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Encyclopedia > Winged Victory of Samothrace
The Winged Victory of Samothrace
The Winged Victory of Samothrace

The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called Nike of Samothrace, is a marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory), discovered in 1863 on the island of Samothrace (Greek: Σαμοθρακη, Samothraki) by the French consul and amateur archaeologist Charles Champoiseau. The statue is now displayed in the Louvre in Paris. Download high resolution version (577x1116, 93 KB)The Winged Victory of Samothrace (Nike) in the Louvre, Paris This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (577x1116, 93 KB)The Winged Victory of Samothrace (Nike) in the Louvre, Paris This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... In Greek mythology, Nike (Greek Νίκη, pronounced /nike/ Nee-keh, meaning Victory) (Roman equivalent: Victoria), was a goddess who personified triumph and victory. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Samothrace Samothrace (in Greek: Σαμοθρακη, Samothraki) is an island in Greece, in the northern Aegean Sea. ... I.M. Peis Louvre Pyramid: the entrance to the galleries lies below the glass pyramid The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


In Greek the statue is called the Niki tis Samothrakis (Νίκη της Σαμοθράκης) and in French La Victoire de Samothrace. Numerous copies exist in museums and galleries around the world; one of the best-known copies stands, somewhat incongruously, outside the Caesar's Palace casino in Las Vegas. The main entrance. ... This article is about the city of Las Vegas in Nevada. ...


The Victory is considered one of the great surviving masterpieces of Greek sculpture from the Hellenistic period, despite the fact that the figure is significantly damaged, missing its head and outstretched arms. By an unknown artist (presumably Rhodian in origin), the sculpture is thought to date from the period 220 BC - 190 BC (though some scholars date it as early as 250 BC or as late as 180 BC). Certainly, the parallels with figures and drapery from the Pergamon Altar (dated about 170 BC) seem strong. A partial inscription on the base of the statue includes the word "Rhodhios" (Rhodes), indicating that the statue was commissioned to celebrate a naval victory by Rhodes, at that time the most powerful maritime state in the Aegean. The Samothrace Archaeological Museum, however, says that the statue was an offering donated by the Macedonian general Demetrius I Poliorcetes after his naval victory at Cyprus. This would date the statue to 288 BC at the earliest. The Hellenistic period of Greek history was the period between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic society and culture, which... Main entrance to the medieval city of Rhodes Rhodes, Greek Ροδος (Rhodos), is the largest of the Dodecanese islands, and easternmost of the major islands of Greece in the Aegean Sea. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC - 220s BC - 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 225 BC 224 BC 223 BC 222 BC 221 BC - 220 BC - 219 BC 218 BC... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC - 190s BC - 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC Years: 195 BC 194 BC 193 BC 192 BC 191 BC - 190 BC - 189 BC 188 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC - 250s BC - 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC Years: 255 BC 254 BC 253 BC 252 BC 251 BC - 250 BC - 249 BC 248 BC... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC - 180s BC - 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 185 BC 184 BC 183 BC 182 BC 181 BC - 180 BC - 179 BC 178 BC... The front of the Pergamon Altar, as it is reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. ... Main entrance to the medieval city of Rhodes Rhodes, Greek Ροδος (Rhodos), is the largest of the Dodecanese islands, and easternmost of the major islands of Greece in the Aegean Sea. ... the Aegean Sea Satellite view of the island Santorini, in the Aegean Sea The Aegean Sea (Greek: Αιγαίον Πέλαγος, Aigaion Pelagos) is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea, located between the Greek peninsula and Anatolia (Asia Minor, now part of Turkey). ... Demetrius I (337-283 BC), surnamed Poliorcetes (Besieger), son of Antigonus I of Macedon and Stratonice was a king of Macedon ( 294 - 288 BC) . He belonged to the Antigonid dynasty. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC - 280s BC - 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 293 BC 292 BC 291 BC 290 BC 289 BC 288 BC 287 BC 286 BC 285...


The statue stands on the prow of a ship, and probably served as part of an outdoor altar, representing the goddess as she descended from the skies to the triumphant fleet. Rendered in white Parian marble, the larger than life-sized figure (height 3.28 m / 10.7 ft, including the wings) originally formed part of the Sanctuary of the Gods. Before losing her arms the Nike was probably blowing a victory paean on a trumpet. Parian marble is a fine-grained semitranslucent pure-white marble quarried during the classical era on the Greek island of Paros. ...


The statue has been reassembled in stages since its original discovery in 1863. The prow was rediscovered by Champoiseau in 1879 and reconstructed in situ before being shipped to Paris. Various other fragments have since been found: in 1950 one of the statue's hands was found on Samothrace and is now in a glass case in the Louvre next to the podium on which the statue stands. Neither the arms nor the head have been found. 1879 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The statue shows a mastery of form and movement which has impressed critics and artists since its discovery - the Nike of Samothrace is particularly admired for its naturalistic pose and rendering of the figure's draped garments, depicted as if rippling in a strong sea breeze. It soon became a cultural icon to which artists responded in many different ways. When Filippo Tommaso Marinetti issued his Futurist Manifesto in 1908, he chose to contrast his movement with the supposedly defunct artistic sentiments of the Winged Victory: "A screaming automobile that seems to run on grapeshot is more beautiful than the Winged Victory of Samothrace." Filippo Tommaso Emilio Marinetti (Born December 22, 1876 in Alexandria, Egypt. ... This article is about the art movement, futurism. ... 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Victory is one of the Louvre's greatest treasures, and it is today displayed in the most dramatic fashion, at the head of the sweeping Escalier Daru. The loss of the head and arms, while regrettable in a sense, is held by many to enhance the statue's depiction of the supernatural.


This statue was a favorite of Frank Lloyd Wright and he used reproductions of it in a number of his buildings, including Ward Willits House, Darwin D. Martin House and Storer House. Frank Lloyd Wright Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the most prominent architects of the first half of the 20th century. ... The Ward W. Willits House is a building designed by famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright. ... Darwin Martin House, Buffalo, New York Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), perhaps the most famous architect of the United States, designed the Darwin D. Martin House Complex between 1903 and 1905. ...


External links

  • The Louvre website on the Winged Victory of Samothrace
  • Greek website demanding the return of the Victory to Greece

  Results from FactBites:
 
Winged Victory of Samothrace | Musée du Louvre (880 words)
The goddess of Victory (Nike, in Greek) is shown in the form of a winged woman standing on the prow of a ship, braced against the strong wind blowing through her garments.
This is achieved by the oblique angles of the wings and the placement of the left leg, and emphasized by the clothing blowing between the goddess's legs.
Of all the works in the Louvre, the Winged Victory of Samothrace and the Venus de Milo are among the most admired: in their striking depiction of the human form they encapsulate the "Greek spirit." This circuit traces this artistic quest of sculptors who had an indelible influence on Western art.
Eleganza: Nike Goddess of Victory Marble Statue (360 words)
Nike of Samothrace and Winged Victory of Samothrace.
In Greece, the winged goddess Nike represents the personification of victory.
Nike the goddess of victory was the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the Oceanid Styx, according to the poet Hesiod.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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