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Encyclopedia > Windows 7
Windows 7
(Part of the Microsoft Windows family)
Screenshot

Screenshot of Windows 7 Milestone 1 Build 6519
Developer
Microsoft
Release information
Release date: Expected late 2009[1] info
Preview version:  Milestone 1 (6.1.6574.1) (April 20, 2008) info
Source model: Closed source
License: Microsoft EULA
Kernel type: Hybrid Kernel

Windows 7 (formerly known as Blackcomb and Vienna) is the working name for the next major version of Microsoft Windows as the successor to Windows Vista.[2] Microsoft has announced that it is "scoping Windows 7 development to a three-year timeframe", and that "the specific release date will ultimately be determined by meeting the quality bar."[3] Windows 7 is expected to be released sometime in 2010.[4] The client versions of Windows 7 will ship in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions.[3] A server variant, codenamed Windows Server 7, is also under development. Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... Image File history File links Nuvola_apps_kpager. ... Windows redirects here. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... A software license is a type of proprietary or gratiuitious license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software — sometimes called an End User License Agreement (EULA) — that specifies the perimeters of the permission granted by the owner to the user. ... A kernel connects the application software to the hardware of a computer. ... Graphical overview of a hybrid kernel Hybrid kernel is a kernel architecture based on combining aspects of microkernel and monolithic kernel architectures used in computer operating systems. ... Microsoft codenames are the codenames given by Microsoft to products it has in development, before these products are given the names by which they appear on store shelves. ... Windows redirects here. ... Windows Vista (pronounced ) is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... 32-bit is a term applied to processors, and computer architectures which manipulate the address and data in 32-bit chunks. ... In computing, a 64-bit component is one in which data are processed or stored in 64-bit units (words). ...


Microsoft is maintaining a policy of silence concerning discussion of plans and aspirations for Windows 7 as they focus on the release and marketing of Windows Vista,[5] though some early details of various core operating system features have emerged. As a result, little is known about the feature set, though public presentations from company officials have disseminated information about some features. Leaked information from people to whom Milestone 1 (M1) of Windows 7 was shipped also provides some insight into the feature set.

Contents

Development

History

In about 2000 Microsoft started the planning to follow up Windows XP and its server counterpart Windows Server 2003 (both codenamed Whistler) with a major new release of Windows that was codenamed Blackcomb (both codenames refer to the Whistler-Blackcomb resort). This new version was at that time scheduled for a 2005 release.[citation needed] Windows XP is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, and media centers. ... Windows Server 2003 (also referred to as Win2K3) is a server operating system produced by Microsoft. ... This article is about the ski resort. ...


Major features were planned for Blackcomb, including an emphasis on searching and querying data and an advanced storage system named WinFS to enable such scenarios. In this context, a feature mentioned by Bill Gates for Blackcomb was "a pervasive typing line that will recognize the sentence that [the user is] typing in."[6] It has been suggested that Microsoft Rave be merged into this article or section. ...


