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Encyclopedia > Wilt Chamberlin
Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain during his stint with the Harlem Globetrotters
Position Center
Nickname "The Big Dipper", "Wilt The Stilt", “Goliath”
Height ft 1 in (2.16 m)
Weight 275 lb (125 kg)
Nationality Flag of United States United States
Born August 21, 1936
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died October 12, 1999 (age 63)
Bel-Air
College Kansas
Draft 3rd overall, 1959
Philadelphia Warriors
Pro career 1959–1974
Former teams Globetrotters (1958-59)
Warriors (1959−1964)
76ers (1965−1968)
Lakers (1968−1973)
Conquistadors (1973−1974)
Awards Four-time NBA MVP
Two-time NBA Champion
NBA Finals MVP
NBA Rookie of the Year (1960)
NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team
Holder of 46 NBA all-time records, including 100 point NBA game[1]
Hall of Fame 1978

Wilton Norman "Wilt" Chamberlain (born August 21, 1936, in Philadelphia - died October 12, 1999 in Bel-Air), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was a professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Harlem Globetrotters, the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers. The 7'1" Chamberlain, who weighed 275 lbs as a rookie and eventually bulked up to 300 lbs,[2] played the center position and is credited as the one of the most successful and dominant players in the history of the NBA. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2170x2744, 463 KB) [edit] Summary (Note: high resolution version not linked from the LoC description, but was found at http://memory. ... The Harlem Globetrotters are a basketball team that combines athleticism and comedy to create one of the best-known sports entertainment franchises in the world. ... The center is one of the standard positions in a regulation basketball game. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... The pound (abbreviations: lb or, sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass in a number of different systems, including various systems of units of mass that formed part of English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The U.S. National Prototype Kilogram, which currently serves as the primary standard for measuring mass in the U.S. It was assigned to the United States in 1889 and is periodically recertified and traceable to the primary international standard, The Kilogram, held at the Bureau International des Poids et... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Bel Air is the name of several places in the United States of America: Bel Air, Alabama Bel Air, Los Angeles, California Bel Air, Kentucky Bel Air, Maryland Bel Air, Tennessee Bel Air, Texas Bel Air, Virginia (two places): in Fairfax County in Stafford County Outside America: Bel Air, Mauritius... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is an institution of higher learning located in Lawrence, Kansas. ... 1959 NBA Draft. ... The Golden State Warriors are a professional basketball team based in Oakland, California, United States. ... The Harlem Globetrotters are a basketball team that combines athleticism and comedy to create one of the best-known sports entertainment franchises in the world. ... The Golden State Warriors are a professional basketball team based in Oakland, California, United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a professional basketball team, based in Los Angeles, California, who play in the National Basketball Association. ... The San Diego Conquistadors, nicknamed the Qs, were an American Basketball Association team based in San Diego, California. ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award is presented to the National Basketball Association (NBA) player in the NBA Finals that is seen as contributing the most to the series. ... The National Basketball Associations Rookie of the Year Award, first given after the 1952-1953 NBA season, is given to the top first-year player in the league. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Cradle of Liberty, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701  - Mayor... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Bel Air is the name of several places in the United States of America: Bel Air, Alabama Bel Air, Los Angeles, California Bel Air, Kentucky Bel Air, Maryland Bel Air, Tennessee Bel Air, Texas Bel Air, Virginia (two places): in Fairfax County in Stafford County Outside America: Bel Air, Mauritius... The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a basketball league. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... The Harlem Globetrotters are a basketball team that combines athleticism and comedy to create one of the best-known sports entertainment franchises in the world. ... The Golden State Warriors are a National Basketball Association team based in Oakland, California. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a professional basketball team, based in Los Angeles, California, who play in the National Basketball Association. ... The center is one of the standard positions in a regulation basketball game. ...


Chamberlain holds 46 official NBA all-time records,[1] among them 25 regular-season records,[3] setting yardsticks in many scoring, rebounding and durability categories. Among others, he is the only player in NBA history to average more than 50 points in a season or score 100 points in a single game. He also won seven scoring, nine field goal percentage, and eleven rebounding titles, and once even led the league in assists.[4] Although never receiving full recognition for his feats,[5] Chamberlain also had a successful career, making the NBA Finals six times, winning two NBA titles, earning four regular-season Most Valuable Player awards, one NBA Finals MVP award, and being elected into 13 All-Star games and into ten All-NBA First and Second teams.[2][6] For his feats, Chamberlain was enshrined in the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1978, elected into the NBA's 35th Anniversary Team of 1980 and chosen as one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History of 1996.[6] A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ... The slam dunk by LeBron James is a field goal worth 2 points. ... Field goal percentage in basketball is the ratio of field goals made to field goals attempted. ... Carlos Arroyo of the Utah Jazz (left) passing to a teammate (not shown) for an assist. ... Logo of the NBA Finals The NBA Finals is the championship series of the National Basketball Association, played under a best-of-seven playoff format. ... In sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... The NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award is presented to the National Basketball Association (NBA) player in the NBA Finals that is seen as contributing the most to the series. ... All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (also referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players...


Off the court, Chamberlain was also a successful businessman, authored several books and appeared in the movie Conan the Destroyer. He was a lifelong bachelor, but became notorious for his claim to have slept with 20,000 women, a statement which has entered popular culture.[7] Conan the Destroyer, directed by action/fantasy veteran Richard Fleischer (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, The Vikings) as a sequel to Conan The Barbarian, was released worldwide in 1984. ...

Contents

Early years and Overbrook High School

Wilton Norman Chamberlain was born into a big family of nine children. In his early years, Chamberlain was an avid track and field athlete, posting up statistics like a decathlete. As a youth, he high jumped 6 feet, 6 inches, ran the 440 in 49.0 seconds and the 880 in 1:58.3, put the shot 53 feet, 4 inches, and broad jumped 22 feet.[8] He discovered basketball only in seventh grade, but soon discovered it was ideally suited for him; when Chamberlain entered Overbrook High School, he was already 6'11".[4] Chamberlain established himself as one of the most dominant high school players of all time. He broke Tom Gola's high school scoring record by scoring 2,252 points and had three individual games in which he scored 90, 74 and 71 points.[2][5] Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... A decathlon is a sportive contest made up of 10 events. ... Gold medal winner Ethel Catherwood of Canada scissors over the bar at the 1928 Summer Olympics. ... Shot put The shot put is an athletics (track and field) event involving putting (throwing in a pushing motion) a heavy metal ball (called the shot) as far as possible. ... Overbrook High School(Philadelphia) is a public four year secondary school located in West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Joseph Gola (born January 13, 1933 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is one of Philadelphias most famous basketball players. ...

In his youth, Chamberlain was an avid track and field athlete.
In his youth, Chamberlain was an avid track and field athlete.

In the days when so-called “big men” like 6'10" Minneapolis Lakers center George Mikan were still a rare breed in the NBA, Chamberlain, who already stood 6'11", terrified his high school opposition with his frame.[9] It was also in this period of his life when his three life-long nicknames were “Wilt the Stilt”, “Goliath”, and his favourite, “The Big Dipper”, allegedly born because he always had to dip his head before entering a room.[2] When Chamberlain left Overbrook in 1955, he had led them to a 56-3 record and two city championships, while averaging 37.4 points.[10] Over 200 universities wanted to recruit the basketball prodigy,[4] but Chamberlain then proclaimed he was going to play college basketball at the University of Kansas. The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... The Big Dipper may refer to: In astronomy - Ursa Major In basketball - Wilt Chamberlain In leisure - the Roller coaster ride, especially in the United Kingdom This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is an institution of higher learning located in Lawrence, Kansas. ...


University of Kansas

Wilt Chamberlain scoring on a slam dunk for the University of Kansas.
Wilt Chamberlain scoring on a slam dunk for the University of Kansas.

In 1955, Chamberlain became a player for the Kansas Jayhawks freshman team under future Hall-of-Fame coach Phog Allen. In those times, freshmen could not compete with the varsity squad. In Chamberlain’s debut game for the freshman squad, the freshman Jayhawks were pitted against the varsity Jayhawks, who were favored to win their conference that year. Chamberlain dominated his older college mates by scoring 52 points (16-35 from the field, 10-12 on free throws), grabbing 29 rebounds and registering four blocks, as recalled in an December 21, 1955 article for The Sporting News .[8] As he did at Overbrook, Chamberlain again showcased his great athletic talent. He ran the 100-yard dash in 10.9 seconds, threw the shotput 56 feet, triple jumped more than 50 feet, and won the high jump in the Big Eight track and field championships three straight years.[11] Main article: Basketball moves This article is about the term, slam dunk. For the manga series, see Slam Dunk (manga). ... The sports teams at the University of Kansas are known as the Jayhawks. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Forrest Phog Allen, D.O. (November 18, 1885 – September 16, 1974) was an American collegiate basketball coach known as the Father of Basketball Coaching. ... Wally Szczerbiak at the free throw line. ... The player in blue and white is in position to block the shot. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... The triple jump is an athletics (track and field) event, previously also known as hop, step and jump, whose various names describe the actions a competitor takes. ... This page deals with movie studios. ...


