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Encyclopedia > Wilma Rudolph
Olympic medalist

Wilma Rudolph
Medal record
Women's athletics
Gold 1960 Rome 100 m
Gold 1960 Rome 200 m
Gold 1960 Rome 4 x 100 m relay
Bronze 1956 Melbourne 4 x 100 m relay

Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete, and in the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy, she became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field during a single Olympic Games, despite running on a sprained ankle.[1] Wilma Rudolph Source: U.S. Census Bureau This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Athletics has been contested at every Summer Olympics since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... At the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, 34 events in athletics were contested, 24 by men and 10 by women. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... At the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, 34 events in athletics were contested, 24 by men and 10 by women. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... At the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, 34 events in athletics were contested, 24 by men and 10 by women. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... FUCK YOU ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ...


The powerful sprinter emerged from the 1960 Rome Olympics as "The Tennessee Tornado," the fastest woman on earth.[2] The Italians nicknamed her "La Gazzella Nera" (the Black Gazelle); to the French she was "La Perle Noire" (The Black Pearl).[3][4] It was with gracefulness that Rudolph carried herself off the track as well. Attractive, intelligent, and charming, Rudolph had defied the heavy odds against her and become the Olympian of which Americans should perhaps be most proud.

Contents

Biography

Wilma Rudolph was born in St. Bethelem, a part of Clarksville, Tennessee, twentieth of twenty-two children of Ed and Blanche Rudolph. At an early age it was discovered that she had polio. In 1947 her mother took her to Nashville's Meharry Medical College, a hospital for blacks, 50 miles from their home twice a week. Because of the expense and difficulty of obtaining professional medical care, Wilma's mother usually treated her ailing child at home. Rudolph remembered that during her youth, "my mother used to have all these home remedies she would make herself, and I lived on them". Many nights her mother, herself tired after a long day's work, would sit on Wilma's bed and massage her daughter's leg well into the evening hours. Blanche Rudolph kept telling her polio-stricken daughter she would one day walk without braces.[5] The Roxy in Clarksvilles historic downtown section. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ...


In 1952, 12-year old Wilma Rudolph finally achieved her dream of shedding her handicap and becoming like other children. Wilma's older sister was on a basketball team, and Wilma vowed to follow in her footsteps. While in high school Wilma was on the basketball team, when she was spotted by Tennessee State track and field coach Edward S. Temple. Being discovered by Temple was a major break for a young athlete. The day he saw the tenth grader Wilma Rudolph for the first time, he knew he had found a natural athlete. Wilma had already gained some track experience on Burt High School's track team two years before, mostly as a way to keep busy between basketball seasons.[6] Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ...


While attending Burt High School, Rudolph became a basketball star, setting state records for scoring and leading her team to the state championship. By the time she was 16, she earned a berth on the U.S. Olympic track and field team and came home from the 1956 Melbourne Games with a Olympic bronze medal, the third place prize, in the 4 x 100-meter relay.


At the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome she won three Olympic titles; in the 100 m, 200 m and the 4 x 100 m relay. The temperture climbed toward 100 degrees, 80,000 spectators jammed the Studio Olympico. Rudolph ran the 100-meter dash in an impressive 11 seconds flat. She had also won the 200-meter dash in 23.2 seconds, a new Olympic record. After these twin triumphs, she was being hailed throughout the world as "the fastet woman in history." Finally, she combined with Tennessee State teammates Martha Hudson, Lucinda Williams and Barbara Jones to win the 400-meter relay in 44.5 seconds, setting a world record. Rudolph had a special, personal reason to hope for victory--to pay tribute to Jesse Owens, the celebrated American athlete who had been her inspiration. The star of the 1936 Summer Olympics, held in Berlin, Germany.[7] The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Barbara Jones (26 March 1937) is an American athlete who competed mainly in the 100 metres. ... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an American track and field athlete. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation). ...


Rudolph retires from track competition in 1962 after winning two races at a U.S.-Soviet meet. In 1963, Rudolph was granted a full scholarship to Tennessee State University where she ultimately received her Bachelor's degree in elementary education. After her athletic career, Rudolph worked as a teacher at Cobb Elementary School, coaching track at Burt High School, and a sports commentator on national television. This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ...


Wilma married her high school sweetheart Robert Eldridge in 1963, and had four children: Yolanda (b. 1958), Djuanna (b. 1964), Robert Jr. (b. 1965) and Xurry (b. 1971). Wilma and Eldridge later divorced. In 1977, she published her autobiography, “Wilma: The Story of Wilma Rudolph.”


