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Encyclopedia > Winnipeg, Manitoba
City of Winnipeg, Canada
List of cities in Canada
City of Winnipeg Official Flag
(in detail)
List of Flags of Canada
City of Winnipeg Coat of Arms
(in detail)
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Motto:
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Unum Cum Virtute Multorum
(One With the Strength of Many)
Location
City Information
Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg)
Area: 465.16 km²
Population:

 - City (2001)
 - Metro (2004 est)
This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... Image File history File links Winnipegflag. ... Flag ratio 1:2 The current flag of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada was adopted on October 1, 1975. ... This work is copyrighted. ... This is a list of the symbols of Canadian provinces and territories. ... A motto is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (509x720, 16 KB) Summary Location of Winnipeg, Manitoba Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Winnipeg, Manitoba ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... This is a list of the 100 largest cities and towns (see note) in Canada ranked by area. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 1 km² (100 hectares) and 10 km² (1000 hectares). ...


619,544(6th)
706,900 (9th)
The below table is a list of the 100 largest cities (or municipalities) in Canada. ... The below table is a list of the 100 largest Metropolitan Areas in Canada. ...

Population density: 1331.9/km²
Time zone: Central: UTC -6
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Postal code span:
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R
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Local area code:
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204
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Latitude:
Longitude:
A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... It has been suggested that leap second be merged into this article or section. ... A Canadian postal code is a string of six characters that form part of a postal address in Canada. ... The North American Numbering Plan (NANP) is a system for three-digit area codes and seven-digit telephone numbers that direct telephone calls to particular regions on a public switched telephone network (PSTN), where they are further routed by the local network. ...

49°54′ N
97°08′ W
Elevation: 238 m MSL
Government
Mayor: Sam Katz
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List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba
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Governing body: Winnipeg City Council
MPs
Rod Bruinooge, Bill Blaikie, Steven Fletcher, Pat Martin, Anita Neville, Raymond Simard, Joy Smith, Judy Wasylycia-Leis
MLAs
Cris Aglugub, Nancy Allan, Rob Altemeyer, Marilyn Brick, David Walter Chomiak, Gary Doer, Myrna Driedger, Jon Gerrard, George Hickes, Kerri Irvin-Ross, Bidhu Jha, Bonnie Korzeniowski, Kevin Lamoureux, Hugh McFadyen, Gord Mackintosh, Jim Maloway, Doug Martindale, Diane McGifford, Christine Melnick, Bonnie Mitchelson, Stuart Murray, Theresa Oswald, Daryl Gary Reid, Jack Reimer, Jim Rondeau, Tim Sale, Conrad Santos, Harry Schellenberg, Gregory F. Selinger, Heather Stefanson, Andy Swan
Members of Parliament:
{{{MPs}}}
Provincial Representatives:
Winnipeg, Manitoba Logo
Satellite view of the city
City of Winnipeg
1(sc) According to the Canada 2001 Census.
Template help Flag of Canada
For other uses, see Winnipeg (disambiguation).

Winnipeg is an important Canadian city, and the capital of the province of Manitoba. Located in Western Canada, Winnipeg plays a prominent role in transportation, finance, manufacturing, agriculture and education. It is known as the Gateway to the West. Orders of magnitude (length) 1 E-13 m 1 E-12 m 1 E-11 m 1 E-10 m 1 E-9 m 1 E-8 m 1 E-7 m 1 E-6 m 1 E-5 m 1 E-4 m 1 E-3 m 1 E... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... Samuel (Sam) Michael Katz, OM , BA (born Rehovot, Israel, 1951) is the 42nd mayor of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba: 1874 Francis Evans Cornish, Q. C. 1875–76 William Nassau Kennedy 1877–78 Thomas Scott 1879–80 Alexander Logan 1881 Elias George Conklin 1882 Alexander Logan 1883 Alexander McMicken 1884 Alexander Logan 1885 Charles Edward Hamilton 1886 Henry Shaver Wesbrook 1887–88 Lyman Melvin... The Winnipeg City Council is the governing body of the City of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... Rod Bruinooge (born 1973) is a Canadian politician, businessman and filmmaker. ... The Honourable Rev. ... Steven John Fletcher, MP, B. Sc. ... Patrick Pat Martin (born December 13, 1955 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Canadian politician. ... Anita Neville (born July 22, 1942 in Winnipeg, Canadian politician. ... Raymond Simard (born March 8, 1958) is a politician from Manitoba, Canada. ... Joy Ann Smith (born February 20, 1947) is a Canadian politician. ... Judy Wasylycia-Leis (born August 10, 1951) is a Canadian politician. ... The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge ridings. ... Cris Aglugub is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Nancy Allan (born July 25, 1952 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Rob Altemeyer is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Marilyn Brick is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... David Walter Chomiak (February 15, 1953-) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Myrna Driedger is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Honourable Dr. Jon Gerrard, P.C., M.L.A. (born October 13, 1947 in Birmingham, England) is a Manitoba politician. ... George Hickes is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Kerri Irvin-Ross is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Bidhu Jha is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Bonnie Korzeniowski (born October 5, 1941) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Kevin Lamoureux (January 22, 1962-) is a Manitoba politician. ... Hugh McFadyen (born 1967) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Gord Mackintosh (born July 7, 1955) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Peter James (Jim) Maloway (November 10, 1952-) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Doug Martindale (May 25, 1947-) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Diane McGifford (born March 26, 1945) is a Manitoba politician, and a current member of Premier Gary Doers cabinet. ... Christine Melnick is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Bonnie Mitchelson (born November 28, 1947 in Winnipeg) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Stuart Murray (born November 24, 1954) is a Manitoba politician. ... Theresa Oswald is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Daryl Gary Reid (born November 2, 1950 in Winnipeg) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Jack Reimer is a Progressive Conservative politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Jim Rondeau (April 6, 1959-) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... For other people named Tim Sale, see Tim Sale. ... Conrad Santos (November 26, 1934-) is a Manitoba politician and a current member of the Manitoba legislature. ... Harry Schellenberg is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Gregory Selinger is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Heather Stefanson (born May 11, 1970) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Andy Swan (born August 9, 1968 in Winnipeg) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... This article is about the term as used within the Commonwealth of Nations; there is also an Legislative Assembly in Oregon and there used to be a Legislative Assembly in France during the French Revolution. ... The City of Winnipeg Logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada. ... Winnipeg may refer to: Winnipeg, Manitoba, the capital city of Manitoba Lake Winnipeg, a large lake in Manitoba Winnipeg River, a river flowing into Lake Winnipeg Winnipeg Capital Region, a region of Manitoba in the Red River Valley Winnipeg, a former federal electoral district in Canada This is a disambiguation... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... Map of Canada Canada is a federation of ten provinces which, together with three territories, comprise the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English (French is an official language of the Manitoban legislature and courts) Flower Pasqueflower Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of... Western Canada is a geographic region of Canada, also known as simply the West, generally considered to be west of the province of Ontario. ... Western Canada is a geographic region of Canada, also known as simply the West, generally considered to be west of the province of Ontario. ...


The city is located near the geographic centre of North America. It lies in a flood plain at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers and started around the point now commonly known as The Forks. It is protected from flooding by the Red River Floodway. Winnipeg is the province's largest city with a population of 619,544 people (2001 Canadian Census). The Winnipeg Census Metropolitan Area (which includes Winnipeg and surrounding rural municipalities) has a population of 706,900 (Statistics Canada, July 1, 2005 estimate). The climate in Winnipeg is very extreme; overall, it is one of the coldest large cities in the world, with temperatures averaging below freezing from mid-November through much of March (and most nights below −24 °C (-11.2 °F) in mid-winter), although from May to September temperatures often reach 30 °C (86 °F) and sometimes exceed 35 °C (95 °F). The city receives more precipitation in the forms of both rain and snow than other Prairie cities, but the weather is characterized year-round by an abundance of sunshine. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Floodplain. ... Confluence of Rhine and Mosel at Koblenz In geography, a confluence describes the point where two rivers meet and become one, usually when a tributary joins a more major river. ... See also the Red River disambiguation page. ... Junction of the Assiniboine and Red rivers in downtown Winnipeg. ... Link title The Forks market The Forks is a historic site and meeting place in downtown Winnipeg located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River. ... The Red River Floodway is an artificial flood control waterway in Canada first used in 1969. ... The Winnipeg Capital Region is located in the Red River Valley in the south central portion of the province of Manitoba, Canada, containing the provincial capital of Winnipeg and its surrounding rural municipalities (RMs), cities, and towns. ... A degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701-1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... For other senses of this word, see winter (disambiguation). ...

Contents


History

Tombstone of Louis Riel at the St. Boniface Cathedral
Tombstone of Louis Riel at the St. Boniface Cathedral

In 1738, the Sieur de la Vérendrye built the first post on the site, Fort Rouge, but it was later abandoned. Other posts were built in the Red River region, which was fiercely contested by the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company. Fort Gibraltar, a post of the North West Company on the site of present-day Winnipeg, was renamed Fort Garry in 1822 and became the leading post in the region. In 1835, Fort Garry was rebuilt after the devastating flood of 1826 and although it played a small role in the actual trading of furs, it housed the residence of the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company for many years. In 1869-1870, Winnipeg was the site of the Red River Rebellion, a conflict between the local Métis people led by Louis Riel and newcomers from eastern Canada. This rebellion led directly to the entry of Manitoba into Confederation as Canada's fifth province in 1870. On November 8, 1873, Winnipeg was incorporated as a city. In 1876, the post office officially adopted the name "Winnipeg", three years after the city's incorporation. Download high resolution version (1488x1984, 1812 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1488x1984, 1812 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Saint Boniface Cathedral Saint Boniface Cathedral forms an important architectural feature of Saint Boniface, Manitoba, especially in the eyes of the Franco-Manitoban community. ... Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye (November 17, 1685 – December 5, 1749) was a French Canadian military officer, fur trader and explorer. ... Fort Rouge can be: The Fort Rouge in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada The Fort Rouge which is a provincial electoral district in Manitoba (in the same area as the above) Somewhat rarely used to refer to Agra Fort ... Today, the North West Company is a grocery vendor in remote communities across northern Canada, Alaska and Greenland. ... The Hudsons Bay Company building in Montreal The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC) is the oldest corporation in Canada and is one of the oldest in the world still in existence. ... In the early 19th century fur-trading was the main industry of Western Canada. ... Upper Fort Garry in the early 1870s Fort Garry also known as Upper Fort Garry was a Hudsons Bay Company trading post at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers in what is now downtown Winnipeg. ... The Métis provisional government The Red River Rebellion or Red River Resistance are the names given to the events surrounding the actions of a provisional government established by Métis leader Louis Riel in 1869 at the Red River Settlement in what is now the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Métis (pronounced MAY tee, IPA: , in French or , in Michif ) are one of three recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ... Louis Riel Louis David Riel (October 22, 1844 – November 16, 1885), was a Canadian politician, a founder of the province of Manitoba, and leader of the Métis people of the Canadian prairies. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ...

Upper Fort Garry in the early 1870s
Upper Fort Garry in the early 1870s

The name Winnipeg is a transcription of the western Cree word wi-nipe-k (????), meaning "muddy waters" from wi-ni (??) - dirty, or soiled - and nipiy (???) - water. It is the Cree name of Lake Winnipeg, some sixty kilometres to the north (about forty miles). Upper Fort Garry in the early 1870s, circa 1872 / Fort Garry, Manitoba Credit: Topley / Library and Archives Canada / PA-011337 http://www. ... Upper Fort Garry in the early 1870s, circa 1872 / Fort Garry, Manitoba Credit: Topley / Library and Archives Canada / PA-011337 http://www. ... The Cree are an indigenous people of North America whose people range from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean in both Canada and the United States. ... Winnipeg Beach, Manitoba, on Lake Winnipeg Lake Winnipeg (52°30′N 97°47′W) is a very large (24,400 km²) lake in central North America, in the province of Manitoba, Canada, about 55 km north of the city of Winnipeg. ...


Winnipeg experienced an economic boom during the 1890s through 1920s, however, growth slowed towards the end of that period due to the opening of the Panama Canal, a key event in 1914. This 77 kilometre conduit for international trade and passenger travel helped propel Vancouver over Winnipeg in the resulting years. No longer did cargo or people have to traverse the country solely by railway. The option of using the Panama Canal had a profound effect on Winnipeg's development. A canal tug, making its way down to the Caribbean end of the canal, waits to be joined by a ship in the uppermost chamber of the Gatun Locks. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Vancouver (pronounced ) is a Canadian city in the province of British Columbia. ...

Crowd gathered outside old City Hall during the Winnipeg General Strike, June 21, 1919
Crowd gathered outside old City Hall during the Winnipeg General Strike, June 21, 1919

Another major event that effected Winnipeg both economically, socially and politically was the Winnipeg General Strike in 1919. Appalling labour conditions following World War I led to calls for reform. Around 35,000 Winnipeggers walked off the job in May 1919. The government defeated the strike through arrests, deportation and violence. The strike winded down in June 1919, but the lasting effect was a polarized population. Crowd gathered outside old City Hall, at Main Street and William Avenue, during the Winnipeg General Strike. ... Crowd gathered outside old City Hall, at Main Street and William Avenue, during the Winnipeg General Strike. ... Crowd gathered outside old City Hall during the Winnipeg General Strike, June 21, 1919 The Winnipeg General Strike was Canadas most influential labour protest. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First World War, also known as...


The population rose from about 25,000 in 1891 to more than 200,000 by 1921. The Manitoba Provincial Legislature Building reflects the optimism of the boom years. Built of Tyndall Stone in 1920, it is topped by the "Golden Boy". Tyndall Stone is a dolomitic limestone quarried from the Ordovician Red River Formation, in the vicinity of Tyndall, Manitoba. ... The Golden Boy is 5. ...


From the 1920s to 1945, Winnipeg experienced many challenges. Vancouver surpassed Winnipeg to become the third largest city in Canada in the 1920s. Saskatoon, Regina, Edmonton and Calgary also grew quickly and this allowed them to offer services comparable to Winnipeg firms. Wholesale trade declined in Winnipeg from 1924 to 1930 due in large part to growth in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Saskatoon nickname: The Bridge City, The Hub City Broadway Bridge in Saskatoon Area  - Total Metro. ... Motto: Nickname: The Queen City Motto: Floreat Regina (Let Regina Flourish) Location City Information Established: 1882 Area: 118. ... More than one place has the name Edmonton. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Flower Wild rose Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English Flower Western Red Lily Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 7th 651,036 km² 591...


The wholesale trade continued a downward spiral in Winnipeg due to national department stores moving into the region. Manufacturers bypassed city wholesalers offering their goods directly to retailers and the public. The mail order business also hurt Winnipeg since many of the orders were filled in eastern Canada.


The stock market of crash in 1929 only hastened an already steep decline in Winnipeg. The Great Depression followed and dragged Winnipeg down to depths not seen it its history. By 1937, city officials told a federal commission from Ottawa that they could no longer function without assistance. The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn, starting in 1929 and lasting through most of the 1930s. ... Motto: Template:Unhide = Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant Location City Information Established: 1850 as Bytown Area: 2,778. ...