On December 3, 1956, Chamberlain made his varsity debut. In that year, he made the First Team of the All-America squad and led his Jayhawks into the NCAA finals against the Tar Heels of North Carolina. In that game, Tar Heels coach Frank McGuire used several unorthodox tactics to thwart Chamberlain. At the tip-off, he sent his shortest player, Tommy Kearns, in order to rattle him, and the Tar Heels spent the rest of the night triple-teaming Chamberlain, one defender in front, one behind and a third arriving as soon as he got the ball. The game went into three overtimes and North Carolina won 54-53. However, he was elected the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four.[5] December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Legend has it that the Tar Heel nickname applied to the state and inhabitants of North Carolina--as well as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s athletic teams--dates back to the Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Frank Joseph McGuire (November 8, 1916 - November 11, 1994) was an American athletic coach who gained his greatest renown in collegiate basketball. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ...


In two years at Kansas, Chamberlain averaged statistics of 29.9 points and 18.3 rebounds per game; in total, 1,433 points and 877 rebounds,[9] and had led Kansas to two Big Seven championships.[6] With these figures, the public rapidly paid attention to the seven-foot-one basketball sensation. By the time Chamberlain was 21, he had already been featured in the Time, Life, Look and Newsweek magazines, an incredible feat for an amateur player.[10] The Great Renaming was a restructuring of Usenet newsgroups that took place in 1987. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Edward Steichens portrait of Greta Garbo. ... Look was a weekly, general-interest magazine published in the United States from 1937 to 1971, with more of an emphasis on photographs than articles. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


Professional career

Harlem Globetrotters

After a frustrating junior year in which Kansas did not reach the NCAA Tournament, Chamberlain wanted to be paid for being double- and triple-teamed every night and wanted to become professional before finishing his senior year.[12] However, in those days, the NBA did not accept players who had not finished their last year of studies. Therefore, Chamberlain was in limbo for a year, and at last decided to play for the Harlem Globetrotters in 1958 for a then-astronomical sum of $50,000.[2][5] So, Chamberlain became member of the Globetrotters team which made history by playing in Moscow in 1959, enjoyed a sold out tour of the USSR and prior to the start of a game at Moscow's Lenin Central Stadium, were greeted by the late General Secretary Nikita Khrushchev.[13] In later years, he fondly recalled his time as a Trotter, because he was no longer jeered at or asked to break records, but just one of several artists who loved to entertain the crowd.[14] On March 9, 2000, Chamberlain’s number 13 was retired by the Trotters.[13] // The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is a single elimination tournament held each spring featuring 65 college basketball teams in the United States. ... The Harlem Globetrotters are a basketball team that combines athleticism and comedy to create one of the best-known sports entertainment franchises in the world. ... Location Position of Moscow in Europe Government Country District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Mayor Yuriy Luzhkov Geographical characteristics Area  - City 1,081 km² Population  - City (2007)    - Density 10,469,000   8537. ... Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (Russian: ; IPA: , in English, , or , occasionally ); surname more accurately romanized as Khrushchyov; April 17 [O.S. April 5] 1894–September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors

Chamberlain as a member of the San Francisco Warriors.
Chamberlain as a member of the San Francisco Warriors.

In the 1959-60 NBA season, Chamberlain finally made his debut as a NBA player, starting for the Philadelphia Warriors. The Warriors’ draft pick was highly unusual, as it was a so-called “territorial pick” despite the fact Chamberlain had spent his college years in Kansas. However, Warriors’s owner Eddie Gottlieb, one of the NBA's founding fathers, argued that Chamberlain had grown up in Philadelphia and had become popular there as a high school player. Because there were no NBA teams in Kansas, he argued, the Warriors held his territorial rights and could draft him. The NBA agreed, marking the only time in NBA history that a player was made a territorial selection based on his pre-college roots.[2] The 1959-60 NBA Season was the 14th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Golden State Warriors are a National Basketball Association team based in Oakland, California. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select young players who wish to join the league. ... Edward Gottlieb (September 15, 1898 – December 7, 1979) was one of the founding members of the Basketball Association of America and the former owner and coach of the Philadelphia Warriors. ...


From the beginning, Chamberlain brought a level of domination to the game which had seldom been seen before. In his rookie season, Chamberlain averaged an incredible 37.6 points and 27.0 rebounds, obliterating the previous regular-season records. He won both the NBA Most Valuable Player and NBA Rookie of the Year awards, a feat only equalled by fellow Hall-of-Famer Wes Unseld in the 1968-69 NBA season.[5] Chamberlain capped off his rookie season awards by also winning the NBA All-Star Game MVP award with a 23 point, 25 rebound performance for the East. However, in the Eastern Conference Finals, Chamberlain and his fellow future Hall-of-Fame team mates Tom Gola and Paul Arizin met the Boston Celtics with legendary center Bill Russell and Hall-of-Fame coach Red Auerbach. Despite outscoring Russell by 81 points, the Warriors lost the series 2 games to 4.[2] In historical perspective, the rivalry between Chamberlain and his perennial nemesis Bill Russell would grow out to become the NBA’s greatest on-court rivalry of all time.[6] It must be noted that Russell and Chamberlain were fierce rivals on court, but also became best friends in personal life, similar to later rivals Magic Johnson and Larry Bird.[15] The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The National Basketball Associations Rookie of the Year Award, first given after the 1952-1953 NBA season, is given to the top first-year player in the league. ... Westley Sissel Wes Unseld (born March 14, 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American former basketball player and coach in the NBA. Unseld is a prominent member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-Americans. ... The 1968-69 NBA Season was the 23rd season of the National Basketball Association. ... The NBA staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... The Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association is made up of fifteen teams, and organized in three divisions of five teams each. ... Thomas Joseph Gola (born January 13, 1933 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is one of Philadelphias most famous basketball players. ... Paul Joseph Arizin (April 9, 1928 – December 12, 2006), nicknamed Pitchin Paul, was an American basketball player who spent his entire National Basketball Association career with the Philadelphia Warriors from 1950 to 1962. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 69 Russell was the centerpiece of... Arnold Jacob Red Auerbach (September 20, 1917 – October 28, 2006) was an American coach and executive for the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 69 Russell was the centerpiece of... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is an American former NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players to ever play, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ...


The rookie Chamberlain then shocked the Warriors' fans by saying he was thinking of retiring. He was tired being subject of double- and triple teams, and teams hacking him down with hard fouls. Chamberlain feared to lose his cool one day, a thing which he did not want to happen.[2] This observation was supported by Celtics forward Tom Heinsohn, who stated: "Half the fouls against him [Chamberlain] were hard fouls [...] he took the most brutal pounding of any player ever".[2] In addition, Chamberlain was seen as a freak of nature, jeered at by the fans, scorned by the media, which caused him to say: "Nobody roots for Goliath."[5] Tom Heinsohn (August 26, 1934- ) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics basketball team. ... David faces Goliath in single combat. ...


However, in the next season, Chamberlain surpassed his rookie season statistics. During the 1960-61 season, he averaged 38.4 points and 27.2 rebounds per game. He became the first player to break the 3,000-point barrier and the first and still only player to break the 2,000-rebound barrier for a single season, grabbing 2,149 boards. Chamberlain also won his first field goal percentage title, and set the all-time record for rebounds in a single game with 55.[16][5] However, Chamberlain’s Warriors again failed to convert his stellar play into team success, as the Warriors this time bowed out against the Syracuse Nationals of Hall-of-Famer Dolph Schayes in a three game sweep.[17] The 1960-61 NBA Season was the 15th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1960-61 NBA Season was the 15th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Field goal percentage in basketball is the ratio of field goals made to field goals attempted. ... The Philadelphia 76ers are a National Basketball Association team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Adolph Schayes (known as Dolph Schayes) (born May 19, 1928 in New York, New York) was a professional basketball player and coach in the NBA. He played his college basketball at New York University 1944-48. ...

Book cover of Wilt, 1962 by Gary M. Pomerantz (2005). In this book, Pomerantz draws parallels between Chamberlain's legendary 100 point game and the rising of Black America.
Book cover of Wilt, 1962 by Gary M. Pomerantz (2005). In this book, Pomerantz draws parallels between Chamberlain's legendary 100 point game and the rising of Black America.

Chamberlain took his game to even greater heights in his third season, as he set all-time records which have never been threatened since. In 1961-62, he scored a mind-boggling 50.4 points and grabbed 25.7 rebounds per game[16] — Chamberlain's 4,029 regular-season points making him the first and only player to break the 4,000-point barrier. To place this in perspective the only player other than Chamberlain to break the 3,000-point barrier is Michael Jordan, who scored 3,041 points in the 1986-87 NBA season. Chamberlain once again broke the 2,000 rebound barrier by grabbing 2,052. In addition, he was on the hardwood for an average of an equally mind-boggling 48.5 minutes, playing 3,882 of his team's 3,890 minutes.[16] On March 2, 1962, Chamberlain delivered another incredible performance and became the first player to score 100 points in a single NBA game, in the 169-147 victory of his Warriors against the New York Knicks.[5] To date, none of these records have ever been threatened. His incredible feats in the 1962-63 season were later subject of the book Wilt, 1962 by Gary M. Pomerantz (2005), who used Chamberlain as a metaphor for the uprising of Black America.[18] In addition to Chamberlain's regular season accomplishments, he scored 42 points in the NBA All-Star Game -- still the all-time record -- on 17-23 shooting and pulled down 24 rebounds. However, the Warriors stranded again in the playoffs against Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics after a close Game 7 loss.[19] The 1961-62 NBA Season was the 16th season of the National Basketball Association. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... The 1986-87 NBA Season was the 41st season of the National Basketball Association. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... The 100 point game is the name for a famous NBA basketball game which took place on March 2, 1962 at Hersheypark Arena in Hershey, Pennsylvania, between the Philadelphia Warriors and the New York Knicks, which ended 169-147 for the Warriors. ... The New York Knicks, short for Knickerbockers, are a professional basketball team based in New York City. ...


