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Encyclopedia > Wimbledon, London
Wimbledon
OS grid reference TQ239709
London borough Merton
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LONDON
Postcode district SW19, SW20
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
UK Parliament Wimbledon
London Assembly Merton and Wandsworth
European Parliament London
List of places: UKEnglandLondon

Coordinates: 51°25′25″N 0°13′02″W / 51.4235, -0.2171 Image File history File links Greater_london_outline_map_bw. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The London Borough of Merton is a London borough in south west London. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... The London postal districts are divisions of the London post town in England and are primarily used for the direction of mail. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The SW (South Western and Battersea) postcode area, also known as the London SW postcode area[1] is a group of postcode districts in south west London, England. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... 020 is the dial code for Greater London in the United Kingdom. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Wimbledon is a constituency covering the district of Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton in south-west London. ... Greater London is divided into a number of constituencies for London Assembly elections. ... Merton and Wandsworth is a constituency represented in the London Assembly. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... London is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a partial list of places in London, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Wimbledon (pronounced ['wɪmbəldən]) is a suburb of London, part of the London Borough of Merton and located seven miles (11.3 km) south west of Charing Cross. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... Wimbledon is a film released in September 2004. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The London Borough of Merton is a London borough in south west London. ... The Victorian Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The name Charing Cross, now given to a district of central London in the City of Westminster, comes from the original hamlet of Charing, where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile. ...


For most of the past one hundred years, Wimbledon has been internationally known as the home of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships. The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ...

Contents

Name

The name Wimbledon means "Wynnman's hill", with the final element of the name being the Old English dun (hill).[1] The current spelling appears to have been settled on relatively recently in the early 19th century, the last in a long line of variations. Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ...


The village is referred to as "Wimbedounyng" in a charter signed by King Edgar the Peaceful in 967 and is shown on J Cary's 1786 map of the London area as "Wimbleton". King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ... Events Emperor Reizei ascends to the throne of Japan The Khazar capital of Atil falls to the Kievan Rus around this year Births Deaths Emperor Murakami of Japan Abu al-Faraj Ali of Isfahan, scholar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


History

Early history

Wimbledon has been inhabited since at least the Iron Age when the hill fort on Wimbledon Common is thought to have been constructed. The original centre of Wimbledon was at the top of the hill close to the common - the area now known locally as "the village". Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... A hill fort is a fortified refuge or defended settlement, located to exploit a rise in elevation for military advantage. ... The windmill on Wimbledon Common in February 2005 A map of Wimbledon common from 1944 Wimbledon and Putney Commons consist of a large open space in south-west London comprising 1140 acres (4. ...


In 1087 when the Domesday Book was compiled, Wimbledon was part of the manor of Mortlake. The ownership of the manor of Wimbledon changed hands many times during its history. The manor was held by the church until 1398 when Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury fell out of favour with Richard II and was exiled. The manor was confiscated and became crown property. Events May 9 - The remains of Saint Nicholas were brought to Bari. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Mortlake is a part of south west London between Sheen and Barnes and bounded by the river Thames to the north. ... Events Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland destroyed. ... Thomas Arundel (1353-1414) was Archbishop of Canterbury in 1397 and from 1399 until his death, an outspoken opponent of the Lollards. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born in Bordeaux and became his fathers successor when his elder brother died in infancy. ...


16th century

The manor remained crown property until the reign of Henry VIII when it was granted briefly to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex until Cromwell was executed in 1540 and the land was again confiscated. The manor was next held by Henry VIII's last wife and widow Catherine Parr until her death in 1548 when it again reverted to the monarch. “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Thomas Cromwell: portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, 1532–3 Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex ( 1485 – July 28, 1540) was an English statesman, King Henry VIII of Englands chief minister 1532–1540. ... Earl of Essex is a title that has been held by several families and individuals, of which the best-known and most closely associated with the title was Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (1566 - 1601). ... Year 1540 was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Catherine Parr (c. ... Events Mary I of Scotland sent to France Births September 2 - Vincenzo Scamozzi, Italian architect (died 1616) September 29 - William V, Duke of Bavaria (died 1626) Francesco Andreini, Italian actor (died 1624) Giordano Bruno, Italian philosopher, astronomer, and occultist (burned at the stake) 1600 (died 1600) Honda Tadakatsu, Japanese general... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ...


In the 1550s, Henry's daughter, Mary I, granted the manor to Cardinal Reginald Pole who held it until his death in 1558 when it once again become royal property. Mary's sister, Elizabeth I held the property until 1574 when she gave the manor house (but not the manor) to Christopher Hatton who sold it in the same year to Sir Thomas Cecil, Earl of Exeter. The lands of the manor were given to the Cecil family in 1588 and a new manor house was constructed and gardens laid out in the formal Elizabethan style. Events and Trends Categories: 1550s ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... The coat of arms of a Cardinal are indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual Cardinal). ... Reginald Pole (1500 – November 17, 1558) was an English prelate, Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Year 1574 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Christopher Hatton, c. ... Thomas Cecil (May 5, 1546-February 8, 1623), eldest son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, was created 1st Earl of Exeter on May 4, 1605, the same day his half-brother Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cranborne was created 1st Earl of Salisbury. ... The title of Marquess of Exeter was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1801 for the Earl of Exeter. ... 1588 was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ...