Numerous companies shut down and massive unemployment ensued. To make matters worse, drought and depressed agricultural prices drove people off the land and into the cities.


The only thing that saved Winnipeg and the rest of the province from complete devastation was the city and provincial hydro-electric power plants built in the years prior to the Depression. The low cost electric power made it possible for businesses to slowly develop throughout the province. One of the industries that blossomed in the Depression years was the garment industry. The low cost power, vacated warehouses and plentiful workforce were ideal for the needle trade.


The Depression only ended when World War II broke out in 1939. Thousands of Canadians volunteered to join the forces. In Winnipeg, the old established armouries of Minto, Tuxedo (Fort Osborne) and McGregor were so crowded that the military had to take over other buildings to handle the capacity. Businesses in Winnipeg went on a war footing as well and men and women were hired in large numbers. Combatants Allies: Poland, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, France/Free France, United States, China, Canada, India, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8...


Despite nearly full employment in Winnipeg, the hardships of the Depression were not completely left behind. Rationing, shortages, stamps and coupons were the order of the day. There was also an entire generation of men and women overseas contributing to the war effort which left huge holes in many families.


The end of World War II brought a new sense of optimism in Winnipeg. Pent up demand brought a boom in housing development. Neighborhoods on new streets sprung up almost overnight. The building activity came to an abrupt halt in 1950 when city was swamped in the Winnipeg Flood. Not since 1861 had the water levels risen so high and heavy rainfall in the spring kept the flood waters above flood stage for 51 days. On May 8, 1950, the huge swell of water tore through eight dikes and destroyed four of eleven bridges. Homes and businesses filled with water and nearly 70,000 people had to be evacuated. Premier Douglas Campbell called for federal assistance and Canadian Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent declared a state of emergency. Soldiers from the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry were brought to the city just prior to the flood and remained for the duration of it. Only one person lost their life to the flood but the final tally in damage was over $1 billion. The Winnipeg Flood usually refers to a devastating flood that took place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada on May 8, 1950. ... For others named Douglas Campbell see Douglas Campbell (disambiguation) Douglas Lloyd Campbell (May 27, 1895-April 23, 1995) was a Manitoba politician. ... Louis Stephen St. ... Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) is an infantry regiment in the Canadian Forces (CF), belonging to 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1 CMBG). ...


The end result of the flood was a federal and provincial Royal Commission to determine what needed to be done to prevent such a thing from happening again. The Red River Basin Investigation recommended a system of complementary flood control measures. This involved a primary and secondary diking system for Winnipeg and a floodway to divert the Red River around Winnipeg. In states that are Commonwealth Realms a Royal Commission is a major government public inquiry into an issue. ... See also the Red River disambiguation page. ...


The whole project, which also included the Shellmouth Reservoir on the upper Assiniboine River, the Portage Diversion channel and a control structure on the Fairford River, cost of $99,200,000. The Winnipeg Floodway alone cost $62,700,000. The Shellmouth Reservoir (, ) in Manitoba, Canada was completed in 1972 as part of a diversion project to prevent flooding of the Red River Valley. ... Junction of the Assiniboine and Red rivers in downtown Winnipeg. ... The Portage Diversion (, )is a water control structure on the Assiniboine River in Manitoba, Canada. ... Control gates at the inlet to the Floodway The Red River Floodway is an artificial flood control waterway in Canada first used in 1969. ...


Despite the damage done in the Winnipeg Flood of 1950, there was much criticism and outright opposition to the project. Under the leadership of Premier Duff Roblin, an agreement for cost sharing with the Government of Canada was signed. Construction commenced in October of 1962 and was completed in 1968. For many years, both critics and supporters called the floodway "Duff's Ditch." Dufferin Roblin (born June 17, 1917) is a Canadian businessman and politician. ...


The current city of Winnipeg was created when the City of Winnipeg Act was amended to form Unicity in 1971. The municipalities of St. James-Assiniboia, St. Boniface, Transcona, St. Vital, West Kildonan, East Kildonan, Tuxedo, Old Kildonan, North Kildonan, Fort Garry, and Charleswood were amalgamated with the Old City of Winnipeg. Small portions of the city have since seceded, but the vast majority of the populated area of the city remains within one single municipality. In order to prevent urban sprawl, the city restricted development to inside an urban limit line and in most cases left several kilometres of open space between the municipal boundary and suburban developments. Surrounding municipalities have a combined population of fewer than 100,000. The City of Winnipeg Act was incorporated on July 21, 1971 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Unicity came into existence in the Greater Winnipeg area in 1972. ... St. ... Saint Boniface is an area of the city of Winnipeg, home to the Franco-Manitoban community. ... Transcona is a neighbourhood in Winnipeg, Manitoba, located about 6 miles (10 km) east of the downtown area. ... St. ... West Kildonan is the area north of Inkster Blvd and west of the Red River. ... East Kildonan is a primarily residential community in Winnipeg, Manitoba, located in the northeast part of the city. ... Tuxedo (population 16,605 as of 2001, including Linden Woods) is an affluent residential suburb of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Rural Municipality of Old Kildonan was originally part of the Rural Municipality of East Kildonan which was formed in 1914. ... The Regional Municipality of North Kildonan was incorporated on January 1, 1925. ... Fort Garry is a large area in the southern part of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Charleswood is a residential community within the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...


Geography and climate

Winnipeg lies at the bottom of the valley of the Red River and has an extremely flat topography. There are no substantial hills in the city or in its vicinity. Downtown Winnipeg is centred at the intersection of Portage Avenue and Main Street about one kilometre (0.6 mile) from The Forks of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers. From this intersection, known as the windiest in Canada (or conversely as the most famous intersection in Canada), all roads radiate outwards. The city uses the grid system for streets although there are several different grids in place which correspond to old Red River Lots and the meandering courses of the rivers. This creates some very irregular intersections. As a result many visitors find it difficult to get around in Winnipeg. There is no absolute numbering system in place but usually street addresses become higher the farther one moves away from either river. For example west of the Red River street addresses will increase as one heads west, but east of the river they will increase as one heads east. In general avenues run east and west and streets north and south. Unlike many cities in North America, all streets are named, not numbered. Of interest, many of the main thoroughfares in Winnipeg are extremely wide due to the spring soil conditions and the historical use of the Red River Cart which created wide ruts in the (then) muddy roads. Portage Avenue has four lanes of traffic in each direction plus a central boulevard for much of its run through Winnipeg. See also the Red River disambiguation page. ... Surface of the Earth Topography, a term in geography, has come to refer to the lay of the land, or the physiogeographic characteristics of land in terms of elevation, slope, and orientation. ... Junction of the Assiniboine and Red rivers in downtown Winnipeg. ... A Red River Cart, normally pulled by Oxen with the Furloft and Store at Lower Fort Garry in background The Red River ox cart was a large, two-wheeled cart made entirely of wood (usually oak) and pulled by oxen. ...


Downtown Winnipeg is the financial heart of the city, and covers an area of about one square mile (2.5 km²) which is quite large for a city this size. Although downtown Winnipeg once housed what was for a time one of the world's most successful department stores, the Eaton's store on Portage Avenue, it is no longer the retail centre of the city. The Eaton's store was torn down and replaced by an arena, the MTS Centre in November, 2004. Surrounding the downtown area are various residential neighbourhoods. Urban development spreads in all directions from downtown but is greatest to the south and west, and has tended to follow (and has been determined by) the course of the two major rivers. The urbanized area in Winnipeg is about 25 km (15 mi) from east to west and 20 km (12 mi) from north to south, although there is still much land available for development within the City Limits. Areas include Downtown/Exchange District, Chinatown, The Forks, Fort Rouge/Crescentwood, River Heights, Tuxedo, Charleswood, St. James-Assiniboia, The West End, Weston, Wolseley, North End, Elmwood, East Kildonan, West Kildonan, and North Kildonan, St. Boniface, St. Vital, Fort Garry, St. Norbert, and Transcona. Winnipeg is known for its urban forest particularly its beautiful elm trees. The two major parks in the city, Assiniboine Park and Kildonan Park, are both located in the suburbs. The major commercial areas are Polo Park (West End and St. James) Kildonan Crossing (Transcona and East Kildonan), South St. Vital, and Garden City (West Kildonan). The main cultural and nightlife areas are the Exchange District, The Forks, Osborne Village and Corydon Village (both in Fort Rouge), Sargent and Ellice Avenues (West End) and Old St. Boniface. Downtown Winnipeg is centered around Portage Avenue and Main Street, and is widely spread out in between Broadway, Memorial Boulevard, Portage Avenue and Main Street. ... Eatons was once Canadas largest department store retailer. ... The MTS Centre is an indoor arena at 300 Portage Avenue in downtown Winnipeg, Manitoba, at the former Eatons site. ... The Chinatown of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada was formed in 1909. ... Link title The Forks market The Forks is a historic site and meeting place in downtown Winnipeg located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River. ... Fort Rouge was Winnipegs first true suburb. ... Crescentwood was developed by noted Winnipeg real estate agent C. H. Enderton. ... River Heights is an affluent neighborhood in Winnipeg, Manitoba, located south of the Assiniboine River, west of Fort Rouge (unofficial boundary Stafford Street), east of Tuxedo, and north of the CNR mainline. ... Tuxedo (population 16,605 as of 2001, including Linden Woods) is an affluent residential suburb of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Charleswood is a residential community within the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... St. ... // Location The West End of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, is a mostly residential area just west of Downtown Winnipeg. ... Weston is a neighborbood south of the CP Weston railyards and west of McPhillips Street in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Wolseley is an area in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The North End is a neighborhood in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... East Kildonan is a primarily residential community in Winnipeg, Manitoba, located in the northeast part of the city. ... West Kildonan is the area north of Inkster Blvd and west of the Red River. ... The Regional Municipality of North Kildonan was incorporated on January 1, 1925. ... Saint Boniface is an area of the city of Winnipeg, home to the Franco-Manitoban community. ... St. ... Fort Garry is a large area in the southern part of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... St. ... Transcona is a neighbourhood in Winnipeg, Manitoba, located about 6 miles (10 km) east of the downtown area. ... Binomial name Ulmus americana L. The American Elm Ulmus americana is a species of elm native to eastern North America, occurring from Nova Scotia west to southeast Saskatchewan, and south to Florida and central Texas. ... Assiniboine Park is a park in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Kildonan Park was established in 1909. ... Polo Park is Winnipegs largest retail and entertainment district. ... The Exchange District is a National Historic Site in the downtown area of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Link title The Forks market The Forks is a historic site and meeting place in downtown Winnipeg located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River. ... Osborne Village derived its names from the Fort Osborne Barracks of the The Second Battalion, Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry. ...


Because of its extremely flat topography and substantial snowfall, Winnipeg is subject to severe flooding. The Red River reached its greatest flood height in 1826, and this event still remains the highest flood stage of the last two hundred years. Another large flood occurred in 1950, which caused millions of dollars in damages and thousands of evacuations. This flood prompted Duff Roblin's government to build the Red River Floodway (sometimes colloquially referred to as Duff's Ditch), a 49-kilometre (30-mile) long diversion channel that protects the city of Winnipeg from flooding. Other related water diversion projects farther away from Winnipeg include the Portage Diversion (also known as the Assiniboine River Floodway) and the Shellmouth Dam. The flood-control system prevented flooding in 1974 and 1979 when water levels neared record levels. However, in the 1997 flood, flooding threatened the city's relatively unprotected southwest corner. Flood control dikes were reinforced and raised using sandbags and the threat was averted. Winnipeg suffered very limited damage compared to cities without flood control structures, such as Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. Dufferin Roblin (born June 17, 1917) is a Canadian businessman and politician. ... The Red River Floodway is an artificial flood control waterway in Canada first used in 1969. ... The Portage Diversion (, )is a water control structure on the Assiniboine River in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Portage Diversion (, )is a water control structure on the Assiniboine River in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Shellmouth Reservoir (, ) in Manitoba, Canada was completed in 1972 as part of a diversion project to prevent flooding of the Red River Valley. ... Obelisk in Grand Forks commemorating the 1997 flood. ... A dyke (or dike) is a stone or earthen wall constructed as a defence or as a boundary. ... Motto: A Place of Excellence Nickname: The Sunflake City Map Political Statistics Founded 15 June 1870 Incorporated February 22, 1881 County Grand Forks County Mayor Michael Brown Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 49. ...


The relatively flat terrain and the poor drainage of the Red River Valley's clay-based soil results in seasonal explosions of insect populations, such as that of the mosquito, which are intensified during especially wet years . Winnipeg has gained a reputation as the mosquito capital of North America, resulting in the limitation of much outdoor activity during the hot and humid summer months. The fear of West Nile Virus has further exacerbated the problem. In the summer of 2005, mosquito trap counts in some parts of the city went into the thousands, causing immediate city-wide fogging with the chemical malathion. The use of chemicals to combat Winnipeg's insect problem is an extremely controversial issue in the city as many feel that the use of chemicals, and particularly malathion, is unnecessarily dangerous to human and animal health. The Red River Valley is a region in central North America that is drained by the Red River of the North. ... West Nile virus is a virus of the family Flaviviridae, found in both tropical and temperate regions. ... Malathion is a organophosphate parasympathomimetic which binds irreversibly to cholinesterase. ...

A freak Winnipeg snow storm that occurred on May 11, 2004
A freak Winnipeg snow storm that occurred on May 11, 2004

Winnipeg lies in an unprotected arctic trough which channels cold arctic air south, directly across the Canadian Shield and Canadian Prairie. This results in bone-chilling temperatures as early as the end of October, followed by bitter cold and icy winds during December, January and February. Cold weather and snow often extend into April. The extremity of its climate in the winter months has caused the (somewhat derisive) nickname of "Winterpeg". Summers are typically warm with average temperatures above 25 °C (77 °F) and much sunshine is received throughout the year. Spring and fall tend to be rather contracted seasons, each averaging little over six weeks. Average maximum temperatures for each month are as follows (source Environment Canada): January −13 °C (9 °F), February −9 °C (16 °F), March −1 °C (30 °F), April 10 °C (50 °F), May 19 °C (67 °F), June 23 °C (74 °F), July 26 °C (79 °F), August 25 °C (77 °F), September 19 °C (67 °F), October 11 °C (52 °F), November 0 °C (32 °F), December −10 °C (14 °F). The city receives an annual average of about 510 mm (20 inches) of precipitation including 115 cm (45 inches) of snow. There is generally snow cover from mid-November to the end of March, though this varies depending on the year—heavy snowfalls in late October and in April are not uncommon. Winnipeg is virtually assured of having a White Christmas as there is only one December 25 on record in the last century where there was no snow on the ground. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1671 KB) Summary A photograph of a freak snow storm that occured May 11, 2005 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1671 KB) Summary A photograph of a freak snow storm that occured May 11, 2005 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Canadian Shield The Canadian Shield is a large craton in eastern and central Canada and adjacent portions of the United States, composed of bare rock dating to the Precambrian Era (between 4. ... The Canadian prairies is a vast area of flat sedimentary land that stretches from Ontario and the Canadian Shield to the Canadian Rockies covering much of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta - the Prairie Provinces. ... White Christmas A white Christmas, to most people in the Northern Hemisphere, refers to snowy weather at Christmas, a phenomenon which is far more common in some countries than in others. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ...

