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Encyclopedia > Windsor Castle
Aerial view of the castle
Aerial view of the castle

Windsor Castle, in Windsor in the English county of Berkshire, is the largest inhabited castle in the world and, dating back to the time of William the Conqueror, is the oldest in continuous occupation. It may be the most famous castle in the world. The castle's floor area is approximately 484,000 square feet (about 45,000 square metres).[1] This article is about the English town. ... As well as Windsor Castle, the castle in Windsor, there are other things known as Windsor Castle, notably ships. ... Image File history File links Windsor_Castle_from_the_air. ... Image File history File links Windsor_Castle_from_the_air. ... This article is about the English town. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... William I of England (c. ... A square foot is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 foot long. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


Together with Buckingham Palace in London and Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh, it is one of the principal official residences of the British monarch. Queen Elizabeth II spends many weekends of the year at the castle, using it for both state and private entertaining. Her other two residences, Sandringham House and Balmoral Castle, are the Royal Family's private homes. Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A 19th century view of Holyrood Palace from Calton Hill. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Balmoral Castle. ...


Most of the Kings and Queens of England have had a direct influence on the construction and evolution of the castle, which has been their garrison fortress, home, official palace, and sometimes their prison. The castle's history and that of the British monarchy are inextricably linked. Chronologically the history of the castle can be traced through the reigns of the monarchs who have occupied it. When the country has been at peace, the castle has been expanded by the additions of large and grand apartments; when the country has been at war, the castle has been more heavily fortified. This pattern has continued to the present day. For the various rulers of the kingdoms within England prior to its formal unification, during the Heptarchy, see Bretwalda. ... For people named Garrison, see Garrison (disambiguation) Garrison House, built by William Damm in 1675 at Dover, New Hampshire Garrison (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, to equip) is the collective term for the body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ...

Contents

Environs

Layout

Windsor Castle, a thousand-year-old fortress transformed into a royal palace. This well-known silhouette of a seemingly medieval castle was not created, however, until the 1820s by Jeffry Wyatville.
Windsor Castle, a thousand-year-old fortress transformed into a royal palace. This well-known silhouette of a seemingly medieval castle was not created, however, until the 1820s by Jeffry Wyatville.

Over its 1,000-year history, the design of Windsor Castle has changed and evolved according to the times, tastes, requirements and finances of successive Monarchs. Nevertheless, the positions of the main features have remained largely fixed and the modern plan below is a useful guide to locations. The castle today, for example, remains centred on the motte or artificial hill ("A" on the plan) on which William the Conqueror built the first wooden castle. Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Jeffry Wyatville (1766-1840) was an English architect. ... A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ...


Plan of Windsor Castle. Throughout this article the letters marked in red on this plan will be used to reference locations discussed.
Plan of Windsor Castle. Throughout this article the letters marked in red on this plan will be used to reference locations discussed.

Key to plan (right) Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x938, 134 KB) A schematic plan of Windsor Castle in England. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x938, 134 KB) A schematic plan of Windsor Castle in England. ...

A: The Round Tower of Windsor Castle.
  • A: The round tower
  • B: The Upper Ward, The Quadrangle (as this courtyard is known)
  • C: The State Apartments
  • D: Private Apartments, overlooking the East terrace
  • E: South Wing, overlooking The Long Walk
  • F: Lower Ward
  • G: St George's Chapel
  • H: Horseshoe Cloister
  • K: King Henry VIII Gate (principal entrance)
  • L: The Long Walk
  • M: Norman Gate
  • N: North Terrace
  • O: Edward III Tower
  • T: The Curfew Tower

The highly visible landmark of the castle, the Round Tower ("A"), is in reality far from cylindrical, its shape being dictated by the irregular, but seemingly round, man-made hill on which it sits. The castle's layout dates back to the mediaeval fortifications. The Round Tower divides the castle into two distinct sections known as wards. The Lower Ward ("F") is home to St George's Chapel ("G"), while the upper ward ("B") contains the private Royal Apartments ("D") and the more formal state rooms ("C"), which include St George's Hall, a vast room which has a ceiling decorated with the coats of arms of past and present members of the Order of the Garter. Image File history File links Windsor. ... Image File history File links Windsor. ... Members of the public outside St Georges Chapel at Windsor Castle, waiting to watch the Garter Procession St Georges Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England. ... A State Room in a large European mansion, is usually one of a suite of very grand rooms which were designed to impress, they were the most luxurious in the house and contained the finest works of art. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ...


Park

The immediate environs of the castle, known as the Home Park, comprise parkland and two working farms along with many estate cottages mainly occupied by employees. The estate of Frogmore also lies within the Home Park. Frogmore House and Gardens are open to the public on certain days of the year (the remainder of the Home Park is private). The Home Park adjoins the northern edge of the more extensive Windsor Great Park. The Home Park, previously known as the Little Park (and originally Lydecroft Park), is a private 655 acre British Royal park, administered by the Crown Estate. ... Frogmore or Frogmore House is a former royal residence in England, in the grounds of Windsor Castle, and is the site of the Frogmore Mausoleum containing the grave of Victoria and Albert. ... Standing in Frogmore Gardens, about a kilometre south of Windsor Castle in Windsor Home Park, the original house was built in 1680-1684 by Charles IIs architect Hugh May for his nephew Thomas May. ... Deer crossing the Long Walk to Windsor Castle Windsor Great Park (locally referred to simply as the Great Park) is a large deer park and Crown Estate of 5,000 acres, to the south of the town of Windsor on the border of Berkshire and Surrey in England. ...


Elsewhere

In the Home Park, to the north of the castle, stands a private school, St George's, Windsor Castle, which provides choristers to the Chapel.[2] Eton College is located about a mile north of the castle. The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and...


History

See also: List of historical events at Windsor Castle

Historical events at Windsor Castle Below are some of the important events which have occurred at Windsor Castle: the marriage of Henry I of England and his second wife, Adeliza (1121) the birth of King Edward III of England (1312) the marriage of Edward, the Black Prince and Joan of...

1070–1350

Windsor Castle was originally built by William the Conqueror, who reigned from 1066 until his death in 1087. His original wooden castle stood on the site of the present Round Tower ("A"). The castle formed part of his defensive ring of castles surrounding London, the site chosen in part because of its easily defensible position. William I of England (c. ...