17th century

Wimbledon's convenient proximity to the capital was beginning to attract other wealthy families and in 1613 Robert Bell, Master of the Worshipful Company of Girdlers and a director of the British East India Company built Eagle House as a home at an easy distance from London. The Cecil family retained the manor for fifty years before it was bought by Charles I in 1638 for his Queen, Henrietta Maria. Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. ... The Worshipful Company of Girdlers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Events March 29 - Swedish colonists establish first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden. ... Henrietta Maria Henrietta Maria (November 25, 1609 - September 10, 1669) was Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland (June 13, 1625 - January 30, 1649) through her marriage to Charles I. The U.S. state of Maryland (in Latin, Terra Maria) was so named in her honour by Cæcilius Calvert...


Following the King's execution in 1649, the manor passed rapidly through various parliamentarian ownerships including Leeds MP Adam Baynes and civil war general John Lambert but, following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, was back in the ownership of Henrietta Maria (now Charles I's widow and mother of the new King, Charles II). // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Adam Baynes was a MP for Leeds during the Commonwealth, and as such the first MP for the city. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... John Lambert (1619 - 1684) served as an English Parliamentary general in the English Civil War. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...


The Dowager Queen sold the manor in 1661 to George Digby, Earl of Bristol who employed John Evelyn to improve and update the landscape in accordance with the latest fashions including grottos and fountains. On his death in 1677 the manor was sold on again to the Lord High Treasurer, Thomas Osborne, Earl of Danby. A Queen Dowager or Dowager Queen is a title or status generally held by the widow of a reigning king. ... 1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... George Digby, 2nd Earl of Bristol (<22 February 1612 - 20 May 1677), eldest son of the 1st earl. ... Marquess of Bristol is a title in the peerage of the United Kingdom held by a member of the Hervey family since 1714. ... John Evelyn. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... 1677 (MDCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Lord High Treasurer bears a white staff as his symbol of office. ... Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke of Leeds (February 20, 1631 - July 26, 1712), English statesman, commonly known also by his earlier title of Earl of Danby, served in a variety of offices under Kings Charles II and William III of England. ... The title Duke of Leeds was created in 1694 for the 1st Marquess of Carmarthen and became extinct on the death of the 12th Duke in 1964. ...


18th century

The Osborne family sold the manor to Sir Theodore Janssen in 1712. Janssen, a director of The South Sea Company, began a new house to replace the Cecil-built manor house but, due to the spectacular collapse of the company, never finished it. Sir Theodore Janssen, 1st Baronet (c. ... // Events Treaty of Aargau signed between Catholic and Protestants. ... Hogarthian image of the South Sea Bubble by Edward Matthew Ward, Tate Gallery More well known than The South Sea Company is perhaps the South Sea Bubble (1711 - September 1720) which is the name given to the economic bubble that occurred through overheated speculation in the company shares during 1720. ...


The next owner was Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough who increased the land belonging to the manor and completed the construction of a house to replace Janssen's unfinished effort in 1735. On her death in 1744, the property passed to her grandson, John Spencer, and subsequently to the first Earl Spencer. Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, c. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... The title Earl Spencer was created in 1765 in the Peerage of Great Britain for John Spencer, 1st Viscount Spencer, a great-grandson of the 1st Duke of Marlborough. ...


The village continued to grow and the introduction in the 18th century of stagecoach services from the Dog and Fox public house made the journey to London routine, although not without the risk of being held-up by highwaymen such as Jerry Abershawe on the Portsmouth Road. The 1735 manor house burnt down in the 1780s and was replaced with Wimbledon Park House in 1801 by the second Earl. At this time the manor lands included Wimbledon Common (then called a heath) and the enclosed parkland around the manor house. The area of the park corresponded to the modern Wimbledon Park area, The house was situated to the east of St Mary's church. Stagecoach in Switzerland A stagecoach is a type of four-wheeled enclosed passenger and/or mail coach, strongly sprung and drawn by four horses, widely used before the introduction of railway transport. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... Jerry Abershawe (1773-1795) was a notorious highwayman who terrorised travellers along the road between London and Portsmouth in the late 18th century. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Nothing much really happened in the 1780s only that Mary-Anne Tobin was hung in public for wearing a flase beard and voting. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The Right Honourable Sir George John Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer KG PC FRS FSA (1 September 1758–10 November 1834) was a Whig politician of the late 18th and early 19th century. ... Wimbledon and Putney Commons consist of a large open space south west of London comprising 1140 acres (4. ... Heath comes from Old English hæð tract of wasteland, from Proto-Germanic *khaiþijo (cognate with Old Irish ciad; see also heather, heathen) refers to a wild meadow or open, unploughed country, see Heath (habitat). ... Wimbledon park is the second biggest park in the whole of the london borough of merton, it was renovated in the year 2001, with the help of the local council and the local millionnaire [Gemini Murthen]. The facilities provided within the park is ideal for the people living around it...


