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Encyclopedia > Willow (film)
Willow
Directed by Ron Howard
Produced by Joe Johnston
George Lucas
Nigel Wooll
Written by George Lucas (story)
Bob Dolman (screenplay)
Starring Val Kilmer
Warwick Davis
Joanne Whalley

Jean Marsh
Patricia Hayes
Billy Barty
Pat Roach
Music by James Horner
Cinematography Adrian Biddle
Distributed by MGM (U.S.)
Release date(s) May 20, 1988 (U.S.)
Running time 126 min.
Language English
Budget $35,000,000
IMDb profile

Willow is a 1988 fantasy film directed by Ron Howard, based on a story by George Lucas. Image File history File links Willow_movie. ... Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954 in Duncan, Oklahoma) is an American actor, and an Academy Award winning film director, and producer, known for his roles on sitcoms, movies and television. ... Joseph Eggleston Joe Johnston III (born May 13, 1950 in Fort Worth, Texas) is a well-known American film director responsbile for such films as Hidalgo, Jurassic Park III, October Sky, and Jumanji, amongst others. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... Warwick Ashley Davis (born 3 February 1970) is an English actor. ... Joanne Whalley (born August 25, 1964 ) ) is a British actress. ... Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ... Patricia Hayes, CBE (born Patricia Lawlor Hayes on December 22, 1909 in Camberwell; died September 19, 1998 in London) was a British-born comedy actress of Irish Catholic extraction. ... Billy Barty (born William John Bertanzetti) (October 25, 1924–December 23, 2000) was an American film actor. ... Patrick Roach (May 19, 1937 – July 17, 2004) was a wrestler and actor from Birmingham, United Kingdom. ... James Roy Horner (born August 14, 1953) is an American composer of orchestral and film music. ... Adrian Biddle, (July 20, 1952 – December 7, 2005), was an English cinematographer. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Fantasy films are films with fantastic themes, usually involving magic, supernatural events, make-believe creatures, or exotic fantasy worlds. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ...

Contents

Production

George Lucas originally planned to film an adaptation of The Hobbit.[citation needed] Unable to secure the rights, he wrote Willow, which shares many similarities with J.R.R. Tolkien's celebrated novel and its sequel, The Lord of the Rings. George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... This article is about the book. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... This article is about the novel. ...


The film was notable for employing more dwarfs than any production in many years, and was widely praised by the "little person" community for employing Warwick Davis as the lead, cast in that role when he was 17 years old. Willow was among the first feature films to use detailed computer graphics to portray characters, in particular in the morphing special effect, transforming an old sorceress into various animals. This article is about the medical condition. ... Dwarfism is a condition in which a person, animal or plant is much below the ordinary size of the species. ... Warwick Ashley Davis (born 3 February 1970) is an English actor. ... 3 Frames from a morph from George W. Bush to Arnold Schwarzenegger showing the mid-point between the two extremes Morphing is a special effect in motion pictures and animations that changes (or morphs) one image into another through a seamless transition. ...


The two-headed monster in the film, the Eborsisk, was named as a reference to popular movie critics Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel; the villainous General Kael was also named for a critic, noted journalist Pauline Kael. Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ... Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine from 1968 to 1991. ...


Prior to Val Kilmer's selection, John Cusack and Matt Frewer were both considered for the role of Madmartigan. Once filming began, Val Kilmer improvised and ad-libbed much of his dialogue. Filming action scenes in the snow of a New Zealand winter prompted Val Kilmer to remark that he wished his wardrobe shirt had buttons, as the open shirt bared his chest to the cold. Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... This article is about the actor. ... Matt Frewer (b. ...


Much of the concept art, such as creature designs and storyboard art, was drawn by Jean Giraud (aka Moebius) and Chris Achilleos. Ultimately, the designs which appeared in the final film were considerably different from those initial designs; several sequences were also completely cut from the film due to time constraints. One such scene was a battle at sea in which the heroes narrowly escape a giant sea monster, which was depicted as a huge anthropomorphic shark in storyboard artwork. This took place when Willow returned from the island where he found Fin Razael, and the shark initially appeared as a young boy. Jean Henri Gaston Giraud (born May 8, 1938) is a French comics artist. ... Chris Achilleos (born 1947) is a painter and illustrator . ... 7th millennium BC anthropomorphized rocks, with slits for eyes, found in modern-day Israel. ...