Later Blackcomb was delayed and an interim minor release, codenamed "Longhorn", was announced for a 2003 release.[7] By the middle of 2003, however, Longhorn had acquired some of the features originally intended for Blackcomb, including WinFS, the Desktop Window Manager, and new versions of system components built on the .NET Framework. After the 2003 "Summer of Worms", where three major viruses -- Blaster, Sobig, and Welchia -- exploited flaws in Windows operating systems within a short time period, Microsoft changed their development priorities, putting some of Longhorn's major development work on hold in order to develop new service packs for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 that included a number of new security and safety features. Development of Longhorn was also "reset" in September 2004 (see Mid-2004 to Mid-2005: Development "reset") as a result of concerns about the quality of code that was being introduced to the operating system. The eventual result of this was that WinFS, the Next Generation Secure Computing Base, and other features seen in Longhorn builds were deemed "not ready" for wide release, and as such did not appear in Longhorn, when it was released as Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008. It has been suggested that Microsoft Rave be merged into this article or section. ... Desktop Window Manager (DWM) is currently the name for the new windowing system that will be available in all versions of Windows Vista, except Starter Edition, to enable the new Aero user interface. ... Microsoft . ... The Blaster Worm (also known as Lovsan or Lovesan) was a computer worm that spread on computers running the Microsoft operating systems, Windows XP and Windows 2000, during August 2003. ... The Sobig Worm was a computer worm that infected millions of Internet-connected, Microsoft Windows computers in August 2003. ... The Welchia worm, also known as the Nachia worm, is a computer worm that exploits a vulnerability in the Microsoft Remote procedure call (RPC) service similar to the Blaster worm. ... Windows Server 2003 (also referred to as Win2K3) is a server operating system produced by Microsoft. ... Development of Windows Vista occurred over the span of five and a half years, starting in earnest in May 2001,[1] prior to the release of Microsofts Windows XP operating system, and continuing until November 2006. ... Development of Windows Vista occurred over the span of five and a half years, starting in earnest in May 2001,[1] prior to the release of Microsofts Windows XP operating system, and continuing until November 2006. ... The Next-Generation Secure Computing Base (NGSCB), formerly known as Palladium (Pd), is Microsofts new trusted computing architecture. ... Windows Vista (pronounced ) is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... Windows Server 2008 is the most recent release of Microsoft Windowss server line of operating systems. ...


As major feature work on Windows Vista wound down in early 2006, Blackcomb was renamed Vienna.[8] However, following the release of Windows Vista, it was confirmed by Microsoft on July 20, 2007 that "the internal name for the next version of the Windows Client OS"[3] is Windows 7, a name that had been reported by some sources months before.[8] Windows Vista (pronounced ) is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Focus

Microsoft's Ben Fathi claimed on February 9, 2007 that the focus on the operating system was still being worked out, and could merely hint at some possibilities:[9] is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

We're going to look at a fundamental piece of enabling technology. Maybe it's hypervisors. I don't know what it is" [...] "Maybe it's a new user interface paradigm for consumers.

Bill Gates, in an interview with Newsweek, suggested that the next version of Windows would "be more user-centric."[10] When asked to clarify what he meant, Gates said: VMware Workstation running Ubuntu, on Windows, uses a Type-2 Hypervisor to allow Operating Systems to run virtualized. ... The user interface is the part of a system exposed to users. ... For other uses, see Paradigm (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...

That means that right now when you move from one PC to another, you've got to install apps on each one, do upgrades on each one. Moving information between them is very painful. We can use Live Services to know what you're interested in. So even if you drop by a [public] kiosk or somebody else's PC, we can bring down your home page, your files, your fonts, your favorites and those things. So that's kind of the user-centric thing that Live Services can enable. [Also,] in Vista, things got a lot better with [digital] ink and speech, but by the next release there will be a much bigger bet. Students won't need textbooks; they can just use these tablet devices. Parallel computing is pretty important for the next release. We'll make it so that a lot of the high-level graphics will be just built into the operating system. So we've got a pretty good outline.

Later Gates also said that Windows 7 will also focus on performance improvements:[11] A stylised illustration of a personal computer A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose original sales price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals, intended to be operated directly by an end user, with no intervening computer operator. ... Windows Live is the collective brand name for a set of services and software products from Microsoft. ... HP Compaq tablet PC with rotating/removable keyboard A Tablet PC is a notebook or slate-shaped mobile computer, first introduced by Pen Computing in the early 90s with their PenGo Tablet Computer and popularized by Microsoft. ... Parallel computing is the simultaneous execution of the same task (split up and specially adapted) on multiple processors in order to obtain results faster. ...

We're hard at work, I would say, on the next version, which we call Windows 7. I'm very excited about the work being done there. The ability to be lower power, take less memory, be more efficient, and have lots more connections up to the mobile phone, so those scenarios connect up well to make it a great platform for the best gaming that can be done, to connect up to the thing being done out on the Internet, so that, for example, if you have two personal computers, that your files automatically are synchronized between them, and so you don't have a lot of work to move that data back and forth.

