack Frost, is a personification of winter. ... Jack Frost is an elfish creature who personifies crisp, cold, winter weather; a variant of Father Winter. ... 19th century cartoon of Jack Frost as a United States major-general during the American Civil War Jack Frost is an elfish creature who personifies crisp, cold, winter weather; a variant of Father Winter (AKA Old Man Winter). ... In the culture of the eastern Slavs the traditional character Ded Moroz (Russian: ) plays a role similar to that of Santa Claus. ... Snegurochka pictured in a Russian childrens book Snegurochka (Russian: ), or the Snow Maiden, is a character in Russian fairy tales. ...

Gallery

See also

Human-related:

Weather-related: The fimbulwinter is an element in Norse pagan eschatology. ... Winter City or Winter Cities is a concept for communities in northern latitudes that encourages them to plan their transportation systems, buildings, and recreation project around the idea of using their infrastructure during all four seasons, rather than just two seasons (summer and autumn). ... This is an incomplete list of festivals and holidays that take place during the winter in the northern hemisphere, especially those commemorating the season. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ... Combatants Finland Soviet Union Commanders Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim Kliment Voroshilov Semyon Timoshenko Strength 250,000 men 30 tanks 130 aircraft[1][2] 1,000,000 men 6,541 tanks [3] 3,800 aircraft[4][5] Casualties 26,662 dead 39,886 wounded 1,000 captured[6] 126,875 dead... Ski warfare, the use of ski equipped troops in war is first recorded by the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus in the 13th century. ...

A cold wave is a weather phenomenon that is distinguished by marked cooling of the air, or the invasion of very cold air, over a large area. ... Global cooling in general can refer to a cooling of the Earth. ... Nuclear winter is a hypothetical global climate condition that is predicted to be a possible outcome of a large-scale nuclear war. ... This article is about the tropical jet stream. ... The Siberian Express is an area of very cold air that originates in Siberia. ... A volcanic winter is the reduction in temperature caused by volcanic ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscuring the sun, usually after a volcanic eruption. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ...

References

  1. ^ Winter of 1947
  • Rosenthal, Norman E. (1998). Winter Blues. New York: The Guilford Press. ISBN 1-57230-395-6

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Winter
  • Winter of animals and plants in Finland by the Northern Nature Project
  • Native American seasons myths from the Zion Natural History Association

  Results from FactBites:
 
Winter solstice celebrations of Christianity, Judaism, Neopaganism, etc (3376 words)
On that day, due to the earth's tilt on its axis, the daytime hours are at a minimum in the Northern hemisphere, and night time is at a maximum.
The concept of birth and or death/rebirth became associated with the winter solstice.
One of the stones marked the position of the sun at the time of the winter solstice and were probably used in religious rituals.
Ancient Origins: Solstice (2057 words)
When it's winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, the sun is directly overhead at noon only along the Tropic of Capricorn, on which lie such places as Sao Paulo, Brazil, southern Madagascar, and areas north of Brisbane, Australia.
Winter solstice was overlaid with Christmas, and the observance of Christmas spread throughout the globe.
Winter solstice celebrations are also part of the cultural heritage of Pakistan and Tibet.
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