In the next 1962-63 NBA season, the Warriors had relocated from Philadelphia to San Francisco to become the San Francisco Warriors. Chamberlain continued his incredible array of statistical feats, scoring 44.8 points and grabbing 24.3 rebounds per game that year.[16] However, despite his incredible statistics, the Warriors missed the playoffs.[20] In the following season of 1963-64 Chamberlain had another superb season with 36.9 ppg / 22.3 rpg,[16] and the San Francisco Warriors went all the way to the NBA Finals, but then succumbed to the fantastic Boston Celtics team of Bill Russell again, this time 1-4. In the Russell-Chamberlain matchups, Russell now had a 3-0 post-season edge a despite getting outplayed regularly on a statistical level.[21] The 1962-63 NBA Season was the 17th season of the National Basketball Association. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Golden State Warriors are a National Basketball Association team based in Oakland, California. ... The 1963-64 NBA Season was the 18th season of the National Basketball Association. ... RPG is an abbreviation with several different meanings: Role-playing game, in which players assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create narratives Computer role-playing game (sometimes CRPG), a video game with the setting and game mechanics of a role-playing game Console role-playing game, a CRPG for...


In the following season, the Warriors ran into financial trouble. At the 1965 All-Star break, Chamberlain was traded back to Philadelphia to the Philadelphia 76ers, the new name of the relocated Syracuse Nationals, who had left Syracuse to move to Philadelphia. In return, the Warriors received Paul Neumann, Connie Dierking, Lee Shaffer and $150,000.[5][2] When Chamberlain left the Warriors, owner Franklin Mieuli said: “Chamberlain is not an easy man to love [and] the fans in San Francisco never learned to love him. Wilt is easy to hate […] people came to see him lose.”[12] The 1964-65 NBA Season was the 19th season of the National Basketball Association. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Philadelphia 76ers are a National Basketball Association team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Paul Neumann served as Attorney General of the Kingdom of Hawaii under the administrations of King David Kalakaua from December 14, 1883 to September 18, 1884 and Queen Liliuokalani from August 29 to November 1, 1892. ...


Philadelphia 76ers

After the trade, Chamberlain found himself in a promising Sixers team that included guards Hal Greer, a future Hall of Famer, and talented role players Larry Costello, Chet Walker and Lucious Jackson. Chamberlain again was outstanding, posting 34.7 ppg and 22.9 rpg for the entire season.[16] However, as with the Warriors, Bill Russell’s Celtics beat Chamberlain’s squad soundly with 4-1 and established the Russell-Chamberlain score at 4-0 in six years.[12][22] Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... Lawrence Ronald Larry Costello (born July 2, 1931 in Minoa, New York) is a former pro basketball player. ... Image:Http://www. ... Lucious Brown Jackson (born October 31, 1941 in San Marcos, Texas) is a former pro basketball player. ...


In the 1965-66 NBA season, the Sixers posted a record 55-25 regular season, and for his strong play, Chamberlain was handed his second MVP award.[6] In that season, the giant center had again dominated his opposition by scoring 33.5 points and 24.6 rebounds a game, leading the league in both categories.[16] In the Eastern Conference Finals that year, the Sixers fought the Celtics again, and they split the first six games. The decision came down to the final seconds of Game 7, when the Celtics won by one point with a legendary play: when the 76ers' Hal Greer attempted to pass the ball inbounds, John Havlicek stole it to preserve the Celtics' lead. Again, Bill Russell’s team had eluded Chamberlain, for the fifth time in seven years.[2] According to Chamberlain, that was the time that people started calling him “loser”.[5][23] The 1965-66 NBA Season was the 20th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a former professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ...

Book cover of Season of the 76ers (2002) featuring Chamberlain and the Sixers' championship winning 1966-7 season. Author: Wayne Lynch
Book cover of Season of the 76ers (2002) featuring Chamberlain and the Sixers' championship winning 1966-7 season. Author: Wayne Lynch

Prior to the 1966-67 NBA season, Sixers coach Alex Hannum talked to the center and persuaded him to change his style of play. Loaded with several other players who could score, such as future Hall-of-Famers Hal Greer and new recruit Billy Cunningham, Hannum wanted Chamberlain to concentrate more on defense.[5][3] As a consequence, Chamberlain's averaged a career-low 24.1 points, but he led the league in rebounds (24.2), ended third in assists (7.8), had a record shattering .683 field goal accuracy, and played strong defense.[16] For these feats, Chamberlain earned his third MVP award. The Sixers charged their way to an then-record 68-13 season, including a record 46-4 start.[2] The Sixers easily defeated the Boston Celtics with 4-1 in the Eastern Conference Finals; after five frustrating losses, Chamberlain had finally vanquished his nemesis Bill Russell. Then, the Sixers defeated San Francisco 4-2 in the 1967 NBA Finals. Chamberlain at last had won his first championship, contributing with 17.7 ppg and an incredible 28.7 rpg against fellow future Hall-of-Fame pivot Nate Thurmond, never failing to snare at least 23 rebounds in the six games.[5][24] Chamberlain himself described the team as the best in NBA history.[16] In 2002, writer Wayne Lynch wrote a book about this remarkable Sixers season, Season of the 76ers, centering on Chamberlain. The 1966-67 NBA Season was the 21st season of the National Basketball Association. ... Alexander Murray Hannum (July 19, 1923 - January 18, 2002) was a pro basketball coach. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... William John Billy Cunningham (born June 3, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former pro basketball player, who was nicknamed the Kangaroo Kid, and coach. ... Series Summary 76ers win series 4-2 Categories: | ... Nathaniel Nate Thurmond (born July 25, 1941, in Akron, Ohio) is rated by many one of the best defensive centers ever to play pro basketball, feared and praised by legends including Bob Pettit, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Wilt Chamberlain. ...


In the 1967-68 NBA season, Chamberlain continued his focus on team play and registered 24.3 points and 23.8 rebounds a game for the season.[16] The 76ers had the best record in the league for the third straight season, and Chamberlain made history by becoming the first and only center in NBA history to finish the season as leader in assists. His 702 assists beat the runner-up, Hall-of-Fame point guard Lenny Wilkins, by 23.[10] For these feats, Chamberlain won his fourth and last MVP title.[6] However, in the 1968 Eastern Division Finals, the Sixers took a 3-1 lead against the Celtics, but Boston tied the series. In the second half of Game 7, Chamberlain did not attempt a single shot from the field, and the Sixers lost the game and the series. Asked later for the reason, he simply stated that coach Hannum had not told him to shoot.[3] So, Bill Russell’s Celtics took the title, and Chamberlain was now 1-6 in series against his perennial nemesis. The 1967-68 NBA Season was the 22nd season of the National Basketball Association. ... Point guard (PG), also called the “one guard” or “lead guard“, is one of the standard positions in a regulation basketball game. ... Leonard (Lenny) Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, U.S.) is an American former National Basketball Association player and coach, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching win-loss totals. ...


After that season, coach Alex Hannum left the Sixers to coach the Oakland Oaks in the newly-founded ABA. Chamberlain then asked for a trade, and Sixers general manager Jack Ramsay traded Chamberlain for Darrall Imhoff, Archie Clark and Jerry Chambers.[3] The motivations for this move remain in dispute. According to sports writer Roland Lazenby, a journalist close to the Los Angeles Lakers, Sixers owner Irv Kosloff broke a promise to hand over Chamberlain part of the franchise, infuriating the superstar,[12] but according to Dr. Jack Ramsay, who was the Sixers general manager then, Chamberlain also threatened to jump to the ABA after Hannum left, and forced the trade himself.[3] There have been two sports franchises based in Oakland known as the Oakland Oaks: The Oakland Oaks of minor league baseball, who played in the Pacific Coast League. ... Look up ABA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term general manager is a descriptive term for certain executives in a business operation. ... Dr. John T. Ramsay (born February 21, 1925 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former professional basketball coach in the National Basketball Association. ... Darrall Tucker Imhoff (born October 11, 1938 in San Gabriel, California) is a former pro basketball player. ... Archie L. Clark (born July 15, 1941 in Conway, Arkansas) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a professional basketball team, based in Los Angeles, California, who play in the National Basketball Association. ... Dr. John T. Ramsay (born February 21, 1925 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former professional basketball coach in the National Basketball Association. ... The term general manager is a descriptive term for certain executives in a business operation. ...