Milestone 1

The first known build of Windows 7 was identified as a "Milestone 1 (M1) code drop" according to TG Daily with a version number of 6.1.6519.1. It was sent to key Microsoft partners by January 2008 in both x86 and x86-64 versions.[12][13] Though not yet commented on by Microsoft, reviews and screenshots have been published by various sources.[14][15]The M1 code drop installation comes as either a standalone install or one which requires Windows Vista with Service Pack 1, and creates a dual-boot system.[16] January 2008 was the first month of the current year. ... x86 or 80x86 is the generic name of a microprocessor architecture first developed and manufactured by Intel. ... The AMD64 or x86-64 is a 64-bit processor architecture invented by AMD. It is a superset of the x86 architecture, which it natively supports. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Windows Vista (pronounced ) is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ...


On April 20, 2008, screenshots and videos of a second build of M1 were leaked with a version number of 6.1.6574.1. This build included changes to Windows Explorer as well as a new Windows Health Center.[17] is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


A standalone copy of build 6519 was leaked initially to private FTPs by BETAArchive on June 10, 2008, which quickly spread to many torrent trackers.[18]


Later builds

According to TG Daily article of January 16, 2008, the Milestone 2 (M2) code drop was at that time scheduled for April or May of 2008.[12] User interface appearance changes are expected to appear in later builds of Windows 7.[19]


Milestone 3 (M3) is listed as coming in the third quarter, with the release to manufacturing in the second half of 2009.[12] The release dates of a beta version and a release candidate are "to be determined".


Bill Gates commented in a press conference in April 2008 that a new version [of windows] would come "in the next year or so".[20] According to additional clarification by Microsoft, he was only referring to availability of alpha or beta versions of Windows 7.[21]


Unveiling

The Windows 7 user interface was demonstrated for the first time at the D6 conference[22] during which Steve Ballmer acknowledged a projected release date of late 2009.[23]


Features

Desktop context menu showing the return of the Display Properties icon (previously removed in Vista) and new options for Gadgets.

Windows 7 has reached the Milestone 1 (M1) stage and has been made available to key partners.[12] According to reports sent to TG Daily, the build adds support for systems using multiple heterogeneous graphics cards and a new version of Windows Media Center.[12] New features in Milestone 1 also reportedly include Gadgets being integrated into Windows Explorer, a Gadget for Windows Media Center, the ability to visually pin and unpin items from the Start Menu and Recycle Bin, improved media features, a new XPS Viewer, and the Calculator accessory is multi-line featuring Programmer and Statistics modes along with unit conversion. Windows Media Center is an application designed to serve as a home-entertainment hub. ... Microsoft Gadgets are light-weight single-purpose applications that can sit on the users computer desktop, or are hosted on a web page. ... Windows Explorer running on Windows Vista Windows Explorer running on Windows XP Windows Explorer is an application that is part of modern versions of the Microsoft Windows operating system that provides a graphical user interface for accessing the file systems. ... Windows Media Center is an application designed to serve as a home-entertainment hub. ... The XML Paper Specification (XPS), formerly codenamed Metro, is a specification for a page description language and a fixed-document format developed by Microsoft. ... Microsoft Calculator is a calculation application included with all Microsoft Windows operating systems. ...


Reports indicate that a feedback tool included in Milestone 1 lists some coming features: the ability to store Internet Explorer settings on a Windows Live account, updated versions of Paint and WordPad, and a 10 minute install process.[24] In addition, improved network connection tools might be included. Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer abbreviated MSIE), commonly abbreviated to IE, is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. ... Windows Live is the collective brand name for a set of services and software products from Microsoft. ... Paint (formerly Paintbrush for Windows) is a simple graphics painting program that has been included with almost all versions of Microsoft Windows since its first release. ... WordPad is a simple word processor that is included with almost all versions of Microsoft Windows from Windows 95 upwards. ...


A new feature in build 6574, Windows Health Center, allows the user to monitor all of their PC's health problems, and concerns in one place. It allows turning User Account Control on and off, and monitoring 3rd party anti-virus programs, firewalls, etc.[citation needed] UAC confirmation dialog UAC credentials dialog User Account Control (UAC) is a technology and security infrastructure introduced with Microsofts Windows Vista operating system. ...


