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Encyclopedia > Williamsburg, Virginia
Williamsburg, Virginia
Official seal of Williamsburg, Virginia
Seal
Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia.
Coordinates: 37°16′29″N, 76°42′6.72″W
Country United States
State Virginia
Counties Independent city
Government
 - Mayor Jeanne Zeidler
Area
 - City  8.7 sq mi (22.5 km²)
 - Land  8.5 sq mi (22.1 km²)
 - Water  0.1 sq mi (0.3 km²)
Elevation 49.2 ft (15 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 11,998
 - Density 1,404.8/sq mi (542.4/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: http://www.williamsburgva.gov/

Williamsburg is a city located on the Virginia Peninsula in the Hampton Roads region in southeastern Virginia. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 11,998. It is bordered by James City CountyGR6 and York County, and is an independent city. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Williamsburg with James City County for statistical purposes. ImageMetadata File history File links Backpalace_Williamsburg_Virginia. ... Image File history File links The official seal of the city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Image File history File links Adapted from Wikipedias VA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... The Commonwealth of Virginia is divided into 95 counties and 39 independent cities, which are considered county-equivalents for census puposes. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The or meter (see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ...


Originally Middle Plantation, a 1632 fortified settlement located on high ground on the Peninsula between the James and York rivers, it was renamed Williamsburg after the capital of the Virginia Colony was moved there from Jamestown in 1698. The town received a royal charter as a city in 1722, and was the center of political events in Virginia leading to the American Revolution. Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... The York River is a navigable estuary, approximately 40 mi (64 km) long, in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that...


Williamsburg is well-known for Colonial Williamsburg, the restored Historic Area of the city, and for the adjacent College of William and Mary, established in 1693, the second-oldest university in the United States. Nearby, established in 1770, the predecessor of the current Eastern State Hospital was the first known mental hospital in the United States. Presently, the city is also home to Williamsburg Place, one of the most renowned drug and alcohol rehabilitation clinics in the nation. However, the modern city also includes schools, restaurants, lodging, and a full range of retail services. Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Eastern State Hospital, located in Williamsburg, Virginia was the first public facility in the United States constructed solely for the care and treatment of the mentally ill, and remains in operation today. ... Williamsburg Place is one of the top recovery centers in the nation, aiding those who suffer from drug and/or alcohol addiction. ...


The Historic Triangle of Virginia, which also includes Jamestown and Yorktown, is among the most popular tourist destinations in the world, with Williamsburg located in the center. The three are linked by the National Park Service's bucolic Colonial Parkway, a 23 mile-long (37 km) National Scenic Byway which is carefully shielded from views of commercial development. The toll-free Jamestown Ferry is located at the southern end of the Colonial Parkway, State Route 5, another scenic byway, links Williamsburg and Richmond). This article reads like an advertisement. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ... A National Scenic Byway is a road recognized by the United States Department of Transportation for its archeological, cultural, historic, natural, recreational, and/or scenic qualities. ... Jamestown Ferry (also known as the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry) is an automobile ferry on the James River in Virginia, connecting Jamestown in James City County with Scotland in Surry County. ... State Route 5 runs between the independent cities of Richmond and Williamsburg in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


Most highway travelers reach Williamsburg via nearby Interstate 64, U.S. Route 60, and State Route 143, each four laned east-west highways. Commercial airline service is available at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (20 miles), and at Richmond and Norfolk airports (55 miles each). All are located along I-64 and offer limousine service to Williamsburg, as well as rental cars. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... U.S. Route 60 in Virginia runs east-west through the central part of the state, generally following the Interstate 64 corridor. ... State Route 143 is a primary state highway in the Virginia Peninsula region of Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States. ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (IATA: PHF, ICAO: KPHF) is an airport in Newport News, Virginia, and serves the entire Hampton Roads metropolitan area along with Norfolk International Airport in Norfolk. ... Richmond International Airport (IATA: RIC, ICAO: KRIC) is a public airport located in Sandston, Virginia, an unincorporated community within Henrico County which is about 5 miles (8 km) east of Richmond. ... Norfolk International Airport (IATA: ORF, ICAO: KORF, FAA LID: ORF) is a public airport located in Norfolk, Virginia, United States. ...