Los Angeles Lakers

March 1969 edition of SPORT Magazine, featuring Lakers superstars Wilt Chamberlain (l.), Jerry West (m.) and Elgin Baylor (r.). Note the caption: "Wilt, West And Baylor: Do Three Superstars Make A Super Team?"
March 1969 edition of SPORT Magazine, featuring Lakers superstars Wilt Chamberlain (l.), Jerry West (m.) and Elgin Baylor (r.). Note the caption: "Wilt, West And Baylor: Do Three Superstars Make A Super Team?"

In Los Angeles, Chamberlain joined a Lakers squad which shared the same fate as him, namely being perennially beaten by the Boston Celtics. Up to 1968, the team of future Hall-of-Famers Elgin Baylor and Jerry "Mr. Clutch" West had gone 0-6 in NBA Finals against Bill Russell’s team. With the new star center, the Lakers became instant favourites to win the 1969 NBA Finals. However, among others, the SPORT magazine (March 1969) publicly doubted their ability to mesh with each other. In addition, Chamberlain soon got into trouble with Lakers coach Bill van Breda Kolff, who accused him of slacking off in practice and focusing too much on statistics.[12] Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... The 1969 NBA Finals was one of the most spectacular Finals series ever. ... Willem Hendrik Butch Van Breda Kolff (born October 28, 1922 in Glen Ridge, New Jersey) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ...


In any case, Chamberlain averaged 20.5 points and 21.1 rebounds a game that season,[16] and the Lakers stormed through the playoffs. They were heavily favored to win the 1969 NBA Finals, but after splitting the first six games, Chamberlain hurt his leg with six minutes left to play in Game 7, with the Lakers trailing by nine points. Lakers coach van Breda Kolff took him out, and when the Lakers came back within one point, Chamberlain wanted to return with three minutes left, but the coach infamously benched him until the end. The Celtics won, 108-106, and Chamberlain was accused of being a malingerer who gave up when it seemed the Lakers would lose.[2] In any case, Bill Russell ended his career with winning his seventh out of eight series against his best friend Chamberlain. This was also the last Van Breda Kolff Lakers game, as he was replaced by Joe Mullaney in the next season. The 1968-69 NBA Season was the 23rd season of the National Basketball Association. ... Joseph A. Mullaney (born November 17, 1925 in Long Island, New York – died March 8, 2000) was a successful basketball player and coach. ...


In his second Lakers year, Chamberlain seriously injured his knee. He missed almost the entire 82-game regular season, only appearing in 12 games. However, in these 12 games, he still managed to average 27.3 points, 18.4 rebounds and 4.1 assists per game.[16] He was able to make a comeback just before the playoffs started, and played in all 18 Lakers playoff games. Again, the Lakers charged through the playoffs, and in the 1970 NBA Finals, the Lakers were pitted against the rugged New York Knicks, loaded with future Hall-of-Famers Willis Reed, Dave DeBusschere, Bill Bradley, and Walt Frazier. The Knicks took a 3-1 lead, but then, center Reed injured his leg. With nobody to counter Chamberlain down low, the Lakers tied the series, and looked winners prior to Game 7. However, Reed famously hobbled up court, won the tip against Chamberlain, scored the first four points. He inspired his team to one of the most famous playoff upsets of all time, and the Knicks won 110-99 in the end.[25] Chamberlain scored only 21 points on only 16 shots, although Reed was hardly able to move and often had to be subbed. Furthermore, Chamberlain shot an abysmal 1-of-11 from the foul line, making the game perhaps his greatest on-court failure.[26] The 1969-70 NBA Season was the 24th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1970 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1969-1970 season. ... How They Got Here The New York Knicks had a spectacular season, theyre 60 wins came as a result of team play instead of big name superstars, something the 2004 Detroit Pistons successfully did in winning their championship. ... The New York Knicks, short for Knickerbockers, are a professional basketball team based in New York City. ... Willis Reed Jr. ... David Albert DeBusschere (October 16, 1940 - May 14, 2003) was a professional basketball player born in Detroit, Michigan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Walter Clyde Frazier (born March 29, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American former basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ...

Chamberlain (r.) appearing on the cover of LIFE magazine with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (l.) in March 1972. The Chamberlain-Jabbar matchup was called the greatest matchup in sports by LIFE. When the two players met in the 1972 Western Conference Finals Chamberlain's Lakers prevailed over Jabbar's Bucks in 6 games.
Chamberlain (r.) appearing on the cover of LIFE magazine with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (l.) in March 1972. The Chamberlain-Jabbar matchup was called the greatest matchup in sports by LIFE. When the two players met in the 1972 Western Conference Finals Chamberlain's Lakers prevailed over Jabbar's Bucks in 6 games.
In 1971, Chamberlain (r.) had the offer to fight Muhammad Ali (l.) in a boxing match, but finally declined.
In 1971, Chamberlain (r.) had the offer to fight Muhammad Ali (l.) in a boxing match, but finally declined.

In the 1970-71 NBA season, the Lakers made a notable move by signing future Hall-of-Fame guard Gail "Stumpy" Goodrich. Chamberlain averaged 20.7 points, 18.2 rebounds and 4.3 assists,[16] once again led the NBA in rebounding and the Lakers won the Pacific Division title. However, after losing Elgin Baylor to a knee injury that effectively ended his career, the Lakers failed to reach the 1971 NBA Finals, getting easily defeated by the championship-bound Milwaukee Bucks with young future Hall-of-Fame pivot Lew Alcindor, better known under his later Muslim name Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and veteran superstar guard Oscar Robertson with 1-4.[27] After the 1971 playoffs, Chamberlain had the offer to fight heavyweight boxing legend Muhammad Ali. The 15-round fight would have taken place on July 26, 1971 in the Houston Astrodome but Chamberlain finally refused the match.[10] In an 1999 interview, Chamberlain stated that boxing trainer Cus D'Amato wanted to train him for the fight, and they offered Ali and him $5 million each to battle each other. However, after checking back with his father, Chamberlain finally said no.[28][29] Image File history File links Wilt_on_LIFE.jpg‎ Note: Do not use this picture in the articles infobox, it only passes fair use criteria if it appears next to the mention of the LIFE magazine issue in the article. ... Image File history File links Wilt_on_LIFE.jpg‎ Note: Do not use this picture in the articles infobox, it only passes fair use criteria if it appears next to the mention of the LIFE magazine issue in the article. ... For other uses, see Life (disambiguation), Lives (disambiguation) or Living (disambiguation), Living Things (disambiguation). ... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... The 1970-71 NBA Season was the 25th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Gail Charles Goodrich Jr. ... Series Summary Bucks win series 4-0 Categories: | ... The Milwaukee Bucks are a professional basketball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 in New York City, New York) was a successful high school, collegiate, and professional basketball player. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian and Urdu: مسلمان, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of Islam. ... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee) is an American former NBA player and is considered by many to be one of the greatest basketball players in history. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... The Reliant Astrodome, formerly just the Astrodome, is a domed sports stadium in Houston, Texas, and is part of the Reliant Park complex. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In the 1971-72 NBA season, the Lakers hired former Celtics star guard Bill Sharman as head coach. Sharman wanted to introduce morning shoot-arounds and transform the veteran Chamberlain into a defensive-minded, low-scoring post defender, thinking the Lakers had enough firepower with high-scoring guards West and Goodrich and forward Jim McMillian.[1] Knowing that Chamberlain slept and woke up late, and was the all-time scoring champion, Sharman took out the sting by stating he wanted Chamberlain to play like his retired rival Bill Russell, who never put up great scoring numbers, but always seemed to win. Chamberlain accepted his new role, dedicated himself to playing tough defense, was content with being the fourth scoring option and only missed two morning shoot-arounds the entire season.[1] The 1971-72 NBA Season was the 26th season of the National Basketball Association. ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... James M. Jim McMillian (born March 11, 1948 in Raeford, North Carolina) is a former pro basketball player. ...


As a consequence, Chamberlain posted an all-time low 14.8 points, but also won the rebound crown with 19.2 rebound per game average and shot with a record .649 field goal accuracy.[16] Powered by his defensive presence, the Lakers would embark on a never approached 33 game win streak en-route to a then-record 69 wins in the regular season. This is a list of the longest winning streaks in National Basketball Association history. ...


In the post-season, the Lakers defeated the Bulls in a sweep,[30] then went on to face the Milwaukee Bucks of young superstar center and regular-season MVP Kareem Abdul-Jabbar again. The Chamberlain-Jabbar matchup was hailed by LIFE magazine as the greatest matchup in all of sports. Chamberlain would help lead the Lakers past Jabbar and the Bucks in 6 games,[30] and performed so well in the series that TIME magazine stated, "In the N.B.A.'s western division title series with Milwaukee, he (Chamberlain) decisively outplayed basketball's newest giant superstar, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, eleven years his junior."[31] They then beat the New York Knicks in the 1972 NBA Finals thereby acquiring the first Lakers title since moving to Los Angeles by convincingly winning the series 4-1. In the series against the Knicks, Chamberlain averaged 19.2 ppg and was elected Finals MVP, mainly for his incredible rebounding. Over the series, he averaged 23.2 rebounds per game, taking in almost a quarter of the series' entire rebound total—at age 36.[32] Sweep may be any of the following: Look up Sweep in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Milwaukee Bucks are a professional basketball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... For other uses, see Life (disambiguation), Lives (disambiguation) or Living (disambiguation), Living Things (disambiguation). ... A pocket watch, a device used to keep time There are two distinct views on the meaning of time. ... Series Summary Lakers win series 4-1 Categories: | ... The NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award is presented to the National Basketball Association (NBA) player in the NBA Finals that is seen as contributing the most to the series. ...