In the demonstration of Windows 7 at D6, the operating system featured multi-touch, including a virtual piano program, a directions program and a more advanced paint program.


Kernel

A minimalistic variation of the Windows kernel, known as MinWin, was being developed for use in Windows 7. The MinWin development efforts were aimed towards componentizing the Windows kernel and reducing the dependencies with a view to carving out the minimal set of components required to build a self-contained kernel as well as reducing the disk footprint and memory usage.[25] MinWin takes up about 25 MB on disk and has a working set (memory usage) of 40 MB.[26] It lacks a graphical user interface and is interfaced using a full-screen command line interface.[27][26] It includes the I/O and networking subsystems.[25][27] MinWin was first publicly demonstrated on October 13, 2007 by Eric Traut. The demo system included an OS image, made up of about 100 files, on which a basic HTTP server was running.[26][28] A kernel connects the application software to the hardware of a computer. ... This article is about a unit of data. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... Working set is the set of physical memory pages currently dedicated to a specific process. ... GUI redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Eric Traut is an American software engineer and software emulation pioneer. ... HTTP (for HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the primary method used to convey information on the World Wide Web. ...


Incidentally, the name MinWin was also used earlier to refer to what is currently known as Server Core in Windows Server 2008.[25][27] Both efforts are intended to consolidate and modularize the core of Windows; however, the two are quite different in implementation. With Server Core, the functionality of the OS is constrained according to server roles, and unneeded components (which will never be used as the role isn't supported) are removed from the binary image. However, the dependencies still exist in code, and the code cannot compile without the components. In contrast, with MinWin, the dependencies are consolidated into MinWin and what is not needed is removed at the code level itself. As a result, the code compiles even without any extraneous components and builds a stripped-down self-contained OS kernel image.[27][25] Windows Server 2008 is the most recent release of Microsoft Windowss server line of operating systems. ... An operating system (OS) is a software that manages computer resources and provides programmers with an interface used to access those resources. ...


In an interview with Ina Fried of Cnet's News.com, Steven Sinofsky described the Windows 7 kernel as a further evolution of the Windows Server 2008 kernel, itself an evolution of the Windows Vista kernel.[29]


On 2 June 2008, Mary-Jo Foley of ZDNet reported:

The official word from Microsoft’s Windows Engineering Chief Steven Sinofsky seems to be that MinWin — the slimmed-down Windows core many expected to be at the heart of Windows 7 — is not going to be part of Windows 7.[30]

Methods of input

On December 11, 2007, Hilton Locke, who worked on the Tablet PC team at Microsoft reported that Windows 7 will have new touch features. An overview of the touch capabilities was demonstrated at the All Things Digital Conference on May 27, 2008. A video demonstrating the multi-touch capabilities was later made available on the web on the same day.[31] is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... HP Compaq tablet PC with rotating/removable keyboard A Tablet PC is a notebook or slate-shaped mobile computer, first introduced by Pen Computing in the early 90s with their PenGo Tablet Computer and popularized by Microsoft. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Multi-touch is a human-computer interaction technique and the hardware devices that implement it. ...


Also, Bill Gates has said that Windows 7 is also "a big step forward" for speech technology and handwriting recognition.[32] For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Speech recognition (also known as automatic speech recognition or computer speech recognition) converts spoken words to machine-readable input (for example, to keypresses, using the binary code for a string of character codes). ... Handwriting recognition is the ability of a computer to receive intelligible handwritten input. ...


Virtual hard disk

On May 21, 2008, Microsoft posted a job opening for Windows 7 regarding work to implement VHD support, i.e. support for single-file containers that represent an entire hard drive including partitions, and transparently performing I/O operations on this as a typical hard drive, including boot support. [33] is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Energy Input: The energy placed into a reaction. ...

In Windows 7, our team will be responsible for creating, mounting, performing I/O on, and dismounting VHDs (virtual hard disks) natively. Imagine being able to mount a VHD on any Windows machine, do some offline servicing and then boot from that same VHD. Or perhaps, taking an existing VHD you currently use within Virtual Server and boost performance by booting natively from it.

