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Encyclopedia > Winchester College
Winchester College
Motto Manners makyth man
Established 1382
Type Public School
Head Master Dr Ralph Townsend
Founder William of Wykeham
Location College Street
Winchester
Hampshire
England Flag of England
Staff ~100
Students ~670
Gender Boys
Houses 10
School colours Blue, Brown & Red                
Publication The Wykehamist, Quelle
Former pupils Old Wykehamists
Website www.winchestercollege.co.uk
Coordinates: <span class="geo-dms" title="Maps, aerial photos, and other data for Expression error: Unexpected < operator°Expression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unrecognised word "n" Expression error: Unexpected < operator°Expression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unrecognised word "w"">Expression error: Unexpected < operator°Expression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unrecognised word "n" Expression error: Unexpected < operator°Expression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unexpected < operatorExpression error: Unrecognised word "w" / 51.058N, -1.312W

Winchester College is a well-known boys' independent school, and an example of an English public school, in the city of Winchester in Hampshire, England. Officially known as Collegium Sanctae Mariae prope Wintoniam (or Collegium Beatae Mariae Wintoniensis prope Winton), or St Mary's College near Winchester, the college is commonly referred to as "Win: Coll:" or just "Winchester". Winchester has existed for over six hundred years - the longest unbroken history of any school in England. It is one of the original nine English public schools as defined by the Public Schools Act 1868. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Year 1382 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... Dr Ralph Townsend is Headmaster of Winchester College. ... William of Wykeham (1320 – September 27, 1404), Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College and of New College, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle, was born in Wickham, Hampshire. ... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Former pupils of Winchester College are known as Old Wykehamists and as such are able to include OW in any list of post-nominal letters. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... The University of Winchester is a university in Winchester in the United Kingdom. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close Arms of Winchester City Council Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,000. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Public Schools Act 1868 was passed by the UK Parliament to regulate nine major English boys schools. ...

Contents

History

Winchester College was founded in 1382 by William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester and Chancellor to Richard II, and the first seventy poor scholars entered the school in 1394. It was founded in conjunction with New College, Oxford, for which it was designed to act as a feeder: the buildings of both colleges were designed by master mason William Wynford. This double foundation was the model for Eton College and King's College, Cambridge some 50 years later (a sod of earth from Winchester and a number of scholars were sent to Eton for its foundation), and for Westminster School, Christ Church, Oxford and Trinity College, Cambridge in Tudor times. William of Wykeham (1320 – September 27, 1404), Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College and of New College, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle, was born in Wickham, Hampshire. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... and of the New College College name New College of St Mary Latin name Collegium Novum Oxoniensis/Collegium Sanctae Mariae Wintoniae Named after Mary, mother of Jesus Established 1379 Sister college Kings College, Cambridge Warden Prof. ... William Wynford (flourished 1360-1405)[1] was one of the most successful English master masons of the 14th century, using the new Perpendicular Gothic style. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... For other uses, see Kings College. ... For other uses, see Westminster School (disambiguation). ... and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street...


In addition to the seventy scholars and 16 "Quiristers" (choristers), the statutes provided for ten "noble Commoners". These Commoners ("Commoners in Collegio") were paying guests of the Head Master or Second Master in his official apartments in College. Other paying pupils ("Commoners extra Collegium"), either guests of one of the Masters in his private house or living in lodgings in town, grew in numbers till the late 18th century, when they were all required to live in "Old Commoners" and town boarding was banned. In the 19th century this was replaced by "New Commoners", and the numbers fluctuated between 70 and 130: the new building was compared unfavourably to a workhouse, and as it was built over an underground stream epidemics of typhus and malaria were common. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the late 1850s four boarding houses were planned (but only three built, namely A, B and C), to be headed by masters: the plan, since dropped, was to increase the number of scholars to 100 so that there would be "College", "Commoners" and "Houses" consisting of 100 pupils each. In the 1860s "New Commoners" was closed and converted to classrooms, and its members were divided among four further boarding houses (D, E, G and H, collectively known as "Commoner Block"). At the same time two more houses (F and I) were acquired and added to the "Houses" category; a tenth (K) was acquired in 1905 and allotted to "Commoners". (The distinction between "Commoners" and "Houses" is now of purely sporting significance, and "a Commoner" means any pupil who is not a scholar.) There are therefore now ten houses in addition to College, which continues to occupy the original 14th century buildings, and the total number of pupils is almost 700. // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA was built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ...