The 1972-73 NBA season was to be Chamberlain’s last, although he did not know this at the time. In his last NBA year, he averaged 13.2 points and 18.6 points rebounds, still enough to win the rebounding crown for the 11th time in his career. In addition, he shot with an all-time NBA record .727 accuracy from the field, bettering his own mark of .683 from the 1966-67 season — neither percentage has been topped by any other player.[16] It was the ninth time Chamberlain would lead the league in field goal percentage. Powered by his defensive presence, and carried by the offensive firepower of fellow veteran Jerry West and Gail Goodrich, the Lakers won 60 games in the regular season and reached the 1973 NBA Finals. The Lakers won Game 1 with 115-112, but the Knicks stormed back to win the next four games, powered by NBA Finals MVP Willis Reed and their newest addition, slick Hall-of-Fame shooting guard Earl "The Pearl" Monroe.[33] Chamberlain did not yet know that this loss was the last professional game of his career. The 1972-73 NBA Season was the 27th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Series Summary Knicks win series 4-1 Categories: | ... The NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award is presented to the National Basketball Association (NBA) player in the NBA Finals that is seen as contributing the most to the series. ... Shooting guard (SG), also known as “two guard” or “off guard”,[1] is one of five traditional positions on a basketball team. ... Earl Vernon Monroe (born on November 21, 1944, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), was an American professional basketball player known for his flamboyant dribbling, passing and play-making. ...


San Diego Conquistadors

Wilt Chamberlain as a member of the Conquistadors. However, due to legal problems, he never played a game, but only coached the team.
Wilt Chamberlain as a member of the Conquistadors. However, due to legal problems, he never played a game, but only coached the team.

In 1973, the San Diego Conquistadors of the NBA rival league ABA signed Chamberlain as a player-coach. However, the Lakers filed legal action against their former star and successfully prevented him from actually playing, because he still owed them the option year of his contract. So, Chamberlain became one of basketball's best-paid coaches. In his single season as a coach, the Conquistadores went a mediocre 37-47 in the regular season and lost against the Utah Stars in the Conference Semifinals.[5] After the season, Chamberlain retired from professional basketball. The San Diego Conquistadors, nicknamed the Qs, were an American Basketball Association team based in San Diego, California. ... Look up ABA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Utah Stars was an American Basketball Association (ABA) team based in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. // The Anaheim Amigos, based in Anaheim, California, began play in the fall of 1967, in the Anaheim Convention Center. ...

Book cover of Chamberlain's book Who's Running the Asylum? Inside the Insane World of Sports Today (1997), in which he criticised the state of the NBA.
Book cover of Chamberlain's book Who's Running the Asylum? Inside the Insane World of Sports Today (1997), in which he criticised the state of the NBA.

Post-NBA career

After his stint with the Conquistadores, Chamberlain became bored with coaching jobs. He successfully went into business and entertainment, made money in stocks and real estate, opened a popular Harlem nightclub, Smalls Paradise, and also invested in broodmares. Chamberlain also sponsored his personal professional volleyball and track and field teams, and made money by appearing in ads for Drexel Burnham, Le Tigre Clothing and Foot Locker.[14] In addition, Chamberlain also played a supporting role alongside Arnold Schwarzenegger in the film Conan the Destroyer (1984). He also published several books, among them Who's Running the Asylum? Inside the Insane World of Sports Today (1997), in which he harshly criticised the NBA of the 1990s for being too disrespectful of players of the past.[34] Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... Drexel Burnham Lambert was one of the most profitable Wall Street investment banking firms during the late 1970s and most of the 1980s. ... Le Tigre or Le Tigre (album) Le Tigre is an American brand of apparel designed to rival Lacoste in styling. ... Foot Locker, Inc. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born on July 30, 1947, in Graz, Austria) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, actor and an American politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... Conan the Destroyer, directed by action/fantasy veteran Richard Fleischer (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, The Vikings) as a sequel to Conan The Barbarian, was released worldwide in 1984. ...


Chamberlain was fit enough in his mid-forties to humble a young Los Angeles Lakers rookie called Magic Johnson in practice,[35] and even in the 1980s, he flirted with making a comeback in the NBA. In the 1980-81 NBA season, coach Larry Brown recalled that the 45-year old Chamberlain had received an offer by the Cleveland Cavaliers. When Chamberlain was 50, the New Jersey Nets had the same idea, and Chamberlain declined again.[35] Chamberlain however participated in several marathons instead.[5] He would stay an epitome of physical fitness for years to come, until his health rapidly worsened in 1999.[14] Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a professional basketball team, based in Los Angeles, California, who play in the National Basketball Association. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The 1980-81 NBA Season was the 35th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Larry Brown For other people of the same name, see Larry Brown (disambiguation). ... The Cleveland Cavaliers (also known as the Cavs) are a professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ... The New Jersey Nets are a professional basketball team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... Modern-day marathon runners Runners in ancient Greece. ...


Legacy

He was basketball's unstoppable force, the most awesome offensive force the game has ever seen.
— introductory line of Chamberlain's nba.com profile[2]

The 7-foot-1, two-time NBA champion Chamberlain is universally regarded as one of the most extraordinary and dominant basketball players ever.[6] With an assortment of fadeaway jump shots, his favourite one-hand finger-roll and powerful dunks in the low post,[14][12] he scored 31,419 points, grabbed 23,924 rebounds, averaging 30.1 points (second best all time) and 22.9 rebounds (all-time leader) and was also very durable, standing on the hardwood an average 45.8 minutes.[16] A fadeaway in basketball is a jump shot while jumping backwards, away from the basket. ... David Robinson performing a jump shot to shoot over Karl Malone. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


For his feats, Chamberlain was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame (1978), elected one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History (1996), ranked #2 in SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players of all time in 2003 and #13 in ESPN list "Top North American athletes of the century".[36] In honour of Chamberlain, his jerseys have been retired five times, by respectively the University of Kansas, the Harlem Globetrotters, and the Warriors, 76ers and Lakers franchises.[6] The Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... The first issue of SLAM, featuring cover athlete Larry Johnson. ...


Accolades

Main article: Career achievements of Wilt Chamberlain
See also: List of National Basketball Association top individual scoring season averages
See also: List of NBA Scoring Champions

Most prominently, Chamberlain is holder of a mind-boggling forty-six official NBA all-time records,[1] including 25 regular-season records.[3] Among his 46 records are several which are regarded as virtually unbreakable, such as averaging 22.9 rebounds for a career or 50.4 points in a regular season, scoring 100 points or 55 rebounds in a single game, scoring 65 points or more fifteen times, 50 or more points 118 times, having 126 consecutive 20-plus point games or shooting with a regular season field goal percentage of .727.[5][6] During Chamberlain's time, defensive statistics like blocks and steals had not been recorded yet. However, according to Jack Ramsay, "Harvey (Pollack) said he used to tell one of his statisticians to keep track of Wilt's blocks in big games . . . One night, they got up to 25".[37] This article concerns the career achievements of NBA Hall-of-Fame player Wilt Chamberlain, who holds holds forty-six official NBA all-time records,[1] among them 25 regular-season records,[2] setting yardsticks in many scoring, rebounding and durability categories. ... NBA scoring champions were decided on total points scored through the 1968-69 season, after which points per game was used to determine the champion. ... Herbert Harvey Pollack (born March 9, 1922 in Camden, New Jersey) is the director of statistical information for the Philadelphia 76ers. ...


In addition to his mind-boggling array of statistical feats, Chamberlain also had a successful career. He is a two-time NBA champion (1967, 1972) and a six-time NBA Finalist (1964, '67, '69, '70, '72, '73), was voted NBA regular season MVP four times (1959-60, 1965-66, 1966-67, 1967-68 seasons) and NBA Finals MVP once (1972), was elected into seven All-NBA First Teams (1960, '61, '62, '64, '66, '67, '68) and three All-NBA Second Teams ('63, '65, '72) and is with Wes Unseld one of two players to have won the Rookie of the Year and the NBA regular season MVP in the same year. In addition, he was voted NBA All-Star Game MVP 1960 and also made two All-Defensive First Teams (1972, '73).[6] The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The 1959-60 NBA Season was the 14th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1965-66 NBA Season was the 20th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1966-67 NBA Season was the 21st season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1967-68 NBA Season was the 22nd season of the National Basketball Association. ... The NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award is presented to the National Basketball Association (NBA) player in the NBA Finals that is seen as contributing the most to the series. ... Series Summary Lakers win series 4-1 Categories: | ... Westley Sissel Wes Unseld (born March 14, 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American former basketball player and coach in the NBA. Unseld is a prominent member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-Americans. ... The National Basketball Associations Rookie of the Year Award, first given after the 1952-1953 NBA season, is given to the top first-year player in the league. ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The NBA staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... The NBA All-Defensive Team is the NBAs annual honor given to the best defensive players in the NBA during the regular season. ...