Synopsis

A young farmer named Willow Ufgood (Warwick Davis), one of a halfling-like people called Nelwyns, is drawn away from his sheltered home to save Elora Danan (a baby girl with a destiny) from the evil Queen Bavmorda (Jean Marsh) who would see her destroyed. Warwick Ashley Davis (born 3 February 1970) is an English actor. ... Halfling is another name for J. R. R. Tolkiens hobbit and is a fictional race sometimes found in fantasy novels and games. ... Elora Danan is a fictional character from the 1988 fantasy Willow, played by infant twins Kate and Ruth Greenfield. ... Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ...


Willow is aided by the disillusioned master swordsman Madmartigan (Val Kilmer), who has turned to a life of roguery, sorceress Fin Raziel (Patricia Hayes), who has been turned into a possum by Bavmorda, as well as two diminutive brownies Franjean and Rool. They are initially thwarted, but later joined, by the queen's daughter Sorsha (played by Joanne Whalley, later Kilmer's wife). Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... Patricia Hayes, CBE (born Patricia Lawlor Hayes on December 22, 1909 in Camberwell; died September 19, 1998 in London) was a British-born comedy actress of Irish Catholic extraction. ... For other uses, see Possum (disambiguation). ... A signature Cox Brownie A brownie, brounie/Urisk (Lowland Scots) or ùruisg/brùnaidh (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary kind of elf popular in folklore around Scotland and England (especially the north). ... Joanne Whalley (born August 25, 1964 ) ) is a British actress. ...


Plot

Queen Bavmorda, a ruthless ruler of the kingdom Nockmar, seeks a child of prophecy that is to destroy her someday- she aims to send the child to the netherworld before she is threatened. The child, identified by a small rune on her arm, is soon born, but a midwife sneaks out with the child, caring for it while on the run. The midwife is eventually hunted down and killed by Bavmorda's devil-dogs, but not before she is able to send the child downstream on a small raft of wood and earth. The child is found by a Nelwyn named Willow Ufgood and his family. Willow is a young farmer and a sorcerer-in-training and wants nothing to do with the baby, fearing that it may be a bad omen, but his family overrules him- it is not before long that Willow also comes around. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


The next day, Willow and his other two children, Mims and Ranon, attend a festival in the Nelwyn village, where Willow preforms magic tricks. The celebration is cut short when a devil dog rampages through the festivities, until it is slain by the village militia- Willow realizes the baby's presence is the cause for this. Willow presents the child to the High Aldwin (Billy Barty), the village elder, sorcerer and Willow's mentor. The High Aldwin commands Willow to take the child with a group of men to The Crossroads, and deliver the baby to the first Daikini (human) they encounter. Willow doesn't want to go but he reluctantly agrees to follow his mentor's instructions. Meanwhile, in Nockmar, Bavmorda grows impatient with her daughter, the battle-hardened Sorsha, and her inability to track the child, ordering General Kael to aid her in the search- moments after they leave, an adviser expresses doubt at Sorsha's loyalty, which Bavmorda downplays. Billy Barty (born William John Bertanzetti) (October 25, 1924–December 23, 2000) was an American film actor. ...


Upon arrival at the crossroads, Willow and the group encounter a daikini thief named Madmartigan, imprisoned in a crow's cage. He claims to be the greatest swordsman to have lived, though this is doubted. Though he is a Daikini, Willow is adamant against giving the baby to him. After a brief argument amongst the accompanying men, Willow is left alone with the child and his friend, Meegosh, while the remainder head home. The next day, an army marches by. Madmartigan "smells" a battle. Willow tries to give the baby away- a soldier named Airk informs him that they are going to battle, so they cannot take her. Madmartigan, having been friends with Airk before, is informed that the Nockmar army has destroyed the kingdom of Galadoorn. Though Madmartigan is eager to help, Airk refuses, and leaves them behind. After the army passes, and seeing no other option, Willow and Meegosh free Madmartigan and give him the baby. Madmartigan heads off promising to take good care of the baby.