The headmaster is currently Dr Ralph Townsend, formerly of Sydney Grammar School and Oundle School. Dr Ralph Townsend is Headmaster of Winchester College. ... Sydney Grammar School (colloquially known as Grammar)[4] is an independent, secular, selective day school for boys, located in Darlinghurst, Edgecliff and St Ives, all suburbs of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Oundle School is a famous public school located in the ancient market town of Oundle in Northamptonshire, England. ...


Boarding houses

Houses
Official Name Informal Name House Letter
Chernocke House Furley's A
Moberly's Toye's B
Du Boulay's Cook's C
Fearon's Kenny's D
Morshead's Freddie's E
Hawkins' Chawker's F
Sergeant's Phil's G
Bramston's Trant's H
Turner's Hopper's I
Kingsgate House Beloe's K

Every pupil at Winchester, apart from Scholars (also known as Collegemen), lives in a boarding house, chosen when applying to Winchester. It is here that he eats and sleeps. Each house is presided over by a housemaster (who takes on the role in addition to teaching duties) and a number of house tutors. Houses compete in school competitions, and in particular in sporting competitions. Each house has an official name, used mainly as a postal address, and an informal name, usually based on the name or nickname of an early housemaster. Each house also has a letter assigned to it, in the order of their founding, to act as an abbreviation. A member of a house is described by the informal name of the house with "-ite" suffixed, as "a Cookite", "a Toyeite" and so on. The houses have been ordered by their year of founding. Boarding House is a privately owned house,in which individuals or families on vaccation, holidays, deputition,transfered on temporary duties, on some particular training,short&mediun tenure visitors,working professionals & lodgers,rent one or more rooms sets for one or more nights,sometimes for extended periods of weeks, months and...


The scholars live in the original buildings, known as College; individual scholars are known as "Collegemen". College is not usually referred to as a house, except for the purposes of categorisation: hence the terms 'housemaster of College' and 'College house' are not generally used. The housemaster of College is known as the 'Master in College'. Within the school, 'College' refers only to the body of scholars (and their buildings); 'Winchester College' and 'the college' refer to the school as a whole.


Each house also had a set of house colours, which adorned the ribbon worn around boys' "strats" (straw hats). The wearing of strats was abolished for Commoners in around 1984 - Collegemen had ceased to wear them years earlier.


College does not have an informal name, although the abbreviation Coll: is sometimes used, especially on written work. It also has a letter assigned to it, X, but it is considered bad form to use this except as a laundry mark.


Chapel

Situated on the south side of Chamber Court, the Chapel is part of the original College buildings and retains its original wooden fan-vaulted ceiling. Built to easily accommodate just over 100 people, it is now too small for the current school population of around 660. Additional seating installed in 1908 allows the Chapel to seat just over 300 people with the remainder worshipping in the nearby St. Michael's Church.


The Chapel's most striking feature is its stained glass. The East window depicts the stem of Jesse. Down the Chapel's north and south sides is a collection of saints. Little of the original medieval glass survives. A firm of glaziers in Shrewsbury was tasked with cleaning the glass in the 1820's. At that time there was no known process for cleaning the badly deteriorated glass and so it was copied, while most of the original glass was scattered or destroyed. Some pieces have been recovered. The south west corner holds the largest piece, bought and donated by Kenneth Clark. Five other figures bequeathed by Otto von Kienbusch and two more donated by Coleorton Church, Leicestershire were placed in Fromonds Chantry in 1978. Kenneth Clark presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation. ...


The school is blessed with the internationally renowned Winchester College Chapel Choir, who sing regular services in the chapel, as well as other venues. There is also a Junior choir for St. Michael's church, known as Michla. Winchester College Chapel Choir is a internationally renowned choir that sing in the Chapel of Winchester College. ... On the campus of the University of St. ...

The exterior of the Chapel is currently undergoing a large scale restoration project to clean and protect the stonework. It is one of the main projects being undertaken by the Development Society. One can easily see the difference the restoration has made. While very bright at the moment, the restored stonework is expected to weather with time.