Wimbledon House, a separate residence close to the village at the south end of Parkside (near present day Peek Crescent), was home in the 1790s to the exiled French statesman Vicomte de Calonne, and later to the mother of writer Frederick Marryat. Their association with the area is recorded in the names of nearby Calonne and Marryat Roads. Events and Trends French Revolution (1789 - 1799). ... Charles Alexandre de Calonne, portrait by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun. ... Captain Frederick Marryat (July 10, 1792 – August 9, 1848) was an English novelist, a contemporary and acquaintance of Charles Dickens, noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story. ...


To the south of the common, the early 18th century Warren House (called Cannizaro House from 1841) was home to a series of grand residents. Cannizaro Park is a park in Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


19th century

Wimbledon's Population
19th Century 20th Century
1801 1,591 1901 41,652
1811 1,914 1911 54,966
1821 2,195 1921 61,418
1831 2,195 1931 59,524
1841 2,630 1941¹ war
1851 2,693 1951 58,141
1861 4,644 1961 57,312
1871 9,087 1971 53,844
1881 15,951 1981 47,834
1891 25,761 1991² n/a
  1. no census was held due to war
  2. census data no longer relates to parish boundaries
source: UK census

The first decades of the 19th century were relatively quiet for Wimbledon, with a stable rural population coexisting alongside nobility and wealthy merchants from the city, but renewed upheaval came in 1838 when the opening of the London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) brought a station to the south east of the village at the bottom of Wimbledon hill. The location of the station shifted the focus of the town's subsequent growth away from the original village centre. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Waterloo Station The London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) was a railway company in England from 1840 to 1923. ...


For a number of years Wimbledon Park was leased to the Duke of Somerset, who briefly in the 1820s employed a young Joseph Paxton as one of his gardeners, but, in the 1840s, the Spencer family sold the park as building land. A period of residential development began with the construction of large detached houses in the north of the park. In 1864, the Spencers attempted to get parliamentary permission[2] to enclose the common for the creation of a new park with a house and gardens and to sell part for building. Following an enquiry, permission was refused and a board of conservators was established in 1871[3][4] to take ownership of the common and preserve it in its natural condition. Wimbledon park is the second biggest park in the whole of the london borough of merton, it was renovated in the year 2001, with the help of the local council and the local millionnaire [Gemini Murthen]. The facilities provided within the park is ideal for the people living around it... The Most Noble Edward Adolphus St. ... Nationalistic independence helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece gains independence from the Ottoman Empire in the Greek War of Independence (1821-1827). ... Sir Joseph Paxton (1803–1865) was an English gardener and architect of The Crystal Palace. ... // First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi, Northland New Zealand. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Enclosure (disambiguation). ...


Transport links expanded further with new railway lines to Croydon (Wimbledon and Croydon Railway, opened in 1855) and Tooting (Tooting, Merton and Wimbledon Railway, opened in 1868). The Metropolitan District Railway (now London Underground's District Line) extended its service over new tracks from Putney in 1889. Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Metropolitan Railway (MetR) and the Metropolitan District Railway (District) were the first two underground railways to be constructed in London, starting in the 1860s, and the first of the worlds metro systems. ... The London Underground is a transit system that serves much of Greater London and some neighbouring areas. ... The District Line is a line of the London Underground, coloured green on the Tube map. ...


In the second half of the century Wimbledon experienced a very rapid expansion of its population. From a small base of just under 2,700 residents recorded in the 1851 census, the population grew by a minimum of 60 per cent each decade up to 1901 increasing fifteenfold in fifty years. During this time large numbers of villas and terraced houses were built out along the roads from the centre towards neighbouring Putney, Merton Park and Raynes Park. 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Merton Park is a place in the London Borough of Merton. ... Raynes Park is a primarily residential area within the London Borough of Merton. ...


The commercial and civic development of the town also accelerated during this period. Ely's department store opened in 1876 and shops began to stretch along the Broadway towards Merton. Wimbledon got its first police station in 1870, situated in Victoria Crescent. Cultural developments included a Literary Institute by the early 1860s and the opening of Wimbledon Library in 1887. The religious needs of the growing population were dealt with by a church building programme starting with the rebuilding of St Mary's Church in 1849 and the construction of Christ Church (1859) and Trinity Church (1862). The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about 1862 . ...


The change of character of Wimbledon from village to small town was recognised in 1894 when, under the Local Government Act 1894, it formed the Wimbledon Urban District with an elected council. The Local Government Act 1894 (57 & 58 Vict. ... There is no single system of local government in the United Kingdom. ...


20th century

The Broadway, looking east from Wimbledon Bridge
The Broadway, looking east from Wimbledon Bridge
Wimbledon Hill Road, looking north-west from Wimbledon Bridge
Wimbledon Hill Road, looking north-west from Wimbledon Bridge

Wimbledon's population continued to grow at the start of the 20th century, a condition recognised in 1905 when the urban district was incorporated as the Municipal Borough of Wimbledon, with the power to select a Mayor. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 1960 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 1960 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 1960 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 521 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 1960 pixel, file size: 2. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901&#8211;2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900&#8211;1999... Wimbledon (pronounced ) is a suburb of London, part of the London Borough of Merton and located seven miles (11. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ...


By the end of the first decade of the new century Wimbledon had established the beginnings of the Wimbledon School of Art at the Gladstone Road Technical Institute and acquired its first cinema and the theatre. Somewhat unusually, at its opening the theatre's facilities included a Turkish baths. Wimbledon School of Art is an art school based in the British capital of London, albeit some way adrift of the city centre. ...