In 2005, John Taylor wrote the book The Rivalry about the Russell-Chamberlain rivalry. Chamberlain is on the right.
In 2005, John Taylor wrote the book The Rivalry about the Russell-Chamberlain rivalry. Chamberlain is on the right.

Image File history File links 0812970306. ... Image File history File links 0812970306. ...

Chamberlain-Russell rivalry

From a historical NBA perspective, the rivalry between Chamberlain and his perennial nemesis Bill Russell is cited as the greatest on-court rivalry of all time.[6] Its significance is documented by the 2005 book The Rivalry by sports journalist John Taylor. It was somewhat lopsided, as Russell’s Celtics won 7-1 series against Chamberlain’s Warriors, Sixers and Lakers teams, and went 57-37 in the regular season and 29-20 in the playoffs against them.[10] To Chamberlain's credit, Russell was surrounded by a half-dozen Hall-of-Famers virtually all his career,[38] while Chamberlain at best had two enshrined team mates in his teams.[39] and that Chamberlain outscored Russell 30 to 14.2 per game and outrebounded him 28.2 to 22.9 in the regular season, and also in the playoffs, he outscored him 25.7 to 14.9 and outrebounded him 28 to 24.7.[10] William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 69 Russell was the centerpiece of...


However, Russell and Chamberlain were best friends in private life. Russell never considered him his rival and disliked the term, instead pointing out that they rarely talked about basketball when they were alone. When Chamberlain died in 1999, Chamberlain’s nephew stated that Russell was the second person he was ordered to break the news to.[40]


Rule changes

Chamberlain's impact on the game is also reflected in the fact that he was directly responsible for several rule changes in the NBA, including widening the lane to try to keep him farther away from the hoop, institute offensive goaltending and revise rules governing inbounding the ball and shooting free throws.[4][35] Among others, Chamberlain was so athletic that he could convert foul shots via a slam dunk. When his incredible dunks practically undermined the difficulty of a foul shot, the NBA banned his modus operandi.[4][35] In basketball history, pundits have stated that the only other player who forced such a massive change of rules is 6'10" Minneapolis Lakers center George "Mr. Basketball" Mikan, who played a decade before Chamberlain and also caused many rule changes designed to thwart so-called "big men".[1] Main article: Basketball moves This article is about the term, slam dunk. For the manga series, see Slam Dunk (manga). ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ...


The 100-point game

Main article: 100 point game

On March 2, 1962, in a 169-147 Warriors victory over the New York Knicks at Hersheypark Arena in Hershey, Pennsylvania, Chamberlain scored 100 points in a standard regulation game, 59 in the second half alone, mainly victimising Knicks reserve center Darrall Imhoff. He became the first and only NBA player in history to score 100 points or more.[41] No video footage exists of this phenomenal achievement because the game was not televised, although there is an audio recording of the game's radio broadcast. For the game, Chamberlain ended with 100 points, going 36-of-63 from the field and 28-of-32 from the free throw line. At that time, the three-point line was not introduced yet. Chamberlain also grabbed 25 rebounds in that game.[41] The 100 point game is the name for a famous NBA basketball game which took place on March 2, 1962 at Hersheypark Arena in Hershey, Pennsylvania, between the Philadelphia Warriors and the New York Knicks, which ended 169-147 for the Warriors. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... The New York Knicks, short for Knickerbockers, are a professional basketball team based in New York City. ... HERSHEYPARK Arena, located in Hershey, Pennsylvania housed millions of spectators for sports and entertainment over seven decades of multi-purpose use. ... Hershey is also the name of a candy company see: Hersheys Hershey is an unincorporated community within Derry Township in Dauphin County in the U.S. commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 10 miles (16 km) east of Harrisburg. ... Darrall Tucker Imhoff (born October 11, 1938 in San Gabriel, California) is a former pro basketball player. ... In basketball, a three-point field goal, three-pointer, three-point shot, or, simply, three is a field goal made from beyond the three point line, a designated semi-ellipsoid arc radiating from the basket. ...


Reputation

Chamberlain's 1965 interview with Sports Illustrated caused a stir throughout the league.
Chamberlain's 1965 interview with Sports Illustrated caused a stir throughout the league.

Although racking up some of the most impressive statistics in the history of Northern American professional sports, but winning "just" two NBA championships, and losing seven out of eight playoffs series against the Boston Celtics teams of his nemesis and best friend Bill Russell, Chamberlain was often called "selfish" and a "loser".[5] Frank Deford of ESPN stated that Chamberlain was caught in a lose-lose situation: "If you [Chamberlain] win, everybody says, 'Well, look at him, he's that big.' If you lose, everybody says, 'How could he lose, a guy that size?' "[10] Chamberlain himself often said: "Nobody roots for Goliath."[5] Image File history File links Wilt_on_SI.jpg‎ Note: Do not use this picture in the articles infobox, it only passes fair use criteria if it appears next to the mention of the Sports Illustrated issue in the article. ... Image File history File links Wilt_on_SI.jpg‎ Note: Do not use this picture in the articles infobox, it only passes fair use criteria if it appears next to the mention of the Sports Illustrated issue in the article. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 69 Russell was the centerpiece of... Frank Deford (born December 16, 1938, in Baltimore, Maryland) is a senior contributing writer for Sports Illustrated, author, and commentator. ... ESPN, formerly the Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... David faces Goliath in single combat. ...


Similar to later superstar Shaquille O'Neal, Chamberlain was also target of criticism because of his bad free throw shooting. He connected on an abysmal .511 average, including a career low of .380 during the 1967-68 season.[16] Countless suggestions were offered; he shot them underhanded, one-handed, two-handed, from the side of the circle, from well behind the line. Once, Sixers coach Alex Hannum suggested to him to shoot his famous fadeaway jumpshot as a foul shot; but Chamberlain was too scared to bring even more attention to his one great failing.[14] Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (born March 6, 1972), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is one of the most famous American professional basketball players playing today; he is generally regarded as being one of the most dominant players in the National Basketball Association. ... Wally Szczerbiak at the free throw line. ... Alexander Murray Hannum (July 19, 1923 - January 18, 2002) was a pro basketball coach. ...


Furthermore, Chamberlain damaged his reputation in an April 1965 article with Sports Illustrated. In an interview entitled "My Life In A Bush League", he criticized his fellow players, coaches, and NBA administrators.[42] Chamberlain later commented that he could see in hindsight how the interview could have been instrumental in hurting his public image.[42] The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


However, contemporary colleagues were often terrified to play against Chamberlain. Bill Russell regularly feared to get embarrassed by Chamberlain,[12] Walt Frazier called his dominance on the court “comical”,[43] and when 6’10”, 270-pound Hall-of-Fame center Bob Lanier was asked about the most memorable moment of his career, Lanier answered: “When Wilt Chamberlain lifted me up and moved me like a coffee cup so he could get a favorable position.”[14] Walter Clyde Frazier (born March 29, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American former basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Chamberlain featured on his biography Wilt: Larger Than Life (2004, author Robert Cherry). His Lakers team mate Jerry West wrote the foreword.
Chamberlain featured on his biography Wilt: Larger Than Life (2004, author Robert Cherry). His Lakers team mate Jerry West wrote the foreword.

Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ...

Personal life

Chamberlain was born as the son of Olivia and William Chamberlain. He was born into a big family where he was one of nine children.[5] Chamberlain remembers having a comfortable, middle-class upbringing, unaffected by racial or religious issues. Therefore, he had little reservation to join Overbrook High School, a school with many Jewish students, and all his life strongly opposed bigotry of any kind.[14] Chamberlain was one of basketball big earners; as a Laker, he earned $250,000 a year.[12] Therefore, he could afford a level of luxury few other athletes at that time could permit themselves, such as renting an appartement in New York.[44] In addition, he would often stay out until late in the night and only wake up at noon.[1] The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... A bigot is a prejudiced person who is intolerant of opinions, lifestyles, or identities differing from his or her own. ... NY redirects here. ...


In Bel-Air, Chamberlain built a million-dollar mansion he called “Ursa Major” (The Big Dipper) after his nickname.[2] It had a 2,200-pound pivot as a front door and contained great displays of luxury. Chamberlain lived alone, relying on a great deal of automated gadgets, with only two cats named Zip and Zap as company. In addition, Chamberlain drove a Ferrari, a Bentley, and engaged James Bond car designer Peter Bohanna to design the Chamberlain Searcher I, a $400,000 custom sports car.[14] Bel Air is the name of several places in the United States of America: Bel Air, Alabama Bel Air, Los Angeles, California Bel Air, Kentucky Bel Air, Maryland Bel Air, Tennessee Bel Air, Texas Bel Air, Virginia (two places): in Fairfax County in Stafford County Outside America: Bel Air, Mauritius... This article is about the Great Bear constellation. ... Ferrari is an Italian sports car manufacturer based in Maranello, Italy. ... Bentley Motors Limited is a British based manufacturer of luxury automobiles and Grand Tourers. ... The James Bond 007 gun logo James Bond 007 is a fictional British agent [1] created in 1952 by writer Ian Fleming, featured in several novels and short stories. ...