Winnipeg panorama, from 1907
Winnipeg panorama, from 1907

Download high resolution version (1759x420, 276 KB)Winnipeg - 1907 panorama Source: [1] [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1759x420, 276 KB)Winnipeg - 1907 panorama Source: [1] [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Government

Winnipeg City Council
Mayor Sam Katz
River Heights-Fort Garry Donald Benham
Charleswood-Tuxedo Bill Clement
St. Charles Peter De Smedt
St. James-Brooklands Jae Eadie
Fort Rouge-East Fort Garry Jenny Gerbasi
North Kildonan Mark Lubosch
St. Boniface Franco Magnifico
Old Kildonan Mike O'Shaughnessy
Point Douglas Mike Pagtakhan
Daniel McIntyre Harvey Smith
St. Vital Gord Steeves
St. Norbert Justin Swandel
Elmwood-East Kildonan Lillian Thomas
Transcona Russ Wyatt

Samuel (Sam) Michael Katz, OM , BA (born Rehovot, Israel, 1951) is the 42nd mayor of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Donald Benham, BA, is a journalist, teacher and politician. ... Bill Clement is a City Councillor in the Charleswood-Tuxedo ward in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Peter De Smedt is a City Councillor in the St. ... Jae Eadie is a City Councillor for the St. ... Jenny Gerbasi is a City Councillor in the Fort Rouge - East Fort Garry in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Mark Lubosch is a city councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Franco Magnifico is a City Councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Mike OShaughnessy is a City Councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada for the Old Kildonan ward. ... Mike Pagtakhan is a City Councillor in the Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Harvey Smith (born November 6, 1936) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Gord Steeves is a City Councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Justin Swandel is a City Councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Lillian Thomas is a City Councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Russ Wyatt is a City Councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...

History of city government

The first elections for city government in Winnipeg were held shortly after the city was incorporated in 1873. On January 5, 1874, Francis Evans Cornish, former mayor of London, Ontario defeated Winnipeg Free Press editor and owner William F. Luxton by a margin of 383 votes to 179. There were only 382 eligible voters in the city at the time but property owners were allowed to vote in every civic poll in which they owned property. Up until the year 1955, mayors could only serve one term. City government consisted of 13 aldermen and one mayor. This number of elected officials remained constant until 1920. Francis Evans Cornish, QC (February 1, 1831 – November 28, 1878) was a politician in the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Manitoba. ... Nickname: The Forest City Location City Information Established: 1826 (as village) 1855 (as city) Area: 421. ... The Winnipeg Free Press is the primary daily newspaper of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... William Fisher Luxton (1844, Bampton, Devon, England-1907, Canada) migrated to Canada with his family in 1855 and came to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in 1871. ... An alderman is a member of a municipal legislative body in a town or city with many jurisdictions. ...


The inaugural Council meeting took place on January 19, 1874 on the second floor of Bentley's, a newly constructed building on the northwest corner of Portage and Main


Construction of a new City Hall commenced in 1875. The building proved to be a structural nightmare and eventually had to be held up by props and beams. The building was eventually demolished in favour of building a new City Hall in 1883.

Legislative building of Manitoba
Legislative building of Manitoba

A new City Hall building was constructed in 1886. It was a statuesque "Gingerbread" building done in Victorian grandeur and symbolized Winnipeg's coming of age at the end of the nineteenth century. The building stood for fifty years and originally there had been a plan to replace it around World War I but the war itself delayed that process. And so the beloved Gingerbread City Hall stood until it started to fall down. In 1958, falling plaster almost hit visitors to the building. The tower eventually had to be removed and in 1962 the whole building was torn down. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1265 KB) Summary Manitoba parliament building Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Winnipeg, Manitoba Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1265 KB) Summary Manitoba parliament building Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Winnipeg, Manitoba Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of Great Britain is considered the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First World War, also known as...


City Council[1] embraced the idea of a "Civic Centre" as a replacement for the old city hall. The concept originally called for an administrative building and a council building with a courtyard in between. Eventually, a police headquarters and remand center (The Public Safety Building) and parkade were added to the plans. The four building were completed in 1964 at a cost of $8.2 million. The Civic Centre and the Manitoba Centennial Centre were connected by underground tunnels in 1967. The Manitoba Centennial Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada was an urban renewal program that began in 1960. ...

See also: List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba

List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba: 1874 Francis Evans Cornish, Q. C. 1875–76 William Nassau Kennedy 1877–78 Thomas Scott 1879–80 Alexander Logan 1881 Elias George Conklin 1882 Alexander Logan 1883 Alexander McMicken 1884 Alexander Logan 1885 Charles Edward Hamilton 1886 Henry Shaver Wesbrook 1887–88 Lyman Melvin...

Unicity

"Unicity" was created on July 27, 1971. The City of Winnipeg Act incorporated the R. M. of Charleswood, R. M. of Fort Garry, R. M. of North Kildonan, R. M. of Old Kildonan, Town of Tuxedo, City of East Kildonan, City of West Kildonan, City of St. Vital, City of Transcona, City of St. Boniface, City of St. James-Assiniboia, City of Winnipeg and The Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg into one city. Unicity came into existence in the Greater Winnipeg area in 1972. ... The City of Winnipeg Act was incorporated on July 21, 1971 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Charleswood is a residential community within the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... In 1912 the R. M. of Fort Garry was incorporated. ... The Regional Municipality of North Kildonan was incorporated on January 1, 1925. ... The Rural Municipality of Old Kildonan was originally part of the Rural Municipality of East Kildonan which was formed in 1914. ... Tuxedo is an affluent residential suburb of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... East Kildonan is a primarily residential community in Winnipeg, Manitoba, located in the northeast part of the city. ... West Kildonan is the area north of Inkster Blvd and west of the Red River. ... St. ... Transcona is a neighbourhood in Winnipeg, Manitoba, located about 6 miles (10 km) east of the downtown area. ... Saint Boniface is an area of the city of Winnipeg, home to the Franco-Manitoban community. ... St. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) City of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canadas Location. ... In 1960, the Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg took over responsibility for transit and certain other services of the City of Winnipeg and surrounding muncipalities. ...


The first election for the newly combined city was held on October 6, 1971. The City Council consisted of 50 councillors and one mayor. The councillors were elected on the basis of one councillor per city ward while the mayor was elected by the city-at-large. The term of office was three years. The inaugural meeting of the new council took place on January 4, 1972.


Since 50 councillors proved too unwieldy the city wards were reduced to 29 in 1977. In 1992 the city wards were reduced even further to the present 15 and city councillors became full-time politicians.


Demographics

Winnipeg skyline
Winnipeg skyline

The City of Winnipeg is home to 619,544 people (2001 Census)[2], about 54% of the total population of Manitoba. Winnipeg's population grew by about 12,000 residents from 1996 to 2001. Winnipeg's total annual growth rate has been 0.5% since 1971, with the majority of growth coming from immigration from Asia and Africa and in-migration from the surrounding rural areas, and aboriginal communities. Download high resolution version (900x522, 134 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (900x522, 134 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Edmonton and Calgary, however, formerly smaller cousins, have grown 3.0% and 4.5% per year, over the same period, so that each now has a metropolitan population of over 1.0 million. Winnipeg was once Canada's third-largest city (until the 1930s), but, beginning in the 1970s, as the economy evolved away from rural farm-based industry, and Canada's pattern of trade changed from east-west to north-south, Winnipeg stalled in growth and dropped to sixth by 2004. The Winnipeg Metropolitan Area ranks 9th in population in Canada, just behind Quebec City, Quebec, and Hamilton, Ontario. Winnipeg's growth rate has increased in recent years and Metropolitan Winnipeg may again overtake Quebec City and Hamilton in the near future. Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the north central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farm land on the prairies. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... Motto : « Don de Dieu feray valoir Â» (I shall put Gods gift to good use) Site in the province of Quebec Official logo Country  Canada Province Québec Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Constitution date 1833 Geographical code Founder Foundation date Samuel... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Flower White garden lily Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 2nd 1,542,056 km² 1,183... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Motto: Steel City Area: 1,117. ...


As of the 2001 census[2]:

  • 25.7% of the population were 19 or under
  • 29.4% were between 20 and 39
  • 31.6% were between 40 and 64
  • 13.3% were 65 or older

Visible minorities


Statistics Canada asks census respondents whether they are aboriginal and whether they belong to a visible minority. Published figures for 2001[2]:

  • Total visible minority: 13.4%, as follows:
  • Filipino: 4.9%
  • South Asian: 2.0%
  • Black: 1.8%
  • Chinese: 1.8%
  • Southeast Asian: 0.8%
  • Latin American: 0.7%
  • Japanese: 0.3%
  • Korean: 0.2%
  • Arab: 0.2%
  • West Asian: 0.1%
  • Other minority or multiple minories: 0.6%.
  • Aboriginal: 8.6% (census respondents claiming Aboriginal identity)
  • Not aboriginal or visible minority: 78.0%

Religious affiliation

Religious affiliations with less than 0.5% are not listed here. Units are in percent of population. 1.4% of the population did not respond. Catholic Church redirects here. ... The United Church of Canada (French: lÉglise Unie du Canada) is Canadas second largest church (after the Roman Catholic Church), and its largest Protestant denomination. ... Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... Mr wadawits smells Luthers seal Lutheranism is a Christian tradition based upon the main theological insights of Martin Luther. ... The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is a successor church to the acceptance of Christianity by Prince Volodymyr (also Vladimir) in Kyiv (Kiev), in 988. ... The Mennonites are a group of Christian Anabaptist (Re-baptizers) denominations named after and influenced by the teachings and tradition of Menno Simons (1496-1561). ... This article describes the Jewish religion; for a consideration of ethnic, historic, and cultural aspects of the Jewish identity refer to the article Jew. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit, as shown in the Biblical account of the Day of Pentecost. ... Buddhism is a religion, philosophy, and arguably a psychology, focusing on the teachings of the Buddha Śākyamuni (Siddhārtha Gautama). ... The Harimandir Sāhib, known popularly as the Golden Temple, is a sacred shrine for Sikhs Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is a major religion that found its genesis in sixteenth century Northern India with the teachings of Nānak and nine successive human Gurus. ... For other uses, including people named Islam, see Islam (disambiguation). ... Pentecost is considered in Eastern Orthodoxy to be the birth of the Church. ... Presbyterianism is a form of Protestant Christianity, primarily in the Reformed branch of Christendom, as well as a particular form of church government. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit - Sanātana (eternal) Dharma also known as Vaidika (Vedic) Dharma) is a religion or philosophy that orginated from the Indian subcontinent and nearby surrounding areas. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as recounted in the Gospels. ... Protestantism is one of three primary branches of Christianity. ...

Source: Statistics Canada (Census 2001)[2].

Languages spoken


The most common languages spoken by Winnipeggers are: English (99.0%), French (11.1%), German (4.1%), Tagalog (3.8%), Ukrainian (3.1%), Spanish (1.7%), Chinese (1.7%), Polish (1.7%), Portuguese (1.3%), Italian (1.1%), Punjabi (1.0%), Vietnamese (0.6%), Ojibway (0.6%), Hindi (0.5%), Russian (0.5%), Cree (0.5%), Dutch (0.4%), Non verbal languages (0.3%), Arabic (0.3%), Croatian (0.3%), Greek (0.3%), Hungarian (0.3%), Japanese (0.2%), Creoles (0.1%), Danish (0.1%), Gaelic languages (0.0%), Inuktitut (0.0%), Micmac (0.0%). The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Punjabi (also Panjabi; in Gurmukhī, Panjābī in Shāhmukhī) is the language of the Punjabi people and the Punjab regions of India and Pakistan. ... Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... Hindi (हिन्दी or हिंदी in Devanāgarī), an Indo-European language spoken mainly in Northern and Central India is an official language of the central government of India. ... Cree is the name for a group of closely-related Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 50,000 speakers across Canada, from Alberta to Labrador. ... A sign language (also signed language) is a language which uses manual communication instead of sound to convey meaning - simultaneously combining handshapes, orientation and movement of the hands, arms or body, and facial expressions to fluidly express a speakers thoughts. ... The Arabic language (Arabic: ‎ transliterated: ), or simply Arabic (Arabic: ‎ transliterated: ), is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... // A creole language, or just creole, is a well-defined and stable language that originated from a non-trivial combination of two or more languages, typically with many distinctive features that are not inherited from either parent. ... Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic). ... Inuktitut (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ, literally like the Inuit) is the language of the Inuit people. ... The Mikmaq (also Míkmaq, Micmac, Migmaq) are a First Nations people indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Maritimes, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ...


In terms of Canada's official languages as used by Winnipeggers: 88.0% spoke English only, 11.0% both English and French, 0.9% neither English nor French, and 0.1% French only. An official language is a language that is given a unique status in the constitutions of countries, states, and other territories. ...

Source: Statistics Canada (Census 2001)[2]
Source: Winnipeg 2001 census summary[3]

Education

Education is a provincial government responsibility in Canada.


In Manitoba, education is governed principally by The Public Schools Act and The Education Administration Act as well as regulations made under both Acts. Rights and responsibilities of the Minister of Education, Citizenship and Youth and the rights and responsibilities of school boards, principals, teachers, parents and students are set out in the legislation.

School Divisions[4]


There are six school divisions in Winnipeg:

  • Winnipeg School Division
  • St James-Assiniboia School Division
  • Pembina Trails School Division
  • Seven Oaks School Division
  • River East Transcona School Division
  • Louis Riel School Division

Higher education The River East Transcona School Division is located in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ...


There are four universities and one major college in Winnipeg:

Private schools[5] The University of Manitoba (established in 1877) is one of four universities in Winnipeg, Manitoba and was the first university ever established in Western Canada. ... The University of Winnipeg received its charter in 1967 but its roots date back more than 130 years. ... Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface The Collège Universitaire de Saint-Boniface, or CUSB, is a university college affiliated with the University of Manitoba and located in Saint Boniface, Manitoba. ... Canadian Mennonite University is a private Mennonite university located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Red River College (RRC) is the largest and most comprehensive institute of applied learning in Manitoba. ...

The Mennonite Brethren Collegiate Institute is a private Mennonite Christian school located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... St. ... St. ... St. ...

Workforce and industry

Winnipeg's Portage Ave.
Winnipeg's Portage Ave.