In 1931 the council built itself a new red brick and Portland stone Town Hall next to the station on the corner of Queen's Road and Wimbledon Bridge. The architects were Bradshaw Gass & Hope. The Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, England, is made from Portland stone Portland stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. ... English firm of Architects founded in 1862 by John Jonas Bradshaw (1837-1912). ...


By the 1930s residential expansion had peaked in Wimbledon and the new focus for local growth had moved to neighbouring Morden which had remained rural until the arrival of the Underground at Morden station in 1926. Wimbledon station was rebuilt by Southern Railway with a simple Portland stone facade for the opening of a new railway branch line from Wimbledon to Sutton. The Wimbledon to Sutton line opened in 1930. The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Morden is a place in the London Borough of Merton. ... Morden tube station is a London Underground station in Morden in the London Borough of Merton. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wimbledon station is a National Rail, London Underground, and Tramlink station located in Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton. ... The Southern Railway in the United Kingdom was the smallest of the four railway systems created in the Grouping ordered by the Railways Act 1921. ... Sutton railway station is the main station for Sutton in South London. ... Route of the Wimbledon & Sutton Railway on a 1920s map The Wimbledon and Sutton Railway (W&SR) was a railway company established by an Act of Parliament in 1910 to build a railway line in Surrey (now south-west London) from Wimbledon to Sutton via Merton and Morden. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Damage to housing stock in Wimbledon and other parts of London during the Second World War led to the final major building phase when many of the earlier Victorian houses built with large grounds in Wimbledon Park were sub-divided into apartments or demolished and replaced with apartment blocks. Other parts of Wimbledon Park which had previously escaped being built upon saw local authority estates constructed by the borough council to house some of those who had lost their homes. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In 1965, the London Government Act 1963 abolished the Municipal Borough of Wimbledon, the Merton and Morden Urban District and the Municipal Borough of Mitcham and in their place created the London Borough of Merton. Initially, the new borough's administrative centre was at Wimbledon Town Hall but this moved to the fourteen storey Crown House in Morden in the early 1990s. The London Government Act 1963 was an Act of the UK parliament which led to the official recognition of the conurbation known as Greater London. ... Merton Urban District was an urban district in Surrey created in 1907 to cover the parish of Merton. ... Mitcham is a place in the London Borough of Merton. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


54 Parkside is home to the Papal Nuncio (ambassador) to Great Britain. Karl-Josef Rauber; Nuncio for Belgium Nuncio is an ecclesiastical diplomatic title, derived from the ancient Latin Nuntius, meaning any envoy. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ...


During the 1970s and 1980s Wimbledon town centre struggled to compete commercially with the more developed centres at Kingston and Sutton. Part of the problem was the shortage of locations for large anchor stores to attract custom. After a number of years in which the council seemed unable to find a solution The Centre Court shopping centre was developed on land next to the station providing the much needed focus for retail expansion. The shopping centre incorporated the old town hall building. A new portico, in keeping with the old work, was designed by Sir George Grenfell-Baines who had worked on the original designs over fifty years earlier. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... View of Sutton town centre, as seen from the top of the Gibson Road car park. ... Professor Sir George Grenfell-Baines OBE DL (30 April 1908 to 9 May 2003) was an English architect and town planner. ...


Present day

As it was in the 16th and 17th centuries, Wimbledon's attraction remains its combination of convenient access to central London with the benefit of plentiful recreational facilities. Strong demand for homes, especially the larger properties in the Wimbledon Village and Wimbledon Park areas, has seen prices increase to amongst the highest in the outer London area.


Wimbledon Village provides a good collection of bistros, restaurants and pubs and during the fortnight of the tennis championship the streets are crowded with visitors enjoying the facilities. The newly reopened New Wimbledon Theatre on the Broadway is also popular throughout London, bringing in a large number of West End productions. For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... New Wimbledon Theatre The New Wimbledon Theatre is situated on The Broadway, Wimbledon, London. ...


There is a Buddhist temple where on 15 August of every year a chariot festival takes place, open to the general public. is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sport

Although now best known as the home of tennis, this was not the first sport to bring Wimbledon national fame.


Football

Wimbledon has also been well known for another period of sporting fame. From a small, long-established non-League team, Wimbledon Football Club had, starting in 1977, climbed quickly through the ranks of the football league structure, reaching the highest national professional league in 1986 and winning the FA Cup against Liverpool in 1988. Non-league football refers to football in England played at a level below that of the FA Premier League and The Football League. ... Wimbledon F.C. crest This article refers to the original club from London which existed until 2003. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


However, the close proximity of other more established teams such as Chelsea and Fulham and its small ground, meant that the club never developed its fan base to the size needed to maintain a top flight team. In 2000 the team was relegated from the top division of English football after 14 years - the start of a rapid decline. Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Fulham Football Club are an English football team based in Fulham, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Having already played their matches outside their home territory at neighbouring Crystal Palace's Selhurst Park since 1991 when their former Plough Lane ground was left for financial reasons, an FA commission controversially allowed the owners of the club to re-locate 70 miles north to the town of Milton Keynes in, despite vehement fan protests. This repesented a previously unheard-of acceptance by the FA of American style sports team franchising, and the decision was universally criticised. Crystal Palace Football Club is an English professional football team based in the London Borough of Croydon. ... Selhurst Park is a football stadium in south London, and is the current home ground of Crystal Palace F.C. Its present capacity is 26, 247. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Plough Lane was a football stadium in the Wimbledon area of south London. ... Fa or FA may refer to: Federal Association, Federal Savings Bank Financial Adviser The Football Association, England First ascent, climbing Free agency Fallen Angels, a clan spanning many role-playing games In solfege, fa is the name of the fourth note of the scale Farm Aid Fame Academy Fiery Avenger... , Milton Keynes is a large town in northern Buckinghamshire, in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London, and roughly halfway between London and Birmingham. ...


