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Encyclopedia > Win (baseball)

In Major League Baseball, a win (denoted W) is generally credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when they last took the lead. A starting pitcher must generally complete five innings to earn a win. Under some exceptions to the general rules, the official scorer awards the win based on guidelines set forth in the official rules. The winning pitcher cannot also be credited with a save in the same game. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... mcv ... In the game of baseball, the official scorer is a person appointed by the league to record the events on the field and to send this official record of the game back to the league offices. ... To save in a sport means to stop a goal or to maintain the lead. ...


The pitchers who receive the win and the loss are known, collectively, as the pitchers of record. In Major League Baseball, a loss (denoted L) is charged to the pitcher of the losing team who allows the run that gives the opposing team the lead which the game is won with (the go-ahead run). ... Pitcher of record is a baseball term that refers to a pitcher who is credited with the win or charged with the loss in a particular game. ...


Every game (excluding the rare tie game) has both a winning and a losing pitcher. A pitcher who starts a game but leaves without earning either a win or a loss (that is, before either team gains or surrenders the ultimate lead) is said to have received a no decision, regardless of his individual performance.


A pitcher's total wins and losses are commonly noted together; a pitching record of 12-10 indicates 12 wins and 10 losses.


In the early years of major league baseball (USA) before 1900 it was common for an exceptional pitcher to win 40 or more games in one season. However, after that, pitchers made fewer and fewer starts and the standard changed. In the first third of the 20th century (especially in the Live Ball Era), winning 30 games became the rare mark of excellent achievement; this standard diminished to 25 games during the 1940s through 1980s (the only pitcher to win 30 or more games during that time was Denny McLain in 1968, in what was an anomalous pitching-dominated season). This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... The Live Ball Era, also referred to as the Lively Ball Era, is the period in Major League Baseball beginning in 1920. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 1980s refers to the years of and between 1980 and 1989. ... Denny McLain, after having won his 30th game of the 1968 season, holds a baseball commemorating the accomplishment at Tiger Stadium; he would win 31 games that season. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ...


Since 1990, this has changed even further, as winning 20 or more games in a single season is now achieved by only a handful of pitchers each season (for example, in 2004 only three of the more than five hundred major league pitchers did so). In 2006, no pitcher won more than 20 games. Winning 25 or more games is now considered one of the highest marks of extreme success and excellence in the sport, on a par with winning 30 or more games a generation or two ago. It is so rare now that the last pitcher to even do this was Bob Welch back in 1990 though it was achieved several times per decade immediately before that. MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Bob Welch was a baseball pitcher in the 1980s, primarily for the Los Angeles Dodgers. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...


Wins have become in an increasingly controversial way of determining a pitcher's brilliance. Some baseball analysts (sabermetricians) argue that many times a win is completely out of the pitcher's control, and in turn a dominant pitcher with weak run support from the offense can have a substantial losing record, which affects Cy Young Award consideration. For instance, in 2004, Milwaukee Brewers starting pitcher Ben Sheets had a losing record of 12-14, despite displaying an easy league best 8:1 strikeout-to-walk ratio and was among baseball's Top 5 in ERA (2.70) and WHIP (0.98). Sabermetrics is the analysis of baseball through objective evidence, especially baseball statistics. ... In baseball, the Cy Young Award is an honor given annually to the best pitchers in the Major Leagues. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970-2000) Sicks Stadium (Seattle) (1969) Major league titles World Series titles (0) None... Ben M. Sheets (born July 18, 1978 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a Major League Baseball pitcher who currently plays for the Milwaukee Brewers baseball team. ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... And distinguish from wip and WIP. Whip from Germany. ...

Contents

Records

Career wins

All the pitchers listed below are members of the 300-win Club, one of the most coveted landmarks for pitchers. Members of the 300-win Club are dead locks for the Baseball Hall of Fame, and all members (except for Greg Maddux and Roger Clemens, who have not retired as of 2006) are indeed Hall-of-Famers. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


The 300th win today is a cause for on-field celebration. The achievement is exceedingly rare in modern times as starters are getting fewer starts.


