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Encyclopedia > Winchester Cathedral
Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close
Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close
View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door
View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door
A plan published in 1911
A plan published in 1911
View of Winchester Cathedral
View of Winchester Cathedral

Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, said to be the second longest, and with the longest nave, in Europe. It is dedicated to the Holy Trinity, Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Swithun and is the seat of the Bishop of Winchester and centre of the Diocese of Winchester. Winchester Cathedral as seen from Cathedral Close. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from Cathedral Close. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (581x882, 378 KB) View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (581x882, 378 KB) View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door. ... Image File history File links WinchesterCathplan. ... Image File history File links WinchesterCathplan. ... Winchester Cathedral from the side, taken by CGS on June 11, 2003. ... Winchester Cathedral from the side, taken by CGS on June 11, 2003. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close Arms of Winchester City Council Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,000. ... Hampshire, sometimes historically Southamptonshire or Hamptonshire, (abbr. ... A cathedral is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishops seat, and thus as the central church of a diocese. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... For other uses, see Trinity (disambiguation). ... Saint Peter, also known as Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... St. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... The Diocese of Winchester forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ...

Contents

Pre-Norman cathedral

Main article: Old Minster, Winchester

The cathedral was originally founded in 642 on an immediately adjoining site to the north. This building was known as the Old Minster. It became part of a monastic settlement in 971. Saint Swithun was buried near the Old Minster and then in it, before being moved to the new Norman cathedral. Mortuary chests said to contain the remains of Saxon kings, first buried in the Old Minster, are also housed in the present cathedral. The Old Minster was demolished in 1093. The Old Minster was the Anglo-Saxon cathedral for the diocese of Wessex and then Winchester from 660 to 1093. ... The Old Minster was the Anglo-Saxon cathedral for the diocese of Wessex and then Winchester from 660 to 1093. ... St. ... The Nave of Durham Cathedral demonstrates the characteristic round arched style, though use of shallow pointed arches above the nave anticipates the Gothic style. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Demolition of the Old Myer Building, Perth, Western Australia. ...


Brief history

Construction of the cathedral began in 1079 under bishop Walkelin. The earliest part of the present building is the crypt, which dates from that time. William II of England (son of William I 'the Conqueror') was buried in the cathedral on 11 August 1100, after he was killed in a hunting accident in the nearby New Forest. The squat, square central tower was begun in 1202 to replace an earlier version which collapsed on top of him. It has an indisputably Norman look to it. Work continued on the cathedral during the 14th century, in 1394 the remodelling of the Norman nave commenced to the designs of master mason William Wynford, this continued into the 15th and 16th centuries, notably with the building of the retrochoir to accommodate the many pilgrims to the shrine of Saint Swithun. The Benedictine foundation, the Priory of Saint Swithun, was dissolved in 1539. The cloister and chapter house were demolished, but the cathedral continued. Walkelin or Walchelin, (died 1098), first Norman bishop of Winchester. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... William II (c. ... William I of England (c. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events William II of England dies in a hunting accident - Henry I becomes King of England King Henry I proclaims the Charter of Liberties, one of the first examples of a constitution. ... For other uses, see New Forest (disambiguation). ... The Nave of Durham Cathedral demonstrates the characteristic round arched style, though use of shallow pointed arches above the nave anticipates the Gothic style. ... William Wynford (flourished 1360-1405)[1] was one of the most successful English master masons of the 14th century, using the new Perpendicular Gothic style. ... Monument to pilgrims in Burgos, Spain This article is on religious pilgrims. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... St. ... A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries, referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the formal process during the English Reformation by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the monastic institutions in England between 1538 and 1541. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is a part of cathedral, monastic and abbey architecture. ... A chapter house is a building or room attached to a cathedral or collegiate church in which meetings are held. ...


Restoration work was carried out by T.G. Jackson during the years 1905–1912, including the famous saving of the building from total collapse. Some waterlogged foundations on the south and east walls were reinforced by a diver, William Walker, packing the foundations with more than 25,000 bags of concrete, 115,000 concrete blocks and 900,000 bricks. He worked six hours a day from 1906 to 1912 in total darkness at depths up to 6 m, and is credited with saving the cathedral from total collapse. For his troubles he was awarded the MVO. William Walker (died 1918) was a diver. ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ...


Events

Important events which took place at Winchester Cathedral include:

Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... ≈68. ... // Birth and life before accession - relationship with Richard II - exile - return and usurpation Henry IV (April 3, 1367 – March 20, 1413) was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire, hence the other name by which he was known, Henry of Bolingbroke. His father, John of Gaunt was the third and oldest... Joanna of Navarre (1370? - 1437) was the daughter of Charles the Bad, King of Navarre. ... Queen Mary I of England (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death. ... Philip II of Spain Philip II (Spanish: Felipe II de Habsburgo; Portuguese: Filipe I) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was the first official King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, King of England (as King-consort of Mary I) from...