Academic structure

Until the 1860s the predominant subject of instruction was classics, and there was one main schoolroom used as both the classroom and the place of preparation, under extremely noisy conditions: there were adjacent rooms used for French and mathematics. Under the headmastership of George Ridding proper classrooms were built, and pupils had the option of joining "Parallel Div" for the study of history and modern languages. Later still a "Sen: Science Div" was added. Science teaching at Winchester had a high reputation: one of the early science masters duplicated the experiments of Hertz about radio waves, the equipment for which is still preserved at Science School. George Ridding (March 16, 1828 - August 30, 1904), English headmaster and bishop, was born at Winchester College, of which his father, the Rev. ... Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (February 22, 1857 - January 1, 1894) was the German physicist and mechanician for whom the hertz, an SI unit, is named. ...


For much of the twentieth century the senior forms were divided among three "ladders": the A ladder for classics, the B ladder for history and modern languages and the C ladder for mathematics and science. There was also a vertical division, in descending order, into Sixth Book (equivalent to the sixth form at other schools), Senior Part, Middle Part and Junior Part: depending on ability, new boys were placed in either Junior or Middle Part.


The school now offers a wide range of subjects, and no longer has a system of ladders. In addition, all boys throughout the school are required to attend lessons on "div subjects" (history, literature and politics) that do not lead to external examinations. The purpose is to ensure a broad education which does not focus solely on examinations.


Winchester has its own entrance examination, and does not use Common Entrance. Those wishing to enter a Commoner house make their arrangements with the relevant housemaster some time before sitting the exam. Those applying to College do not take the normal entrance examination but instead sit a separate, harder, exam called "Election": successful candidates may obtain, according to their performance, a scholarship, an exhibition with or without emolument or a Headmaster's nomination. The Common Entrance Examinations for girls (at age 11-12) or boys (at 12-13), are academic entrance examinations common to almost all private or independent schools (often known as Public Schools) in England & Wales. ...


Notions

A notion is a manner or tradition peculiar to Winchester College. The word notion is also used to refer to unique and peculiar words used (with diminishing frequency) in the school. An example is "toytime", meaning prep or homework. It can also refer to more recent slang, some of which features the altering of vowels in certain words for sarcastic emphasis. Notions are a highly specialised form of slang used by pupils at Winchester College. ...


The Notions Test was until recently an important tradition in most houses, in which juniors were required to answer questions about notions. Although now banned under various pretexts including the European human rights conventions, the test was usually administered to new boys during their first term at the school by more senior boys, and aimed to test and demonstrate their familiarity with the vocabulary, history and traditions of the school. College Notions was more elaborate and continued for a few years longer than the Commoner tests. It took the form of an end-of-term celebration and marked the point at which new Collegemen formally became known as Jun: Men. Notions are a highly specialised form of slang used by pupils at Winchester College. ...


War Cloister

Winchester College War Cloister
Winchester College War Cloister

Situated to the west of College Meads, this cloister serves as a memorial to the Wykehamist dead of the two world wars. It was designed by Sir Herbert Baker and dedicated in 1924 and again in 1948. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (7934x2070, 2954 KB) Summary Summary Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (7934x2070, 2954 KB) Summary Summary Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sir Herbert Baker 9 June 1862 Cobham, Kent - 4 February 1946 Cobham, Kent, was the dominant force in South African architecture for two decades, 1892–1912. ...


A bronze bust of Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding sits on the west side of the cloister. “Dowding” redirects here. ...


War Cloister occupies a strategic position in Kingsgate Street (accessed via "South Africa Gate", which commemorates the Wykehamist dead of the 1899-1902 Boer War), so that all Commoners go through it on their way to and from class.


Another older war memorial in the school is the entry chamber to Chapel, known as "Crimea" after the Crimean War of the early 1850s, and bearing the names of Wykehamists who died at the siege of Sevastopol.


Prefectorial system

College

Traditionally there were always 18 prefects in College, though since the mid-twentieth century there have been fewer, 10 to 14 being typical. Of these, five (later increased to six) hold salaried offices. Historically, these were as follows, in descending order of seniority:

  • Aulae Praefectus (Aul: Prae:, Prefect of Hall), the head boy of the school. ("Hall", in this connection, is not restricted to the dining hall but means the College as a whole, as in the phrases "Trinity Hall" and "hall of residence".) He acts jointly with the Sen: Co: Prae: (see below)
  • Bibliothecae Praefectus (Bib: Prae:, Prefect of Library), until recently in charge of Moberly Library (the school academic library); this function has now been taken over by a full-time librarian.
  • Scholae Praefectus (Schol: Prae:, Prefect of School), in charge of bookings of the old School building and miscellaneous other functions.
  • two Capellae Praefecti (Cap: Prae:, Prefects of Chapel): functions obvious. Formerly they took turns to officiate; until recently practice has been to differentiate between the "Sen: Cap: Prae:" and the "Jun: Cap: Prae:". Nowadays there is only one Cap: Prae:

The post of Jun: Cap: Prae: (junior chapel prefect) has recently been abolished and has been replaced by Ollae Praefectus (Oll: Prae:), which literally translates as "prefect of tub". (This is the revival of an ancient office, which was suppressed in the nineteenth century when the office of Bib: Prae: was created. The duties were to do with catering, especially the disposal of uneaten food from College lunch, which was collected in a special wooden vat and given to the poor. This vat or tub is still on display in College Hall.)


Each Officer, in addition to his specialized duties, has charge of a College Chamber (day-room). Thus when IVth Chamber was reopened, increasing the number of chambers to six, a sixth Officer was created, the Coll: Lib: Prae:, in charge of Upper Coll: Lib: (the fiction library available to Collegemen). The post had previously existed informally, but the holder used not to rank as an Officer.


Formerly, there were one or two (originally five) further prefects "in full power", invariably, though improperly, known as Co: Praes. Officers and Co: Praes had authority throughout the school; the remaining prefects had authority only in College. Nowadays, while there are still six officers, they have little to do with the running of the school and are mainly responsible for their respective chambers, and there are no other College Co: Praes. In practice, only the Prefect of Hall has significant duties outside College.


The present practice is for all fifth-years in College to be prefects. Each officer nominates a prefect from those members of his year who are not officers to act as his deputy within his chamber; any prefects left over are sometimes known as "Jemimas" (reason unknown). The seven senior inferiors (non-prefects) in College are known as Custodes Candelarum (tollykeepers), but this is a purely nominal dignity. The next senior person in a chamber after the prefects and tollykeepers was once known as the in loco, and kept the accounts for Chamber Tea.


Commoner Houses

Outside College there is a Sen: Co: Prae: (Senior Commoner Prefect), who acts as joint Head Boy with the Prefect of Hall. There are then a number of Co: Praes (Commensalibus Praefecti, Commoner Prefects) with authority over all Commoners: traditionally, no Commoner has authority over any Collegeman. Nowadays, there is generally only one Co: Prae: per house, who acts as the senior house prefect. In addition, each house has a number of House Prefects, with authority only in that house. The Co: Praes (heads of houses) meet weekly together with the Prefect of Hall and Head Master to discuss the running of the school.


Sweat

There has been no system of fagging for some decades. College prefects used to engage junior boys as "valets": by the 1960s this had become a voluntary arrangement in which the valets were paid for their services, and the system disappeared altogether in the early 1970s. Similarly in the 1970s some Commoner houses retained traditions, for example in Toye's, of "trap-cads", who would perform services for senior boys for money and other benefits. Junior Collegemen still take it in turns to perform services ("sweat") for the whole Chamber such as bringing down bread and milk. The College Officers and the College Editor of The Wykehamist each engage (and pay) a second-year as a "writer" (Latin: "Scriptor"), to perform a variety of duties, more or less related to the position held by their Officer - for example, the Cap: Prae:'s writer puts out the choir's hymnsheets before services, while the Schol: Prae:'s writer collects and delivers the morning's newspapers to each chamber.


Sport

Winchester College has its own game, Winchester College Football (also known as 'Win: Co: Fo:' or, more recently, 'Winkies'), played only at Winchester. It is played in Common Time (the spring term), the main game in Short Half (the autumn term) being Association football. Match around 1840. ... Match around 1840. ... Soccer redirects here. ...


Winchester Football could be considered a cross between football and rugby, but neither of these comparisons is helpful to the spectator or the tactician. It is above all else a court game in its rules and tactics: volleyball with the feet and especially tennis are the most helpful analogies. The game can be played by teams of 6, 9, 10, 11, 15 or 22 men. Soccer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


There is also a distinctive Winchester version of Fives, resembling Rugby Fives but with a buttress on the court. Fives is a British sport believed to derive from the same origins as many racket sports. ... Rugby Fives is a handball game, similar to squash, played in an enclosed court. ...