(Bold denotes active pitchers as of 2006) For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

For the Disney animator, see Cy Young (animator). ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Grover Cleveland Alexander of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1915. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Pud Galvin baseball card, 1887 James Francis Pud Galvin (December 25, 1856 – March 7, 1902), an American professional baseball pitcher, was Major League Baseballs first 300-game winner. ... Warren Edward Spahn (April 23, 1921 – November 24, 2003) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for 21 seasons, all in the National League. ... Kid Nichols of the Philadelphia Phillies at the West Side Grounds in 1905. ... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962 in Dayton, Ohio), nicknamed The Rocket, is one of the preeminent Major League baseball pitchers of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, and is widely considered to be one of the best pitchers of all time[1]. He has won seven Cy Young Awards... Tim Keefe on an 1888 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Goodwin Champions (N162)). Timothy John Keefe (January 1, 1857 - April 23, 1933) was a 19th century Major League Baseball pitcher noted for his longevity and record-setting strikeout totals. ... Gregory Alan Maddux (born April 14, 1966, in San Angelo, Texas, USA) is a pitcher for the San Diego Padres. ... Steven Norman Carlton (born December 22, 1944 in Miami, Florida) is a former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, from 1965 to 1988, who retired as one of the most successful pitchers to ever play the game. ... 1905 photograph of baseball player John Clarkson. ... Eddie Plank of the Philadelphia Athletics at South Side Park in 1905. ... Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... Donald Howard Sutton (born April 2, 1945 in Clio, Alabama) is a former Major League Baseball player and current television sportscaster. ... 1970 Topps super card #15 Philip Henry Niekro (born April 1, 1939 in Blaine, Ohio) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball and member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Gaylord Jackson Perry (born September 15, 1938 in Williamston, North Carolina) is a All-Star Major League Baseball pitcher and member of the United States Baseball Hall of Fame. ... George Thomas Seaver (born November 17, 1944 in Fresno, California) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who broke into the major leagues in 1967 and retired in 1986. ... Charles Radbourn on a 1887-1890 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge (N172)). Charles Gardner Radbourn (December 11, 1854 - February 5, 1897), nicknamed Old Hoss, was a pitcher in Major League Baseball prior to the turn of the 20th century. ... Michael Francis Welch (July 4, 1859 - July 30, 1941), also known as Mickey Welch, was a 19th century Major League Baseball starting pitcher. ... Robert Moses Lefty Grove (March 6, 1900 - May 22, 1975) was one of the greatest pitchers in Major League Baseball history. ... Early Wynn (January 6, 1920 – April 4, 1999) was a right-handed baseball pitcher for the Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ...

See also

In Major League Baseball, a win is generally credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when they last took the lead. ...

External links

  • Winning-losing pitcher - MLB Official Rule 10.19

  Results from FactBites:
 
Win (baseball) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (638 words)
In baseball, a pitcher is credited with a win (or "W") when, in a game won by his team, he is the team's pitcher at the time that his team takes a lead that it does not relinquish for the remainder of the game.
Winning 25 or more games is now considered one of the highest marks of extreme success and excellence in the sport, on a par with winning 30 or more games a generation or two ago.
A fair amount of baseball critics argue that many times a win is completely out of the pitcher's control, and in turn a dominant pitcher with weak run support from the offense can have a substantial losing record, which affects Cy Young Award consideration.
SignOnSanDiego.com > Sports > Baseball (1084 words)
Bonds was fined $5,000 for wearing wristbands that violated baseball's apparel rules because of their size and logo design.
Plucked off baseball's scrap heap a couple of years ago, Detroit's redheaded first baseman is now more than a curiosity or cute, opening-week story.
A seven-time MVP who, if many baseball people have their way and some diligent investigators uncover the steroidal stench, will be out of baseball sometime in the near future.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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