Although living alone, Chamberlain regularly mingled into the public, having no problems being recognised as Wilt Chamberlain and refraining from having great entourages. These facts impressed his team mate Jerry West, who later wrote the foreword to Chamberlain's biography Wilt: Larger Than Life by Robert Cherry (2004).[35] Sixers’ ex-general manager Dr. Jack Ramsay confirmed these facts, recalling Chamberlain regularly took walks in downtown Philadelphia and acknowledged honking hoots with the air of a man enjoying all the attention. [3] West also stated that Chamberlain was friendly and well-informed, but tended to have strong opinions and came over as a bit aloof because he thought he was the best in everything.[12] Finally, Chamberlain always wore rubber bands around his wrists, at first to hold up his socks, then just for effect.[14] Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... Dr. John T. Ramsay (born February 21, 1925 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former professional basketball coach in the National Basketball Association. ...

Book cover to Chamberlain's second autobiography, A View from Above (1991). There, he claimed to have slept with 20,000 women.
Book cover to Chamberlain's second autobiography, A View from Above (1991). There, he claimed to have slept with 20,000 women.

"20,000 women" claim

Regarding his love life, Chamberlain was never at loss for female company, a fact his long-time Bel-Air neighbour Groucho Marx often made fun about. Time and again, Marx would poke in and ask Chamberlain “Where are the girls? Where are the girls?”[14] However, because Chamberlain never was engaged or married, he sometimes had to challenge claims he was homosexual, an ironic fact given the reality. In 1991, Chamberlain wrote his second autobiography, A View from Above. There, the lifelong bachelor Chamberlain made his most notorious claim, namely stating he had sex with 20,000 women. Quickly, he became target for jokes and jibes, and fellow African-American superstar Arthur Ashe was highly critical, blasting Chamberlain for embarrassing black men and fueling prejudices about their sexual behaviour. Chamberlain defended himself “I was just doing what was natural -- chasing good-looking ladies, whoever they were and wherever they were available” and pointed out he never started a relationship with a married woman.[7] Julius Henry Marx, known as Groucho Marx (October 2, 1890 – August 19, 1977), was an American comedian, working both with his siblings, the Marx Brothers, and on his own. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Arthur Ashe (1943-1993) Country: United States Height: 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) Weight: 73 kg (160 lb) Plays: Right Turned pro: 1966 Retired: 1980 Highest singles ranking: 1 (1968 and 1975) Singles titles: 34 Career prize money: $2,584,909 Grand Slam Record Titles: 3 Australian Open W...


In an 1999 interview shortly before his death, Chamberlain regretted not explaining the sexual climate at the time of his escapades, and warned other men who admired him for it, closing with the words: "Having a thousand different ladies is pretty cool, I have learned in my life I've found out (sic) that having one woman a thousand different times is much more satisfying."[28] Chamberlain also acknowledged he never came close to marrying, and never had intention of raising any children.[14]


Death

Chamberlain had a history of heart trouble. In 1992, Chamberlain was hospitalised for three days following an irregular heartbeat, and in 1999, his situation deteriorated rapidly. After undergoing dental surgery in that year, he lost 50 pounds, was in great pain and seemed unable to recover from the stress. On October 12, 1999, Chamberlain died at age 63. His agent Sy Goldberg stated Chamberlain died of congestive heart failure, and for about a month, doctors had been draining his legs of fluid that had accumulated because of the heart problem. He was survived by sisters Barbara Lewis, Margaret Lane, Selina Gross and Yvonne Chamberlain, and brothers Wilbert and Oliver Chamberlain.[4] October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


NBA players and officials mourned the loss of a player they universally remembered as a figurehead of the sport. His lifelong on-court nemesis and personal friend Bill Russell stated "the fierceness of our competition bonded us together for eternity", and legendary Celtics coach Red Auerbach praised Chamberlain as vital for the success of the entire NBA. Ex-Lakers team mate Jerry West fondly remembered him as an utterly dominant, yet friendly and humorous player, and fellow Hall-of-Famers Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Johnny Kerr, Phil Jackson and Wes Unseld as well as later stars like Allen Iverson and Michael Jordan universally called Chamberlain one of the greatest players in the history of the sport.[43] William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 69 Russell was the centerpiece of... Arnold Jacob Red Auerbach (September 20, 1917 – October 28, 2006) was an American coach and executive for the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... John G. “Red” Kerr (b. ... Phil Jackson as a coach of the Los Angeles Lakers Philip Douglas Phil Jackson (born September 17, 1945 in Deer Lodge, Montana) is a National Basketball Association (NBA) coach and former player. ... Westley Sissel Wes Unseld (born March 14, 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American former basketball player and coach in the NBA. Unseld is a prominent member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-Americans. ... Allen Ezail Iverson (born June 7, 1975, in Hampton, Virginia[1]), nicknamed A.I. and The Answer, is an American professional basketball player for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ...


Chamberlain in popular culture

Wilt, the tall basketball player of the animated television series Foster's Home For Imaginary Friends
Wilt, the tall basketball player of the animated television series Foster's Home For Imaginary Friends

Libertarian philosopher Robert Nozick created the "Wilt Chamberlain example". He states that if fans agreed to pay to see him play, then Chamberlain was entitled to higher compensation because of his superior ability [on the court], in order to demonstrate that non-entitlement theories of justice were inherently unjust.[45] Furthermore, in the media, Wilt, a tall, lanky, basketball fan and imaginary friend in the animated television series Foster's Home For Imaginary Friends is named after Chamberlain. Finally, the satirical Chuck Norris Facts website has spoofed Chamberlain's "sex with 20,000 women" claim with by stating "Wilt Chamberlain claims to have slept with more than 20,000 women in his lifetime. Chuck Norris calls this 'a slow Tuesday.'".[46] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (261x606, 21 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (261x606, 21 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends is an Emmy award-winning, American animated television series created and produced at Cartoon Network Studios by animator Craig McCracken, who also created The Powerpuff Girls. ... In English-speaking countries, libertarianism usually refers to a political philosophy maintaining that every person is the absolute owner of their own life and should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they respect the liberty of others. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Robert Nozick (November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher and Pellegrino University Professor at Harvard University. ... Justice as Fairness is the phrase used by the philosopher John Rawls to refer to his distinctive theory of justice. ... Distributive justice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Wilt is a fictional character in Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends who is voiced by Phil LaMarr. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends is an Emmy award-winning, American animated television series created and produced at Cartoon Network Studios by animator Craig McCracken, who also created The Powerpuff Girls. ... Chuck Norris Facts in Rolling Stone. ...


See also

List of National Basketball Association players who have scored 60 or more points in a single game. ... Scoring 100 points in a basketball game is a rare accomplishment in the sport of basketball. ...

Further reading

  • Chamberlain, Wilt; Shaw, David (1973). Wilt: Just Like Any Other 7-Foot Black Millionaire Who Lives Next Door. New York: Macmillan. 
  • Chamberlain, Wilt (1992). A View From Above. New York: New York Signet Books. ISBN 0-451-17493-3. 
  • Chamberlain, Wilt (1997). Who's Running the Asylum? Inside the Insane World of Sports Today. International Promotions. ISBN 1-57901-005-9. 
  • Cherry, Robert (2004). Wilt: Larger Than Life. Chicago: Triumph Books. ISBN 1-57243-672-7. 
  • Heisler, Mark (2003). Giants: The 25 Greatest Centers of All Time. Chicago: Triumph Books. ISBN 1-57243-577-1. 
  • Pluto, Terry (1992). Tall Tales: The Glory Years of the NBA in the Words of the Men Who Played, Coached, and Built Pro Basketball. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-74279-5. 
  • Pomerantz, Gary M. (2005). Wilt, 1962: The Night of 100 Points and the Dawn of a New Era. New York: Crown. ISBN 1-4000-5160-6. 