Features

Construction (Crucifixion): Homage to Mondrian, outside Winchester Cathedral
Construction (Crucifixion): Homage to Mondrian, outside Winchester Cathedral
Explanation of Construction (Crucifixion): Homage to Mondrian
Explanation of Construction (Crucifixion): Homage to Mondrian

Nowadays the cathedral draws many tourists as a result of its association with Jane Austen, who died in the city and is buried in the cathedral's north aisle of the nave. The original 19th-century marker gave reluctant praise for her writing ability. Much later a more descriptive marker about Austen's talent was placed on a nearby wall. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 3176 KB) Suzanne Knights, my photo, xmas 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 3176 KB) Suzanne Knights, my photo, xmas 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 3127 KB) Suzanne Knights, my photo, xmas 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 3127 KB) Suzanne Knights, my photo, xmas 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... In a modern church an aisle is a row down the middle of the church with a set of pews on each side. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ...


In the south transept there is a "Fishermen's Chapel," which is the burial place of Izaak Walton. Walton, who died in 1683, was the author of The Compleat Angler and a friend of John Donne. Cathedral ground plan. ... Izaak Walton (August 9, 1593 - December 15, 1683) was an English writer, author of The Compleat Angler. ...


The Epiphany Chapel has a series of Pre-Raphaelite stained glass windows designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and made in William Morris's workshop. The foliage decoration above and below each pictorial panel is unmistakably William Morris and at least one of the figures bears a striking resemblance to Morris's wife Jane, who frequently posed for Dante Gabriel Rossetti and other members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris, publisher Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ... Jane Burden (October 19, 1839 – January 1914) was the embodiment of the Pre-Raphaelite ideal of beauty. ... Dante Gabriel Rossetti (May 12, 1828 - April 10, 1882) was an English poet, painter and translator. ... Persephone, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ...


The crypt, which frequently floods, features a statue by Antony Gormley, called "Sound II", installed in 1986, and there is a modern shrine to Saint Swithun. Angel of the North Antony Gormley (born 1950) is an English sculptor, best known as the creator of Angel of the North, a public sculpture in Gateshead. ...


A series of nine icons were installed between 1992 and 1996 in the retroquire screen which for a short time protected the relics of St Swithun destroyed by Henry VIII in 1538. This iconostasis in the Russion Orthodox tradition was created by Sergei Fedorov (sometimes spelt Fyodorov) and dedicated in 1997. The icons include the local religious figures St Swithun and St Birinus. Beneath the retroquire Icons is the Holy Hole once used by pilgrims to crawl beneath and lie close to the healing shrine of St Swithun. The 'external link' below connects to images of each icon and the retroquire.


The cathedral also possesses the only diatonic ring of 14 church bells in the world, with a tenor (heaviest bell) weighing 36 cwt (or approximately 1.83 metric tonnes). Church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden containing an inscription from 1228 in the Runic alphabet A church bell is a bell which is rung in a (especially Christian) church either to signify the hour or the time for worshippers to go to church, perhaps to attend a wedding... Hundred weight or hundredweight is a unit of measurement for mass in both the system of measurement used in the United Kingdom (and previously throughout the British Commonwealth), and in the system used in the United States. ...


Organ and Organists

Organ

Details of the organ from the National Pipe Organ Register


Organists

  • 1402 John Dyes
  •  ???? Richard Wynslade
  • 1572 John Langton
  •  ???? John Holmes
  • 1602 John Lante
  • 1615 George Bath
  • 1631 Thomas Holmes
  • 1638 Christopher Gibbons
  • 1661 John Silver
  • 1666 Randolph Jewitt
  • 1675 John Reading
  • 1681 Daniel Rosingrave
  • 1693 Vaughan Richardson
  • 1729 John Bishop
  • 1737 James Kent
  • 1774 Peter Fusse
  • 1802 George Chard
  • 1849 Samuel Sebastian Wesley
  • 1865 G. B. Arnold
  • 1902 William Prendergast
  • 1933 Harold Rhodes
  • 1949 Alwyn Surplice
  • 1972 Martin Neary
  • 1988 David Hill
  • 2002 Andrew Lumsden

Samuel Sebastian Wesley (14 August 1810 — 19 April 1876) was an English organist and composer. ...

Trivia

Edwy All-Fair or Eadwig (941? – October 1, 959) was the King of England from 955 until his death. ... Elgiva was the wife of king Edwy of England. ... Anthony Trollope (April 24, 1815 – December 6, 1882) became one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. ... Barchester Towers is a novel by Anthony Trollope, first published in 1857. ... Winchester Cathedral is a song released in late 1966, whereupon it shot to the #1 spot on the Billboard Top 11 Hits. ... The New Vaudeville Band was a group created by songwriter Geoff Stephens in 1966 to record his novelty composition Winchester Cathedral, a song inspired by the dance bands of the 1920s. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Crosby, Stills & Nash, also Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young when including occasional fourth member Neil Young, are a folk rock/rock supergroup. ... This article is about the film. ...

External links

List of Anglican Cathedrals in the United Kingdom and Ireland
Anglican Communion

  Results from FactBites:
 
Winchester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (802 words)
Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre.
The famous novelist Jane Austen died in Winchester on 18 July 1817 and is buried in the cathedral.
The city of Winchester is twinned with Laon in France and the Winchester district is twinned with Gießen in Germany.
Winchester Cathedral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (591 words)
Winchester Cathedral in Winchester, Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England.
William II of England (son of William I, "the Conqueror") was buried in the cathedral on August 11, 1100, after he was killed in a hunting accident in nearby New Forest.
Nowadays the cathedral draws many tourists as a result of its association with Jane Austen, who died in the city and is buried in the cathedral's north aisle of the nave.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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