As Willow and Meegosh head back towards home, they see an eagle, carrying the baby and being ridden by a brownie, fly by. They chase after the eagle and are eventually captured by the other brownies. Willow and Meegosh wake up hours later, tied to the ground and surrounded by a pack of brownies, led by Franjean. A voice from the forest orders Franjean to release Willow and Meegosh. The forest sorceress, Cherlindrea, appears to them and greets Willow. They find the baby under her protection. She reveals to them that the baby's real name is Elora Danan. Elora has chosen Willow to be her guardian, because she likes him. Cherlindrea reveals Elora's destiny to Willow and instructs him to take Elora to the kingdom of Tir Asleen, where she will be safe. She gives Willow her magic wand and tells him to take it to Fin Raziel, an old rival of Bavmorda, to aid him in getting there. She also warns Willow that if he doesn't accept the calling Elora will surely die, and nothing will stop Bavmorda. The next day, Willow decides to continue on and sends Meegosh back to the village, starting out for the island of Fin Raziel, guided by Franjean and Rool. A signature Cox Brownie A brownie, brounie/Urisk (Lowland Scots) or ùruisg/brùnaidh (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary kind of elf popular in folklore around Scotland and England (especially the north). ... A wand consists of a thin, straight, hand-held stick of wood, ivory or metal, approximately a foot long and up to an inch in circumference. ...


At a tavern along the road, they run into Madmartigan. Neither are happy to see each other, since Willow feels Madmartigan is untrustworthy, and Madmartigan believes Willow is an annoyance. But Madmartigan helps Willow escape when Bavmorda's troops search the tavern. Madmartigan accompanies them on their way to the island. When they get to the island, Madmartigan goes his own way, and Willow goes to find Raziel. He's surprised to see that she's been turned into an opossum. He takes her to see Elora. Seeing the baby confirms Raziel's faith in the prophecy. Raziel can't do anything as an opossum, so she tells Willow to change her back into a human. She's shocked to learn that Willow is just an amateur. Bavmorda's troops ride up, led by Madmartigan who has betrayed Willow for unknown reasons. Willow, Raziel, Elora and Madmartigan (who has outlived his usefulness), are captured and taken to a Nockmar encampment in the mountains. Franjean and Rool are left behind and are forced to track the horses up the mountains. Rool states that this should be fun. Genera Several; see text Opossum fur is quite soft. ...


Up at the encampment, Willow and Madmartigan free Raziel, despite still being locked up, and Willow attempts to change her back into her human form. He fails, accidentally changing her into crow. Franjean and Rool arrive and offer to help them out of their cage. Franjean uses his spear to pick the lock, but not before Madmartigan tries to intervene and is immediately struck with a sack containing a very powerful, fairy love potion. The potion makes him feel "good". Madmartigan sneaks into Sorsha's tent to retrieve Elora, but (still under the effects of the love potion) stops the moment he sees Sorsha - he falls instantly in love with her. Sorsha awakens and threatens to kill him, but is swooned by his poetry - at least, until Kael arrives with Willow and the baby. Presuming that Madmartigan was lying to her as a distraction, they all begin to attack him - he grabs a spare sword and destroys the tent support, kissing Sorsha and then cutting his way out. For other uses, see Crow (disambiguation). ...


It is at this point that Madmartigan proves his claims of being an expert swordsman is not merely talk, dispatching three soldiers in a matter of seconds. Using a shield as a sled, Willow and Madmartigan ride out of the camp and down the hill toward a small village. Franjean and Rool are left behind once again. Halfway down the hill, Madmartigan falls off the sled, and eventually comes to a stop, smashing into a house as a human snowball. The impact seems to bring him out of the effects of the love potion.