Williamsburg also offers good non-automobile driving alternatives for visitors and citizens. The intermodal Williamsburg Transportation Center is located in a restored Chesapeake and Ohio Railway station near the Historic Area, downtown, and the College. It offers Amtrak and Greyhound services, taxicabs, and rental cars. There, many visitors transfer to the community's local transit bus system, Williamsburg Area Transport, which operates accessible equipment for the mobility-impaired with bicycle racks on buses as well. Parking Yes; free Baggage check No Other information Accessible Code WBG Traffic Passengers (2006) 37,957 1% The Williamsburg (Amtrak station) is located at 468 North Boundary Street in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ... Taxicab, short forms taxi or cab, is a type of public transport for a single passenger, or small group of passengers, typically for a non-shared ride. ... A Volvo articulated bus in contract service for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, operated by Virginia Overland Transportation, an urban-suburban bus line, in 2003 A transit bus (also known as a commuter bus) in the United States is usually operated by an urban-suburban bus line, a governmental... Williamsburg Area Transport (or WAT) provides bus service in the City of Williamsburg, York County, and James City County. ...

Contents

History of Williamsburg

17th century

The area which became Williamsburg was settled in 1638 and called Middle Plantation. It was so named due to its location on high ground about half-way across the Virginia Peninsula between the James River and York River. A stockade across the peninsula, which was about 6 miles wide at that point between College Creek and Queen's Creek (which each fed into one of the two rivers) provided some security from attacks by the Native Americans for colonists farming and fishing lower on the Peninsula from that point. Events March 29 - Swedish colonists establish first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... The York River is a navigable estuary, approximately 40 mi (64 km) long, in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in...


The area of Middle Plantation was included in James City Shire when it was established 2 years later in 1634, as the Colony reached a total population of approximately 5,000. (James City Shire changed its name and became known as James City County). The cross-peninsula defensive palisade completed in 1634 was an integral part of the creation of Middle Plantation, though its exact route is long gone. Remnants have recently been discovered by archaeologists on the Bruton Heights School property adjacent to the site of the house of Governor John Page while working on a Colonial Williamsburg archaeological research project.[1] Jamestown, which had been the original capital of Virginia Colony, remained as such until its burning during the events of Bacon's Rebellion in 1676. Immediately after Governor William Berkeley regained control, temporary quarters for the functions of the seat of government were established about 12 miles away on the high ground at Middle Plantation while the Statehouse at Jamestown was rebuilt. The Burgesses found the surroundings both safer and more pleasant environmentally than Jamestown, which was muggy and plagued with mosquitoes. Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... James City Shire was formed in the British colony of Virginia in 1634. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... John Page John Page (April 17, 1744 – October 11, 1808) was a figure in early United States history. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Bacons Rebellion or the Virginia Rebellion was an uprising in 1676 in the Virginia Colony, led by Nathaniel Bacon. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... Sir William Berkeley (pronounced bark-lee) (1605-July 9, 1677) was a Governor of Virginia, appointed by King Charles I, of whom he was a favorite. ...


A school of higher education had long been an aspiration of the colonists. An early attempt at Henricus failed after the Indian Massacre of 1622. The location at the outskirts of the developed part of the colony had left it more vulnerable to the attack. In the 1690s, the colonists tried again and sent Reverend James Blair who spent several years in England lobbying and finally obtained a royal charter for the desired new school, which was named the College of William and Mary in honor of the monarchs of the time. When Reverend Blair returned to Virginia, the new school was founded in a safe place, Middle Plantation in 1693. Classes began in temporary quarters in 1694, and the College Building, a precursor to the Wren Building, was soon under construction. The Citie of Henricus was a city founded by Sir Thomas Dale in 1611 as an alternative to the swampy and dangerous area around Jamestown Settlement, Virginia. ... Indian massacre of 1622, depicted as a woodcut by Theodore de Bry The Indian massacre of 1622 (also known as the Jamestown massacre) occurred in the Virginia Colony on March 22, 1622. ... The Reverend Dr. James Blair James Blair, D.D., (1656–April 18, 1743), was a clergyman, missionary, educator, and is best known as the founder of the College of William and Mary. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... The Wren Building is a highly notable building on the campus of the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