Early in William's reign he had taken possession of a manor in what today is Old Windsor, probably a Saxon royal residence. A short time later between 1070 and 1086, he leased the site of the present castle from the Manor of Clewer and built the first motte-and-bailey castle. The motte is fifty feet (15 metres) high and consists of chalk excavated from a surrounding ditch, which then became a moat. For the 17th century system in Canada, see Seigneurial system of New France. ... Map sources for Old Windsor at grid reference: SU 983 744 Old Windsor is a village in Berkshire, south of the large town of Windsor, Berkshire and near to the villages of Englefield Green and Datchet. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Events Hereward the Wake begins a Saxon revolt in the Fens of eastern England. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... Map sources for Clewer at grid reference TQ073693 Clewer is an area of Windsor, Berkshire, United Kingdom. ... A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ... For other uses, see Chalk (disambiguation). ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ...


At this time the castle was defended by a wooden palisade rather than the thick stone walls seen today. The original plan of William the Conqueror's castle is unknown, but it was purely a military base, and nothing structural survives from this early period. From that time onwards the castle has remained in continuous use and has undergone numerous additions and improvements. His successor William II is thought to have improved and enlarged the structure, but the Conqueror's youngest son King Henry I was the first sovereign to live within the castle. Palisade and Moat A palisade is a Medieval wooden fence or wall of variable height, used as a defensive structure. ... William II (c. ... Henry I (c. ...


Concerned for his own safety due to the instabilities of his reign, he took up residence there and celebrated Whitsuntide at the castle in 1110.[3] His marriage to Adela, the daughter of Godfrey of Louvain, took place in the castle in 1121. … The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Events December 4 - First Crusade: The Crusaders conquer Sidon. ... Adeliza of Louvain (1103-1151) was queen consort of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of King Henry I of England. ... Godfrey I of Leuven (c. ... Events Concordat of Worms condemns Pierre Abélards writings on the Holy Trinity. ...


The earliest surviving buildings at Windsor date from the reign of Henry II who came to the throne in 1154. He replaced the wooden palisade surrounding the old fortress with a stone wall interspersed with square towers; a much-altered part of this defensive wall can be seen on what is today the east terrace. Henry II also built the first stone keep on the irregular mound at the centre of the castle. Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... For other uses, see Keep (disambiguation). ...

An early 18th-century view of Windsor Castle by Kip and Knyff
An early 18th-century view of Windsor Castle by Kip and Knyff

In 1189, the castle was besieged during the revolt of the English barons against Prince John. The King's Welsh troops (little more than private mercenaries) took flight, and the Prince escaped to France. Later in 1215 at Runnymede, close to the castle, the Prince, now King, was forced to sign Magna Carta. In 1216, again during the First Barons' War, the castle was again besieged, but this time withheld despite severe damage to the structure of the lower ward. Download high resolution version (810x596, 141 KB)An early 18th century birdseye view of Windsor Castle by Kip and Knyff. ... Download high resolution version (810x596, 141 KB)An early 18th century birdseye view of Windsor Castle by Kip and Knyff. ... Hampton Court, from Kip and Knyffs Britannia illustrata, 1708 The inexorably linked careers of Jan Kip and Leonard Knyff trace a specialty of engraved views of English country houses, represented in minute detail from the birds-eye view that was a long-established pictorial convention for topography. ... A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ... Combatants Pro-Angevin forces Pro-Capetian forces, and Kingdom of France Commanders Hubert de Burgh Prince Louis The First Barons War (1215–1217) was a combination of a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons and King John, and a foreign invasion invited by... This article is about the King of England. ... This article is about the country. ... Location of Runnymede at grid reference SU998727 in the United Kingdom Runnymede is a water-meadow alongside the River Thames in the county of Surrey, England, associated with the signing of the Magna Carta and today the site of a collection of memorials. ... This article is about the English charter issued in 1215. ...


This damage was immediately repaired in 1216 by King John's successor Henry III, who further strengthened the defences with the construction of the western curtain wall, much of which survives today. The oldest existing parts of the castle include the curfew tower ("T"), constructed in 1227. The interior of the tower contains the former castle prison, and also the remnants of a "Sally port", a secret exit for the occupants in a time of siege. The upper storey contains the castle bells placed there in 1478, and the castle clock of 1689. The French-style conical roof is, however, a 19th-century addition. Henry III died in 1272, and there seems to have been little further building carried out at the castle until the reign of King Edward III (1327–1377). Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... An example of a Sally port, here is the main entrance to Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland. ... This article is about the geometric object, for other uses see Cone. ...


1350–1500

King Edward III was born in the castle on 13 November 1312, and was often referred to as "Edward of Windsor". Beginning in 1350, he initiated a 24-year rebuilding program by demolishing the existing castle, with the exception of the Curfew Tower ("T") and some other minor outworks. He placed William of Wykeham in overall charge of the rebuilding and design of the new castle. Henry II's keep (the Round Tower) was replaced by the present keep, although it was not raised to its present height until the 19th century. The fortifications too were further increased. The castle's chapel was substantially enlarged, but plans to build a new church were not executed, probably due to the scarcity of manpower and resources following the Black Death. Also dating from this time is the Norman Gate ("M"). This large and imposing gate at the foot of the Round Tower is the last bastion of defence before the Upper Ward ("B") where the Royal Apartments are situated. This article is about the King of England. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 15 : Battle near Rozgoni Battle near Thebes Siege of Rostock begins Births November 13 - King Edward III of England Deaths June 19 - Piers Gaveston, favourite of Edward II of England September 7 - King Ferdinand IV of Castile Categories: 1312 ... William of Wykeham (1320 – September 27, 1404), Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College and of New College, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle, was born in Wickham, Hampshire. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ...


In 1348 Edward III established the Order of the Garter, whose annual ceremony still takes place in St George's Chapel, the principal chapel of the castle. In 1353–1354, he had the Aerary Porch built. The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... St Georges Chapel, Windsor St. ... Aerary is a room in a building that was used to contain something precious, such as treasure. ...

The lower ward in the 1840s. St George's Chapel is on the left and the Round Tower is centre right.
The lower ward in the 1840s. St George's Chapel is on the left and the Round Tower is centre right.