Death

In July of 1994, shortly after her mother’s death, Wilma Rudolph was diagnosed with brain and throat cancer. On November 12, 1994, Wilma Rudolph age 54, died in her home in Brentwood, Tennessee of brain cancer. At the time of her death, she had four children, eight grandchildren, and over 100 nieces and nephews.[8] Thousands of mourners filled Tennessee State University's Kean Hall on November 17, 1994 for the memorial service in her honor. Others attended the funeral at Clarksville's First Baptist Church. Across Tennessee, the state flag flew at half-mast. Nine months after Wilma's death, Tennessee State University, on August 11, 1995, dedicated its new six-story dormitory the Wilma G. Rudolph Residence Center. A black marble marker was placed on her grave in Clarksville's Foster Memorial Garden Cemetery by the Wilma Rudolph Memorial Commission on November 21, 1995. Brentwood is a city in Williamson County, Tennessee, United States. ... A brain tumor is any mass created by an abnormal and uncontrolled growth of cells either found in the brain (neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, myelin producing cells, etc. ...


Legacy and honors

2004 US Postage Stamp

She received numerous awards: United Press Athlete of the Year 1960 and Associated Press Woman Athlete of the Year 1960. In 1961, the year her father died, Rudolph won the James E. Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in the United States, and visited President John F. Kennedy.[9] She was voted into the National Black Sports and Entertainment Hall of Fame in 1973[10] and the National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1974.[11] She was inducted in the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1994, a track and field champion, Rudolph elevated women's track to a major presence in the United States.[12] Inducted into the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983 and honored with the National Sports Award in 1993. Image File history File linksMetadata WilmaRudolphStamp23. ... Image File history File linksMetadata WilmaRudolphStamp23. ... The AAU James E. Sullivan Award is awarded annually by the Amateur Athletic Union to the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917–November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F Kennedy, JFK, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The National Womens Hall of Fame was created in 1969 by a group of people in Seneca Falls, New York, the location of the first American womens rights convention, now known to historians as the 1848 Womens Rights Convention. ... The US Olympic Hall of Fame is a list of the top American Olympic athletes. ...


On December 2, 1980, Tennessee State University named its indoor track for Wilma Rudolph.


In 1981 she established the Wilma Rudolph Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to assisting young athletes by teaching them that they, too, can succeed even in the face of seemingly impossible odds. Based in Indianapolis, Indiana, the organization, which had over 1,000 participants by the mid-1980's, provided free coaching in their chosen sports. Vitalis Cup for Sports Excellence 1983.


In 1977, NBC made a movie about her life from her autobiography, "Wilma". Wilma worked on it as a consultant. Denzel Washington age 18, played the boyfriend, and he later married Pauletta Pearson whom he met on the set.[13] Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. ... Denzel Jermaine Washington, Jr. ...


Received the Jackie Robinson Image Award of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1989.


In 1994, Wilma Rudolph Boulevard is the name given to the portion of U.S. Route 79 in Clarksville, Tennessee. Wilma Rudolph Boulevard is the name given to the portion of U. S. Route 79 in Clarksville, Tennessee between the Interstate 24 exit 4 in Clarksville to the Red River (Lynnwood-Tarpley) bridge near the Kraft Street intersection. ... U.S. Highway 79 is a north-south United States highway. ...


The Women's Sports Foundation Wilma Rudolph Courage Award is presented to a female athlete who exhibits extraordinary courage in her athletic performance, demonstrates the ability to overcome adversity, makes significant contributions to sports and serves as an inspiration and role model to those who face challenges, overcomes them and strives for success at all levels. This award was first given in 1996 to Jackie Joyner-Kersee.[14] Jackie Joyner-Kersee (born March 3, 1962) is a retired American athlete, ranked amongst the all-time greatest heptathletes. ...


To honor one of America's most outstanding Olympic athletes and her legacy, a bronze life size statue of Clarksville, Tennessee native Wilma Rudolph was hand-crafted in her likeness. The statue can be viewed at the southern end of the Cumberland RiverWalk at the base of the Pedestrian Overpass, College Street & Riverside Drive.[15]


In 2000 Sports Illustrated magazine ranked Rudolph as number one in its listing of the top fifty greatest sports figures in twentieth-century Tennessee.[16]


In 2004, the United States Postal Service issued a 23 cent postage stamp in recognition of her accomplishments. Her courage and idealism have established her as an authentic American hero. The United States Postal Service (USPS) is an independent establishment of the executive branch of the United States government (see 39 U.S.C. Â§ 201) responsible for providing postal service in the U.S. Within the United States, it is colloquially referred to simply as the post office. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ...