Four years later, the rebuilt statehouse in Jamestown burned again (in 1698), this time accidentally. The government once again relocated temporarily to Middle Plantation, but now enjoyed use of the College's facilities in addition to the better climate. After that fire, upon suggestion of the students of the College, who made a presentation to the House of Burgesses, the colonial capital was permanently moved to Middle Plantation in 1699. A village was laid out and Middle Plantation was renamed Williamsburg in honor of King William III of England, befitting the town's newly elevated status. Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Hampton Court, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28...

For more details on this topic, see Middle Plantation.

Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ...

18th Century

Following its designation as the Capital of the anal Colony, immediate provision was made for construction of a capitol building and for platting the new city according to the survey of Theodoric Bland.


Alexander Spotswood, who arrived in Virginia as lieutenant governor in 1710, had several ravines filled and the streets leveled, and assisted in erecting additional college buildings, a church, and a magazine for the storage of arms. In 1722, the town of Williamsburg was granted a royal charter as a city, now believed to be the oldest in the United States. Alexander Spotswood c. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ...


Williamsburg was the site of the first canal built in the United States. In 1771, Lord Dunmore, Virginia's Royal Governor, announced plans to connect Archer's Creek, which leads to the James River with Queen's Creek, leading to the York River. It would have been a water bridge across the Virginia Peninsula, but was not completed. Portions of the remains of this canal are visible at the rear of the grounds behind the Governor's Palace in Colonial Williamsburg.[2] The Canal du Midi, Toulouse, France Canals are man-made channels for water. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Lord Dunmore John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore (1730–February 25, 1809) was the British governor of the Province of New York from 1770 to 1771 and the Virginia Colony, from September 25, 1771 until just before the American Revolutionary War began in June 1775. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... The York River is a navigable estuary, approximately 40 mi (64 km) long, in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... The Governors Palace from Palace Green The Governors Palace, home of the Colony of Virginias Royal Governors, is located on Duke of Gloucester Street in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


The first psychiatric hospital in the United States was built in the city in the 1770s as the, "Public Hospital for Persons of Insane and Disordered Minds" (known in modern times as Eastern State Hospital), was established by act of the Virginia colonial legislature on June 4, 1770. The act, which intended to, "Make Provision for the Support and Maintenance of Ideots, Lunaticks, and other Persons of unsound Minds," authorized the House of Burgesses to appoint a fifteen-man Court Of Directors to oversee the future hospital’s operations and admissions. In 1771, contractor Benjamin Powell constructed a two-story building on Francis Street near the College capable of housing twenty-four patients. The design of the grounds included "yards for patients to walk and take the Air in" as well as provisions for a fence to be built to keep the patients out of the nearby town. A psychiatric hospital (also called at various places and times, mental hospital, mental ward, sanitarium or asylum) is a hospital specializing in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... Eastern State Hospital, located in Williamsburg, Virginia was the first public facility in the United States constructed solely for the care and treatment of the mentally ill, and remains in operation today. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Beginning in April 1775, the Gunpowder incident of Williamsburg, a dispute between Governor Dunmore and Virginia colonists over gunpowder (stored in the Williamsburg Magazine) evolved into an important event in the run-up to the American Revolution. Dunmore, fearing another rebellion, ordered royal marines to seize gunpowder from the magazine. Virginia militia led by Patrick Henry responded to the "theft" and marched on Williamsburg. A standoff ensued, with Dunmore threatening to destroy the city if attacked by the militia. The dispute was resolved when payment for the powder was arranged. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Drawing of the octagonal Williamsburg Magazine The Gunpowder Incident (also known as the Gunpowder Affair) was a conflict early in the American Revolutionary War between Lord Dunmore, the Royal Governor of colonial Virginia, and militia led by Patrick Henry. ... John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore (1730 – February 25, 1809) was the British governor of the Province of New York from 1770 to 1771 and the Virginia Colony, from September 25, 1771 until his departure to New York on New Years Eve, 1776. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ...


