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Encyclopedia > Willow
Willows
Weeping Willow
Weeping Willow
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Salicaceae
Genus: Salix L.
Species

About 350, including:
Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow
Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow
Salix alba - White Willow
Salix alpina - Alpine Willow
Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow
Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow
Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow
Salix arctica - Arctic Willow
Salix atrocinerea
Salix aurita - Eared Willow
Salix babylonica - Peking Willow
Salix bakko
Salix barrattiana - Barratt's Willow
Salix bebbiana - Beaked Willow
Salix boothii - Booth Willow
Salix bouffordii
Salix brachycarpa - Barren-ground Willow
Salix cacuminis
Salix canariensis
Salix candida - Sage Willow
Salix caprea - Goat Willow
Salix caroliniana - Coastal Plain Willow
Salix chaenomeloides
Salix chilensis
Salix cinerea - Grey Sallow
Salix cordata
Salix daphnoides
Salix discolor - Pussy Willow
Salix eastwoodiae - Eastwood's Willow
Salix eleagnos
Salix eriocarpa
Salix eriocephala - Heartleaf Willow
Salix excelsa
Salix exigua - Sandbar Willow
Salix foetida
Salix fragilis - Crack Willow
Salix futura
Salix geyeriana
Salix gilgiana
Salix glauca
Salix gooddingii - Goodding Willow
Salix gracilistyla
Salix hainanica - Hainan Willow
Salix helvetica - Swiss Willow
Salix herbacea - Dwarf Willow
Salix hirsuta
Salix hookeriana - Hooker's Willow
Salix hultenii
Salix humboldtiana - Chile Willow
Salix humilis - Upland Willow
Salix integra
Salix interior
Salix japonica
Salix jessoensis
Salix koriyanagi
Salix kusanoi
Salix lanata - Woolly Willow
Salix lapponum - Downy Willow
Salix lasiandra - Pacific Willow
Salix lasiolepis - Arroyo Willow
Salix lucida - Shining Willow
Salix magnifica
Salix matsudana - Chinese Willow
Salix miyabeana
Salix mucronata
Salix myrtilloides - Swamp Willow
Salix myrsinifolia - Dark-leaved Willow
Salix myrsinites - Whortle-leaved Willow
Salix nakamurana
Salix nigra - Black Willow
Salix pedicellaris - Bog Willow
Salix pentandra - Bay Willow
Salix petiolaris - Slender Willow
Salix phylicifolia - Tea-leaved Willow
Salix planifolia- Planeleaf Willow
Salix polaris - Polar Willow
Salix pseudo-argentea
Salix purpurea - Purple Willow
Salix pyrifolia - Balsam Willow
Salix reinii
Salix repens - Creeping Willow
Salix reticulata - Net-leaved Willow
Salix retusa
Salix rorida
Salix rosmarinifolia - Rosemary-leaved Willow
Salix rupifraga
Salix salicicola
Salix schwerinii
Salix scouleriana - Scouler's Willow
Salix sericea - Silky Willow
Salix serissaefolia
Salix serissima - Autumn Willow
Salix shiraii
Salix sieboldiana
Salix sitchensis - Sitka Willow
Salix subfragilis
Salix subopposita
Salix taraikensis
Salix tetrasperma
Salix thorelii
Salix triandra - Almond Willow
Salix udensis
Salix viminalis - Common Osier
Salix vulpina
Salix waldsteiniana
Salix wallichiana
Salix wilmsii
Salix woodii
Salix yezoalpina
Salix yoshinoi
Download high resolution version (959x1280, 524 KB)A Willow tree in St. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Orders See text. ... Families Family Achariaceae Family Balanopaceae Family Bonnetiaceae Family Caryocaraceae Family Chrysobalanaceae Family Clusiaceae Family Ctenolophonaceae Family Dichapetalaceae Family Elatinaceae Family Erythryloxaceae (coca family) Family Euphorbiaceae (spurge family) Family Euphroniaceae Family Goupiaceae Family Humiriaceae Family Hypericaceae (St Johns wort family) Family Irvingiaceae Family Ixonanthaceae Family Lacistemaceae Family Linaceae (flax family... Genera See text. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Binomial name Salix alba L. The White Willow is a willow native to Europe, and western and central Asia. ... Binomial name Salix alba L. The White Willow is a willow native to Europe, and western and central Asia. ... Binomial name Salix amygdaloides Anderss The Peachleaf Willow (Salix amygdaloides) is a species of willow native to southern Canada and the United States. ... Binomial name Salix amygdaloides Anderss The Peachleaf Willow (Salix amygdaloides) is a species of willow native to southern Canada and the United States. ... Binomial name Salix arctica Pall. ... Binomial name Salix arctica Pall. ... Binomial name Salix babylonica L. The Peking Willow (Salix babylonica), also known as the Babylon Willow, is a species of willow native to dry areas of northern China, but cultivated for millennia elsewhere in Asia, being traded along the silk road to Babylon, whence the scientific name. ... Binomial name Salix babylonica L. The Peking Willow (Salix babylonica), also known as the Babylon Willow, is a species of willow native to dry areas of northern China, but cultivated for millenia elsewhere in Asia, being traded along the silk road to Babylon, whence the scientific name. ... Binomial name Salix bakko Kimura. ... Binomial name Salix canariensis Salix canariensis is a species of willow native to the islands of Madeira and Canaries. ... Binomial name Salix caprea L. For the song Goat Willow by Hawkwind, see Hall of the Mountain Grill The Goat Willow (Salix caprea), also known as the Pussy Willow or Great Sallow, is a common species of willow native to Europe and northwestern Africa. ... Binomial name Salix caprea L. The Goat Willow (Salix caprea), also known as the Pussy Willow or Great Sallow, is