References

  1. ^ Rome, 1960, Games of the XVII Olympiad Photo Gallery of Wilma Rudolph
  2. ^ Biracree, Tom. Wilma Rudolph: Champion Athlete, Chelsea House Publishers, New York, (1988)
  3. ^ Biracree, Tom. p. 82
  4. ^ Time Magazine, The Fastest Female, Monday, September 19, 1960
  5. ^ Biracree, Tom. p. 32
  6. ^ Biracree, Tom. p. 47
  7. ^ Biracree, Tom. p. 16
  8. ^ Smith, Maureen Margaret. Wilma Rudolph: A Biography, Greenwood Press, (2006)
  9. ^ Wilma Rudolph biography. Women in History. Retrieved on 2007-06-11.
  10. ^ National Black Sports and Entertainment Hall of Fame
  11. ^ National Track and Field Hall of Fame
  12. ^ Women's Hall of Fame
  13. ^ NBC "Wilma"
  14. ^ Wilma Rudolph Courage Award
  15. ^ Wilma Rudolph Statue
  16. ^ Wilma Rudolph (1940-1994) and the TSU Tigerbelles

Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

  • Biracee, Tom. Wilma Rudolph, Holloway House Publishing Company; (June 1990) - ISBN 0870675656
  • Braun, Eric. Wilma Rudolph, Capstone Press, (2005) - ISBN 0736842349
  • Coffey, Wayne R. Wilma Rudolph, Blackbirch Press, (1993) - ISBN 1567110045
  • Conrad, David. Stick to It!: The Story of Wilma Rudolph, Compass Point Books (August 2002) - ISBN 0756503841
  • Harper, Jo. Wilma Rudolph: Olympic Runner (Childhood of Famous Americans), Aladdin (January 6, 2004) - ISBN 0606297391
  • Krull, Kathleen. Wilma Unlimited: How Wilma Rudolph Became the World's Fastest Woman, Harcourt *Children's Books; Library Binding edition (April 1, 1996) - ISBN 0152012672
  • Ruth, Amy. Wilma Rudolph, Lerner Publications (February 2000) - ISBN 082254976X
  • Schraff, Anne E. Wilma Rudolph: The Greatest Woman Sprinter in History, Enslow Publishers, (2004) - ISBN 0766022919
  • Sherrow, Victoria. Wilma Rudolph (On My Own Biographies), Carolrhoda Books (April 2000) - ISBN 1575052466
  • Smith, Maureen Margaret. Wilma Rudolph: A Biography, Greenwood Press, (2006) - ISBN 0313333076
  • Streissguth, Tom. Wilma Rudolph, Turnaround Publisher, (2007) - ISBN 0822566931

External links

Olympic champions in women's 100 m
1928: Betty Robinson | 1932: Stanisława Walasiewicz | 1936: Helen Stephens | 1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen | 1952: Marjorie Jackson | 1956: Betty Cuthbert | 1960: Wilma Rudolph | 1964: Wyomia Tyus | 1968: Wyomia Tyus | 1972: Renate Stecher | 1976: Annegret Richter | 1980: Lyudmila Kondratyeva | 1984: Evelyn Ashford | 1988: Florence Griffith-Joyner | 1992: Gail Devers | 1996: Gail Devers | 2000: Marion Jones | 2004: Yulia Nestsiarenka
Olympic champions in women's 200 m
1948: Fanny Blankers-Koen | 1952: Marjorie Jackson | 1956: Betty Cuthbert | 1960: Wilma Rudolph | 1964: Edith McGuire | 1968: Irena Szewińska | 1972: Renate Stecher | 1976: Bärbel Eckert | 1980: Bärbel Eckert | 1984: Valerie Brisco-Hooks | 1988: Florence Griffith-Joyner | 1992 Gwen Torrence | 1996: Marie-José Pérec | 2000: Marion Jones | 2004: Veronica Campbell

  Results from FactBites:
 
Wilma Rudolph biography (1212 words)
Wilma was born prematurely and weighed only 4.5 pounds.
Even though it was 50 miles away, Wilma's mother took her there twice a week for two years, until she was able to walk with the aid of a metal leg brace.
For Wilma, the fact that she insisted that her homecoming parade in Clarksville, Tennessee be open to everyone and not a segregated event as was the usual custom.
Gale - Free Resources - Black History - Biographies - Wilma Rudolph (351 words)
Wilma Rudolph was the first American woman runner to win three gold medals in the Olympic games.
Rudolph was born on June 23, 1940, in St. Bethlehem, Tennessee, the 17th of 19 children, and soon moved with her family to Clarksville.
Rudolph, a noted goodwill ambassador, was also a talk show hostess and active on the lecture circuit.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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