In 1390, during the reign of Richard II, it was found that St George's chapel was close to collapse, and a restoration process was undertaken. The clerk of the works was one of King Richard's favourites, Geoffrey Chaucer, who served as a diplomat and Clerk of The King's Works. Whatever his skills as a surveyor and builder were, within 50 years of his restoration the chapel was again ruinous. Image File history File linksMetadata WindsorLowerBaileyJosephNash1848_edited. ... Image File history File linksMetadata WindsorLowerBaileyJosephNash1848_edited. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... Chaucer redirects here. ... Surveyor at work with a leveling instrument. ...


King Edward IV (1461–1483), the first Yorkist King, who was said to be addicted to "the advauncement of vaine pompe" (sic), began the construction of the present St. George's Chapel. In reality the chapel, begun in 1475, is more a miniature cathedral and royal mausoleum than a chapel. Its architecture is an exercise in the Perpendicular Gothic style. During the reign of Henry VII, some of the original chapel of St. George was demolished to make way for the Lady Chapel, which the King then abandoned. The building was one of the first truly grand pieces of architecture within the castle precincts. Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... St Georges Chapel, Windsor St. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... St. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... The chapel dedicated to the Blessed Virgin and attached to churches of large size. ... A precinct is a space enclosed by the walls or other boundaries of a particular place or building, or by an arbitrary and imaginary line drawn around it. ...


The construction of the chapel marked a turning point in the architecture of the castle. The more stable political climate following the end of the Wars of the Roses meant that future building tended to be more considerate of comfort and style than of fortification. In this way the castle's role changed from that of royal bastion to that of a royal palace. One example of this is the "Horseshoe Cloister" ("H") from 1480, built near the chapel to house its clergy. This curved brick building is said to be in the shape of a fetlock: one of the badges used by Edward IV. Restoration work in 1871 was heavy, and little of the original building remains. Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... The point of a bastion on a reconstructed French fort in Illinois. ... Fetlock is the common name for the metacarpophalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints (MCPJ and MTPJ) of the horse. ...


Fortress to palace

Windsor Castle and the Thames.
Windsor Castle and the Thames.

While it is accepted that Edward III was the monarch who began the transformation of the castle from a fortress to a comfortable residence, when compared to the other royal palaces at Whitehall and Nonsuch Windsor remained a very bleak residence.[4] Henry VIII (who reigned from 15091547) rebuilt the principal castle gateway in about 1510, siting it in such a place that, should the gateway fall in an attack, further invasion into the castle would involve an uphill battle. The coat of arms above the arch and portcullis bears the pomegranate badge of the king's first queen, Catherine of Aragon. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. ... Nonsuch Palace was a Tudor royal palace that was built by Henry VIII in Surrey, on the location of Cuddington, near Epsom (the church and village of Cuddington were destroyed to create the plot for the palace). ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Counterweights for the sliding portcullis A portcullis is a grille or gate made of wood, metal or a combination of the two. ... Catherine of Aragon (16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536) (Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla), was the Queen of England as the first wife of Henry VIII of England. ...


Henry VIII's successor and son, the boy King Edward VI (who reigned from 15471553), wrote while staying in the castle "Methink I am in a prison, here are no galleries, nor no gardens to walk in."[4] Edward Tudor redirects here. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey...


Edward VI's sister Queen Elizabeth I (who reigned 15581603) spent much of her time at Windsor and regarded it as the safest place in her realm and would retire here in moments of anxiety, as she described it: "knowing it could stand a siege if need be".[4] While her statement suggests the castle was still very much a fortress, she too contributed to the transformation by constructing the north terrace ("N") as a place to exercise, and over it she built a covered gallery, a very early example of what was later to be known as a conservatory. This building has survived relatively unaltered. Still containing an enormous Tudor fireplace, it today houses the Royal Library. Elizabeth I redirects here. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... A traditional conservatory at the Horniman Museum in London A modern Conservatory. ... Kings College Chapel outside view The Tudor style in English architecture is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons. ...


The Civil War

Elizabeth I was followed by James I, and he by his son Charles I, neither of whom made significant changes to the castle. However, following the deposition of Charles in the English Civil War, the castle became the headquarters of Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army. Windsor Castle fell to Cromwell's Parliamentarians early in the hostilities due to the cunning of Colonel John Venn. Prince Rupert of the Rhine arrived to retake the town and castle a few days later, but though he severely battered the town, he was unable to retake the castle. Venn remained Governor of the castle until 1645. James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scots and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... For the band, see New Model Army (band). ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... John Venn was one of the regicides of King Charles I. Categories: People stubs | Regicide ... For other uses, see Prince Rupert (disambiguation). ...


Under Parliamentarian jurisdiction the castle suffered, but not as badly as such an iconic symbol of monarchy could have been expected to. However, the garrison stationed there was underpaid and was allowed to loot the castle's treasures.[5] For the duration of the Commonwealth period, the castle remained a military headquarters, and a prison for more important Royalists captured. For a short time prior to his execution in 1649, Charles was imprisoned in the castle, although in today's terminology house arrest would be a more accurate term. Following the King's execution, Britain was ruled by Cromwell until the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. Charles' body was smuggled back to Windsor in the dead of night through a snowstorm to be interred without ceremony in the vault beneath the choir in St George's Chapel, next to the coffins of Henry VIII and his wife Jane Seymour. Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto: PAX QUÆRITUR BELLO (English: Peace is sought through war) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Language(s) English Government Republic Lord Protector  - 1649-1658 Oliver Cromwell Legislature Rump Parliament Barebones Parliament History  - Declaration of Commonwealth May 19, 1649  - Declaration of Breda April 4, 1660 Area 130,395... °°°°°°°°°°°→→→→→→→→→→→→§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§ Prince Rupert, an archetypical cavalier For other uses, see Cavalier (disambiguation). ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... For the New York prison see The Tombs. ... The choir stalls in the quire of Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England The choir stalls at Buxheim Priory, by Ignaz Waibl See also: Choir (disambiguation) A quire (sometimes referred to as a choir) is an area of a church or cathedral, usually in the western part of the chancel between the... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ...