As soon as The Football Association approved this move in May 2002, former Wimbledon FC supporters founded their own replacement club, the semi-professional AFC Wimbledon, and the club's support overwhelmingly shifted to the new team, who in their second and third seasons of existence earned successive promotions to the First then Premier Divisions of the Isthmian League. The club also won the Combined Counties League Premier Challenge Cup in 2004 and the Surrey Senior Cup in 2005 to complete consecutive league and cup doubles. The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Wimbledon (full name AFC Wimbledon) is a semi-professional English football club, affiliated to both the London and Surrey FAs, and representing the area of Wimbledon in south London. ... The Isthmian League First Division (also known for sponsorship reasons as the Ryman League First Division) was part of the Isthmian League, an English association football league. ... The Premier Division is the top division of the Isthmian League. ... The Isthmian League is a regional football league covering London and South East England. ...


Rifle shooting

In the 1860s, the newly formed National Rifle Association held its first competition on Wimbledon Common. The association and the annual competition grew rapidly and by the early 1870s, rifle ranges were established on the common. In 1878 the competitions were lasting two weeks and attracting nearly 2,500 competitors, housed in temporary camps set up across the common. By the 1880s, however, the power and range of rifles had advanced to the extent that shooting in an increasingly populated area was no longer considered safe. The last meeting was held in 1889 before the NRA moved to Bisley in Surrey. The National Rifle Association of Great Britain (NRA) is the Governing Body of full bore rifle and pistol shooting in the United Kingdom. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The village of Bisley, in Surrey, England, is well known to rifle marksmen around the world. ... This article is about the English county. ...


Tennis

In the 1870s, at the bottom of the hill on land between the railway line and Worple Road, the All-England Croquet Club had begun to hold its annual championships. But the popularity of croquet was waning as the new sport of lawn tennis began to spread and after initially setting aside just one of its lawns for tennis, the club decided to hold its first Lawn Tennis Championship in July 1877. By 1922, the popularity of tennis had grown to the extent that the club's small ground could no longer cope with the numbers of spectators and the renamed All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club moved to new grounds close to Wimbledon Park. For the Smalltalk based 3D software platform, see Croquet project. ... This article is about the sport, tennis. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club is based at Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton, at grid reference TQ242721. ...


Wimbledon historian Richard Milward recounts how King George V opened the new courts. "He gave three blows on a gong, the tarpaulins were removed, the first match started - and the rain came down..." The club's old grounds continue to be used as the sports ground for Wimbledon High School. George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Wimbledon High School Logo . Wimbledon High School is an independent all-girls school in Wimbledon, southwest London. ...


Horse racing

In 1792 the Rev. Daniel Lysons published The Environs of London: being an historical account of the towns, villages, and hamlets, within twelve miles of that capital in which he wrote: "In the early part of the present century there were annual races upon this common, which had then a King's plate." However, he gives no further details and does not say how successful the horse racing was or how long it lasted. Daniel Lysons (1762 - 1834) was a notable English antiquary and topographer of the late 18th and early 19th century, who published the four-volume The Environs of London (published 1792 to 1796). ...


Motorcycle Speedway at Wimbledon Stadium

For many years Wimbledon Stadium has been host to Greyhound racing [1] as well as Stock car racing [2] and Speedway. Wimbledon Greyhound Stadium is a dog racing track located in Earlsfield in southwest London, England. ... Several greyhounds before a race. ... NEXTEL Cup drivers practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 Stock car racing is a form of automobile racing found mainly in the United States and Great Britain held largely on oval rings of between approximately a quarter-mile and 2. ... A speedway race in Poland Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps. ...


Speedway began at Wimbledon Stadium in 1928 and the local team, the "Dons" [3], was very successful over the decades. In the Dons' last season, 2005, the team finshed 2nd in The National Conference League. However, following the collapse of lease renewal talks between the speedway promoters and the Greyhound Racing Association (the owners of the stadium) due to the high increase in rent required by the GRA, the team were wound up. Greyhound racing and Stock car racing continue to take place. Wimbledon Greyhound Stadium is a dog racing track located in Earlsfield in southwest London, England. ...