Following the Declaration of Independence, the American Revolutionary War broke out in 1776. During the War, in 1780, the capital of Virginia was moved again, this time to Richmond at the urging of then-Governor Thomas Jefferson, who was afraid that Williamsburg's location made it vulnerable to a British attack. However, during the Revolutionary War many important conventions were held in Williamsburg. A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries French Monarchy Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida and Tuscarora tribes Polish volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz KoÅ›ciuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben Sir... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


19th century

With the capitol gone after 1780, Williamsburg also lost prominence, but not to the degree Jamestown had 81 years earlier. 18th and early 19th century transportation in the Colony was largely by canals and navigable rivers. Built deliberately on "high ground," Williamsburg was not located along a major waterway like many early communities in the United States. Early railroads beginning in the 1830s also did not come its way. The Canal du Midi, Toulouse, France Canals are man-made channels for water. ... This bridge across the Danube River links Hungary with Slovakia. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ...


It seemed the principal business activities of Williamsburg had been the government and the College, the latter continuing and expanding, as well as the Public Hospital for Persons of Insane and Disordered Minds. Both the College and the Hospital grew, with the latter known in recent years as Eastern State Hospital. Eastern State Hospital, located in Williamsburg, Virginia was the first public facility in the United States constructed solely for the care and treatment of the mentally ill, and remains in operation today. ...


American Civil War

The Williamsburg area saw some activity during the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil War (1861-1865), notably the Battle of Williamsburg on May 5, 1862 as General George McClellan's Union forces crept up the Peninsula to lay siege to Richmond. Confederate forces, with earthen Fort Magruder as their only physical base, were successful in delaying the Union forces long enough for the retreating Confederates to reach the outer defenses of Richmond safely. A siege resulted, culminating in the Seven Days Battles, and McClellan's campaign failed. As a result, the War dragged on almost 3 more years at great cost to lives and finances for both sides before the Union was restored in April 1865. McClellan and Johnston of the Peninsula Campaign The Peninsula Campaign (also known as the Peninsular Campaign) of the American Civil War was a major Union operation launched in southeastern Virginia from March through July 1862, the first large-scale offensive in the Eastern Theater. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The Battle of Williamsburg, also known as the Battle of Fort Magruder, took place on May 5, 1862 in York County and Williamsburg, Virginia as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil War. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 - October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Fort Magruder was an earthen fortification alongside the road between Yorktown and Williamsburg, Virginia, USA, just outside the latter city (and former Virginia state capital) during the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac; 105,445 Army of Northern Virginia; 90,500 Casualties 1,734 killed 8,062 wounded 6,053 missing/captured 3,286 killed 15,009 wounded 946 missing/captured Peninsula...


Post Civil War

About 20 years later, in 1881, Collis P. Huntington's Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad (C&O) built through the area, eventually establishing six stations in Williamsburg and the surrounding area. This aided passenger travel and shipping for local farmers, but the railroad had been built primarily for through-coal traffic destined for the coal pier and export at Newport News. Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker) who built the Southern Pacific Railroad and other major interstate train lines. ... The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ... Aerial view looking east of Virginian Railway coal piers at Sewells Point on Hampton Roads near Norfolk, Virginia. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ...


Of course, there were the ongoing activities of the College of William and Mary. However, school sessions there were temporarily suspended for financial reasons from 1882 until 1886, when the College became a state school.