Approximately 375,000 people are employed in Winnipeg and the surrounding area. Winnipeg's largest employers are either government or government-funded institutions: the Province of Manitoba, the City of Winnipeg, the University of Manitoba, the Health Sciences Centre, the Casinos of Winnipeg, and Manitoba Hydro. There are several large private sector employers, as well: Manitoba Telecom Services, Palliser Furniture, Great-West Life Assurance, Motor Coach Industries, Convergys, Faneuil, New Flyer Industries, Boeing Canada Technology, Bristol Aerospace, Nygård International and Investors Group. Approximately 54,000 people or 14% of the work force are employed in the public sector. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 319 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Winnipeg, Manitoba Corporations based in Winnipeg Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 319 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Winnipeg, Manitoba Corporations based in Winnipeg Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... The University of Manitoba (established in 1877) is one of four universities in Winnipeg, Manitoba and was the first university ever established in Western Canada. ... The Health Sciences Centre is the largest hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Founded in 1961, Manitoba Hydro is the electric power and natural gas utility in the province of Manitoba, Canada. ... Manitoba Telecom Services TSX: MBT, or MTS, (formerly Manitoba Telephone System) is the primary telecommunications carrier in the Canadian province of Manitoba and the third largest telecommunications provider in Canada with 7000 employees. ... Palliser Furniture Ltd. ... The Great-West Life Assurance Company (known more commonly Great-West Life) is a life and health insurance company. ... Motor Coach Industries (MCI) is a Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada-based bus manufacturer. ... Convergys (NYSE: CVG) is a multi-national corporation that provides outsourced billing, customer care, employee care, and transaction management software. ... The Faneuil Group is a Canadian customer contact company specializing in inbound/outbound telecom and email communications. ... New Flyer Industries is the leading bus manufacturer in North America, headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Boeing Canada Technology began in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in 1971 with 50 employees. ... Bristol Aerospace is a Canadian aerospace firm located in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... NygÃ¥rd International is a womens clothing designer and manufacturer started in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in 1967 by Peter J. NygÃ¥rd. ... IGM Financial Inc. ...


Winnipeg is the site of Canadian Air Division (1CAD)[6], the headquarters of the Canadian Forces "Air Command" (Canada's Air Force). This is also the command structure responsible for strategic coordination and control of North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) operations over Canada (tactical control is in North Bay, Ontario, in a bunker similar to Cheyenne Mountain in the United States). The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes) are the combined armed forces of Canada. ... The NORAD shield. ... North Bay (, time zone EST) is a city in Northeastern Ontario, Canada (2001 population 52,771). ... 1,400 people work inside Cheyenne Mountain. ...


The Royal Canadian Mint located in eastern Winnipeg is where all circulating coinage in Canada is produced. The plant, established in 1975, also produces coins for many other countries in the world. The Royal Canadian Mint produces all of Canadas circulation coins, and manufactures circulation coins on behalf of other nations. ...


Winnipeg is also home to the National Microbiology Laboratory, Canada's front line in its response to SARS and one of only 15 Biosafety level 4 microbiology laboratories in the world. The National Microbiology Laboratory is located in the Canadian Science Centre for Human and Animal Health in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Sars may refer to any of the following: Severe acute respiratory syndrome, commonly abbreviated as SARS Michael Sars, a Norwegian biologist, father of Georg Sars Georg Sars, a Norwegian biologist, son of Michael Sars Special Administrative Regions, commonly abbreviated as SARs Sars, Perm Krai, an urban settlement in Perm Krai... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention specifies four levels of biosafety precautions for biological agents. ...

See also: Corporations based in Winnipeg
Royal Winnipeg Mint
Royal Winnipeg Mint

Winnipegs Portage Ave. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 614 KB)I (Bryan Wittal) took this photo of the Canadian Mint in Winnipeg, Manitoba in August 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 614 KB)I (Bryan Wittal) took this photo of the Canadian Mint in Winnipeg, Manitoba in August 2005. ...

Transportation

Winnipeg from space.
Winnipeg from space.

Winnipeg has had a public transit system since the 1880s, starting with horse-drawn streetcars. It had electric streetcars from 1891 until 1955, and electric trolley buses from 1938 until 1970. Winnipeg Transit now operates entirely with diesel buses. For decades, the city has explored the idea of a rapid transit link, either bus or rail, from downtown to the University of Manitoba's suburban campus. The most recent proposal[7] calls for several enhanced bus routes, which would extend across the city. These routes would use bus-only lanes for most of their length, with separate busways being built around congested sections. In 2004 Winnipeg Mayor Sam Katz effectively shelved these plans and the rail-based option is now seen as more viable (and more desirable). Winnipeg is home to many large transit bus manufacturers, including New Flyer Industries and Motor Coach Industries. New Flyer Industries supplies transit buses for many major North American cities including New York City and Vancouver. Download high resolution version (638x639, 167 KB)Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada - April 1994 image description here File links The following pages link to this file: Winnipeg, Manitoba Categories: NASA images ... Download high resolution version (638x639, 167 KB)Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada - April 1994 image description here File links The following pages link to this file: Winnipeg, Manitoba Categories: NASA images ... Winnipeg Transit is the public transit agency in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The University of Manitoba (established in 1877) is one of four universities in Winnipeg, Manitoba and was the first university ever established in Western Canada. ... Bus rapid transit (BRT) is a relatively new umbrella term for urban mass transportation services utilizing buses to perform premium services on existing roadways or dedicated rights-of-way. ... Samuel (Sam) Michael Katz, OM , BA (born Rehovot, Israel, 1951) is the 42nd mayor of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... An early motorized bus - a Benz truck modified by Netphener company (1895) A bus is a large automobile intended to carry numerous persons in addition to the driver and sometimes a conductor. ... New Flyer Industries is a leading bus manufacturer in North America, headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Motor Coach Industries (MCI) is a Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada-based bus manufacturer. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Big Apple Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ... Vancouver (pronounced ) is a Canadian city in the province of British Columbia. ...


Winnipeg is unique among North American cities its size in that it does not have freeways within the urban area. Beginning in 1958, the primarily suburban Metropolitan council proposed a system of freeways, including one that would have bisected the downtown area. The plan culminated in the monumental Winnipeg Area Transportation Study (WATS)[8] of 1968. The extensive freeway plan faced stiff community opposition and was deemed over-ambitious. It was not implemented as a concerted undertaking, but construction of major traffic corridors follows the study to this day, including expressways such as Winnipeg City Route 165/Bishop Grandin Blvd., although most are in the form of urban arterial roads, and no freeways are likely to be constructed within the urban area anytime soon. However, a one mile stretch of freeway was built in the late 1950s, and that freeway is called the Disraeli Freeway (part of the Disraeli Bridge project), part of it being a freeway, which is part of Winnipeg City Route 42. It has been suggested that Autobahn be merged into this article or section. ... An expressway is a divided highway, usually 4 lanes or wider. ... This is a list of all city routes in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Winnipeg City Route 165 (Locally known as Bishop Grandin Blvd. ... An arterial road is a high-capacity road which is just below a highway level of service. ...


A modern four-lane highway (the Perimeter Highway, which is mostly an expressway around the city (also known as a ring road) with interchanges and at-grade intersections) bypasses the city entirely, allowing travellers on the Trans-Canada Highway to avoid the city and continue east or west uninterrupted. Manitoba Provincial Highways 100 and 101 (locally known as the Perimeter Highway) is a beltway around Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... An expressway is a divided highway, usually 4 lanes or wider. ... A beltway (American English), ring road or orbital motorway (British English) is a circumferential highway found around many cities. ... An interchange is a location where two things meet, usually perform some kind of exchange, and possibly go on their ways again. ... Trans Canada Highway over Canada Map The Trans-Canada Highway is a federal-provincial highway system that joins all ten provinces of Canada. ...


Many Manitoba provincial highways enter Winnipeg, but the majority lose their highway designation and become Winnipeg City Routes once they reach the Perimeter Highway. At present, only two provincial highways pass entirely through the Winnipeg area: The following is a list of Manitoba provincial highways. ... This is a list of all city routes in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...

Several highways also converge on Winnipeg without passing entirely through the city. These include: Manitoba Provincial Highway 1 is the Manitoba section of the Trans-Canada Highway mainline route. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 59 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... United States Highway 59 is a north-south United States highway (though it is signed east-west in parts of Texas). ... Winnipeg City Route 20 (known locally as Lagimodiere Blvd. ...

  • Highway 2, which meets with Highway 3 at the southwest Perimeter,
  • Highway 3, which becomes McGillivray Boulevard in Winnipeg,
  • Highway 6, which is the main highway to northern Manitoba,
  • Highway 7, which becomes Route 90 (known through various street names) in Winnipeg,
  • Highway 8, which becomes Route 180 (known as McPhillips Street) in Winnipeg,
  • Highway 9, which becomes Route 52 (known as Main Street) in Winnipeg, and
  • Highway 15, which becomes Dugald Road in Winnipeg, and
  • Highway 75 (a northern continuation of I-29 and US 75), which becomes Route 42 (known as Pembina Highway) in Winnipeg. (This road is an exception to the rule that only two provincial highways penetrate the Perimeter Highway, as Highway 75 actually continues until the intersection with Bison Drive (which leads to the Fort Garry campus of the University of Manitoba.

Manitoba Provincial Highway 2 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 3 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 6 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Northern Region of Manitoba is situated on the Canadian Shield, and includes Manitobas Hudson Bay coastline. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 7 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 8 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Winnipeg City Route 180 (locally known as McPhillips St. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 9 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 15 is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Manitoba Provincial Highway 75 is a main route from Winnipeg to the U.S. border, where it connects with U.S. Highway 75 (and Interstate 29). ... Interstate 29 (abbreviated I-29) is an interstate highway in the Midwestern United States. ... U.S. Highway 75 is a north-south United States highway. ... The University of Manitoba (established in 1877) is one of four universities in Winnipeg, Manitoba and was the first university ever established in Western Canada. ...

Winnipeg International Airport

Winnipeg is currently served by Winnipeg International Airport (YWG)[9]. It is the only international airport between Toronto and Calgary capable of handling large freighter aircraft. From 1937 to 1949, the airport was the headquarters and site of the national maintenance base of Air Canada. It is one of only a few 24 hour airports in Canada and serves nearly three million passengers (2004). The city is slated to receive a new airport terminal in early 2008 that will replace the existing terminal which was constructed in the early 1960s. Winnipeg International Airport (IATA: YWG, ICAO: CYWG) is an airport in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... Air Canada Boeing 767-300 (C-GGFJ). ...


Railways

Union Station Winnipeg
Union Station Winnipeg

Winnipeg is served by VIA Rail, Canadian National Railways (CN), Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) and Burlington Northern Santa Fe Manitoba. It is the only city between Vancouver and Thunder Bay, Ontario with direct U.S. connections. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1484x1077, 292 KB) Summary This is a photo of Union Station, Winnipeg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1484x1077, 292 KB) Summary This is a photo of Union Station, Winnipeg. ... VIA Rail Canada (also referred to as VIA Rail and VIA; pronounced vee-ah) is an independent Crown corporation offering intercity passenger rail services in Canada. ... CN redirects here, as its the most common usage of the abbreviation in Canada; for more uses, see CN (disambiguation). ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... This railway began as the Midland Railway of Manitoba incorporated in 1903 and it built various lines around Winnipeg. ... Vancouver (pronounced ) is a Canadian city in the province of British Columbia. ... Thunder Bay (, time zone EST) is a city in and the seat of Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada. ...


CN and CP operate large railyards, customer service operations and intermodal facilties inside Winnipeg.


There are approximately 5,000 people employed in Winnipeg in the rail transportation industry.


VIA Rail operates out of Union Station, a grand neoclassical structure near The Forks in downtown Winnipeg. The station was built by the Canadian Northern Railway & National Transcontinental/Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and was designed by the same architects responsible for Grand Central Terminal in New York City. VIA Rail Canada (also referred to as VIA Rail and VIA; pronounced vee-ah) is an independent Crown corporation offering intercity passenger rail services in Canada. ... Union Station Winnipeg VIA Rail operates out of Union Station, a grand neoclassical structure near The Forks in downtown Winnipeg. ... Link title The Forks market The Forks is a historic site and meeting place in downtown Winnipeg located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River. ... The Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) is a historic Canadian railway. ... National Transcontinental Railway logo or herald The National Transcontinental Railway (NTR) was a historic Canadian railway. ... Grand Trunk Pacific Railway logo or herald The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) was a historical Canadian railway. ... The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station) is a train station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Big Apple Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ...


In addition to the major commercial railways, the City of Winnipeg owns and operates the Greater Winnipeg Water District Railway, which runs parallel to the city aqueduct to Shoal Lake. The Greater Winnipeg Water District Railway is a 102-mile long industrial railway from Winnipeg, Manitoba to Shoal Lake near Manitobas eastern boundary. ... Pont du Gard, France, a Roman aqueduct built circa 19 BC. It is one of Frances top tourist attractions and a World Heritage Site. ... Shoal Lake is a lake in extreme west of Ontario, Canada, northwest of Lake of the Woods. ...


Bus terminal

The Winnipeg Bus Terminal is located in downtown Winnipeg across from the University of Winnipeg. The companies operating out of the terminal are: The Winnipeg Bus Terminal is located in downtown Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada across from the University of Winnipeg. ...

Calgary-based Greyhound Canada is a subsidiary of Naperville, Illinois-based Laidlaw International, Incorporated (formerly Laidlaw, Inc. ...

Winnipeg Transit

Main article: Winnipeg Transit

The public transit needs of Winnipeg are primarily met through Winnipeg Transit's regularly scheduled bus service[10]. Primary bus routes run from 5:30 a.m. until just before 2:00 a.m. Monday to Saturday, and until just after midnight on Sunday. Winnipeg Transit is the public transit agency in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Winnipeg Transit is the public transit agency in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...


There are currently 68 fixed routes throughout the city. There are three types of routes:

  • Main line routes provide service from suburban neighbourhoods to downtown, observing all bus stops, and normally operate seven days a week. Some routes operate as crosstown routes, which means buses operate from one suburban area to another, in most cases passing through the downtown area.
  • Express routes operate mainly during rush hour from suburban neighbourhoods, observing a limited number of bus stops to downtown.
  • Suburban feeders generally provide service in suburban areas where ridership demand is lower.

Crime

In 2004, Winnipeg had the fourth highest overall crime rate among Canadian Census Metropolitan Area cities listed with 10,879 Criminal Code of Canada offences per 100,000 population. Only Regina, Saskatoon, and Abbotsford had higher crime rates. Winnipeg had the highest rate among centres with populations greater than 500,000[11]. The crime rate was 50% higher than that of Calgary and more than double the rate for Toronto. A census metropolitan area, or CMA is a Canadian census subdivision comprising a large urban area (known as the urban core) and adjacent areas (known as urban and rural fringes) that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core. ... The Canadian Criminal Code (formal title An Act respecting the Criminal Law) is the codification of most of the criminal offenses and procedure in Canada. ... Regina may. ... Saskatoon nickname: The Bridge City, The Hub City Broadway Bridge in Saskatoon Area  - Total Metro. ... Abbotsford may refer to: Abbotsford, a city in British Columbia, Canada Abbotsford, an electoral district surrounding the Canadian city Abbotsford, a city in Wisconsin, USA Abbotsford, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia Abbotsford, a suburb of Dunedin, New Zealand Abbotsford House, home of Scottish novelist Sir Walter Scott This is a... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ...