a common species of willow native to Europe and northwestern Africa. ... Binomial name Salix chaenomeloides Kimura Salix chaenomeloides is a species of willow native to Japan, Korea and China. ... Binomial name Salix cinerea L. The Grey Sallow (Salix cinerea) is a 2-4 m high shrub of the family Salicaceae that grows on wetland. ... Binomial name Salix cinerea L. The Grey Sallow (Salix cinerea) is a 2-4 m high shrub of the family Salicaceae that grows on wetland. ... Binomial name Salix discolor L. The Pussy Willow, (Salix discolor), is a small, weak-wooded tree, often grown for cut flowers. ... Binomial name Salix caprea The Goat Willow (Salix caprea), also known as the Pussy Willow or Great Sallow, is a common species of willow native to Europe and northwestern Africa. ... Binomial name Salix eriocarpa Fr. ... Binomial name Salix fragilis L. The Crack Willow (Salix fragilis) is a willow native to Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Salix fragilis The Crack Willow (Salix fragilis) is a willow native to Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Salix futura Seemen. ... Binomial name Salix gilgiana Seemen. ... Binomial name Salix gracilistyla Miq. ... Binomial name Salix herbacea L. The Dwarf Willow (Salix herbacea, also known as the Least Willow or Snowbed Willow) is the most common of a group of tiny creeping willows (family Salicaceae). ... Binomial name Salix herbacea The Dwarf Willow (Salix herbacea - also known as the Least Willow) is the commonest of a group of tiny creeping willows in the willow family (Salicaceae). ... Binomial name Salix hultenii Floderus. ... Binomial name Salix integra Thunb. ... Binomial name Salix japonica Thunb. ... Binomial name Salix jessoensis Seemen. ... Binomial name Salix koriyanagi Kimura. ... The Pacific willow is a large shrub or small tree of the willow family which is native to western North America. ... The Pacific willow is a large shrub or small tree of the willow family which is native to western North America. ... Binomial name Synonyms Salix lasiolepsis (lapsus) The Arroyo Willow is a large shrub or small tree of the willow family which is native to the western and southwestern United States, especially prevalent in the state of California. ... Binomial name Synonyms Salix lasiolepsis (lapsus) The Arroyo Willow is a large shrub or small tree of the willow family which is native to the western and southwestern United States, especially prevalent in the state of California. ... Binomial name Salix matsudana Koidz. ... Binomial name Salix matsudana Koidzumi The Chinese Willow (Salix matsudana), also known as the Hankow Willow or Globe Willow, is a species of willow native to northwestern China. ... Binomial name Salix miyabeana Seemen. ... Binomial name Salix myrtilloides L. Swamp Willow (Salix myrtilloides) is a shrubby willow native to boglands in subarctic and arctic Europe and Asia, with a few small isolated populations further south in mountain bogs in the Alps. ... Binomial name Salix myrtilloides L. Swamp Willow (Salix myrtilloides) is a shrubby willow native to boglands in subarctic and arctic Europe and Asia, with a few small isolated populations further south in mountain bogs in the Alps. ... Binomial name Salix nakamurana Koidz. ... Binomial name Salix nigra Marsh. ... Binomial name Salix nigra The Black Willow (Salix nigra) is a species of willow native to the Eastern United States, as well as parts of Canada and Mexico. ... Binomial name Salix pentandra L. The Bay Willow (Salix pentandra) is a willow native to northern Europe and northern Asia. ... Binomial name Salix pentandra L. The Bay Willow (Salix pentandra) is a willow native to northern Europe and northern Asia. ... Binomial name Salix polaris Wahlenb. ... Binomial name Salix polaris Wahlenb. ... Binomial name Salix purpurea L. The Purple Willow or Purple Osier (Salix purpurea) is a species of willow native to most of Europe and western Asia. ... Binomial name Salix purpurea The Purple Willow or Purple Osier (Salix purpurea) is a species of willow native to most of Europe and western Asia. ... Binomial name Salix reinii Fr. ... Binomial name Salix reticulata L. The Net-leaved Willow or Salix reticulata is a dwarf willow, occurring in the colder parts of Northern Europe, Greenland, North America and Northern Asia. ... Binomial name Salix reticulata L. The Net-leaved Willow or Salix reticulata is a dwarf willow, occurring in the colder parts of Northern Europe, Greenland, North America and Northern Asia. ... Binomial name Salix rorida Lacksch. ... Binomial name Salix rupifraga Koidz. ... Salix scouleriana Barratt ex Hook. ... Binomial name Salix serissaefolia Kimura Salix serissaefolia is a species of willow native to central Japan. ... Binomial name Salix shiraii Seemen. ... Binomial name Salix sieboldiana Bl. ... Binomial name Salix subfragilis Anderss. ... Binomial name Salix subopposita Miq. ... Binomial name Salix taraikensis Kimura. ... Binomial name Salix udensis Trautv. ... Binomial name Salix viminalis L. The Common Osier (Salix viminalis) also known simply as Osier, is a many-branched shrubby species of willow (Salix). ... Binomial name Salix viminalis The Common Osier (Salix viminalis - can also be known simply as Osier) is a many-branched shrub of the Willow Family (Salicaceae). ... Binomial name Salix vulpina Anderss. ... Binomial name Salix yezoalpina Koidz. ... Binomial name Salix yoshinoi Koidz. ...