At one time Winchester was one of the Lord's schools, competing in a trilateral cricket tournament with Eton and Harrow; and for this reason the first cricket eleven is still known as "Lords" (with or without the apostrophe). Since 1855 Winchester has not taken part in this, instead playing Eton alternately at the two schools. Eton Match, when played at Winchester, was until recently the major event attended by Old Wykehamists and the main showcase for the school and its activities, but now most of the non-cricket-related functions have been moved to "Wykeham Day" in the autumn. Eton Match itself has now been replaced by "Winchester Day", featuring a match between Wykehamists and Old Wykehamists. The Pavilion The Grand Stand Match in progress The Media Centre at Lords Cricket Ground This memorial stone to Lord Harris is in the Harris Garden at Lords Lords Cricket Ground is a cricket ground in St Johns Wood in London, at grid reference TQ268827. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... Harrow School, (originally: The Free Grammar School of John Lyon; generally: Harrow), is an independent school for boys (aged 13-18), and is located in Harrow on the Hill in the London Borough of Harrow. ...


Rackets is also played. Should the same person be Captain of Lord's and Captain of Rackets, he is known as "Lord of Lords and Prince of Princes", in allusion to Prince's Club in London. R. P. Keigwin (right) with AEJ Collins the Colleges racquets team at Clifton College circa 1902 Rackets (British English) or Racquets (American English), is an indoor racquet sport played in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada. ... There were two sporting clubs (or one club with two or more locations?) in Knightsbridge, London known as Princes Club. ...


Former pupils

See List of notable Old Wykehamists. Former pupils of Winchester College are known as Old Wykehamists and as such are able to include OW in any list of post-nominal letters. ...


Domum

The school song is "Dulce Domum", which is sung on the approach of and at the break-up of the school for the Summer holidays. It is also sung at Abingdon School and Stamford School under similar circumstances, and was popular among 19th century English public schoolboys. For example, it is mentioned in the early chapters of Tom Brown's Schooldays. Paradoxically, although the subject of the song is the joy of breaking from the school grind and returning home for the holidays, it is often taken as symbolising the idyllic, nostalgic view of English public school life in the 19th century. It should not be confused with another song of the same name, but with completely different tune and lyrics, written by Robert S. Ambrose. Abingdon School is an independent day and boarding school for boys in Abingdon, Oxfordshire. ... Front of Stamford School House Main Field Stamford School is an English public school in the market town of Stamford, Lincolnshire. ... Cover of 1999 re-issue by Oxford Worlds Classics Tom Browns Schooldays, first published in 1857, is a novel by Thomas Hughes, set at a public school, Rugby School for Boys, in the 1830s when Hughes himself had been a student there. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ...


According to legend, it was composed by a pupil in the 17th or 18th century, who was confined for misconduct during the Whitsun holidays. (On one account, he was tied to a pillar.) It is said that he carved the words on the bark of a tree, which was thereafter called "Domum Tree", and cast himself into Logie (the river running through the school grounds). There is still a "Domum Cottage" in that area. The word Whitsun is another name for Pentecost It has that meaning in the following: Whitsun, a poem by Sylvia Plath The Whitsun Weddings, a poem by Philip Larkin A Whitsun Ale (esp. ...


The song is sung at the end of the summer term, and on other occasions when a school song is normally sung. There is also a "Domum Dinner" held around the same time, for those former scholars of Winchester who were also scholars of New College, and for various distinguished guests. Until the reforms of the nineteenth century, there were three successive Domum Dinners held at the end of Election Week, culminating in a Domum Ball. Originally these festivities occurred around Whitsun, as suggested by the seasonal references in the song, but when Election Week was moved to the end of the summer term in June or July the Domum celebrations were moved with it.


It is rather remarkable that the author apparently treated 'domum' as a neuter noun. One could argue that domum is the accusative, meaning "homeward", and that dulce is used adverbially.


Here is the chorus (in Latin, with English translation):


Domum, domum, dulce domum!
Domum, domum, dulce domum;
Dulce, dulce dulce domum!
Dulce domum resonemus.


Home, home, joyous home! (or: Homeward, homeward, joyously homeward!)
Home, home, joyous home!
Joyous, joyous, joyous home!
Hurrah for joyous home!