Literature

In the world of literature, Wimbledon provides the principal setting for several comic novels by author Nigel Williams (including the best-selling The Wimbledon Poisoner and They Came from SW19) as well as for Elisabeth Beresford's series of children's stories about the Wombles. Nigel Williams (born January 20, 1948 in Cheadle,Cheshire ) is a British novelist, screenwriter and playwright. ... The Wimbledon Trilogy consists of three books written by Nigel Williams set in Wimbledon, London and published by Faber & Faber: The Wimbledon Poisoner (1990, ISBN 978-0571161317) : Henry Farr, a struggling solicitor is desperate to get rid of his wife, Elinor and decides to poison her, following the example of... The Wimbledon Trilogy consists of three books written by Nigel Williams set in Wimbledon, London and published by Faber & Faber: The Wimbledon Poisoner (1990, ISBN 978-0571161317) : Henry Farr, a struggling solicitor is desperate to get rid of his wife, Elinor and decides to poison her, following the example of... Elisabeth Beresford (also known as Liza) is an author of childrens books, best known for creating the Wombles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Wimbledon was also the site where the sixth Martian invasion cylinder landed in H.G. Wells' book The War of the Worlds and is mentioned briefly in his books, The Time Machine and When the Sleeper Wakes. A Martian is a hypothetical or fictional native inhabitant of the planet Mars. ... H. G. Wells at the door of his house at Sandgate Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 - August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for his science fiction novels such as The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine. ... The War of the Worlds (1898), by H. G. Wells, is an early science fiction novel (or novella) which describes an invasion of England by aliens from Mars. ... The Time Machine is a novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1895, later made into two films of the same title. ... The Sleeper Awakes is a dystopian novel by H. G. Wells about a man who sleeps for two hundred and three years, waking up in a completely transformed London, where, because of compound interest on his bank accounts, he has become the richest man in the world. ...