Winnipeg crime is associated with the distribution of factors related to the population and land-uses of the city. In particular, crime in Winnipeg is concentrated in the City Centre and parts of the North End, West End, and Elmwood, representing a relatively small proportion of the total geographic area of the city. High-crime neighbourhoods were characterized by reduced access to socio-economic resources, decreased residential stability, increased population density and land-use patterns that may increase opportunity for crime. The level of socio-economic disadvantage of the residential population in a neighbourhood was most strongly associated with the highest neighbourhood rates of both violent and property crime.

Source: Statistics Canada[12]

Politics

Starting in 1900, in both provincial and federal elections, central Winnipeg elected politicians from the Labour Party. Winnipeg was the site of a general strike from May 15 to June 28, 1919. There were violent protests during this strikes, several deaths at the hands of the Royal North-West Mounted Police, and the arrest of many of Winnipeg's future politicians. Though it was not chartered until 1932, the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation was born not only out of the depression but also out of the labour unrest of 1919. Its successor, the New Democratic Party, has enjoyed much support in Winnipeg since the early 1960s. Winnipeg's longest-serving Members of Parliament include J.S. Woodsworth (21 years), Stanley Knowles (38 years), David Orlikow (25 years), Bill Blaikie (almost 27 years and re-elected in the 2006 federal election), and Lloyd Axworthy (21 years). There have been various groups in Canada that have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. ... Crowd gathered outside old City Hall during the Winnipeg General Strike, June 21, 1919 The Winnipeg General Strike was Canadas most influential labour action. ... The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP or Mounties; French, Gendarmerie royale du Canada, GRC) is both the federal police force and the national police of Canada. ... The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups, and the League for Social Reconstruction. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP) (Nouveau Parti D̩mocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a social democratic philosophy and moderate democratic socialist tendencies that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... J.S. Woodsworth James Shaver Woodsworth (July 29, 1874 РMarch 21, 1942) was a pioneer in the Canadian social democratic movement. ... Stanley Howard Knowles, PC , OC , BA , BD , LL.D (June 18, 1908 - June 9, 1997) was a Canadian parliamentarian. ... David Orlikow (born April 20, 1918 in Winnipeg, Manitoba; died January 19, 1998) was a Canadian politician, and a long-serving member of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Honourable Rev. ... The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Honourable Lloyd Norman Axworthy, PC , OC , OM, Ph. ...


Winnipeg is represented in the Canadian House of Commons by eight Members of Parliament. As of 2006, three are from the Conservative Party of Canada, three are from the New Democratic Party, and two are from the Liberal Party of Canada. 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP) (Nouveau Parti Démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a social democratic philosophy and moderate democratic socialist tendencies that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ...


On June 22, 2004, businessman Sam Katz was elected mayor of Winnipeg, receiving 42.51% of the vote. June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Samuel (Sam) Michael Katz, OM , BA (born Rehovot, Israel, 1951) is the 42nd mayor of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...


Aside from being the provincial capital of Manitoba, Winnipeg has served as the capital for two other Canadian territories: the Northwest Territories from 1870 to 1876 and the District of Keewatin from 1876 to 1905. Motto: None Official languages Dene Suline, Cree, Dogrib, English, French, Gwichʼin, Inuktitut, Slavey Flower Mountain avens Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Commissioner Tony Whitford Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government - no party affiliations) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 1 1 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 3rd 1... The District of Keewatin was a distinct entity from Keewatin Region, Northwest Territories, although much of their territory overlapped. ...


See also: List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba: 1874 Francis Evans Cornish, Q. C. 1875–76 William Nassau Kennedy 1877–78 Thomas Scott 1879–80 Alexander Logan 1881 Elias George Conklin 1882 Alexander Logan 1883 Alexander McMicken 1884 Alexander Logan 1885 Charles Edward Hamilton 1886 Henry Shaver Wesbrook 1887–88 Lyman Melvin...


Sports

Winnipeg is and has historically been home to numerous professional sports franchises, some of which survive today. The Winnipeg Jets were one of the original teams of the World Hockey Association and won three league titles. The Jets entered the National Hockey League in 1979 and played in Winnipeg until 1996. The Jets featured such Hall of Famers as WHA coach Rudy Pilous and players Bobby Hull, Dale Hawerchuk, and (briefly) Serge Savard, as well as potential Hall of Famers Teemu Selänne, Phil Housley, Keith Tkachuk, and Nikolai Khabibulin. In 1996, the team was sold to an ownership group based in Phoenix, Arizona, and it was moved there to become the Phoenix Coyotes. There is considerable optimism that the city may once again host an NHL franchise. The city has been mentioned as a possible future home for the Pittsburgh Penguins. Support for the minor league AHL Manitoba Moose has been good (among the top 5 AHL teams in average attendance) and the city has often been proclaimed as the flagship franchise of the AHL. The Winnipeg Jets were an ice hockey franchise that existed in both the World Hockey Association and the National Hockey League. ... World Hockey Association logo The World Hockey Association (French: Association Mondiale de Hockey) was a professional ice hockey league that operated in North America from 1972 to 1979. ... The modernized NHL shield logo debuted in 2005, replacing the orange and black shield, which had been used since the leagues inception. ... Rudy Pilous (August 11, 1914 - December, 1994) was a Canadian National Hockey League coach. ... Robert Marvin Hull, born January 3, 1939 in Pointe Anne (near Belleville), Ontario, Canada, is regarded as one of the greatest ice hockey players and perhaps the greatest left winger to ever play the game. ... Dale Hawerchuk (born April 4, 1963 in Toronto) is a retired professional ice hockey player. ... Serge Savard, OC (born January 22, 1946 in Montreal, Quebec) is a former star ice hockey player with the Montreal Canadiens in the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Teemu Ilmari Selänne (born July 3, 1970 in Helsinki, Finland), is a professional Finnish ice hockey right winger. ... Phil Housley (born March 9, 1964 in South St. ... Keith Tkachuk (born March 28, 1972, in Melrose, Massachusetts) is a professional ice hockey player in the National Hockey League. ... Nikolai Ivanovich Khabibulin (Russian Николай Иванович Хабибулин; born January 13, 1973 in Sverdlovsk, USSR, now Yekaterinburg, Russia), nicknamed the Bulin Wall, is a goaltender for the Chicago Blackhawks. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Valley of the Sun Location Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Arizona Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,230. ... The Phoenix Coyotes are a professional ice hockey team based in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...


Since 1996, Winnipeg has been home to the minor-league Manitoba Moose, currently a member of the American Hockey League. The Moose are the farm team to the NHL's Vancouver Canucks. Winnipeg has produced Hall of Fame hockey players Andy Bathgate, Bill Mosienko, Art Coulter, Ching Johnson, Frank Fredrickson, Jack Ruttan and Terry Sawchuk. The Manitoba Moose are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is regarded as the top professional hockey league in North America outside the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Vancouver Canucks are a professional National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Andy Bathgate Andrew James Bathgate, (Born - August 28, 1932 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) is a retired Canadian Professional Hockey Centerman who played 17 seasons in the National Hockey League for the New York Rangers, Toronto Maple Leafs, Detroit Red Wings and Pittsburgh Penguins. ... William Mosienko (Born - November 2, 1921 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) was a Canadian hockey Right Linger who played 14 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Chicago Blackhawks. ... Art Coulter (May 31, 1909 in Winnipeg, Manitoba - October 14, 2000 was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenseman who played for the New York Rangers and Chicago Blackhawks in the National Hockey League. ... Ching Johnson (December 9, 1898 in Winnipeg, Manitoba - June 16, 1979 was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenseman who played for the New York Rangers and New York Americans in the National Hockey League. ... Frank Fredrickson (June 11, 1885 in Winnipeg - May 28, 1979 was a Canadian professional ice hockey forward who played for the Victoria Cougars of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association and Boston Bruins, Pittsburgh Pirates and Detroit Falcons in the National Hockey League. ... Jack Ruttan (April 5, 1889 in Winnipeg, Manitoba - January 7, 1973) was a Canadian amateur ice hockey forward who played for the Winnipeg Hockey Club. ... Terry Sawchuk in 1964 Terrance Gordon Sawchuk (Born - December 28, 1929 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada – Died May 31, 1970 in New York, NY, USA) was a Canadian Professional Hockkey Goaltender who played 21 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Detroit Red Wings, Boston Bruins, Toronto Maple Leafs, Los...


Winnipeg also has a team in the Canadian Football League, the Blue Bombers, who have won 10 Grey Cups, the league's championship trophy. Winnipeg has a long history of minor-league baseball, including the Winnipeg Maroons of the Northern League, which existed from 1902-1942; the Class A Winnipeg Goldeyes, an affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals, from 1953-1964; the AAA Whips, the Montreal Expos farm team in 1970-1971; and, since 1994, the Goldeyes, a franchise in the independent Class AA-quality Northern League. Winnipeg hosted the 1967 Pan American Games and 1999 Pan American Games. In addition, the University of Winnipeg's women's basketball team won 88 consecutive games during the 1990s, tying a college sports record. Winnipeg is also home to many of the world's best curling teams and hosted the 2003 World Championships. The Canadian Football League (CFL), also known by its French name, Ligue canadienne de football (LCF), is a professional league located entirely in Canada that plays Canadian football. ... The Winnipeg Blue Bombers is a Canadian Football League team based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... The Winnipeg Maroons were a minor League Baseball team based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada that played in the Northern League from 1902-1942. ... Northern League can mean: Northern League (baseball) for minor league baseball in the United States and Canada Northern League (football) (Albany Northern League) for the association football league in North East England Northern League (ice hockey) which existed in the late 1970s and early 1980s in Britain. ... The Winnipeg Goldeyes have been two separate and distinct baseball teams based out of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada playing in the independent Northern League. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892-present) Central Division (1994-present) Eastern Division (1969-1993) American Association (1882-1891) National League (1876-1877) National Association (1875) Major league titles World Series titles (9) 1982 â€¢1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934 â€¢ 1931 1926 NL Pennants (16) 2004 â€¢ 1987 â€¢ 1985 â€¢ 1982 1968... Les Expos de Montréal (The Montreal Expos) were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from 1969 to 2004. ... The 5th Pan American Games were held in Winnipeg, Canada. ... The 13th Pan American Games were held in Winnipeg, Canada for the 2nd time. ... The University of Winnipeg received its charter in 1967 but its roots date back more than 130 years. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ...


Other notable sports figures include six time Olympic speedskating medalist and most decorated Canadian Olympian Cindy Klassen and Olympic Taekwondo athlete and bronze-medalist Dominique Bosshart, Milwaukee Brewers third-baseman Corey Koskie, Canadian Olympic Women's Hockey Gold Medalist Jennifer Botterill, Philadelphia 76ers centre Todd MacCulloch, and World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Superstar Chris Jericho. It also hosts some great up in-comers in the basketball world. Such as Stu Moffat, Adam Reese, Josh Czech, Jordan Berger and Kyle Armstrong. For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... Gaetan Boucher training for the 1976 Olympics Speed skating (as well Speedskating) is a form of ice skating in which the competitors attempt to travel a certain distance over the ice as quickly as possible. ... Cindy Klassen (born August 12, 1979 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Canadian skater and Canadas all-time most decorated Olympian. ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... Taekwondo (also spelled Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-Do, or Taegwondo) is the most popular of the Korean martial arts and is the Korean national sport. ... Dominique Bosshart is a Canadian taekwondo athlete. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998-present) Central Division (1998-present) Current uniform Ballpark Miller Park (2001-present) Major league titles World Series titles (0) None NL Pennants (0) None AL Pennants (1) 1982 Central Division titles (0) None AL East Division Champs (1) [1] 1982 Wild card berths (0... Cordel Leonard Corey Koskie (born June 28, 1973 in Anola, Manitoba, Canada) is a Major League Baseball player currently with the Milwaukee Brewers. ... Jennifer Botterill (born May 1, 1979 in Winnepeg, Manitoba) is a womens ice hockey player. ... The Philadelphia 76ers (also known as the Sixers for short) are a professional basketball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Bill Russell (left) and Wilt Chamberlain (right) were two of the greatest centers ever. ... Todd Carlyle MacCulloch (born January 27, 1976 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. A Winnipeg, Manitoba native, the 70, 280 lb. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Christopher Keith Irvine (born on November 9, 1970 in Manhasset, New York), better known by his stage name Chris Jericho, is a Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician and (currently inactive) professional wrestler. ...


Current professional franchises

Club League Venue Established Championships
Winnipeg Blue Bombers Canadian Football League Canad Inns Stadium 1930 10
Manitoba Moose American Hockey League MTS Centre 1996 0
Winnipeg Goldeyes The Northern League CanWest Global Park 1994 1

Winnipeg will be hosting the 94th Grey Cup in November 2006. The Winnipeg Blue Bombers is a Canadian Football League team based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Canadian Football League (CFL), also known by its French name, Ligue canadienne de football (LCF), is a professional league located entirely in Canada that plays Canadian football. ... Canad Inns Stadium (formerly Winnipeg Stadium) is a Canadian football stadium located in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Manitoba Moose are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is regarded as the top professional hockey league in North America outside the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The MTS Centre is an indoor arena at 300 Portage Avenue in downtown Winnipeg, Manitoba, at the former Eatons site. ... The Winnipeg Goldeyes have been two separate and distinct baseball teams based out of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada playing in the independent Northern League. ... Northern League can mean: Northern League (baseball) for minor league baseball in the United States and Canada Northern League (football) (Albany Northern League) for the association football league in North East England Northern League (ice hockey) which existed in the late 1970s and early 1980s in the United Kingdom. ... Canwest Global Park is the home of the Winnipeg Goldeyes Northern League baseball team in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ...


Arts and culture

See also: List of Winnipeg Musicians
See also: List of TV and Films shot in Winnipeg
This unique side spar bridge, the Esplanade Riel, is solely for pedestrian traffic, with a restaurant provided in the spar's base
This unique side spar bridge, the Esplanade Riel, is solely for pedestrian traffic, with a restaurant provided in the spar's base

Winnipeg is well known for its arts and culture. Among the popular cultural institutions in the city are: the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, the Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG), the Manitoba Opera, the Manitoba Museum (formerly the Museum of Man and Nature), the Manitoba Theatre Centre, the Prairie Theatre Exchange, and the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra. The city is home to several large festivals. The Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival is North America's second largest Fringe Festival, held every July. Other festivals include Folklorama, the Jazz Winnipeg Festival, the Winnipeg Folk Festival, the Winnipeg Music Festival, the Red River Exhibition, and Le Festival du Voyageur. This is a selection of singer/songwriters, musicians and bands from the Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... There has been a wide range of films and TV series that have been shot in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (696x928, 765 KB) Summary Self made Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (696x928, 765 KB) Summary Self made Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A side-spar cable-stayed bridge is an otherwise conventional cable-stayed bridge but its cable support does not span the roadway, rather being cantilevered from one side. ... The Royal Winnipeg Ballet, based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is Canadas oldest ballet company and the longest continuously operating ballet company in North America. ... The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) is a public art gallery that been Involving People in the Visual Arts since 1912. ... Manitoba Opera is an opera company in Winnipeg, Manitoba that was founded in 1969. ... The Manitoba Museum, previously the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature is the largest museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Manitoba Theatre Centre (MTC) is Canadas older English-language regional theatre. ... The Prairie Theatre Exchange is a professional theatre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra performs in the Centennial Concert Hall in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and throughout the province of Manitoba. ... The Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival is an annual alternative theater festival held in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Folklorama is an event that runs for two weeks each August in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Folkorama, the longest running multi-cultural event in the world, allows guests to sample exquisite cuisine and celebrate the culture and ethnic heritage of people from more than 60 countries who have made Winnipeg their... Winnipeg Jazz Festival is a jazz festival in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Winnipeg Folk Festival is a summer music festival held in Birds Hill Provincial Park outside of the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Winnipeg Music Festival or Winnipeg Music Competition Festival Inc (Manitoba Music Competition Festival 1919-83) as it is formally known as was founded in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in 1919 by the Mens Musical Club (Mens Music Club). ... Every summer, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, hosts the Red River Exhibition at the Assiniboia Downs Race Tracks. ... The Festival du Voyageur (literally translated as Festival of the Traveller) is an annual 10-day winter festival which takes place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada during February. ...