Antitrust regulatory attention

The development of Windows 7 has already attracted the attention of the antitrust regulators who oversee Microsoft's operations following the 2001 United States Microsoft antitrust case settlement. According to status reports filed, the three-member panel began assessing the prototypes of the new operating system in February 2008.[34]


Michael Gartenberg, an analyst at Jupiter Research said that, "[Microsoft's] challenge for Windows 7 will be how can they continue to add features that consumers will want that also don't run afoul of regulators."[34] JupiterMedia, Inc. ...


See Also

  • Windows Server 7

References

  1. ^ Windows 7: Now a late 2009 deliverable (again). ZDNet (2008-05-28). Retrieved on 2008-05-28.
  2. ^ Cnet: Next version of Windows: Call it 7
  3. ^ a b c Foley, Mary J. "Windows Seven: Think 2010", ZDNet, 2007-07-20. Retrieved on 2007-09-19. 
  4. ^ Microsoft finally confirms Windows 7 for 2010 launch. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  5. ^ Kevin Kutz (February 13, 2007). Microsoft Statement in Response to Speculation on Next Version of Windows.
  6. ^ Gates, Bill (2000-07-12). Professional Developers Conference Remarks. microsoft.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-05.
  7. ^ Lettice, John (2001-10-24). Gates confirms Windows Longhorn for 2003. The Register. Retrieved on 2008-03-05.
  8. ^ a b Thurrott, Paul (February 14, 2007). Windows "7" FAQ. Paul Thurrott's SuperSite for Windows. Retrieved on 2008-01-05.
  9. ^ Robert McMillan, IDG News Service (February 9, 2007). Microsoft: Vista follow-up likely in 2009.
  10. ^ Steven Levy (February 3, 2007). Bill Gates on Vista and Apple's 'Lying' Ads.
  11. ^ Bill Gates (May 12, 2007). Bill Gates: Japan—Windows Digital Lifestyle Consortium.
  12. ^ a b c d e Gruener, Wolfgang (2008-01-16). TG Daily - Windows Vista successor scheduled for a H2 2009 release?. TG Daily. Retrieved on 2008-01-17.
  13. ^ Dan Graham (2008-01-18). Windows 7 set for late 2009 release. Retrieved on 2008-01-18.
  14. ^ More Windows 7 screenshots surfacing. Retrieved on 2008-01-28.
  15. ^ ThinkNext.net: Screenshots from a blogger with Windows 7 M1
  16. ^ TG Daily: Windows 7 M1: Nothing to get excited about
  17. ^ Leaked Details of Windows 7 M1 March 2008 Edition Version 6.1 Build 6574.1. Retrieved on 2008-04-24.
  18. ^ BETAArchive Leak Announcement
  19. ^ 'Insider' confirms anonymous Windows 7 M1 review, writes thesis on Windows 7 development. Long Zheng (2008-01-23). Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  20. ^ Gates sees next Windows "sometime" in next year. Reuters (2008-04-04). Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  21. ^ Microsoft Clears Gates-Induced Confusion about Windows 7. eFluxMedia (2008-04-06). Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  22. ^ Gates and Ballmer debut Windows 7. engadget (2008-05-27). Retrieved on 2008-05-31.
  23. ^ Windows 7: Now a late 2009 deliverable (again). ZDNet (2008-05-28). Retrieved on 2008-05-28.
  24. ^ Long Zheng (2008-01-22). Neowin.net forum member posts first review Windows 7 Milestone 1 Build 6.1.6519.1. Retrieved on 2008-01-26.
  25. ^ a b c d Mark Russinovich: On Working at Microsoft, Windows Server 2008 Kernel, MinWin vs ServerCore, HyperV, Application Virtualization. Retrieved on 2007-12-23.
  26. ^ a b c Video presentation about MinWin
  27. ^ a b c d Inside Windows 7 MinWin. Retrieved on 2007-12-23.
  28. ^ Long Zheng (October 19, 2007). Eric Traut talks (and demos) Windows 7 and MinWin. Retrieved on 2007-10-20.
  29. ^ Fried, Ina (2008-05-27). Windows chief talks '7'. news.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-28.
  30. ^ Foley, Mary-Jo (Junel 2008). MinWin: Is it or isn’t it part of Windows 7?. Retrieved on 2008-06-15.
  31. ^ Windows Vista Team Blog. Microsoft demonstrates Multi-touch. MSDN Blogs. Retrieved on 2008-05-28.
  32. ^ Fried, Ina (2008-02-20). Windows 7 goes beyond keyboard and mouse. ZDNet Australia. Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  33. ^ Job Details - Software Development Engineer in Test. Microsoft (2008-05-21). Retrieved on 2008-05-24.
  34. ^ a b Keizer, Gregg F. (March 2008). Windows 7 eyed by antitrust regulators. Retrieved on 2008-03-19.