Raziel catches up and warns everyone in the village that Kael and his men are coming. Willow and Madmartigan hide with the rest of the villagers and meet up with Airk and his remaining soldiers- he has lost half his forces to Bavmorda, and even after capturing Sorsha he doubts highly that Madmartigan and Willow could ever take Bavmorda on. Nevertheless, Madmartigan remains loyal to Willow, and the two escape, with Sorsha as their captive. Airk and his men cover their escape. On the road to Tir Asleen, Sorsha asks Madmartigan if he was serious about being in love with her. Madmartigan says that he wasn't himself and has since come to his senses. Insulted, Sorsha escapes from Madmartigan and Willow and goes back to find Kael.


The arrival at Tir Asleen is quickly tempered when the group realizes that the castle has been cursed by Bavmorda - it is now overrun by trolls, and its inhabitants are frozen in quartz-like rock formations. As Madmartigan equips himself from the castle's armory, Willow retries in his attempts to turn Raziel human, but fails once more as the approach of Kael's army provides distraction - Raziel is now a goat. After barring the gates, Madmartigan uses what little time he has to set up defenses, while Willow fights off a troll, turning it into an Eborsisk, a two-headed dragon which he promptly kicks into the moat below in disgust. As Kael shatters the gate with a battering ram, the Eborsisk grows at an alarming rate, forcing Kael to shift his men between fighting Madmartigan, the beast, and searching for Elora. Through the ensuing chaos, Sorsha turns coats and fights alongside Madmartigan, and Airk's army (with Franjean and Rool in tow) arrives, but Kael manages to injure Willow and escape with the child. Back at Nockmar, Bavmorda is pleased to see that Elora has been finally caught, but is enfuriated to hear that Sorsha has turned against her.


At the gates of Nockmar, Airk's army has set up camp. Bavmorda promptly turns the entire force, excluding Willow and Raziel, into pigs. Willow, knowing the hour is desperate, tries a final time to return Raziel into human form, as she undergoes a massive transformation from a menagerie of animals, until she is finally human. Taking the wand, she proceeds to return the army back to human form - at this point, Bavmorda has already prepared the ritual. With little in the way of plans, Willow suggests a strategy that will get them inside the castle - though it is a long shot, it is also their only hope.


Come morning, the ritual has not finished, and Willow and Raziel beckon Nockmar to open its gates - Airk's army, disguised under seemingly empty tents, ambushes the cavalry and rides hard into the castle, disabling the gate's mechanism and allowing more troops to get inside. As Kael wades into combat, Sorsha guides Raziel and Willow to the tower where Elora is held. During the battle, Airk is killed. Before he dies, he tells Madmartigan to win the war for him. Madmartigan attacks Kael in a rage. Though evenly matched, he manages to impale Kael on his own sword, throwing him to his death afterwards.


Meanwhile, Sorsha manages to kill Bavmorda's aides, but is rendered unconscious when her mother attacks her magically. Fin Raziel and Bavmorda begin fighting over the wand, and eventually Raziel is choked until she is also unconscious. On his own, Willow manages to grab Elora, but is cut off when Bavmorda seals the doors. Though it seems all is lost, Willow tricks Bavmorda by seemingly making the child disappear - in a rage, Bavmorda knocks over a vial of blood that would have been used on Elora. Moments later, she is struck by cursed lightening, instead exiling her own soul to the Netherworld. As Madmartigan arrives, and Sorsha and Raziel regain consciousness, Willow explains that he used his classic "disappearing pig trick" to hide the baby. Elora is safely hidden behind a stone table.


Back at Tir Asleen, the curse is lifted, and the kingdom is restored to its former glory. Madmartigan and Sorsha stay and raise Elora Danon as their daughter. Raziel gives Willow a book of basic magic, and tells him that he is on his way to becoming a great sorcerer. He is sent home on a white pony. Back in the Nelwyn village, Willow is greeted with a hero's welcome from the whole village. He is happy to see Meegosh, the High Aldwin, and especially his family again.