Winnipeg also has a thriving film community, producing local independent films, such as those by Guy Maddin. It has also supported a number of Hollywood productions, including Shall We Dance (2004), the Oscar nominated film Capote (2005), and The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2006). Several locally-produced and national television dramas have also been shot in Winnipeg. The National Film Board of Canada and the Winnipeg Film Group have produced numerous award-winning films. Guy Maddin (born February 28, 1956) is a Winnipeg writer and director of both features and short films. ... ... Shall We Dance? is an American motion picture released in 2004. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent film awards in the United States and most watched awards ceremony in the world. ... Capote is an Academy Award-winning 2005 biographical film about Truman Capote (played by Philip Seymour Hoffman who won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal) on a writing assignment for The New Yorker. ... The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is an upcoming film directed by Andrew Dominik. ... The National Film Board of Canada (usually National Film Board or NFB) is a Canadian public filmmaking organization established to produce and distribute films that inform Canadians and promote Canada around the world. ... The Winnipeg Film Group is a film cooperative that was founded in 1974 by a group of Winnipeggers committed to making, distributing, and exhibiting their own films. ...


There are several TV and Film production companies in Winnipeg. Some of the prominent ones are Frantic Films, Buffalo Gal Pictures, Les Productions Rivard and Eagle Vision. Frantic Films is an award-winning live action and special effects production company based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Buffalo Gal Pictures is an independent TV and film production company based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Les Productions Rivard is an independent film and television production company based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Eagle Vision is an independent film and TV production company based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...


Winnipeg has a community college, Red River College. Winnipeg's four universities are the University of Manitoba (undergraduate, graduate school, and medical school), Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface affiliated with University of Manitoba, the University of Winnipeg (undergraduate and select graduate programs) and Canadian Mennonite University (private). Winnipeg is also home to several prestigious private schools, including St. John's Ravenscourt School, St. Paul's High School, St. Mary's Academy, Mennonite Brethren Collegiate Institute and Balmoral Hall. Red River College (RRC) is the largest and most comprehensive institute of applied learning in Manitoba. ... The University of Manitoba (established in 1877) is one of four universities in Winnipeg, Manitoba and was the first university ever established in Western Canada. ... Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface The Collège Universitaire de Saint-Boniface, or CUSB, is a university college affiliated with the University of Manitoba and located in Saint Boniface, Manitoba. ... The University of Winnipeg received its charter in 1967 but its roots date back more than 130 years. ... Canadian Mennonite University is a private Mennonite university located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... St. ... St. ... St. ... The Mennonite Brethren Collegiate Institute is a private Mennonite Christian school located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...


Winnipeg is also known for its various music acts. Among the most notable are Neil Young, The Guess Who, Bachman-Turner Overdrive Chantal Kreviazuk, Bif Naked, The Waking Eyes, the New Meanies, Propagandhi, The Weakerthans, Crash Test Dummies, and many more. Neil Percival Kenneth Robert Ragland Young (born November 12, 1945) is a singer/songwriter, who grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba, whose work is characterized by deeply personal lyrics, distinctive guitar work, and an almost instantly recognizable nasal tenor voice. ... The Guess Who is a Canadian rock music band from Winnipeg, Manitoba that was one of the first to establish a major successful following in their own country as well as abroad in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Bachman-Turner Overdrive Bachman-Turner Overdrive (BTO) is a Canadian rock group from Winnipeg, Manitoba that enjoyed a string of hit albums and singles in the 1970s. ... Chantal Kreviazuk is a Canadian singer-songwriter of rock and pop music. ... Bif Naked on the cover of her latest album Bif Naked (born Beth Torbert on June 17, 1971) is a popular Canadian punk rock singer. ... Joey Penner, Matt Peters, Rusty Matyas, Steve Senkiw The Waking Eyes is a rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Origin of the Band The New Meanies, originally called the Blue Meanies, are a 4 piece rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba who formed around 1990. ... John K. Samson performing in Montreal, 2004 The Weakerthans are a Canadian indie rock band, whose blend of punk-inflected folk rock with literate, witty, introspective lyrics have made them one of the most popular bands in the current Canadian music scene. ... For the mannequins, see Crash test dummy. ...


Winnipeg has also achieved some acclaim for being the "Slurpee capital of the world", as its residents have a year-round penchant for the icy slush served in convenience stores.

Museums

Festivals The Aquatic Hall of Fame and Museum of Canada is located in the Pan Am Pool in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Dalnavert is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in the restored home of Sir Hugh John Macdonald, former Premier of Manitoba and son of Sir John A. Macdonald. ... The Fire Fighters Museum is a museum devoted to fire fighter heritage in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Fort Garry Historical Society is a non-profit organization formed in 1971 to foster the preservation of heritage sites in St. ... Fort Garry Horse Museum & Archives Inc. ... Gallery 1C03 is a non-profit public gallery at the University of Winnipeg in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Gallery One One One and FitzGerald Study Centre is an art gallery at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Ivan Franko Museum is a museum dedicated to Ukrainian author and poet Ivan Franko in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Jewish Heritage Centre hosts the The Marion and Ed Vickar Jewish Museum of Western Canada in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... La Maison Gabrielle Roy or The House of Gabrielle Roy is museum in the home of writer Gabrielle Roy. ... Le Musee de Saint-Boniface Museum is a musuem in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada that is dedicated to the Franophone experience in Manitoba. ... The Living Prairie Museum is a 12 hectare (30acre) tall grass prairie preserve located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Manitoba Childrens Museum is a childrens museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Manitoba Crafts Museum and Library is museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada dedicated to the preservation of handcrafts. ... Manitoba Electrical Museum is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada dedicated to the electrical history of Manitoba. ... The Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada dedicated to the history of sport in Manitoba and honoring the best in sport. ... The Naval Museum of Manitoba is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada dedicated to the Royal Canadian Navy and its influence on Manitoba. ... The Ogniwo Polish Museum Society is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Assiniboine Park. ... The Royal Canadian Mint produces all of Canadas circulation coins, and manufactures circulation coins on behalf of other nations. ... The Manitoba Museum, previously the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature is the largest museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) is a public art gallery that been Involving People in the Visual Arts since 1912. ...

Other music groups include The Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, GroundSwell (a new music group), the Camarata Nova Choir specializing in Renaissance music,and the Winnipeg Singers, one of Canada's finest semi-professional choirs. The Festival du Voyageur (Festival of the Traveller) is an annual 10-day winter festival which takes place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Folklorama is an event that runs for two weeks each August in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Folkorama, the longest running multi-cultural event in the world, allows guests to sample exquisite cuisine and celebrate the culture and ethnic heritage of people from more than 60 countries who have made Winnipeg their... Winnipeg Jazz Festival is a jazz festival in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The NSI Film Exchange Canadian Film Festival is a film festival dedicated to showcasing and celebrating Canadian film achievement. ... The Winnipeg Comedy Festival is an annual comedy festival in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Winnipeg Folk Festival is a summer music festival held in Birds Hill Provincial Park outside of the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival is an annual alternative theater festival held in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Winnipeg International Childrens Festival is a childrens festival in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Winnipeg Friendship Festival is a family festival featuring cartoon chracters has it main attraction. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: nn If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ...



Theatre companies

Celebrations Dinner Theatre is a theatre located in the Canad Inns Hotel in south Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Winnipeg Jewish Theatre is a theatre based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Le Cercle Molière is the oldest theatre in Canada. ... Manitoba Theatre Centre (MTC) is Canadas older English-language regional theatre. ... Manitoba Theatre for Young People is a theatre for children and young adults in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Prairie Theatre Exchange is a professional theatre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Rainbow Stage is Canadas longest-surviving outdoor theatre, located in the natural setting of Kildonan Park in north Winnipeg,Manitoba It opened 7 Jul 1954 presenting operettas and musicals using local performers. ... Shakespeare in the Ruins is a theatre company in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Crumbs Improv is trio of performers that does improvisationsal theatre. ... The Black Hole Theatre Company is the theatre company of the University of Manitoba theatre department. ...

Architecture

See also List of Winnipeg's 10 tallest buildings
St Boniface Cathedral, Winnipeg, Manitoba
St Boniface Cathedral, Winnipeg, Manitoba

The Exchange District Historical site is the original site of commerce in Winnipeg. After the railroads came to Winnipeg, this area was developed with many fine warehouses, offices and banks. Many of these buildings are still standing and are unrivalled in Canada. This is a list of the 10 tallest buildings in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Download high resolution version (1024x1365, 255 KB)St Boniface Cathedral, in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Download high resolution version (1024x1365, 255 KB)St Boniface Cathedral, in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ...


On September 27, 1997, the original core of the city of Winnipeg, the Exchange District, was declared a National Historic Site by the federal Minister of Canadian Heritage. The Historic Sites and Monuments board recommended that Winnipeg's Exchange District be designated an historic district of national significance because it illustrates the city's key role as a centre of grain and wholesale trade, finance and manufacturing in two historically important periods in western development: between 1880 and 1900 when Winnipeg became the gateway to Canada's West; and between 1900 and 1913, when the city's growth made it the region's metropolis. September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 95 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Historic Site is a designation for a protected area of historic significance. ...


Winnipeg’s famous North End has spawned a variety of talented writers, artists and entertainers ranging from Let’s Make A Deal’s Monty Hall to The Guess Who’s Burton Cummings. The commercial main street of this neighbourhood, Selkirk Avenue, first saw development in the 1870s and its importance grew with a wave of immigration from Eastern Europe. The old country flavour of the neighbourhood still exists with a variety of boutiques, bakeries and butcher shops. This vibrant area also boasts 49 painted murals, each depicting a different multicultural and historical scene.

See also: Archiseek: Winnipeg[13]

Local media

See also List of media outlets in Winnipeg, Manitoba

The following is a list of media in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ...

Print

Daily newspapers

Ethnic media The Winnipeg Free Press is the primary daily newspaper of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Winnipeg Sun is a daily tabloid-sized newspaper in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...

  • The Jewish Post
  • The Filipino Journal
  • Ang Peryodiko
  • The Philippine Times
  • The Philippine Press
  • La Liberté
  • O Mundial: the Portuguese newspaper

Weekly newspapers The Jewish Post of Winnipeg, Canada, was Western Canadas first Anglo-Jewish newspaper, so named because its language was English though its concerns were those of the Jewish community. ... La Liberté or Freedom is a Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada newspaper founded in 1913 by Archbishop Langevin of Saint-Boniface. ...

  • Uptown - found at various downtown locations

Magazines Uptown is an alternative weekly arts and entertainment newspaper in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...

  • Canadian Dimension
  • Winnipeg Women
  • Winnipeg Men
  • Ciao! Magazine
  • WHERE Winnipeg
See also: Magazines of Winnipeg[14]

Websites

  • WinnipegWeb
  • Winnipeg Online
  • My Winnipeg
  • Winnipeg Indymedia
  • Winnipeg Movies
  • City of Winnipeg
  • New Winnipeg
  • Winnipeg Guide
  • WHERE Winnipeg
  • Winnipeg Rant
  • Destination Winnipeg (DW)

Television stations

There are six English speaking stations and one French speaking station based in Winnipeg that supply free programming to the city. Most homes subscribe to cable through Shaw Communications, or digital television through MTS digital. There are also two satellite services available through StarChoice and Bell ExpressVu. Some homes use grey market satellite dishes to bring in signals from American satellite services. Shaw Communications Inc. ... Manitoba Telecom Services TSX: MBT, or MTS, (formerly Manitoba Telephone System) is the primary telecommunications carrier in the Canadian province of Manitoba and the third largest telecommunications provider in Canada with 7000 employees. ... StarChoice is Canadas second direct broadcast satellite television distributor (the other being Bell ExpressVu), and is majority-owned by cable TV operator Shaw Communications Inc. ... Bell ExpressVu is the division of Bell Canada that sells digital television services in Canada. ... The grey market (or gray market) refers to the flow of goods through distribution channels other than those authorized or intended by the manufacturer or producer. ...


Additionally, American network affiliates broadcasting from North Dakota are available over-the-air in many parts of Winnipeg and Southern Manitoba. Until the mid-1980s, KXJB and KVLY (then known as KTHI) were available on Winnipeg's cable service. These channels were replaced by WDIV and WJBK from Detroit, and then by WCCO and KARE from Minneapolis. KXJB is a television station based in Fargo, North Dakota owned by Catamount Broadcasting. ... KVLY channel 11 (44 digital) is the NBC television affiliate based in Fargo, North Dakota that serves much of eastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. ... KTHI (107. ... WDIV (Local 4) is the NBC television station based in Detroit, Michigan. ... WJBK (FOX2) is the Fox-owned and operated television station in Detroit, Michigan. ... WCCO is a set of radio and television stations with a storied history spanning more than 80 years that serves the Minneapolis-St. ... KARE (or commonly KARE-11) is a broadcast television station serving the Twin Cities market of Minnesota and western Wisconsin in the United States, with studios located in the suburb of Golden Valley. ...