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This article is about the year. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Current logo of The Register. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... Paul Thurrott (born October 29, 1966)[1] is a technology reporter, published author, Podcaster, and news editor for Windows IT Pro Magazine. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ina Fried (previously Ian Fried) is a senior staff writer for CNET Networks News. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CNET Networks, Inc. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) is an information service from Microsoft for software developers. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ina Fried (previously Ian Fried) is a senior staff writer for CNET Networks News. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... In 1989 Ziff Davis Inc. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Windows logo used since November 2006. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Windows 9x is the family of Microsoft Windows operating systems that comprises the 32-bit, DOS-based Windows versions: Windows 95, Windows 98, and often also Windows Me. ... Windows 1. ... Windows 2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Windows 3. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. ... Windows 98 (codenamed Memphis) is a graphical operating system released on June 25, 1998 by Microsoft and the successor to Windows 95. ... Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows Me (IPA pronunciation: [miː], [ɛm iː]), is a hybrid 16-bit/32-bit graphical operating system released on September 14, 2000 by Microsoft. ... Windows NT (New Technology) is a family of operating systems produced by Microsoft, the first version of which was released in July 1993. ... Windows NT 3. ... Windows NT 3. ... Windows NT 3. ... Windows NT 4. ... Windows 2000 (also referred to as Win2K) is a preemptive, interruptible, graphical and business-oriented operating system designed to work with either uniprocessor or symmetric multi-processor computers. ... Windows XP is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, and media centers. ... Windows Server 2003 (also referred to as Win2K3) is a server operating system produced by Microsoft. ... Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs (WinFLP) is an operating system from Microsoft, based on Windows XP, but optimized for older, less powerful hardware. ... Windows Vista (pronounced ) is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, Tablet PCs, and media centers. ... Windows Vista is available in six editions. ... Windows Home Server is a home server operating system from Microsoft. ... Windows Server 2008 is the most recent release of Microsoft Windowss server line of operating systems. ... Windows CE (sometimes abbreviated WinCE) is a variation of Microsofts Windows operating system for minimalistic computers and embedded systems. ... Windows CE (sometimes abbreviated WinCE) is a variation of Microsofts Windows operating system for minimalistic computers and embedded systems. ... Windows CE (sometimes abbreviated WinCE) is a variation of Microsofts Windows operating system for minimalistic computers and embedded systems. ... Microsoft Windows CE 3. ... Windows CE (sometimes abbreviated WinCE) is a variation of Microsofts Windows operating system for minimalistic computers and embedded systems. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Windows CE. (Discuss) Windows CE 5. ... Windows Embedded CE 6. ... Windows Mobile is a compact operating system combined with a suite of basic applications for mobile devices based on the Microsoft Win32 API. Devices which run Windows Mobile include Pocket PCs, Smartphones, Portable Media Centers, and on-board computers for certain automobiles. ... Cairo was the code name for a project at Microsoft from 1991 to 1996. ... Original Nashville desktop build 999 Nashville was the codename for Windows 96, a cancelled operating system upgrade for Microsoft Windows 95, which was originally intended to be released in 1996. ... Windows Neptune Logon Screen Windows Neptune is a version of Microsoft Windows that was in development from early 1999 to early 2000. ... Odyssey was a codename for a version of Microsoft Windows that was in development from early 1999 to early 2000. ... OS/2 is a computer operating system, initially created by Microsoft and IBM, then later developed by IBM exclusively. ...

 
 

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