Cast

Actor/Actress Role(s)
Val Kilmer Madmartigan
Joanne Whalley Sorsha
Warwick Davis Willow Ufgood
Jean Marsh Queen Bavmorda
Patricia Hayes Fin Raziel
Billy Barty High Aldwin
Pat Roach General Kael
Gavan O'Herlihy Airk Thaughbaer
Julie Peters Kaiya Ufgood
David J. Steinberg Meegosh
Phil Fondacaro Vohnkar
Tony Cox Vohnkar warrior
Robert Gillibrand Vohnkar warrior
Mark Northover Burglekutt
Kevin Pollak Rool
Rick Overton Franjean

Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... Joanne Whalley (born August 25, 1964 ) ) is a British actress. ... Warwick Ashley Davis (born 3 February 1970) is an English actor. ... Jean Lyndsay Torren Marsh (born 1 July 1934) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actress and writer, who is best known for co-creating the British period drama Upstairs, Downstairs with Eileen Atkins. ... Patricia Hayes, CBE (born Patricia Lawlor Hayes on December 22, 1909 in Camberwell; died September 19, 1998 in London) was a British-born comedy actress of Irish Catholic extraction. ... Billy Barty (born William John Bertanzetti) (October 25, 1924–December 23, 2000) was an American film actor. ... Patrick Roach (May 19, 1937 – July 17, 2004) was a wrestler and actor from Birmingham, United Kingdom. ... Gavan OHerlihy (b. ... Phil Fondacaro (b. ... Joseph Anthony Tony Cox (born March 31, 1958) is an African-American actor from United States. ... Kevin E. Pollak (born on October 30, 1957) is an American actor, impressionist and comedian. ... Rick Overton is an American writer, actor, and comedian. ...

Release

The theatrical release was distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Lucasfilm, Ltd. that also distributed Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977), Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983).


The videotape was distributed by RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video.

The DVD cover of Willow.

Willow was released on DVD on November 27, 2001, distributed by Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment. Image File history File links WillowDVDcover. ... Image File history File links WillowDVDcover. ...


The DVD presents the film in its original 2.35:1 aspect ratio anamorphic widescreen, with sound remixed in 5.1 surround sound and THX-Certified. Special features:

  1. Available Subtitles: English
  2. Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround)
  3. Commentary by Warwick Davis (Unknown Format)
  4. Willow: The Making of an Adventure (original 1988 featurette)
  5. From Morf to Morphing: The Dawn of Digital Filmmaking
  6. TV spots and trailers
  7. Photo gallery

Many fans and critics complained about the lack of extensive deleted scenes, a more in-depth documentary, and a commentary from the filmmakers.[citation needed]


Soundtrack

The music in the film was composed by James Horner and is considered a very strong musical score. Distinct echoes of Robert Schumann's Rhenish Symphony may be heard in the triumphant theme. The main theme also bears a resemblance to the "Redemption" motif from Richard Wagner's operatic tetralogy Der Ring Des Nibelungen. James Roy Horner (born August 14, 1953) is an American composer of orchestral and film music. ... For other persons named Robert Schumann, see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... Robert Schumanns Symphony No. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Der Ring des Nibelungen, (The Ring of the Nibelung), is a cycle of four epic music dramas by the German composer Richard Wagner. ...


Reception

Critics blasted Willow on its initial release (the movie carries a 43% "rotten" rating among critics at Rotten Tomatoes, [1]). Furthermore, the movie was only moderately successful at the box office, grossing only $57 million domestically. [2] The performances (particularly Davis') and special effects were generally praised, but the film's story was widely dismissed as too derivative of familiar literary sources like The Bible and Gulliver's Travels, as well as the work of J. R. R. Tolkien and other fantasy authors. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... First Edition of Gullivers Travels Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. ... Tolkien redirects here. ...


In the years since its release, it has built up a strong cult following and currently holds an 82% "fresh" rating among users at Rotten Tomatoes [3] as well as a "B" at Box Office Mojo. [4] Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ...


Spinoffs

Video games

The film was the basis of the video game Willow, which was released in 1989 for the Nintendo Entertainment System by Capcom and also the PC which was done by Mindscape. Capcom also created a Willow arcade game for its CPS-1 system, which played much differently than its console cousin, being a side-scrolling platformer rather than an adventure/RPG game similar to Zelda, and also followed the plot of the film more closely. Willow is a video game released in 1989 for the Nintendo Entertainment System and the Famicom based on the 1989 film Willow. ... “NES” redirects here. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Willow is a platform game based on the 1988 film of the same name. ... The CPS-1 ) or Capcom Play System 1 is an arcade system board by Capcom that debuted in 1988 with Forgotten Worlds and Ghouls n Ghosts. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ...