The Restoration

Drawing by Wyatville showing his Gothic transformation to the buildings of the upper ward of Windsor Castle
Wyatville's drawing showing the intended changes to the Prince of Wales Tower at Windsor castle

The Restoration of the monarchy in 1660 was to prove the first period of significant change to Windsor Castle for many years. Charles II did much to restore and refurnish the castle from the damage suffered during the civil war. At this time Versailles was being constructed in France, and with this in mind Charles II laid out the avenue known as the Long Walk ("L") (see illustration right). Running south from the castle, this avenue runs for 5 kilometres (3 miles) and is 75 metres (240 feet) wide. The original elms the King planted have since been replaced with chestnuts and planes. The Long Walk was not the only part of Windsor to be inspired by Versailles. Charles II commissioned the architect Hugh May to rebuild the Royal Apartments and St George's Hall. May replaced the original Plantagenet apartments on the north terrace with the cube-like Star Building. The interiors of these new apartments were decorated with ceilings by Antonio Verrio and carving by Grinling Gibbons. The King also acquired tapestries and paintings to furnish the rooms. These artworks were to form the core of what was to become known as the Royal Collection. Three of these rooms survive relatively unchanged: the Queen's Presence Chamber and the Queen's Audience Chamber, both designed for Charles II's wife Catherine of Braganza, and the King's Dining Room. These retain both their Verrio ceilings and Gibbons' panelling. Originally there were twenty rooms in this style. Some of Gibbons' carvings were rescued at various times when alterations were being made in the name of change or restoration, and in the 19th century these carvings were incorporated into new interior design themes in the Garter Throne Room and the Waterloo Chamber. Image File history File links Windsor_1. ... Image File history File links Windsor_1. ... Jeffry Wyatville (1766-1840) was an English architect. ... Image File history File links Windsor_2. ... Image File history File links Windsor_2. ... Jeffry Wyatville (1766-1840) was an English architect. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Hall of Mirrors redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Species See Elm species, varieties, cultivars and hybrids Elms are deciduous and semi-deciduous trees making up the genus Ulmus, family Ulmaceae, found throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Siberia to Indonesia, Mexico to Japan. ... Species Castanea alnifolia - Bush Chinkapin* Castanea crenata - Japanese Chestnut Castanea dentata - American Chestnut Castanea henryi - Henrys Chestnut Castanea mollissima - Chinese Chestnut Castanea ozarkensis - Ozark Chinkapin Castanea pumila - Allegheny Chinkapin Castanea sativa - Sweet Chestnut Castanea seguinii - Seguins Chestnut * treated as a synonym of by many authors Chestnut is a... Species See text. ... Hugh May (1621-1684) was an English architect. ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Antonio Verrio (1639-1707) was a decorative painter of Italian origin. ... One of the many bookcase carvings Gibbons made for the Wren Library, Cambridge. ... Shaped by the personal tastes of kings and queens over more than 500 years, the Royal Collection includes paintings, drawings and watercolours, furniture, ceramics, clocks, silver, sculpture, jewellery, books, manuscripts, prints and maps, arms and armour, fans, and textiles. ... Catherine of Braganza (November 25, 1638 – November 30, 1705) (Catherine Henrietta, Portuguese: Catarina Henriqueta de Bragança), was the queen consort of King Charles II of England. ... Panelling is a wallcovering constructed from interlocking wooden components. ...


The 18th and 19th centuries

Plan of Windsor Castle in 1743 by Batty Langley
Plan of Windsor Castle in 1743 by Batty Langley

Following the death of Charles II in 1685, the Castle fell slowly into a state of neglect. Needless to say, while the precincts and park remained a complex of inhabited royal mansions, the sovereigns themselves preferred to live elsewhere. During the reign of William and Mary (1689–1702), Hampton Court Palace was enlarged and transformed into a huge modern palace. Later Queen Anne preferred to live in a small house close to the walls of the castle. It was not until 1804 – when King George III, the father of 13 children, needed a larger residence than could be found elsewhere – that the castle was once again fully inhabited. The work carried out by Charles II had been on the contemporary, more classical, style of architecture popular at the time. Inigo Jones had introduced Palladianism to England during the time of Charles I; George III felt this style was not in keeping with an ancient castle, and had many of Charles II's windows redesigned and given a pointed Gothic arch, and thus the castle began once again to acquire its original medieval appearance. During this period Windsor Castle was once again to become a place of royal confinement. In 1811 King George III became permanently deranged and was confined to the castle for his own safety. During the last nine years of his life he seldom left his apartments at Windsor. This plan of Windsor Castle was made by Batty Langley in 1743. ... This plan of Windsor Castle was made by Batty Langley in 1743. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... William III Mary II The phrase William and Mary usually refers to the joint sovereignty over the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland of King William III and his wife Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February, 1689, when they were called to the throne by... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III of England and II of Scotland. ... George III redirects here. ... Inigo Jones, by Sir Anthony van Dyck Inigo Jones (July 15, 1573–June 21, 1652) is regarded as the first significant English architect. ... Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ...


It was during the reign of King George IV between 1820–1830 that the castle was to undergo the greatest single transformation in its history. George IV, known for his extravagant building at both Carlton House and the Royal Pavilion during his regency, now persuaded Parliament to vote him £300,000 for restoration. The architect Jeffry Wyatville was selected, and work commenced in 1824. George IV redirects here. ... The entrance front of Carlton House. ... Brighton Pavilion redirects here. ... The English Regency, or simply the Regency, is a name given to the period from 1811 to 1820 in the history of England. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Jeffry Wyatville (1766-1840) was an English architect. ...


The work took twelve years to complete and included a complete remodelling of the Upper Ward ("B"), private apartments ("D"), Round Tower ("A"), and the exterior facade of the South Wing ("E") which gave the castle its near symmetrical facade seen from the Long Walk. For other uses, see facade (disambiguation). ...