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Lawrence, Mitch (2007-02-10). Chamberlain's feats the stuff of legend.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o nba.com (2007-02-10). Wilt Chamberlain Bio.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Ramsay, Jack (2007-02-10). Wilt's spirit was larger than life.
  4. ^ a b c d e f espn.com (2007-02-10). Chamberlain towered over NBA.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Schwartz, Larry (2007-02-10). Wilt battled loser label.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k hoophall.com (2007-02-10). Wilt Chamberlain Biography.
  7. ^ a b espn.com (2007-02-10). Sexual claim transformed perception of Wilt.
  8. ^ a b Pierce, Don (2007-02-10). Chamberlain rated greatest in court game.
  9. ^ a b Bock, Hal (2007-02-10). More than a big man, Wilt was a giant.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Schwartz, Larry (2007-02-10). A revolutionary force.
  11. ^ "Biography - Wilt Chamberlain", HickokSports.com, 06 September 2004.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i Lazenby, Roland (2007-02-14). Big Norman.
  13. ^ a b harlemglobetrotters.com (2007-02-10). The Original Harlem Globetrotters.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Deford, Frank (2007-02-10). Just doing fine, my man.
  15. ^ nba.com (2007-02-10). Larry Bird Bio.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q basketball-reference.com (2007-02-14). Wilt Chamberlain Statistics.
  17. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1961 NBA Season Summary.
  18. ^ Pomerantz, Gary M.. Wilt, 1962.
  19. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1962 NBA Season Summary.
  20. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1963 NBA Season Summary.
  21. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1964 NBA Season Summary.
  22. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1965 NBA Season Summary.
  23. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1966 NBA Season Summary.
  24. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1967 NBA Season Summary.
  25. ^ nba.com (2007-02-10). Willis Reed Bio.
  26. ^ NBA Finals 1970 (2007-02-10).
  27. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1971 NBA Season Summary.
  28. ^ a b espn.com (2007-02-10). Wilt spoke of regrets, women and Meadowlark.
  29. ^ eastsideboxing.com (2007-03-02). Ali vs. Wilt Chamberlain: The Fight That Almost Was.
  30. ^ a b databasebasketball.com (2007-02-17). Los Angeles Lakers 1971-72 Game Log and Scores.
  31. ^ time.com (1972-05-22). One for the Dipper.
  32. ^ NBA Finals 1972 (2007-02-10).
  33. ^ basketball-reference.com (2007-02-10). 1973 NBA Season Summary.
  34. ^ Chamberlain, Wilt (2007-03-02). Who's Running the Asylum? Inside the Insane World of Sports Today.
  35. ^ a b c d e Sheridan, Chris (2007-02-10). Until his dying day, Wilt was invincible.
  36. ^ ESPN: Top N. American athletes of the century (2007-03-05).
  37. ^ Heisler, Mark: "Giants: Big Men Who Shook the NBA", page 14. Triumph Books
  38. ^ In every year from 1955-69, at least five of following Hall-of-Fame players: Bob Cousy, John Havlicek, Tom Heinsohn, K. C. Jones, Sam Jones, Frank Ramsey, Tom Sanders, Bill Sharman
  39. ^ Hall-of-Famers who played with Chamberlain -- Warriors: Paul Arizin, Tom Gola; Sixers: Hal Greer, Billy Cunningham; Lakers: Jerry West, Elgin Baylor, Gail Goodrich; however, Baylor had a crippling career-ending injury when Goodrich came
  40. ^ Russell, Bill. Chat Transcript: Celtics Legend Bill Russell @ celtics.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  41. ^ a b nba.com (2007-02-14). Wilt Scores 100!.
  42. ^ a b bookrags.com (2007-02-15). Wilt Chamberlain.
  43. ^ a b espn.com (2007-02-10). Reaction to a basketball legend’s death.
  44. ^ espn.com (2007-02-10). Wilt was Philadelphia's greatest athlete.
  45. ^ Johnson, R. N. (2007-02-20). Nozick > The Wilt Chamberlain Argument.
  46. ^ Chuck Norris Facts, page 2 (2007-05-03).

September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a former professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... Tom Heinsohn (August 26, 1934- ) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics basketball team. ... K. C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Sam, Samantha or Samuel Jones can refer to a number of different people. ... Frank Plumpton Ramsey (February 22, 1903 - January 19, 1930) was a British mathematician and logician. ... Thomas Ernest Satch Sanders (born November 8, 1938 in New York City, New York) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Paul Joseph Arizin (April 9, 1928 – December 12, 2006), nicknamed Pitchin Paul, was an American basketball player who spent his entire National Basketball Association career with the Philadelphia Warriors from 1950 to 1962. ... Thomas Joseph Gola (born January 13, 1933 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is one of Philadelphias most famous basketball players. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... William John Billy Cunningham (born June 3, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former pro basketball player, who was nicknamed the Kangaroo Kid, and coach. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Gail Charles Goodrich Jr. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wilt Chamberlain
Preceded by
Hal Lear
NCAA Basketball Tournament
Most Outstanding Player
(men's)

1957
Succeeded by
Elgin Baylor
Preceded by
K. C. Jones
San Diego Conquistadors Head Coach
1973–1974
Succeeded by
Alex Groza
National Basketball Association | NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar | Nate Archibald | Paul Arizin | Charles Barkley | Rick Barry | Elgin Baylor | Dave Bing | Larry Bird | Wilt Chamberlain | Bob Cousy | Dave Cowens | Billy Cunningham | Dave DeBusschere | Clyde Drexler | Julius Erving | Patrick Ewing | Walt Frazier | George Gervin | Hal Greer | John Havlicek | Elvin Hayes | Magic Johnson | Sam Jones | Michael Jordan | Jerry Lucas | Karl Malone | Moses Malone | Pete Maravich | Kevin McHale | George Mikan | Earl Monroe | Hakeem Olajuwon | Shaquille O'Neal | Robert Parish | Bob Pettit | Scottie Pippen | Willis Reed | Oscar Robertson | David Robinson | Bill Russell | Dolph Schayes | Bill Sharman | John Stockton | Isiah Thomas | Nate Thurmond | Wes Unseld | Bill Walton | Jerry West | Lenny Wilkens | James Worthy At the conclusion of the NCAA mens and womens Division I basketball championships (the Final Four tournaments), the Associated Press selects a Most Outstanding Player. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... K. C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... The San Diego Conquistadors, nicknamed the Qs, were an American Basketball Association team based in San Diego, California. ... Alex John Groza (October 7, 1926 – January 21, 1995) was a basketball player who was banned from the NBA for life in 1951 for point shaving. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a basketball league. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... Nathaniel (Nate) Tiny Archibald (born September 2, 1948 in New York City) is a former professional basketball player. ... Paul Joseph Arizin (April 9, 1928 – December 12, 2006), nicknamed Pitchin Paul, was an American basketball player who spent his entire National Basketball Association career with the Philadelphia Warriors from 1950 to 1962. ... Charles Wade Barkley (born February 20, 1963) is an American former basketball power forward in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Rick Barry (with a basket) as a player of the Golden State Warriors Richard Francis Dennis Barry III (born March 28, 1944 in Elizabeth, New Jersey, USA) is a former professional basketball player, remembered for his sharpshooting, his excellent passing, his tenacious and quarrelsome spirit and his odd-looking but... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... David Bing (born November 24, 1943 in Washington, D.C.) is a former All-Star player in the National Basketball Association, primarily for the Detroit Pistons from 1966 to 1975. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is an American former NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players to ever play, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... William John Billy Cunningham (born June 3, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former pro basketball player, who was nicknamed the Kangaroo Kid, and coach. ... David Albert DeBusschere (October 16, 1940 - May 14, 2003) was a professional basketball player born in Detroit, Michigan. ... Clyde Austin Drexler (born June 22, 1962 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American former National Basketball Association shooting guard. ... Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a former American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Patrick Aloysius Ewing (born August 5, 1962) is a Jamaican-born American former NBA player. ... Walter Clyde Frazier (born March 29, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American former basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... George Gervin (born April 27, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former professional basketball player, a shooting guard for the American Basketball Associations (ABA) Virginia Squires and San Antonio Spurs and the National Basketball Associations (NBA) San Antonio Spurs and Chicago Bulls. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a former professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... Elvin Ernest Hayes (born November 17, 1945 in Rayville, Louisiana) is considered as one of the all-time great collegiate and professional basketball players. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Samuel Sam Jones (born June 24, 1933 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Jerry Lucas as a player of the San Francisco Warriors Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Karl Malone (born July 24, 1963, in Bernice, Louisiana) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Peter Press Pete Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988) was an American basketball player known for his dazzling ballhandling, incredible shooting abilities, and creative passing. ... Kevin Edward McHale (born December 19, 1957) is an American former professional basketball player who starred for thirteen seasons in the NBA for the Boston Celtics. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... Earl Vernon Monroe (born on November 21, 1944, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), was an American professional basketball player known for his flamboyant dribbling, passing and play-making. ... Hakeem Abdul Olajuwon (born Akeem Abdul Olajuwon on January 21, 1963 in Lagos, Nigeria) is a former professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (born March 6, 1972), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is one of the most famous American professional basketball players playing today; he is generally regarded as being one of the most dominant players in the National Basketball Association. ... Robert Lee Parish (born on August 30, 1953 in Shreveport, Louisiana), is an American former basketball center. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Scottie Maurice Pippen (born September 25, 1965 in Hamburg, Arkansas) is a former American professional basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is most remembered for leading the Chicago Bulls together with Michael Jordan to six championships and being one of the best all-around players... Willis Reed Jr. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee) is an American former NBA player and is considered by many to be one of the greatest basketball players in history. ... David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965 in Key West, Florida) is a former NBA basketball player, who is often considered one of the greatest centers to ever play the game. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 69 Russell was the centerpiece of... Adolph Schayes (known as Dolph Schayes) (born May 19, 1928 in New York, New York) was a professional basketball player and coach in the NBA. He played his college basketball at New York University 1944-48. ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... John Houston Stockton (born March 26, 1962) is a former American professional basketball player. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA, and is currently the head coach and president of basketball operations for the NBAs New York Knicks. ... Nathaniel Nate Thurmond (born July 25, 1941, in Akron, Ohio) is rated by many one of the best defensive centers ever to play pro basketball, feared and praised by legends including Bob Pettit, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Wilt Chamberlain. ... Westley Sissel Wes Unseld (born March 14, 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American former basketball player and coach in the NBA. Unseld is a prominent member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-Americans. ... William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952, in La Mesa, California), is an American former basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... James Ager Worthy (b. ...


 
 

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