Channel Cable Channel Call Sign Network Other Notes
2 3 KGFE PBS/Prairie Public Television Grand Forks, ND, United States
3 10 CBWFT SRC Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
4 N/A KXJB CBS Fargo, ND, United States
5 N/A CKX CBC Brandon, Manitoba, Canada
6 2 CBWT CBC Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
7 5 CKY CTV Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
8 7 WDAZ ABC Grand Forks, ND, United States
9 12 CKND Global Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
11 N/A KVLY NBC Fargo, ND, United States
12 N/A KNRR Fox Pembina, ND, United States
13 8 CHMI Citytv Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
35 11 CIIT OMNI Television Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
44 N/A CICO TVO Kenora, Ontario, Canada

Locally based national cable television channels Prairie Public Television is a public television network primarily serving the U.S. state of North Dakota, but also reaching neighboring states of Minnesota, Montana, South Dakota and Canadian provinces. ... PBS re-directs here; for alternate uses see PBS (disambiguation) PBS logo The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is a non-profit public broadcasting television service with 349 member TV stations in the United States. ... Prairie Public Television is a public television network primarily serving the U.S. state of North Dakota, but also reaching neighboring states of Minnesota, Montana, South Dakota and Canadian provinces. ... Motto: A Place of Excellence Nickname: The Sunflake City Map Political Statistics Founded 15 June 1870 Incorporated February 22, 1881 County Grand Forks County Mayor Michael Brown Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 49. ... CBWFT is the Societé Radio-Canada station serving franco-manitobans in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the countrys national radio and television broadcaster. ... KXJB is a television station based in Fargo, North Dakota owned by Catamount Broadcasting. ... CBS (formerly an acronym for Columbia Broadcasting System, the former legal name of the network) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... CKX is the callsign of two broadcast stations in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada: CKX-FM CKX-TV CKX is an entertainment company, headed by SFX founder Robert Sillerman, which owns the American Idol company 19 Entertainment and Elvis Presley Enterprises: CKX, Inc. ... Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Cipher-block chaining ... CBWT is a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television station in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the countrys national radio and television broadcaster. ... CKY-TV (also commonly known as CTV Winnipeg) is a television station based in Winnipeg, Manitoba and owned by Bell Globemedia. ... CTV is a TLA that may stand for: CTV Television Network - a Canadian English language television network Channel Television - the main television broadcaster in the Channel Islands Chukyo TV. Broadcasting - a Japanese TV station in Nagoya This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... WDAZ is U.S. television station based in Grand Forks, North Dakota with a transmitter near Devils Lake, North Dakota. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is a television and radio network in the United States. ... Motto: A Place of Excellence Nickname: The Sunflake City Map Political Statistics Founded 15 June 1870 Incorporated February 22, 1881 County Grand Forks County Mayor Michael Brown Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 49. ... CKND is a television station which broadcasts out of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Global Television Network (more commonly called Global) is a major English-language television network in Canada, owned by CanWest Global Communications. ... KVLY channel 11 (44 digital) is the NBC television affiliate based in Fargo, North Dakota that serves much of eastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. ... NBC, (Formerly an acronym for the National Broadcasting Company until 2004), is an American television and radio network based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Flag Location Location in North Dakota Government Country State County Region United States North Dakota Cass County Red River Valley Founded 1871 Mayor Bruce Furness Geographical characteristics Area    - City 98. ... KVRR is a Fox affiliate based in Fargo, North Dakota broadcasting on channel 15 (digital channel 19). ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... Pembina (pronounced PEM in uh, with the stress on the first syllable) is a city located in Pembina County, North Dakota. ... CHMI is a television station formerly owned by Craig Media Inc. ... Citytv is a system of five English language television stations in Canada, owned by the CHUM Limited group. ... CIIT is a Christian television station in Winnipeg, Manitoba previously owned by Trinity Television before being sold to Rogers Communications. ... OMNI Television is a Canadian television brand owned and operated by Rogers Communications. ... TVOntario, officially the Ontario Educational Communications Authority, is an educational public television broadcaster in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... TVO is an acronym with several different significations: TVOntario (Canadian TV station) Óptima Televisión (Chilean TV station) TV Osaka (Japanese TV station) Total Value of Ownership This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

All of these stations are owned by Global, except for APTN. Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, or APTN, is a Canadian television network which airs and produces programming made by, for, and about Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ... DejaView is a Canadian category 2 digital cable television channel owned by the Global Television Network. ... Lonestar also refers to a Rock Band that released a self titled album in 1976 under the UK CBS label Lonestar poses for pictures before a show Lonestar is an American country music band consisting of Richie McDonald (lead vocals) (born Richard Vance McDonald, on 6 February 1962, in Mesquite... The Western is an American genre in literature and film. ... Fox Sports World Canada is a Canadian category 2 digital cable television channel owned by CanWest Global Communications and featuring world sporting events in cricket, soccer and rugby. ... mentv is a Canadian category 1 digital cable mens interest television channel owned by CanWest Global Communications and Quebecor Media. ... CoolTV is a Canadian category 2 digital cable television channel dedicated to the jazz genre; including music videos, movies, concerts, and television series. ... For other article subjects named Jazz see jazz (disambiguation). ... Xtreme Sports is a Canadian digital cable television channel owned by CanWest Global Communications with programming presenting extreme sports and events such as the X Games. ... Mystery is a Canadian category 1 digital cable television channel which presents movies and television series of the mystery genre and suspense. ... TVTropolis is a Canadian cable television specialty channel, formerly known as Prime, which launched on June 1, 2006. ...


Radio stations

Winnipeg is home to 25 AM and FM radio stations. The most popular station for many years has been CJOB, a talk oriented station famous for its coverage of major storms and floods. After an absence of many years, Winnipeg is now home to two English and one French campus radio stations. NCI is devoted to Aboriginal programming and CKJS is to ethnic programming. CBC Radio One and CBC Radio Two broadcast local and national programming. There are several rock and pop oriented stations, one tourist information station and one country station. Two CBC stations broadcast French programming. Native Communications Inc. ... CBC Radio One is the English language news and information radio network of the publicly-owned Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... CBC Radio Two is an FM radio network in Canada, operated by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Cipher-block chaining ...


FM radio

FM radio stations
Frequency Call sign Name Format Owner City
89.9 FM CKSB -- Espace musique Société Radio-Canada Winnipeg
91.1 FM CKXL -- campus radio Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface Winnipeg
92.1 FM CITI 92 Citi FM classic rock Rogers Communications Winnipeg
92.9 FM CKIC Kick FM modern rock Red River College Winnipeg
94.3 FM CHIQ Q94 FM contemporary hit radio CHUM Winnipeg
95.1 FM CHVN -- Christian music Golden West Broadcasting Ltd Winnipeg
95.9 FM CKUW -- campus radio University of Winnipeg Winnipeg
97.5 FM CJKR Power 97 active rock Corus Entertainment Winnipeg
98.3 FM CBW CBC Radio 2 music Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Winnipeg
99.1 FM CJZZ Cool FM Jazz Canwest Global Winnipeg
99.9 FM CFWM Bob FM adult hits CHUM Winnipeg
100.7 FM CKFE -- oldies Newfoundland Capital Corporation Winnipeg
101.5 FM CJUM UMFM campus radio University of Manitoba Winnipeg
102.3 FM CKY Clear FM adult contemporary Rogers Communications Winnipeg
103.1 FM CKMM Hot 103 CHR/Top 40 Standard Radio Winnipeg
104.1 FM CFQX QX 104 Country Standard Radio Winnipeg
105.5 FM CICY NCI Country NCI Winnipeg
106.3 FM CKVN -- tourist information -- Winnipeg
107.1 FM CFEQ Freq 107 modern rock Kesitah Inc. Winnipeg
107.9 FM CJWV Flava 107.9 hip-hop/urban Eddie Blake Winnipeg

AM Radio FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity broadcast radio sound. ... CKSB is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 89. ... Espace musique is the French language musical radio service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation / Société Radio-Canada, the national public broadcaster in Canada. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, commonly known by the abbreviation CBC, is Canadas government-owned radio and television service. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface The Collège Universitaire de Saint-Boniface, or CUSB, is a university college affiliated with the University of Manitoba and located in Saint Boniface, Manitoba. ... CITI is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts classic rock at 92. ... Classic rock was originally conceived as a radio station programming format which evolved from the album oriented rock (AOR) format in the mid-1980s. ... Rogers Communications Inc. ... Red River College in Winnipeg appeared before the CRTC on February 5, 2002 to apply for a license to operate an FM radio station. ... Modern rock is term commonly used to describe a rock music format found on commercial radio stations. ... Red River College (RRC) is the largest and most comprehensive institute of applied learning in Manitoba. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Top 40 (radio format). ... Look up chum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... CHVN-FM (95. ... Christian music is music created by or adapted for the Christian church. ... CKUW 95. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... The University of Winnipeg received its charter in 1967 but its roots date back more than 130 years. ... CJKR is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 97. ... Active rock is a radio format used by many commercial radio stations in Canada and the United States. ... Corus Entertainment (TSX: CJR.NV.B) NYSE: CJR is a Canadian entertainment company, headquarted in Calgary, Alberta, which owns television networks, digital music channels and 50 radio stations across Canada. ... CBW-FM is the callsign the CBC Radio Two station in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... CBC Radio Two is a radio network in Canada, operated by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the countrys national radio and television broadcaster. ... CJZZ is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 99. ... For other article subjects named Jazz see jazz (disambiguation). ... CanWest Global Communications Corp. ... Logo CFWM is a radio station based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... Adult hits (sometimes also called variety hits) is a radio format which emerged in the early 2000s. ... Look up chum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... CKFE FM is a winnipeg radio Station Broadcasting at 100. ... Oldies is a generic term commonly used in the United States and Canada to describe a radio format that concentrates on popular Top 40 music from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. ... CJUM 101. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... The University of Manitoba (established in 1877) is one of four universities in Winnipeg, Manitoba and was the first university ever established in Western Canada. ... CKY-FM has been the callsign of two radio stations in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreciated to just AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream and pop music, without hip-hop or rap since, as per the name, it is geared more towards adults than teens. ... Rogers Communications Inc. ... CHR is a Habbo Hotel AU fansite with a online streaming radio station. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... Standard Broadcasting Corporation is a Canadian radio broadcasting company. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) In popular music, country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic music, blues, gospel music, and old-time music that began... Standard Broadcasting Corporation is a Canadian radio broadcasting company. ... Native Communications Inc. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) In popular music, country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic music, blues, gospel music, and old-time music that began... Native Communications Inc. ... CFEQ 107. ... Modern rock is term commonly used to describe a rock music format found on commercial radio stations. ... Hip hop music (also referred to as rap or rap music) is a style of popular music. ... Urban is in or having to do with cities, as distinct from rural areas. ...

AM radio stations
Frequency Call sign Name Format Owner City
680 AM CJOB The Superstation News/Talk Corus Entertainment Winnipeg
810 AM CKJS -- ethnic radio Newfoundland Capital Corporation Winnipeg
990 AM CBW CBC Radio One Public Radio Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Winnipeg
1050 AM CKSB La Première Chaîne Public Radio Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Winnipeg
CFRW AM CFRW CFRW oldies CHUM Winnipeg

Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... Talk radio is a radio format which features discussion of topical issues. ... Corus Entertainment (TSX: CJR.NV.B) NYSE: CJR is a Canadian entertainment company, headquarted in Calgary, Alberta, which owns television networks, digital music channels and 50 radio stations across Canada. ... CBW is the callsign of the CBC Radio One station in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... CBC Radio One is the English language news and information radio network of the publicly-owned Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the countrys national radio and television broadcaster. ... CKSB is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 1050 AM in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... La Première Chaîne is the news and information service of la Société Radio-Canada, the French-language public broadcaster in Canada. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the countrys national radio and television broadcaster. ... Oldies is a generic term commonly used in the United States and Canada to describe a radio format that concentrates on popular Top 40 music from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. ... Look up chum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Famous Winnipeggers

Main article: List of Winnipeggers

Born in Winnipeg This is a list of notable people, who are from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, or have spent a large part or formative part of their career in that city. ...

Raised but not born in Winnipeg Randoph Charles Bachman, OM (born September 27, 1943) was lead guitarist and songwriter of the 1970s rock band, The Guess Who, and later formed the famous hard rock band Bachman-Turner Overdrive with his brothers Robbie Bachman, drums, Tim Bachman, rhythm guitar and friend Fred Turner on bass and lead... The Guess Who is a Canadian rock music band from Winnipeg, Manitoba that was one of the first to establish a major successful following in their own country as well as abroad in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Bachman-Turner Overdrive Bachman-Turner Overdrive (BTO) is a Canadian rock group from Winnipeg, Manitoba that enjoyed a string of hit albums and singles in the 1970s. ... Tyler Brûlé (born 1968 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Canadian journalist and magazine publisher. ... Burton Cummings O.M., D.Mus(hon), (born December 31, 1947) is a Canadian musician and songwriter. ... The Guess Who is a Canadian rock music band from Winnipeg, Manitoba that was one of the first to establish a major successful following in their own country as well as abroad in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Len Cariou (born September 30, 1939 in Saint Boniface, Manitoba) is a Canadian actor. ... Deanna Durbin (born Edna Mae Durbin on December 4, 1921, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to English immigrant parents) was a popular young singer and actress in Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Terry Fox on his Marathon of Hope cross-country run. ... Monty Hall, born August 25, 1921 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, as Maurice Halprin, is a Canadian-born actor, singer and sportscaster, but is best known for being the MC of popular American television game shows. ... Lets Make a Deal is a television game show aired in the United States. ... Cindy Klassen (born August 12, 1979 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Canadian skater and Canadas all-time most decorated Olympian. ... Guy Maddin (born February 28, 1956) is a Winnipeg writer and director of both features and short films. ... Anna Helene Paquin (born July 24, 1982) is an Academy Award-winning Canadian-New Zealander actress. ... Leonard Peikoff circa 1970 Leonard Peikoff (born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1933) is an Objectivist philosopher. ... Fred Penner (born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) is a Canadian childrens entertainer who gives appearances throughout North America. ... Louis Riel Louis David Riel (October 22, 1844 – November 16, 1885), was a Canadian politician, a founder of the province of Manitoba, and leader of the Métis people of the Canadian prairies. ... Gabrielle Roy (March 22, 1909 - July 13, 1983) was a Canadian author. ... John K Samson is the lead singer of Winnipeg/Toronto based band, The Weakerthans He has been writing and performing for the past fourteen years. ... John K. Samson performing in Montreal, 2004 The Weakerthans are a Canadian indie rock band, whose blend of punk-inflected folk rock with literate, witty, introspective lyrics have made them one of the most popular bands in the current Canadian music scene. ... Propagandhi is a political punk rock/thrash band formed in Winnipeg, Canada in 1986 by Chris Hannah and Jord Samolesky. ... Sir William Samuel Stephenson, CC , MC , DFC (January 23, 1897 – January 31, 1989) was a Canadian soldier, airman, businessman, inventor, spymaster, and the senior representative of British intelligence for the entire western hemisphere during World War II. Stephenson is best-known by his wartime intelligence codename of Intrepid. ... The James Bond 007 gun logo James Bond, also known as 007 (pronounced double-oh seven), is a fictional British spy created by writer Ian Fleming in 1953. ... Fred Turner can refer to: Fred L. Turner Fred Turner (musician) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Bachman-Turner Overdrive Bachman-Turner Overdrive (BTO) is a Canadian rock group from Winnipeg, Manitoba that enjoyed a string of hit albums and singles in the 1970s. ... Antonia Eugenia Vardalos, better known as Nia Vardalos (born September 24, 1962 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), is a Canadian actress, screenwriter and producer. ... Alex Steen Alexander Steen (born March 1, 1984, in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Swedish professional ice hockey player in the National Hockey League. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Toronto Maple Leafs are a professional ice hockey team based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Venetian Snares is the performing name of Aaron Funk, an electronic music producer and performer from Winnipeg, Manitoba, in Canada. ... Aaron Funk Venetian Snares is the performing name of Aaron Funk, an electronic music producer and performer from Winnipeg, Manitoba in Canada. ... Belinda Montgomery (born on July 23, 1950 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) is a Canadian born actress who is perhaps best known as Mrs. ... David Steinberg (born August 9, 1942) is a Canadian comedian, actor, director, and writer who has appeared on Johnny Carsons Tonight Show 140 times, and directed episodes of Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Mad About You and Friends. ... Oscar Brand (born February 7, 1920, in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a folk singer and songwriter. ... Juliette Augustina Sysak Cavazzi, C.M. (born 26 August 1927, St. ... Doug Henning in his standard costume style that changed the image of stage magicians. ... James Patrick (b. ... The Hon. ...