St George's Hall Windsor from W.H. Pyne's Royal Residences (1819). This shows the baroque style of the work carried out at Windsor for Charles II by architect Hugh May, painter Antonio Verrio, carver Grinling Gibbons and others. St George's Hall was redecorated in the early 19th century, but several smaller interiors from this period survive.
St George's Hall Windsor from W.H. Pyne's Royal Residences (1819). This shows the baroque style of the work carried out at Windsor for Charles II by architect Hugh May, painter Antonio Verrio, carver Grinling Gibbons and others. St George's Hall was redecorated in the early 19th century, but several smaller interiors from this period survive.
St George's Hall in 1848 by Joseph Nash, showing the alterations made for George IV by Sir Jeffry Wyatville
St George's Hall in 1848 by Joseph Nash, showing the alterations made for George IV by Sir Jeffry Wyatville

Wyatville was the first architect to view the castle as one composition, rather than a collection of buildings of various ages and in differing styles. As an architect he had a preference for imposing symmetry, whereas the castle which had evolved piecemeal over the previous centuries had no symmetry at all. Wyatville imposed a symmetry of sorts on the existing buildings of the Upper Ward, by raising the heights of certain towers to match others, and refacing the Upper Ward in a Gothic style complete with castelated battlements to match the mediæval buildings, including St George's Chapel in the Lower Ward. The Round Tower had always been a squat structure, and now this was further accentuated by the new height of the buildings in the Upper Ward. Wyatville surmounted this problem by building on top of the Round Tower a hollow stone crown, basically a false upper storey. Some 33 feet (10 metres) high, this crown gives the entire castle its dramatic silhouette from many miles away. St Georges Hall Windsor from W.H. Pynes Royal Residences (1819). ... St Georges Hall Windsor from W.H. Pynes Royal Residences (1819). ... Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Hugh May (1621-1684) was an English architect. ... Antonio Verrio (1639-1707) was a decorative painter of Italian origin. ... One of the many bookcase carvings Gibbons made for the Wren Library, Cambridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata WindsorStGeorgesHallJosephNashPub1848_edited. ... Image File history File linksMetadata WindsorStGeorgesHallJosephNashPub1848_edited. ... George IV redirects here. ... Jeffry Wyatville (1766-1840) was an English architect. ... Sphere symmetry group o. ... It has been suggested that crenellation, crenel and merlon be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Silhouette (disambiguation). ...


Much of the interior of the Castle was given the same makeover treatment as the exterior. Many of the Charles II state rooms which remained after George III's redecorations were redesigned in the Gothic style, most notably St George's Hall (see illustration right), which was doubled in length. Wyatville also roofed over a courtyard to create the Waterloo Chamber. This vast hall lit by a clerestory was designed to celebrate the victors of the Battle of Waterloo and was hung with portraits of the allied sovereigns and commanders who vanquished Napoleon. The large dining table at the centre of the chamber seats 150 people. Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ... Combatants French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Prussia United Netherlands Hanover Nassau Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Strength 73,000 67,000 Anglo-Allies 60,000 Prussian (48,000 engaged by about 18:00) Casualties 25,000 killed or wounded 7,000... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from...


The work was unfinished at the time of George IV's death in 1830, but was virtually completed by Wyatville's death in 1840.


The Victorian era

Queen Victoria's retreat into the privacy of the castle after the death of Prince Albert acquired her the soubriquet "The Widow of Windsor"!
Queen Victoria's retreat into the privacy of the castle after the death of Prince Albert acquired her the soubriquet "The Widow of Windsor"!

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert made Windsor Castle their principal royal residence. Many of their changes were to the surrounding parklands rather than the buildings. In particular, the "Windsor Castle and Town Approaches Act", passed by Parliament in 1848, permitted the closing and re-routing of the old roads which previously ran through the park from Windsor to Datchet and Old Windsor. These changes allowed the Royal Family to undertake the enclosure of a large area of parkland to form the private "Home Park" with no public roads passing through it. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (in full Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (in full Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Datchet is a quintessential English village on the banks of the River Thames, situated in the unitary authority of Windsor and Maidenhead in the county of Berkshire. ... Map sources for Old Windsor at grid reference: SU 983 744 Old Windsor is a village in Berkshire, south of the large town of Windsor, Berkshire and near to the villages of Englefield Green and Datchet. ...


Queen Victoria had retreated to the castle for privacy following the death in 1861 of Prince Albert, who had in fact died at the castle. Albert was buried in a Mausoleum built at Frogmore, within the Home Park of the Castle (and eventually Victoria was buried beside him). Frogmore or Frogmore House is a former royal residence in England, in the grounds of Windsor Castle, and is the site of the Frogmore Mausoleum containing the grave of Victoria and Albert. ... The Home Park, previously known as the Little Park (and originally Lydecroft Park), is a private 655 acre British Royal park, administered by the Crown Estate. ...


From Albert's death until her own death in 1901, Windsor Castle was Victoria's principal home, and she seldom visited Buckingham Palace again. The prince's rooms were maintained exactly as they had been at the moment of his death, and although an air of melancholy was allowed to settle on the castle for the remainder of the 19th century, this did not prevent improvements and restoration from taking place. In 1866 Anthony Salvin created the Grand Staircase in the State Apartments ("C"). This great stone staircase in the Gothic style rises to a double height hall lit by a vaulted lantern tower. The hall is decorated with arms and armour, including the suit of armour worn by King Henry VIII, made in 1540. The top of the stairs are flanked by life-size equestrian statues mounted by knights in armour. This theme of decoration continues into the Queen's Guard Chamber and the Grand Vestibule. Salvin also added the château-style conical roof to the Curfew Tower ("T") at this time. Categories: Stub | 1799 births | 1881 deaths ... The Lierne vault of the Liebfrauenkirche, Mühlacker 1482. ... The equestrian Marcus Aurelius on Capitoline Hill displayed uninterruptedly for eighteen centuries was the prototype of Renaissance equestrian sculptures An equestrian sculpture (from the Latin equus meaning horse) is a statue of a mounted rider. ...


20th century

Following the accession of King Edward VII in 1901, the castle often remained empty for long periods, the new King preferring his other homes elsewhere. The King visited for Ascot week and Easter. One of the few alterations he made was to lay out the castle's golf course. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Ascot Racecourse is a racecourse, located in the village of Ascot in the English county of Berkshire used for thoroughbred horse racing. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ...