Beginning in the 1890s, C&O land agent Carl M. Bergh, a Norwegian-American who had earlier farmed in the mid-western states, realized that the gentler climate of eastern Virginia and depressed post-Civil War land prices would be attractive to his fellow Scandinavians who were farming in other northern parts of the country. He began sending out notices, and selling land. Soon there was a substantial concentration of relocated Americans of Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish descent in the area. The location earlier known as Vaiden's Siding on the railroad just west of Williamsburg in James City County, was renamed Norge. These citizens and their descendants found the area conditions favorable as described by Bergh, and many became leading merchants, tradespersons, and farmers in the community. These transplanted Americans brought some new blood and enthusiasm to the old colonial capitol area. 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... Norwegian Americans are an ethnic group in the United States. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ...


20th-21st century restoration: Colonial Williamsburg

Williamsburg was still a sleepy little town in the early 20th century. Some newer structures were interspersed with colonial-era buildings, but the town was much less progressive than other busier communities of similar size in Virginia. Some local lore indicates that the residents were satisfied with it that way, and longtime Virginia Peninsula journalist, author and historian Parke S. Rouse Jr. has pointed this out in his published work. On June 26, 1912, the Richmond Times-Dispatch newspaper ran an editorial which dubbed the town "Lotusburg," for, "Tuesday was election day in Williamsburg but nobody remembered it. The clerk forgot to wake the electoral board, the electoral board could not arouse itself long enough to have the ballots printed, the candidates forgot they were running, the voters forgot they were alive." [1] The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... Parke S. Rouse Jr. ...


However, even if such complacency was common, a dream of one Episcopalian priest was to expand to change Williamsburg's future and provide it a new major purpose, turning much of it into the world's largest living museum. In the early 20th century, one of the largest historic restorations ever undertaken anywhere in the world was championed by the Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin of Williamsburg's Bruton Parish Church. Initially, Dr. Goodwin had wanted to save his historic church building, and this he accomplished by 1907, in time for the 300th anniversary of the founding of the Episcopal Church in Virginia. However, upon returning to Williamsburg in 1923 after serving a number of years in upstate New York, he began to realize that many of the other colonial-era buildings also remained, but were in deteriorating condition, and their longevity was at risk. A living museum is a type of museum that recreates to the fullest extent conditions of a culture, natural environment or historical period. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Reverend Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin (1869-1939), was the rector of Bruton Parish Church who began the 20th century effort which resulted in the preservation and restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia The Reverend Dr. William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin (1869-1939) (or W.A.R. Goodwin as he preferred... Bruton Parish Church is located in the restored area of Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The arms of the Episcopal Church are based on the St Georges Cross, a symbol of England (mother of world Anglicanism), with a saltire reminiscent of the Cross of St Andrew in the canton in reference to the historical origins of the American episcopate in the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... NY redirects here. ...


Goodwin dreamed of a much larger restoration along the lines of what he had accomplished with his historic church. A cleric of modest means, he sought support and financing from a number of sources before successfully drawing the interests and major financial support of Standard Oil heir and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller Jr. and his wife Abby Aldrich Rockefeller. The result of their combined efforts was the creation of Colonial Williamsburg, which included a restoration of much of the downtown Williamsburg area with creation of a 301-acre Historic Area to celebrate the patriots and the early history of America. Standard Oil (Esso) was a predominant integrated oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... John D. Rockefeller, Jr. ... Abby Aldrich Rockefeller was born Abby Greene Aldrich on October 26, 1874 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


In the 21st century, Colonial Williamsburg has continued to update and refine its attractions, with more features designed to attract modern children and offer better and additional interpretation of the African-American experience in the colonial town. Just a little more after Dr. Goodwin's work began, the effort to maintain and improve this corner piece of Virginia and United States history remains a remarkable work-in-progress.