Notable residents

Bob Astles (born 1924), called Lubowa among the Ngo clan, was a former British soldier who lived in Uganda and became an associate of Idi Amin. ... The President of Uganda is the head of state in Uganda. ... Obote pictured at the beginning of his second regime in 1980 Apollo Milton Obote (December 28, 1924, Apac, Uganda – October 10, 2005, Johannesburg, South Africa), Prime Minister of Uganda 1962-1966 and President of Uganda 1966-1971/1980-1985, was a Ugandan political leader who led Uganda to independence in... Idi Amin Dada (mid-1920s[1]–16 August 2003) was an army officer and president of Uganda. ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, and founder of the Scout Movement. ... This article is about the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts/Girl Guides organizations. ... Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship Through Woodcraft is the first book on Scouting. ... Wimbledon and Putney Commons consist of a large open space south west of London comprising 1140 acres (4. ... Memorial to Sir Joseph Bazalgette on Victoria Embankment Sir Joseph William Bazalgette (28 March 1819 – 15 March 1891) was one of the great Victorian civil engineers. ... Cholera (or Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is a severe diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... Raymond Briggs in his studio Raymond Briggs (born January 18, 1934) is a British illustrator, cartoonist, and author who has achieved critical and popular success among adults and children. ... Josephine Elizabeth Butler (1828 - 1906) was a Victorian era feminist campaigner who was primarily interested in the welfare of prostitutes. ... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ... Charles Alexandre de Calonne, portrait by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun. ... George Edward Cates was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... Sir Ernst Boris Chain (June 19, 1906 – August 12, 1979) was a German-born British biochemist, and a 1945 co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his work on penicillin. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... For the Japanese rock band, see Penicillin (band). ... Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, c. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III and II. Her Roman Catholic father, James II and VII, was forcibly deposed in 1688; her brother-in-law and her sister then became joint monarchs as William III... Steve Curtis MBE (born 9 June 1964 in Wimbledon) is an English eight time offshore powerboat racing World Champion. ... Offshore powerboat racing is racing by large, ocean-going powerboats, typically point-to-point racing. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Hugh La(u/w)rence Laurie Doherty (born October 8, 1875 – died August 21, 1919) was a British male tennis player and younger brother of Reggie Doherty. ... Reginald Reggie Frank Doherty (October 14, 1872 - December 29, 1910) was a British male tennis player and older brother of Laurie Doherty. ... “Dowding” redirects here. ... Fighter Command was one of three functional commands that dominated the public perception of the RAF for much of the mid-20th century. ... Combatants United Kingdom Including combatants from:[1] Poland New Zealand Canada Czechoslovakia Belgium Australia South Africa France Ireland United States Jamaica Palestine Rhodesia Germany Including combatants from Italy Commanders Hugh Dowding Hermann Göring Strength 754 single-seat fighters 149 two-seat fighters 560 bombers 500 coastal 1,963 total... Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (April 28, 1742 - May 28, 1811) was a British statesman. ... The title of Viscount Melville was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1802 for Henry Dundas, a notable politician of the period. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... Mark Edgley Smith (born in Wimbledon, 20 March 1955) is a British composer. ... Flora Gare is a British sculptor, born February 1973, in Wimbledon, South London. ... Nerissa (1906) John William Godward John William Godward (9 August 1861 – 13 December 1922) was an English painter from the end of the Pre-Raphaelite / Neo-Classicist era. ... Charles Ranke Patrick Graves (December 1, 1899 – February 21, 1971) was a journalist and writer. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Victoria Hamilton (born 5 April 1971) is a British actress. ... The Right Honourable George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen, PC (January 28, 1784–December 14, 1860) was a Tory/Peelite politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1852 until 1855. ... Haile Selassie I (Geez: , Power of the Trinity; July 23, 1892 – August 27, 1975) was de jure Emperor of Ethiopia from 1930 to 1974 and de facto from 1916 to 1936 and 1941 to 1974. ... The Abyssinia Crisis was a pre-WW2 diplomatic crisis originating in the conflict between Italy and Ethiopia (then called Abyssinia by the British). ... Georgette Heyer (pronounced hair) (16 August 1902 – 4 July 1974) was an English Historical romance and detective fiction novelist. ... // Isaac Leslie Hore-Belisha, 1st Baron Hore-Belisha, PC (September 7, 1893 – February 16, 1957) was a British Liberal Member of Parliament and Cabinet Minister remembered for his innovations in road transport and for being an alleged victim of anti-semitism. ... The Secretary of State for Transport is the member of the cabinet responsible for the British Department for Transport. ... Top of a Belisha Beacon A Belisha Beacon is a flashing orange globe atop a tall black and white pole. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... John Horne Tooke (June 25, 1736 - March 18, 1812), was an English politician and philologist. ... A statue of Thomas Hughes at Rugby School Thomas Hughes (October 20, 1822 – March 22, 1896) was an English lawyer and author. ... Cover of 1999 re-issue by Oxford Worlds Classics Tom Browns Schooldays, first published in 1857, is a novel by Thomas Hughes, set at a public school, Rugby School for Boys, in the 1830s when Hughes himself had been a student there. ... For other persons named James Hunt, see James Hunt (disambiguation). ... Vincent Peter Jones (born 5 January 1965) is an English-born ex-footballer (and former captain of the Wales national football team). ... Don Lang (born Gordon Langhorn, 18 January 1925, Halifax, Yorkshire - died 3 August 1992, Surrey [1]) was a trombone player and singer, who led his own British band called Don Lang & his Frantic Five. ... Bill Haley, with his band, the Comets, was one of the first rock and roll acts to tour the United Kingdom. ... The Six-Five Special was a television programme launched in February 1957 when both television and rock and roll were in their infancy in Britain. ... Glen Little (born 15 October 1975, Wimbledon, England) is an English footballer. ... Captain Frederick Marryat (July 10, 1792 – August 9, 1848) was an English novelist, a contemporary and acquaintance of Charles Dickens, noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story. ... Sir Joseph Norman Lockyer or Norman Lockyer (May 17, 1836 – August 16, 1920) was an English scientist and astronomer. ... General Name, Symbol, Number helium, He, 2 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 1, s Appearance colorless Standard atomic weight 4. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... Catherine II (&#1045;&#1082;&#1072;&#1090;&#1077;&#1088;&#1080;&#1085;&#1072; II &#1040;&#1083;&#1077;&#1082;&#1089;&#1077;&#1077;&#1074;&#1085;&#1072;: Yekateri&#769;na II Alekse&#769;yevna, April 21, 1729 - November 6, 1796), born Sophie Augusta Fredericka, known as Catherine the Great, reigned as empress of Russia from... The State Hermitage Museum (Russian: ) in Saint Petersburg, Russia is one of the largest museums in the world, with 3 million works of art (not all on display at once), [1] and one of the oldest art galleries and museums of human history and culture in the world. ... Sir Thomas Ralph Merton KBE, DSc, FRS (1888-1969) was an English physicist. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 &#8211; October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... -1... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lord Cottenham wearing ceremonial robes when presiding in the House of Lords as Lord Chancellor. ... Robert Oliver Reed (February 13, 1938 – May 2, 1999) was an English actor known for his macho image on and off screen. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher. ... Jack Stanley (b. ... Jamie Treays (born January 8, 1986), known by his stage name Jamie T, is a 21-year-old English singer/songwriter from Wimbledon, South London. ... Joseph Toynbee (1815-1866) was an English otologist and father of economic historian Arnold Toynbee (1852-1883). ... This page is about the economic historian Arnold Toynbee; for the universal historian Arnold Joseph Toynbee see this article. ... Image:Dome of Discovery. ... The Dome of Discovery was a tempory building built by architect Ralph Tubbs as part of the festival of Britain which took place on Londons south bank in 1951. ... Charing Cross Hospital is a hospital in London. ... Richard Walters (born January 14, 1965), better known by stage names Slick Rick, MC Ricky D and The Ruler, is a rapper. ... Pimpin aint easy. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British Whig statesman, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... William Wilberforce (24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833) was an English politician, philanthropist, and abolitionist who led the parliamentary campaign against the slave trade. ...

Nearby places

Merton Park is a place in the London Borough of Merton. ... Morden is a place in the London Borough of Merton. ... Raynes Park is a primarily residential area within the London Borough of Merton. ... New Malden is a town and shopping centre in the south-western London suburbs, mostly within the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames and partly in the London Borough of Merton, and is situated 9. ... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... South Wimbledon is a place in the London Borough of Merton in south west London. ... , Tooting is a suburb in the London Borough of Wandsworth in south London. ... Roehampton is a place in south London, in the London Borough of Wandsworth. ... , Mitcham is a place in the London Borough of Merton, it is a suburb south of Streatham situated 7. ... Putney is a district of south-west London in the London Borough of Wandsworth. ...