Achieved fame while living in Winnipeg Guy Gavriel Kay (born November 7, 1954) is a Canadian author of fantasy fiction. ... Thomas Clement Douglas, PC, CC, SOM, MA, LL.D (hc) (October 20, 1904 – February 24, 1986) was a Scottish-born Baptist minister who became a prominent Canadian social democratic politician. ... Herbert Marshall McLuhan (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar, professor of English literature, literary critic, and communications theorist, who is one of the founders of the study of media ecology and is today an honorary guru among technophiles. ... Alfred Elton van Vogt (April 26, 1912 – January 26, 2000) was a Canadian-born science fiction author who was one of the most prolific, yet complex, writers of the mid-twentieth century Golden Age of the genre. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Robert (Bob) Thirsk (born August 17, 1953) is a Canadian astronaut. ... STS-78 is a Space Shuttle program mission. ... Neil Percival Kenneth Robert Ragland Young (born November 12, 1945) is a singer/songwriter, who grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba, whose work is characterized by deeply personal lyrics, distinctive guitar work, and an almost instantly recognizable nasal tenor voice. ... Lenny Breau (August 5, 1941–August 12, 1984) was a brilliantly innovative American-born Canadian jazz guitarist who brought together country, classical, flamenco and jazz guitar techniques, then merged and developed them into a unique and influential personal style. ... Christopher Keith Irvine (born on November 9, 1970 in Manhasset, New York), better known by his stage name Chris Jericho, is a Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician and (currently inactive) professional wrestler. ... Tyler Arnason (born March 19, 1979, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is an ice hockey center in the National Hockey League (NHL), playing for the Ottawa Senators. ... Roderick George Toombs (born on April 17, 1954 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan), best known by his stage name of Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler of Scottish descent. ... Brett Hull, left, with Wayne Gretzky, a short-lived Blues teammate Brett Andrew Hull (born August 9, 1964 in Belleville, Ontario) is a former NHL player, and the son of legendary player Bobby Hull. ...

Israel Harold Izzy Asper, OC , OM , QC , LL.M , Ph. ... David Bergen is a Canadian novelist from Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Carol Shields, CC , OM , D.Litt. ... Miriam Toews (born 1964 in Steinbach, Manitoba) is a Canadian novelist and humorist of Mennonite descent. ... Evelyn Anne Hart C.C. (born April 4, 1956) is a Canadian ballerina and principal dancer with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. ... Teemu Ilmari Selänne (born July 3, 1970 in Helsinki, Finland), is a professional Finnish ice hockey right winger. ... Benjamin Zimmerman (b. ...

Winnie-the-Pooh

Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too, Children's record narrated by James Stewart, c. 1940.
Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too, Children's record narrated by James Stewart, c. 1940.
  • Winnipeg Bear, the inspiration for Winnie-the-Pooh, was not actually born in Winnipeg. Instead, Winnipeg Bear was purchased in White River, Ontario, by an officer (Lieutenant Harry Colebourn) of the Fort Garry Horse cavalry regiment en route to his embarkation point for the front lines of World War I. He named the bear after the regiment's home town of Winnipeg. In 1924, on an excursion to the London Zoo with neighbour children, Christopher Robin Milne, son of author A. A. Milne, was introduced to Winnie for the first time.
  • An E.H. Shepard painting of "Winnie the Pooh" is the only known oil painting of Winnipeg’s famous bear cub. It was purchased at an auction for $285,000 in London, England late in 2000. The painting is displayed in the Pavilion Gallery in Assiniboine Park. The painting is a focal point a $6-million Poohseum in Assiniboine Park that will include a Hundred Acre Wood playground.

Image File history File links Winnie the Pooh. ... Image File history File links Winnie the Pooh. ... Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... White River (population 1000), is a township located in Ontario, Canada. ... The Fort Garry Horse badge The Fort Garry Horse is a Canadian Militia (i. ... A.A. Milne. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Assiniboine Park is a park in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...

Twinnings

This is a list of Winnipeg's sister cities and the date the agreement with each location was signed. This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Setagaya (世田谷区; -ku) is a special ward located in Tokyo, Japan. ... Tokyo ) , literally eastern capital, is one of the 47 prefectures of Japan and includes the highly urbanized central area formerly known as the city of Tokyo which is the heart of the Greater Tokyo Area. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Location Location in Iceland Government Constituency Reykjavík North Reykjavík South Geographical characteristics Area  - City 274. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Lviv (Ukrainian: Львів, L’viv ; see Cities alternative names#L for other names) is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... November 26 is the 330th day (331st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... Manila (Filipino: Maynila) is the capital of the Philippines. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Taichung (Chinese: 臺中市 or 台中市; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Tai-chung; POJ: Tâi-tiong) is a city located in west-central Taiwan with a population of just over one million people, making it the third largest city on the island, after Taipei and Kaohsiung. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Kuopio is a Finnish city located in the province of Eastern Finland and the region of Northern Savonia. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Beersheba or Beer Sheva (Hebrew באר שבע; Arabic بئر السبع Biʾr as-Sabʿ) is a city in Israel. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... (Chinese: 成都; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Cheng-tu), located in southwest China, is the capital of the Sichuan province and a sub-provincial city. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... San Nicolás de los Garza, sometimes known only as San Nicolás, is a municipality that is part of the Greater Monterrey metropolitan area. ... July 23 is the 204th day (205th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 161 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

Neighbouring communities

 

^
North
Rosser | West St. Paul | East St. Paul | Selkirk Rosser, Manitoba is a village 26 kilometres north-west of Winnipeg, latitude 49 degrees 59 minutes 26 seconds North, longitude 97 degrees 27 minutes 7 seconds West. ... West St. ... East St. ... Selkirk is a city in the Canadian province of Manitoba, located about 20km northeast of Winnipeg. ...

 

< West
Headingley Headingley is a rural municipality in Manitoba, Canada. ...

WINNIPEG

East >
Rural Municipality of Springfield   Springfield The Rural Municipality of Springfield is Manitobas oldest and largest Rural municipality. ...

 

  MacDonald | Ritchot
South
v

 

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Winnipeg
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Winnipeg

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... Crowd gathered outside old City Hall during the Winnipeg General Strike, June 21, 1919 The Winnipeg General Strike was Canadas most influential labour action. ... Founded in 1961, Manitoba Hydro is the electric power and natural gas utility in the province of Manitoba, Canada. ... This is a list of notable people, who are from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, or have spent a large part or formative part of their career in that city. ... There are 228 neighbourhoods in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada according to the 1996 Census. ...

References

  1. ^ City Council web page
  2. ^ a b c d e Winnipeg Comunity Profile - Statistics Canada. 2002. 2001 Community Profiles. Released June 27, 2002. Last modified: 2005-11-30. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 93F0053XIE.
  3. ^ Winnipeg 2001 census summary at the City of Winnipeg (PDF file)
  4. ^ School Divisions in Winnipeg: Seven Oaks School Division, Louis Riel School Division
  5. ^ Private schools in Winnipeg: Balmoral Hall School, Mennonite Brethren Collegiate Institute, St. Mary's Academy
  6. ^ 1 Canadian Air Division (1CAD)
  7. ^ Transit plans
  8. ^ Winnipeg Streets and Transit Division, Winnipeg area transportation study, 1968. The Council of the Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
  9. ^ Winnipeg International Airport
  10. ^ Winnipeg Transit Homepage
  11. ^ Winnipeg Crime rate - Statistics Canada
  12. ^ Neighbourhood Characteristics and the Distribution of Crime in Winnipeg - Statistics Canada, Extracted November 29, 2005
  13. ^ Archiseek: Winnipeg
  14. ^ Magazines of Winnipeg: Canadian Dimension, Winnipeg Women, Winnipeg Men, Ciao! Magazine, WHERE Winnipeg
  • J. M. Bumsted, The Winnipeg General Strike of 1919: An Illustrated History 1994, 140 pp. heavily illus;ISBN 0-920486-40-1.
  • Ramsay Cook; The Politics of John W. Dafoe and the Free Press (1963)
  • Grayson, J. P., and L. M. Grayson, "The Social Base of Interwar Political Unrest in Urban Alberta". Canadian Journal of Political Science, 7: 289-313 (1974)
  • Kenneth McNaught; A Prophet in Politics: A Biography of J. S. Woodsworth. (1959)
  • Norman Penner, ed., Winnipeg 1919: The Strikers' Own History of the Winnipeg General Strike (Toronto: 1973)
  • K. W. Taylor; "Voting in Winnipeg During the Depression" Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology v 19 #2 1982. pp 222+
  • Taylor, K. W., and Nelson Wiseman, "Class and Ethnic Voting in Winnipeg: The Case of 1941". Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology 14: 174-87 1977
  • Wiseman, Nelson and K. W. Taylor, "Ethnic vs Class Voting: the Case of Winnipeg, 1945". Canadian Journal of Political Science 7: 314-28 1974
  • Wiseman, Nelson and K. W. Taylor, "Class and Ethnic Voting in Winnipeg During the Cold War". Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology 16: 60-76 1979

Crowd gathered outside old City Hall during the Winnipeg General Strike, June 21, 1919 The Winnipeg General Strike was Canadas most influential labour protest. ...

External links

  • Winnipeg.ca - Official Winnipeg website
  • InWinnipeg.ca - Winnipeg News, Reviews, Jobs
  • Coordinates: 49.88° N -97.17° E Maps and aerial photos
    • Satellite image from WikiMapia or Google Maps
    • Street map from Yahoo! Maps or GlobalGuide
    • Aerial image from TerraServer
  • Canadian Climate Normals 1971-2000: Winnipeg at Environment Canada
  • Golden Boy restoration project
  • Winnipedia
  • Transit Riders' Union of Winnipeg
  • Miles MacDonell Collegiate Alumni Association - Local Winnipeg History
Provincial and territorial capitals of Canada
Edmonton, ABVictoria, BCWinnipeg, MBFredericton, NBSt. John's, NLYellowknife, NTHalifax, NSIqaluit, NUToronto, ONCharlottetown, PEQuebec City, QCRegina, SKWhitehorse, YT
Flag of Manitoba Manitoba
Regions Winnipeg Capital Region - Central Plains - Eastman - Interlake - Northern - Parkland - Pembina Valley - Westman
Cities Brandon - Dauphin - Flin Flon - Portage la Prairie - Selkirk - Steinbach - Thompson - Winkler - Winnipeg
List of communities in Manitoba - List of rural municipalities in Manitoba
Neighbourhoods in Winnipeg, Manitoba
Winnipeg, Manitoba: Agassi | Airport | Alpine Place | Amber Trails | Archwood | Armstrong Point | Beaumont | Betsworth| Birchwood| Booth | Broadway - Assiniboine | Brockville| Brooklands| Bruce Park| Buchanan| Burrows - Keewatin| Burrows Central| Canterbury Park | Centennial| Central Park| Central River Heights | Central St. Boniface | Chalmers | China Town | Cloutier Drive | Colony | Crescent Park | Crescentwood | Crestview | Dakota Crossing | Daniel McIntyre | Deer Lodge | Dufferin | Dufresne | Eaglemere | Earl Grey | East Elmwood | Ebby - Wentworth | Edgeland | Elm Park | Elmhurst | Eric Coy | Exchange District | Fort Richmond | Garden City | Glendale | Glenelm | Glenwood | Grant Park | Grassie | Heritage Park | Holden | Inkster - Faraday | Inkster Gardens | Island Lakes | J.B. Mitchell | Jameswood | Jefferson | Kensington | Kern Park | Kil-cona Park | Kildare - Redonda | Kildonan Drive | King Edward | Kingston Crescent | Kirkfield | Lavalee | Leila - McPhillips Triangle | Linden Woods | Logan - C.P.R | Lord Roberts | Lord Selkirk Park | Luxton | Maginot | Mandalay West | Margaret Park | Marlton | Mathers | Maybank | McMillan | Meadowood | Meadows | Melrose | Minnetonka | Minto | Mission Gardens | Montcalm | Munroe East | Munroe West | Mynarski | Niakwa Park | Niakwa Place | Norberry | Normand Park | North Point Douglas | North River Heights | North St. Boniface | Norwood East | Norwood West | Old Tuxedo | Parc La Salle | Peguis | Pembina Strip | Point Road | Polo Park | Portage - Ellice | Pulberry | Radisson | Richmond Lakes | Richmond West | Ridgedale | Ridgewood South | River - Osborne | River East | River Park South | River West Park | Riverbend | Rivergrove | Riverview | Robertson | Roblin Park | Rockwood | Roslyn | Rosser - Old Kildonan | Rossmere - A | Rossmere - B | Royalwood | Sargent Park | Seven Oaks | Shaughnessy Park | Silver Heights | Sir John Franklin | South Point Douglas | South Portage | South River Heights | South Tuxedo | Southboine | Southdale | Southland Park | Spence | Springfield North | Springfield South | St. George | St. John's Park | St. John's | St. Matthews | St. Norbert | St. Vital Perimeter South | Sturgeon Creek | Talbot - Grey | Templeton - Sinclair | The Maples | Tissot | Transcona South | Trappistes | Tuxedo | Tyndall Park | University | Valhalla | Valley Gardens | Varennes | Varsity View | Vialoux | Victoria Crescent | Victoria West | Vista | Waverley Heights | Wellington Crescent | West Alexander | West Broadway | West Wolseley | Westdale | Weston | Westwood | Whyte Ridge | Wildwood | Wilkes South | William Whyte | Windsor Park | Wolseley | Woodhaven | Worthington

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Winnipeg, Manitoba - definition of Winnipeg, Manitoba in Encyclopedia (2231 words)
Winnipeg's total annual growth rate has been 0.5% since 1971 with the majority of growth coming from in-migration from the surrounding rural areas and native communities as well as the expansion of the city limits to annex the suirrounding towns.
Winnipeg has a long history of minor league baseball, including the Class A Winnipeg Goldeyes, an affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals, from 1953-1964, the AAA Whips, Montreal's farm team in 1970-1971, and since 1994, the Goldeyes, a franchise in the independent Class AA Northern League.
Winnipeg's three universities are the University of Manitoba (undergrad and grad, medical), College universitaire de Saint-Boniface and the University of Winnipeg (undergrad).
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