Winchester quotations

Manners makyth man
- William of Wykeham Motto of Winchester College and New College, Oxford William of Wykeham (1320 – September 27, 1404), Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College and of New College, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle, was born in Wickham, Hampshire. ... and of the New College College name New College of St Mary Latin name Collegium Novum Oxoniensis/Collegium Sanctae Mariae Wintoniae Named after Mary, mother of Jesus Established 1379 Sister college Kings College, Cambridge Warden Prof. ...


Broad of Church and broad of mind,
Broad before and broad behind,
A keen ecclesiologist,
A rather dirty Wykehamist.
- John Betjeman "The Wykehamist" A collection of Betjemans poetry, published by John Murray in January 2006 Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family...


Leader in London's preservation lists
And least Wykehamical of Wykehamists{:}
Clan chief of Paddington's distinguished set,
Pray go on living to a hundred yet!
- John Betjeman "For Patrick" (about Patrick Balfour, 3rd Baron Kinross) A collection of Betjemans poetry, published by John Murray in January 2006 Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family...


You can always tell a Wykehamist, but you can't tell him much
- Anon.


These Wykehamists have the kind of mind that likes to relax by composing Alcaics on the moving parts of their toy trains.
- Evelyn Waugh Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ...


Would you doubt the word of a Wykehamist!
- Sir Edward Grey Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Grey of Fallodon (April 25, 1862 - September 7, 1933), better known as Sir Edward Grey was a British politician and ornithologist. ...


O, Eternal God, the Life and the Resurrection of all them that believe in Thee, always to be praised as well for the Dead as for those that be Alive, we give Thee most hearty Thanks for our Founder, William of Wykeham; and all other our Benefactors, by whose Benefits we are here brought up to Godliness and the studies of good Learning; beseeching Thee that we, well using all these Thy Blessings to the Praise and Honour of Thy Holy Name, may at length be brought to the Immortal Glory of the Resurrection, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
- "Thanksgiving for the Founder" as at present used on commemoration days


References

  • Adams, Wykehamica: Oxford, London and Winchester 1878
  • Cook, About Winchester College: London 1917
  • Dilke, Christopher, Dr Moberly's Mint-Mark: A Study of Winchester College: London 1965
  • Fearon, The Passing of Old Winchester: Winchester 1924, repr. 1936
  • Firth, J. D'E., Winchester College: Winchester 1961
  • Kirby, T. F., Annals of Winchester College: London 1892
  • Leach, Arthur F., A History of Winchester College: London 1899
  • Mansfield, Robert, School Life at Winchester College: 1866
  • Sabben-Clare, James, Winchester College: Paul Cave Publications, 1981, ISBN 0861460235
  • Stevens, Charles, Winchester Notions: The English Dialect of Winchester College: London, 1998
  • Tuckwell, The Ancient Ways: Winchester Fifty Years Ago: 1893

John DEwes Evelyn Firth, born at Nottingham, United Kingdom, on February 21, 1900 and died at Winchester on September 21, 1957, won fleeting fame as a schoolboy cricketer at Winchester College during the First World War. ...

See also

The schools of Britain, the British Empire, and later the Commonwealth, have contributed greatly to their armed forces, with some schools having lost hundreds of former pupils, especially in the First and Second World Wars. ... Notions are a highly specialised form of slang used by pupils at Winchester College. ... Match around 1840. ...

External links

  • Winchester College website
  • Victoria County History (Hampshire) s.v. St. Mary's College
  • The Great Conjunction: The Symbols of a College, the Death of a King and the Maze on the Hill (Unpopular Books, 1992), pamphlet by the Archaeogeodetic Association and the London Psychogeographical Association
  • A history of the Quiristers of Winchester College
  • http://www.astoft.co.uk/winchestercollege Pages on the architecture of the College
The London Psychogeographical Association (LPA) is a largely fictitious organisation devoted to psychogeography. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Winchester, England (259 words)
Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,000.
Winchester remained the capital of Wessex, and then England, until some time after the Norman Conquest when the capital was moved to London.
William of Wykeham (1320-1404) played an important role in the history of the town; as bishop of Winchester he was responsible for much of the current structure of the cathedral and also founded Winchester College.
VR Winchester - Tour the historic Hampshire Town of Winchester (335 words)
Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,200.
Winchester was formerly the capital of England, during the 10th and early 11th centuries.
The city of Winchester is twinned with Laon in France and the Winchester district is twinned with Gießen in Germany.
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