Amenities

Major public open spaces

Cannizaro Park is a park in Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton. ... It has been suggested that King Henry VIIIs Mound be merged into this article or section. ... Wimbledon and Putney Commons consist of a large open space south west of London comprising 1140 acres (4. ... Wimbledon park is the second biggest park in the whole of the london borough of merton, it was renovated in the year 2001, with the help of the local council and the local millionnaire [Gemini Murthen]. The facilities provided within the park is ideal for the people living around it...

Football team

Wimbledon (full name AFC Wimbledon) is a semi-professional English football club, affiliated to both the London and Surrey FAs, and representing the area of Wimbledon in south London. ...

Schools

Donhead (Wimbledon College Prep School) is a Roman Catholic independent school taking boys from ages 7 to 11, based in south-west London. ... Kings College School Wimbledon, or KCS, is an independent boys school in Wimbledon, south-west London. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ursuline High School, Wimbledon (the Ursulines) is a Roman Catholic secondary school for girls aged 11 to 18. ... Wimbledon College is a state-maintained voluntary-aided Roman Catholic (Jesuit) secondary school for boys aged 11 to 18. ... Wimbledon High School Logo . Wimbledon High School is an independent all-girls school in Wimbledon, southwest London. ... Hall School Wimbledon (HSW) is a private school in Wimbledon, London, England. ...

Places of worship

The Sacred Heart Church, Wimbledon is a Roman Catholic church run by the Jesuits, which serves Wimbledon and surrounding areas. ... // St Marys Church, Wimbledon is a Church of England church and is part of the Parish of Wimbledon, south-west London, England. ...

Scout groups

Nearest railway stations

Wimbledon station is a National Rail, London Underground, and Tramlink station located in Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton. ... Wimbledon Chase railway station is in the London Borough of Merton in South London. ... Raynes Park railway station is in the London Borough of Merton in South London. ...

Nearest Underground stations

Wimbledon station is a National Rail, London Underground, and Tramlink station located in Wimbledon in the London Borough of Merton. ... Wimbledon Park is a station on the Wimbledon branch of the District Line, in Travelcard Zone 3. ... South Wimbledon (Merton) London Underground station is not actually situated in Wimbledon. ... Tramlink (initially known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport tramway in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ...

Gallery

Wimbledon Village, High Street
Wimbledon Village, High Street
Wimbledon Village, High Street
Wimbledon Village, High Street
Wimbledon Village, High Street on the corner with Church Street
Wimbledon Village, High Street on the corner with Church Street
The Broadway at the junction with Queens Road
The Broadway at the junction with Queens Road
Wimbledon Bridge
Wimbledon Bridge
The Broadway near Wimbledon Theatre
The Broadway near Wimbledon Theatre

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 134 pixelsFull resolution (3574 × 600 pixel, file size: 294 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 134 pixelsFull resolution (3574 × 600 pixel, file size: 294 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 137 pixelsFull resolution (3513 × 600 pixel, file size: 300 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 137 pixelsFull resolution (3513 × 600 pixel, file size: 300 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 127 pixelsFull resolution (3790 × 600 pixel, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 127 pixelsFull resolution (3790 × 600 pixel, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixelsFull resolution (3795 × 600 pixel, file size: 397 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixelsFull resolution (3795 × 600 pixel, file size: 397 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 115 pixelsFull resolution (4190 × 600 pixel, file size: 379 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 115 pixelsFull resolution (4190 × 600 pixel, file size: 379 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixelsFull resolution (3795 × 600 pixel, file size: 320 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixelsFull resolution (3795 × 600 pixel, file size: 320 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ...

References

  1. ^ Room, Adrian: “Dictionary of Place-Names in the British Isles”, Bloomsbury, 1988
  2. ^ London Gazette: no. 22915, 25 November 1864, pages 5834-5835
  3. ^ London Gazette: no. 23682, 25 November 1870, pages 5244-5245
  4. ^ London Gazette: no. 23768, 18 August 1871, page 3643
  5. ^ a b English Heritage - List of Blue Plaques, B
  6. ^ Findagrave.com
  7. ^ a b c d The Friends of Cannizaro Park - History
  8. ^ English Heritage - List of Blue Plaques, D
  9. ^ The Friends of Cannizaro Park - Statue of aile Selassie
  10. ^ London Borough of Merton, Nelson
  11. ^ English Heritage - List of Blue Plaques, R
  12. ^ English Heritage - List of Blue Plaques, S
  13. ^ a b English Heritage - List of Blue Plaques, T
  • Milward, Richard (1989). Historic Wimbledon, Caesar's Camp to Centre Court. The Windrush Press and Fielders of Wimbledon. ISBN 0-900075-16-3
  • Brown, John W. (1991). Lysons's History of Wimbledon. Local History Reprints. ISBN 1-85699-021-4

The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ...

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Wimbledon's convienent proximity to the capital was beginning to attract other wealthy families and in 1613 Robert Bell, Master of the Worshipful Company of Girdlers and a director of the British East India Company built Eagle House as a home at an easy distance from London.
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Wimbledon's population continued to grow at the start of the 20th century, a condition recognised in 1905 when the urban district was incorporated as the Municipal Borough of Wimbledon, with the power to select a Mayor.
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