The Willows are a family of trees and shrubs which differ greatly in size and habit of growth but are very much alike in other respects. There are about 350 species in this genus worldwide, found primarily on moist soils in cooler zones in the Northern Hemisphere. Willows are very cross-fertile and numerous hybrids are known, both naturally occurring and in cultivation. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tree (disambiguation). ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland Technically, soil forms the pedosphere: the interface between the lithosphere (rocky part of the planet) and the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. ... The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 90% of the human population. ... // This article is about a biological term. ...


Some smaller species may also be known by the common names osier and sallow; the latter name is derived from the same root as the Latin salix. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


Some willows, particularly arctic and alpine species, are very small; the Dwarf Willow (Salix herbacea) rarely exceeds 6 cm in height, though spreading widely across the ground. The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... For the climate of the mountains named the Alps, see climate) for a region above the tree-line. ... Binomial name Salix herbacea The Dwarf Willow (Salix herbacea - also known as the Least Willow) is the commonest of a group of tiny creeping willows in the willow family (Salicaceae). ...


The Weeping Willow, very widely planted as an ornamental tree, is a cultivar, Salix × sepulcralis 'Chrysocoma', derived from a hybrid between the Chinese Peking Willow and the European White Willow. Petunia This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... Binomial name Salix babylonica L. The Peking Willow (Salix babylonica), also known as the Babylon Willow, is a species of willow native to dry areas of northern China, but cultivated for millenia elsewhere in Asia, being traded along the silk road to Babylon, whence the scientific name. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Binomial name Salix alba L. The White Willow is a willow native to Europe, and western and central Asia. ...

Contents

Description

The willows all have abundant watery juice, furrowed scaly bark which is heavily charged with salicylic acid, soft, pliant, tough wood, slender branches and large fibrous often stoloniferious roots. These roots are remarkable for their toughness, size, and tenacity of life. Salicylic acid is the chemical compound with the formula C6H4(OH)CO2H, where the OH group is adjacent to the carboxyl group. ...