Edward VII's successor George V, who was King from 1910 until his death in 1936, also preferred his other country homes. However, his wife Queen Mary was a great connoisseur of the arts, and not only sought out and re-acquired long-dispersed items of furniture from the castle, but also acquired many new works of art to furnish the state rooms. She also rearranged the fashion in which the castle was used, abandoning the baroque idea of a large suite of state rooms reserved just for important guests on the principal floor. New, more comfortable bedrooms with modern bathrooms were installed on the upper floors, allowing the formerly reserved state rooms below to be used for entertaining and court functions. The state bedroom itself was retained, but more as a historical curiosity. It has not been used as a bedroom since 1909. George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ...


During the First World War, when the members of the Royal Family felt the need to change its dynastic name from the German "House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha", they took their new name from the castle, becoming the "House of Windsor". “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria... The House of Windsor is the current Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and each of the other Commonwealth Realms. ...


Queen Mary was a lover of all things miniature, and had created a large dolls' house, based on a large aristocratic mansion—it was designed by the architect Lutyens. Its furniture and picture were created by the great craftsmen and designers of the 1930s. The dolls' house today is one of the castle's many tourist attractions. Queen Marys Dolls House was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, for Queen Mary (Consort of George V). ... Edwin Lutyens Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens, OM, KCIE, PRA (29 March 1869 – 1 January 1944) was a leading 20th century British architect who is known for imaginatively adapting traditional architectural styles to the requirements of his era. ...

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth lead the processions of Knights of the Garter from the castle's Upper Ward to St George's Chapel.
King George VI and Queen Elizabeth lead the processions of Knights of the Garter from the castle's Upper Ward to St George's Chapel.

George VI came to the throne in 1936 following the abdication of his brother Edward VIII; on 11 December Edward had broadcast his abdication speech to the British Empire from the castle, but had preferred during his short reign to live at his home Fort Belvedere in Windsor Great Park. George VI (and his wife Queen Elizabeth) preferred their original Windsor home, Royal Lodge. On the outbreak of World War II in 1939 the castle resumed its role as a royal fortress, and the King and Queen and their children Princess Elizabeth (the future Queen Elizabeth II) and Princess Margaret lived, for safety, in the castle. The King and Queen drove daily to London, returning to Windsor to sleep, although at the time this was a well-kept secret, as for propaganda and morale purposes it was reported that the king was still residing full-time at Buckingham Palace. Following the cessation of hostilities in 1945, the Royal Family left Windsor Castle and returned to Royal Lodge. File links The following pages link to this file: Order of the Garter Categories: Public domain images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Order of the Garter Categories: Public domain images ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... St Georges Chapel, Windsor St. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... The Instrument of Abdication signed by Edward VIII and his three brothers The Edward VIII abdication crisis refers to events which occurred in 1936, when King-Emperor Edward VIII of the British Empire precipitated a constitutional crisis throughout his realms by his desire to marry his mistress, Mrs. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Fort Belvedere Fort Belvedere is a country house in Sunningdale, Berkshire. ... Deer crossing the Long Walk to Windsor Castle Windsor Great Park (locally referred to simply as the Great Park) is a large deer park and Crown Estate of 5,000 acres, to the south of the town of Windsor on the border of Berkshire and Surrey in England. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Royal Lodge was the residence of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in Windsor Great Park from 1952 until her death in 2002. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ...

During the latter half of the 20th century Windsor Castle became one of Britain's major tourist attractions.
During the latter half of the 20th century Windsor Castle became one of Britain's major tourist attractions.

In 1952, Queen Elizabeth II came to the throne and decided to make Windsor her principal weekend retreat. The private apartments ("D") which had not been properly occupied since the era of Queen Mary were renovated and further modernised, and the Queen, Prince Philip and their (then) two children took up residence. This arrangement has continued to the present day. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1890x1216, 351 KB) Summary Photograph of Windsor castle showing visitors. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1890x1216, 351 KB) Summary Photograph of Windsor castle showing visitors. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philippos of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage. ...


On 20 November 1992, a fire which began in the Queen's private chapel (between "C" and "D" on plan) quickly spread. The fire raged for 15 hours until it had destroyed nine of the principal state rooms, and severely damaged over 100 more—in all the larger part of the upper ward. One-fifth of the floor space of the castle was damaged—an area of 9,000 square metres. The restoration programme was not complete until 1997, 70% of it funded by the decision to open to the public for the first time the state rooms of Buckingham Palace. The total cost of repairing the damage was £37 million The restoration was undertaken at no additional cost to the British taxpayer. So successful was the restoration and faithfulness to the original plans and decorations that the distinction between old and new is hard to detect. Although some of the rooms that had been gutted by the fire were completely redesigned in a modern interpretation, the new design is very organic and of the Gothic style, called "Downesian Gothic" after the rooms’ architect Giles Downes, of Sidell Gibson Partnership. These rooms include the new Private Chapel, the new Lantern Lobby and the new ceiling of St George's Hall. The latter is made of green-oak, a technique used in mediæval times. However, what is less obvious to the eye is that the restoration work resulted in significant improvements, particularly to the arrangements of the public rooms and the service quarters. is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... In 1992 Windsor Castle to the west of London, England the largest inhabited castle in the world and one of the official residences of the British monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, suffered severe damage in a fire, which destroyed some of the most historic parts of the building. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


In latter years, the Queen has increasingly used the castle as a royal palace as well as her weekend home. It is as often used for state banquets and official entertaining as Buckingham Palace. When during the great fire in 1992 Prince Andrew was interviewed for television, he stated that Windsor Castle was the one place the royal family regarded as home. The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ...


During the Queen's tenure of the Castle much has been done, not only to restore and maintain the fabric of the building, but also to transform it into a major British tourist attraction.[6] This has had to be achieved in co-ordination with the castle's role as a working royal palace. In 1994, oil was discovered on the grounds of the Castle, and the Queen granted permission to sink an exploratory well to test the reserves, which experts predicted could be worth more than $1 billion.[7] Any resulting profits would have been split between the oil company and the state.[7] Tourism > Tourism in England Tourism plays a significant part in the economic life of England. ... Synthetic motor oil For other uses, see Oil (disambiguation). ...


In a June 1999 story, the BBC reported that Prince Charles was considering moving the royal court to Windsor Castle instead of Buckingham Palace when he ascends the throne. The story speculated that the Prince may be attempting to gain more independence from the traditional court at Buckingham Palace. So far, the Palace has not commented on the story, but Prince Charles, along with the rest of the royal family, is said to be fond of Windsor Castle. For other uses, see June (disambiguation). ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ...