Novels

The novelization, written by Wayland Drew and available around the time of the movie's release, contains all the scenes that were eventually cut from the film, along with additional history and character backgrounds added by the author. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


George Lucas outlined a trilogy to follow the film and hired comic-book writer/novelist Chris Claremont to adapt them into a series of books. They take place about fifteen years after the original film and feature the now teenage Elora Danan as the central character. The books are: This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Shadow Moon is a fantasy novel written by Chris Claremont and George Lucas. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Shadow Dawn is a fantasy novel written by Chris Claremont and George Lucas. ... Shadow Star is the third and final book in the Chronicles of the Shadow War trilogy. ...

Comic book

Marvel Comics published a three-issue adaptation of the film. It featured many of the scenes which were cut from the film. This article is about the comic book company. ...


TV series

In April 2005, during the Star Wars "Celebration III" fan convention, George Lucas hinted in an interview[1] that given his company (Lucasfilm) was moving into television production again, there could be a Willow television series. George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Lucasfilm Ltd. ...


In Popular Culture

Willow is mentioned in the song Elvenpath by the Finnish metal band Nightwish along with Bilbo, Sparrowhawk and the Snowman. The word 'daikinis' is the inspiration for the name of Scottish indie band The Dykeenies. Angels Fall First is Nightwishs debut album, released in 1997 by Spinefarm Records. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Nightwish are a Finnish symphonic power metal musical group, formed in 1996 in the town of Kitee, in eastern Finland. ... Bilbo can refer to: Theodore G. Bilbo, a politician who upheld racial segregation and became Senator for the State of Mississippi. ... Ged is the main protagonist in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea book series. ... A classic snowman. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... The Dykeenies are a New Wave/Indie Rock band formed in mid-2005 in Cumbernauld, Scotland. ...


Spanish rapper Tote King makes a reference to Willow in the song "Uno contra 20 MCs" from his album Música para enfermos: ¿qué tiene El Señor de los Anillos que no tenga Willow?, which translates as "what does The Lord of the Rings have which Willow doesn't have?" Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... This article is about the Peter Jackson films. ...


The film has been the subject of a running gag in the MST3K episode Village of the Giants, which starred a young Ron Howard. During the movie, Mike Nelson and Tom Servo would repeatedly mock Willow, sometimes going as far as saying that the episode's movie is better, while Crow would always reply that he liked Willow. The running gag is a popular hallmark of comic and serious forms of entertainment. ... From left to right, Crow T. Robot, Joel Robinson, and Tom Servo. ... Village of the Giants is a 1965 science-fiction/comedy movie produced, directed and written by Bert I. Gordon, based loosely on H.G. Wellss book The Food of the Gods. ...


References

  1. ^ "Thank the Maker: George Lucas", starwars.com, April 19, 2005

See also

Ewoks: Battle for Endor (1985), retitled Star Wars Ewok Adventures: Battle for Endor for the DVD release, is a made-for-TV movie set in the Star Wars galaxy and sequel to The Ewok Adventure. ... Labyrinth is a 1986 fantasy film directed by Jim Henson, produced by George Lucas, and designed through the art of Brian Froud. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Willow (film)
  • Willow at the Internet Movie Database
  • Crossroads - In-depth site about the film and the novels
  • Another fansite
  • Another fansite

  Results from FactBites:
 
Willow: Collector's Edition (1988) (2897 words)
Willow starts like an outtake from The Ten Commandments, as we learn of a special baby who will eventually cause the destruction of evil Queen Bavmorda (Jean Marsh).
Willow’s loyal Nelwyn friend Meegosh (David Steinberg) also comes along for a while, but an injury eventually forces him to head for home.
Willow: The Making of an Adventure starts with these words: “In a time of sequels and spin-offs, Willow is truly one of a kind.” Uhhh - yeah.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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