The leaves are deciduous, often elongate but round to oval in a few species, and with a serrated margin. All the buds are lateral; no absolutely terminal bud is ever formed. These are covered by a single scale, inclosing at its base two minute opposite buds, alternate with two, small, scale-like, fugacious, opposite leaves. The leaves are alternate except the first pair which fall when about an inch long. They are simple, feather-veined, and typically linear-lanceolate. Usually they are serrate, rounded at base, acute or acuminate. In color they show a great variety of greens, ranging from yellow to blue. “Foliage” redirects here. ...


Flowers

Willows are dioecious with male and female flowers appearing as catkins on different plants; the catkins are produced early in the spring, often before the leaves or as the new leaves open. The petioles are short, the stipules often very conspicuous, looking like tiny round leaves and sometimes remaining for half the summer. On some species, however, they are small, inconspicuous, and fugacious. Close-up of an Echinopsis spachiana flower, showing both carpels and stamen, making it a complete flower. ... A Phalaenopsis flower Rudbeckia fulgida A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ... A male catkin on a willow a male flowering catkin on a willow Catkins, or aments, are slim, cylindrical flower clusters, wind-pollinated (anemophilous) and without petals, that can be found in many plant families, including Betulaceae, Fagaceae, Moraceae, and Salicaceae. ...


The staminate flowers are without either calyx or corolla; they consist simply of stamens, in number varying from two to ten, accompanied by a nectariferous gland and inserted on the base of a scale which is itself borne on the rachis of a drooping raceme called a catkin, or ament. This scale is oval and entire and very hairy. The anthers are rose colored in the bud but orange or purple after the flower opens, they are two-celled and the cells open longitudinally. The filaments are threadlike, usually pale yellow, often hairy.


The pistillate flowers are also without calyx or corolla; and consist of a single ovary accompanied by a small flat gland and inserted on the base of a scale which is likewise borne on the rachis of a catkin. This ovary is one-celled, the style two-lobed, and the ovules numerous.


Fruit

The fruit is a small capsule containing numerous tiny (0.1 mm) seeds embedded in white down, which assists wind dispersal of the seeds. The fruit is a one-celled, two-valved, cylindrical, beaked capsule, containing many minute seeds which are furnished with long, silky, white hairs. The catkins appear before or with the leaves. For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... Flowers and fruit (capsules) of the ground orchid, Spathoglottis plicata. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ...


Cultivation

Almost all willows take root very readily from cuttings or where broken branches lie on the ground. There are a few exceptions, including the Goat Willow and Peachleaf Willow. One famous example of such growth from cuttings involves the poet Alexander Pope, who begged a twig from a parcel tied with twigs sent from Spain to Lady Suffolk. This twig was planted and thrived, and legend has it that all of England's Weeping Willows are descended from this first one [1]. Binomial name Salix caprea L. The Goat Willow (Salix caprea), also known as the Pussy Willow or Great Sallow, is a common species of willow native to Europe and northwestern Africa. ... Binomial name Salix amygdaloides Anderss The Peachleaf Willow (Salix amygdaloides) is a species of willow native to southern Canada and the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Willows are often planted on the borders of streams in order that their interlacing roots may protect the bank against the action of the water. Frequently the roots are much larger than the stem which grows from them.


Ecological issues

Willows are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species - see list of Lepidoptera which feed on Willows. A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... Superfamilies Butterflies Hesperioidea Papilionoidea Moths Acanthopteroctetoidea Alucitoidea Axioidea Bombycoidea Calliduloidea Choreutoidea Cossoidea Drepanoidea Epermenioidea Eriocranioidea Galacticoidea Gelechioidea Geometroidea Gracillarioidea Hedyloidea Hepialoidea Heterobathmioidea Hyblaeoidea Immoidea Incurvarioidea Lasiocampoidea Lophocoronoidea Micropterigoidea Mimallonoidea Mnesarchaeoidea Neopseustoidea Nepticuloidea Noctuoidea Palaephatoidea Pterophoroidea Pyraloidea Schreckensteinioidea Sesioidea Simaethistoidea Thyridoidea Tineoidea Tischerioidea Tortricoidea Urodoidea Whalleyanoidea Yponomeutoidea Zygaenoidea The order Lepidoptera... Willows (Salix spp) are used as food plants by the larvae of a large number of Lepidoptera species including: [edit] Monophagous species which feed exclusively on Salix Coleophora case-bearers: - feeds on Minor Shoulder-knot (Brachylomia viminalis) Slender Pug (Eupithecia tenuiata) Sthenopis thule [edit] Polyphagous species which feed on Salix...