21st century

On 30 September 2006 it was reported that the Queen, as part of the equal opportunities policy at Windsor, has allowed an office in the Castle to be used as a Muslim prayer room when required, as requested by an employee.[8] is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Equal opportunity is a descriptive term for an approach intended to provide a certain social environment in which people are not excluded from the activities of society, such as education, employment, or health care, on the basis of immutable traits. ... Salat redirects here. ...


Big Royal Dig

Windsor Castle was one of three royal sites excavated over four days on behalf of Channel 4's Time Team from 25 to 28 August 2006. It was undertaken by Oxford Archaeology. In the United Kingdom, Channel 4 devoted an evening television program to each day's findings, presented by Tony Robinson, and also followed the dig live on More4, together with a simulcast on the internet. This article is about the British television station. ... Time Team is a popular British television series explaining the process of archaeology for the layman in the UK. Broadcast by Channel 4, the programme was first shown in 1994, and is presented by Tony Robinson. ... (Redirected from 25 August) August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oxford Archaeology (formerly the Oxford Archaeological Unit) is, along with MoLAS and Wessex Archaeology, one of the big three private archaeological organisations in the United Kingdom. ... Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ... More4 is a digital television channel, produced by United Kingdom broadcaster Channel 4, that launched on 10 October 2005. ...


Timed to help celebrate the 80th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II, along with many other events ongoing throughout 2006, this marked the 150th dig conducted by Time Team. For the first time, the Queen gave permission for trenches to be dug in the Garden of Buckingham Palace, as well as in Windsor Castle and the Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh. The Big Royal Dig is an example of the Queen opening up her homes for greater access to the public, as she did during her Golden Jubilee Weekend in 2002 and throughout 2006 for her birthday. Buckingham Palace Gardens are the Queens back garden. ... Holyrood Palace The Palace of Holyroodhouse, more commonly known as Holyrood Palace, originally founded as a monastery by David I of Scotland in 1128, has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scotland since the 15th century. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Golden Jubilee of Elizabeth II. (Discuss) The Golden Jubilee Weekend was the main series of events to mark the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland marking fifty years...


The archaeologists had an unprecedented opportunity to probe the geophysics and history of three royal residences over a four-day period, with teams working concurrently in the three locations.


Windsor Castle was the scene of two remarkable finds:

  • In the Upper Ward, the foundations of the Round Table building erected in 1344 by Edward III were discovered, and also, among other finds, a spectacular decorated mediaeval tile in situ.[9] In Edward's day the Round Table building, 200 feet (60 metres) in diameter, was used for feasting, festivals, and theatrical re-enactments of the Knights of the Round Table of Arthurian legend.
  • In the Lower Ward, the Great Hall of Henry III's palace was located and one of its walls, still standing, was found. This has assisted archaeologists in assessing where Windsor's first palace actually stood.

These finds have added to knowledge of the location, history, and uses of the Round Table and the Great Hall.[10] This article is about the King of England. ... In situ is a Latin phrase meaning in the place. ... DIAMETER is a computer networking protocol for AAA (Authentication, Authorization and Accounting). ... For the film, see Knights of the Round Table (film). ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... A great hall was the main room of a royal palace, a noblemans castle or a large manor house in the Middle Ages, and in the country houses of the 16th and early 17th centuries. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ...


Security

Although this has been less well publicised than Buckingham Palace, security at Windsor Castle has occasionally been breached, most recently when an intruder (the self-styled "comedy terrorist", Aaron Barschak) "gate-crashed" the birthday party for Prince William. Police from the Thames Valley Police and from the Royalty and Diplomatic Protection Department of the London Metropolitan Police provide the main element of physical security. The Windsor Castle Guard of the Foot Guards of the Household Division, provided by a public duties battalion in London, or by the battalion at Victoria Barracks, Windsor, contributes to this. Aaron Barschak (born 1966) styles himself as a Comedy Terrorist and fringe UK politician. ... Prince William redirects here. ... Thames Valley Police is one of the largest Home Office police services in England and the largest non-metropolitan one, covering 2200 sq mi (5,700 km²) and a population of 2. ... The security, as distinct from the ceremonial bodyguards or military protection, of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom and of members of the British Royal Family is entrusted to the Metropolitan Police. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ... Household Division is a term used principally in the Commonwealth of Nations to describe a grouping of a country’s most elite or historically senior military units, or those military units that provide ceremonial or protective functions associated directly with the Head of state. ... Public duties are performed by military personnel, and usually have a ceremonial or historic significance rather than an overtly operational role. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... The Foot Guards Battalion stationed at Windsor generally provides the Windsor Castle Guard. ... This article is about the English town. ...


The Foot Guards battalion at Victoria Barracks, a quarter of a mile from the Castle, is supported by the armoured reconnaissance squadron of the Household Cavalry based at Combermere Barracks, Windsor, one mile from the Castle. In times of emergency at the castle, several thousand soldiers, as well as the FV107 Scimitar Light Tanks of the Household Cavalry, would be able to respond quickly to protect the castle and its occupants. The Formation Reconnaissance Regiment is one of two organisations currently used by cavalry regiments of the British Army. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings... The Household Cavalry Regiment of the British Army has an active operational role in armoured fighting vehicles which has seen them at the forefront of the nations conflicts. ... This refers to the armoured vehicle, for other uses see Scimitar (disambiguation) FV107 Scimitar is an armoured reconnaissance vehicle, although sometimes classed as a light tank used by the British Army. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings...