A number of willow species were widely planted in Australia in the past, notably as erosion control measures along watercourses. They are now regarded as an invasive weed and many catchment management authorities are removing them to be replaced with native trees [2].. [3]. Yellow starthistle, a thistle native to southern Europe and the Middle East that is an invasive weed in parts of North America. ...


Uses

Medicinal uses

The leaves and bark of the willow tree have been mentioned in ancient texts from Assyria, Sumer and Egypt[1] as a remedy for aches and fever,[2] and the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote about its medicinal properties in the 5th century BC. Native Americans across the American continent relied on it as a staple of their medical treatments. An Assyrian winged bull, or lamassu. ... Sumer (or Å umer) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in the southern part of Mesopotamia (southeastern Iran) from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term Sumerian applies... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Hippocrates of Cos II or Hippokrates of Kos (ca. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 5th century BC started on January 1, 500 BC and ended on December 31, 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... An independent origin and development of writing is counted among the many achievements and innovations of pre-Columbian American cultures. ...


The active extract of the bark, called salicin, was isolated to its crystalline form in 1828 by Henri Leroux, a French pharmacist, and Raffaele Piria, an Italian chemist, who then succeeded in separating out the acid in its pure state. Salicin is acidic when in a saturated solution in water (pH = 2.4), and is called salicylic acid for that reason. Salicylic acid is a colorless, crystalline organic carboxylic acid. ... In chemistry, saturation has four different meanings: In physical chemistry, saturation is the point at which a solution of a substance can dissolve no more of that substance and additional amounts of that substance will appear as a precipitate. ... Salicylic acid is the chemical compound with the formula C6H4(OH)CO2H, where the OH group is adjacent to the carboxyl group. ...


In 1897 Felix Hoffmann created a synthetically altered version of salicin (in his case derived from the Spiraea plant), which caused less digestive upset than pure salicylic acid. The new drug, formally Acetylsalicylic acid, was named aspirin by Hoffmann's employer Bayer AG. This gave rise to the hugely important class of drugs known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Felix Hoffman (January 21, 1868 – February 8, 1946) was a German chemist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A very old bottle of Aspirin Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid is a drug in the family of salicylates, often used as an analgesic (against minor pains and aches), antipyretic (against fever), and anti-inflammatory. ... Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid (IPA: ), (acetosal) is a drug in the family of salicylates, often used as an analgesic (to relieve minor aches and pains), antipyretic (to reduce fever), and as an anti-inflammatory. ... Bayer AG (IPA pronunciation //) (ISIN: DE0005752000, NYSE: BAY, TYO: 4863 ) is a German chemical and pharmaceutical company founded in Barmen, Germany in 1863. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Other uses

Uses as a plant 
Agroforestry, Biofiltration, Constructed wetlands, Ecological wastewater treatment systems, Hedges, Land reclamation, Landscaping, Phytoremediation, Streambank stabilisation (bioengineering), Slope stabilisation, Soil erosion control, Shelterbelt & windbreak, Soil building, Soil reclamation, Wildlife habitat
Uses as energy source 
Charcoal, Energy forestry such as the Willow Biomass Project
Uses of wood 
Basket weaving, Box, Brooms, Cricket bats, Cradle boards, Chairs & furniture, Dolls, Fish traps, Flutes, Poles, Sweat lodges, toys, turnery, tool handles, Veneer, Wands, Wattle fences, Wattle and daub, whistles
Uses of wood-derived products
Fibre plants, Paper, Rope and string, Tannin

Biofiltration is a pollution control technique using living material to filter or chemically process pollutants. ... // A constructed wetland is an artificial marsh or swamp, created for anthropogenic discharge such as wastewater, stormwater runoff or sewage treatment, and as habitat for wildlife, or for land reclamation after mining or other disturbance. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Wastewater is any water that has been adversely affected in quality by anthropogenic influence. ... The word hedge may be used to refer to an artificial boundary, erected to contain or protect: A hedge or hedgerow in agriculture and in gardening is a lineal barrier or boundary made from growing plants planted and trained in such a way that their limbs intertwine. ... Land reclamation is either of two distinct practices. ... Landscaping refers to any activity that modifies the visible features of an area of land, including but not limited to: living elements, such as flora or fauna; or what is commonly referred to as Gardening efforts in the gestalt, the art and craft of growing plants with a goal of... Phytoremediation describes the treatment of environmental problems (bioremediation) through the use of plants. ... Biological engineering (also biosystems engineering and bioengineering) is a broad-based engineering discipline that deals with bio-molecular and molecular processes, product design, sustainability and analysis of biological systems. ... Look up Slope in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland Technically, soil forms the pedosphere: the interface between the lithosphere (rocky part of the planet) and the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. ... Severe soil erosion in a wheat field near Washington State University, USA. For erosion as an operation of Mathematical morphology, see Erosion (morphology) Erosion is displacement of solids (soil, mud, rock and other particles) by the agents of ocean currents, wind, water, or ice by downward or down-slope movement... A windbreak,or shelterbelt, is usually made up of one or more rows of trees planted in such a manner as to provide shelter from the wind and to prevent soil erosion. ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland Technically, soil forms the pedosphere: the interface between the lithosphere (rocky part of the planet) and the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. ... Various species of deer are commonly seen wildlife across the Americas and Eurasia. ... Habitat (which is Latin for it inhabits) is the place where a particular species live and grow. ... Charcoal is the blackish residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. ... Energy forestry is a form of forestry in which a fast-growing species of tree or woody shrub is grown specifically to provide bio-fuel for heating. ... The Willow Biomass Project is a collaborative effort by members of the Salix Consortium to grow willow and other sustainable woody crops in upstate New York. ... Four styles of household basket. ... For the Wikipedia term see Wikipedia:Userboxes An empty corrugated box An elaborate wooden box Boxes are highly variable receptacles. ... broom A broom is a cleaning tool consisting of stiff fibres attached to, and roughly parallel to, a cylindrical handle, the broomstick. ... A cricket bat is used by batsmen in the sport of cricket. ... Typical Western wooden chair A chair is a piece of furniture for sitting, consisting of a seat, a back, and sometimes arm rests, commonly for use by one person. ... Look up doll in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are cold-blooded, covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... The willow flute, also known as sallow flute or overtone flute (Norwegian seljefløyte, Swedish sälgflöjt), is a Scandinavian folk flute, or whistle, consisting of a simple tube with a transverse fipple mouthpiece and no finger holes. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... A teddy bear A toy is an object used in play. ... A veneer is a thin covering over something. ... The giant Galligantua and the wicked old magician transform the dukes daughter into a white hind. ... Wattle has several meanings: In engineering terms, originally wattle referred collectively to the flexible rods, branches or twigs from various plants woven together to make fences, walls and roofs (see wattle-and-daub). ... A fence in Westtown Township, Pennsylvania. ... Categories: Stub | Construction ... A whistle is a one-note woodwind instrument which produces sound from a stream of forced air. ... For the meaning of fiber in nutrition, see dietary fiber. ... A blank sheet of paper Paper is a commodity of thin material produced by the amalgamation of fibers, typically vegetable fibers composed of cellulose, which are subsequently held together by hydrogen bonding. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Tannins are astringent, bitter-tasting plant polyphenols that bind and precipitate proteins. ... The Four Species (note: in a kosher lulav, the aravah is placed on the left, the lulav in the center, and the hadassim on the right) The Four Species (Hebrew: ארבעה מינים) are three types of plants and one type of fruit which are held together and waved in a special ceremony... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sukkot (Hebrew: סוכות or סֻכּוֹת,  ; booths. ...

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See also

  • Willow-herb is the common name of several species of Epilobium
  • Seep willow is the common name of Baccharis salicifolia

Species See text Epilobium is a genus of about 160-200 species of flowering plants in the family Onagraceae, native to temperate and subarctic regions of both hemispheres. ... Species See text. ...

External links and references

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Salix

  Results from FactBites:
 
Willow Rosenberg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1766 words)
Willow may have inherited from her a strong sense of political injustice, reflected particularly in her attitudes towards Native Americans.
Some fans argue that Willow's later self-identification as a lesbian consists of a retcon, as she manifested a crush for Xander early on in the series and established a long-running and sexually active relationship with Oz, before affirming herself as a lesbian.
With Tara's departure, Willow was forced to face her problem and stopped using magic, but her grief over Tara's death unleashed the dark energies once more, and her vengeance reached a climax when Willow magically skinned the killer Warren, who had intended the bullet that killed Tara for Buffy.
Willow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (596 words)
The willows are deciduous trees and shrubs in the genus Salix, part of the willow family Salicaceae.
Willows are dioecious with male and female flowers appearing as catkins on different plants; the catkins are produced early in the spring, often before the leaves or as the new leaves open.
Willows are very cross-fertile and numerous hybrids are known, both naturally occurring and in cultivation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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