Windsor Castle's Upper Ward from the north west —The Quadrangle—not open to tourists
Windsor Castle's Upper Ward from the north west —The Quadrangle—not open to tourists
The Upper Ward from the south west
The Upper Ward from the south west

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (4815x1958, 2840 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Main Page Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive User talk:Diliff User:Diliff User:NoSeptember/Main Windsor Castle... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (4815x1958, 2840 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Main Page Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Archive User talk:Diliff User:Diliff User:NoSeptember/Main Windsor Castle...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Calculated based on report of area destroyed in 1992 fire as being 9,000 metres squared, which was reported to be about one-fifth of the total area of the castle. See * [1]
  2. ^ The location can be seen from this aerial photograph
  3. ^ South, Raymond (1977). The Book of Windsor. Barracuda Books, p. 35. ISBN 0-86023-038-4. “Eodem anno [1110] rex curiam suam tenuit ad Pentecosam apud novam Windlesores” 
  4. ^ a b c Williams, Neville (1971). Royal Homes. Lutterworth Press. ISBN 0-7188-0803-7. 
  5. ^ Hill, B J W (1972). Windsor Castle. Pitkin Pictorials Ltd.. 
  6. ^ "1994: Royal approval for oil drilling at Windsor", BBC. Retrieved on 2007-07-22. 
  7. ^ a b "Queen Elizabeth, Wildcatter", Time Magazine, 1994-12-19. Retrieved on 2007-07-22. 
  8. ^ "Queen grants Muslim prayer room", BBC News Online, 2006-09-30. 
  9. ^ Upper Ward complete decorated medieval floor tile. Big Royal Dig - Time Team. Channel 4.
  10. ^ Latest from Windsor Castle. Big Royal Dig - Time Team. Channel 4.

In 1992 Windsor Castle to the west of London, England the largest inhabited castle in the world and one of the official residences of the British monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, suffered severe damage in a fire, which destroyed some of the most historic parts of the building. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Members of the public outside St Georges Chapel at Windsor Castle, waiting to watch the Garter Procession St Georges Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England. ... TheConstables and Governors of Windsor Castle are in charge of Windsor Castle on hehalf of the sovereign. ... Historical events at Windsor Castle Below are some of the important events which have occurred at Windsor Castle: the marriage of Henry I of England and his second wife, Adeliza (1121) the birth of King Edward III of England (1312) the marriage of Edward, the Black Prince and Joan of... St Georges Chapel at Windsor Castle, The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, 1831. ... Retired military officers who receive a pension and accommodation at Windsor Castle, and who provide support for the Order of the Garter and for the services of St Georges Chapel, Windsor Castle. ...

External links

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Windsor Castle

Coordinates: 51°29′02″N, 0°36′16″W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This is a list of residences occupied by the British Royal family, noting the seasons of the year they are traditionally occupied. ... Bagshot Park circa 1880. ... Balmoral Castle. ... Birkhall is a 53,000 acre estate in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... Gatcombe Park is the private country home of Princess Anne, the Princess Royal, situated between the Gloucestershire villages of Minchinhampton and Avening, five miles south of Stroud. ... Highgrove is the country home of HRH The Prince of Wales, in Gloucestershire. ... The official entrance of Hillsborough Castle Hillsborough Castle in County Down is a mansion in Northern Ireland. ... A 19th century view of Holyrood Palace from Calton Hill. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... Royal Lodge was the residence of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in Windsor Great Park from 1952 until her death in 2002. ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Sunninghill Park is the official residence of the Duke of York. ... Thatched House Lodge is a royal residence in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in London, England. ... The Palace of Beaulieu also known as New Hall was located in Essex, England, north of Chelmsford. ... Beaumont Palace Oxford was built by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace. ... The Pass Room at Bridewell from Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808–1811), drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin. ... Brantridge Park, Balcombe, West Sussex, is one of the lesser royal residences. ... Coppins was originally a mid-nineteenth century farmhouse built by John Mitchell. ... Built 1650 in Windsor Great Park, south of Royal Lodge, Cumberland Lodge was called Byfield House till 1670. ... Dunfermline Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Dunfermline, Fife. ... Eltham Palace Eltham Palace is a large house in Eltham, London, United Kingdom (Map Ref: TQ424740 , ), currently owned by English Heritage and open to the public. ... Falkland Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Falkland, Fife. ... Fort Belvedere Fort Belvedere is a country house on Shrubs Hill in Windsor Great Park, very near Sunningdale, Berkshire, but actually over the border in the borough of Runnymede in Surrey. ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Three buildings at Kew, which is now a western suburb of London, have been known as Kew Palace. ... Kings Langley is a village in the borough of Dacorum in the county of Hertfordshire, England on the southern edge of the Chiltern Hills. ... The south face of Linlithgow Palace Linlithgow Palace from the east North and west faces of Linlithgow Palace The ruins of Linlithgow Palace are situated in the town of Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland, 15 miles west of Edinburgh. ... Marlborough House, London Marlborough House is a mansion in Westminster, London. ... The Castle of Mey (formerly Barrogill Castle) is in dramatic situation on the north coast of Scotland, about 6 miles west of John OGroats. ... Nonsuch Palace was a Tudor royal palace that was built by Henry VIII in Surrey, on the location of Cuddington, near Epsom (the church and village of Cuddington were destroyed to create the plot for the palace). ... A royal residence 1538-1820, at Weybridge, Surrey. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Greenwich Palace. ... The Queens House, Greenwich The Queens House, Greenwich, was designed and begun in 1616-1617 by architect Inigo Jones for Anne of Denmark (the queen of King James I of England) and completed, also by Jones, about 1635 for Queen Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I. The... A former royal residence at Windlesham, Surrey. ... A royal residence 1327-1649, on The Green, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey. ... Brighton Pavilion redirects here. ... The Savoy Palace was considered the grandest noblemans residence of medieval London, until it was destroyed in the uprising of 1381. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, on the north bank of the River Thames. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. ... White Lodge is a Georgian house situated in Richmond Park, on the outskirts of London. ... Woodstock Palace was a royal residence in the Oxfordshire town of Woodstock. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Windsor Castle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5082 words)
King Edward III was born in the castle on November 13, 1312, and was often referred to as "Edward of Windsor".
While her statement suggests the castle was still very much a fortress, she too contributed to the transformation by constructing the north terrace ("N") as a place to exercise and over it she built a covered gallery, a very early example of what was later to be known as a conservatory.
Windsor Castle fell to Cromwell's Parliamentarians early in the hostilities due to the cunning of Colonel John Venn.
Windsor Castle (939 words)
Windsor Castle, with its fairy tale turrets and towers, is the largest continually inhabited castle in the world.
The castle was used primarily for defense purposes until Henry II rebuilt the castle in stone, concurrently adding extensive expansions for Windsor's use as a State residence.
The castle was siezed by the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War in the mid 17th Century and was used as a prison.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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