In addition to the Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg, the city's railroad station was restored to become an intermodal passenger facility (see Transportation section below). Nearby in James City County, the old ca. 1908 C&O Railway combination passenger and freight station at Norge was preserved and after donation by CSX Transportation, was relocated in 2006 to property at the Croaker Branch of the Williamsburg Regional Library. 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ... CSX Transportation (AAR reporting marks CSXT) is a Class I railroad in the United States, owned by the CSX Corporation. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Today, Colonial Williamsburg is Virginia's largest tourist attraction based upon attendance and forms the centerpiece of the Historic Triangle with Jamestown and Yorktown joined by the Colonial Parkway. This article reads like an advertisement. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ...


See also article Colonial Williamsburg Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


Modern political involvement

The third of three debates between Republican President Gerald Ford and Democratic challenger Jimmy Carter was held at Phi Beta Kappa Memorial Hall at the College of William and Mary on October 22, 1976. Perhaps in tribute to the debate’s historic venue, as well as to the United States Bicentennial celebration, both candidates spoke of a "new spirit" in America. this guy is awsome i played him in a school play he also has some pretty funky history Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on Sunday, July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ...


The 9th G7 Summit was held in Williamsburg in 1983. The summit participants discussed the growing debt crisis, arms control and greater co-operation between the Soviet Union and the G7 (now the G8). At the end of the meeting, U.S. Secretary of State George P. Shultz read to the press a statement confirming the deployment of American Pershing II-nuclear rockets in West Germany later in 1983. The 9th G7 Summit was held at Williamsburg, Virginia during the 28th to 30th of May 1983. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ...


Geography and climate

Geography

Williamsburg is located at 37°16′29″N, 76°42′30″W.GR7


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 22.5 km² (8.7 mi²). 22.1 km² (8.5 mi²) of it is land and 0.3 km² (0.1 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 1.50% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Williamsburg is spread upon a ridge on the peninsula between the James and York Rivers. Queen's Creek and College Creek (called in early days Archer's Hope Creek) partly encircle the city.


The city is located on the I-64 corridor on the Virginia Peninsula, 45 miles southeast of Richmond and approximately 37 miles northwest of Norfolk. It is in the northwest corner of the greater Hampton Roads area, (officially known as the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC MSA), which is the 34th largest in the United States, with a total population of 1,576,370. The area includes the Virginia cities of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Poquoson, Portsmouth, Suffolk, Williamsburg, and the counties of Gloucester, Isle of Wight, James City, Mathews, Surry, and York, as well as the North Carolina county of Currituck. While Virginia Beach is the most populated city within Hampton Roads, it currently functions more as a suburb. The city of Norfolk is recognized as the central business district, while the Virginia Beach seaside resort district and Williamsburg are primarily centers of tourism. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Newport News, Hampton, Portsmouth and Norfolk, Virginia from space, July 1996 Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC MSA is a U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as of June, 2003. ... The following is a list (by population) of all Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the United States Census Bureau. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... Location in the Commonwealth o Virginia. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Founded 1963 Government  - Mayor Dalton S. Edge Area  - City  350. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Founded 1631 Government  - Mayor Gordon Heisel, Jr. ... Map Political Statistics Founded 1752 County Independent city Mayor Dr. James W. Holley III Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 120. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Founded 1742 Mayor Linda T. Johnson Area    - City 1,111. ... Gloucester County is an historical Chesapeake county located on the Middle Peninsula of the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... Isle of Wight County is a county located in the South Hampton Roads region of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... Mathews County is a county located on the Middle Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... Surry County is a county located in the south-eastern part of the state of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Currituck County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ...


Climate

Williamsburg's mild four season climate means outdoor activities can be enjoyed year round. The weather in Williamsburg is temperate and seasonal. Summers are hot and humid with cool evenings. The mean annual temperature is 60 °F (15 °C), with an average annual snowfall of 6 inches and an average annual rainfall of 47 inches. No measurable snow fell in 1999. The wettest seasons are the spring and summer, although rainfall is fairly constant all year round. The highest recorded temperature was 104.0°F (40.0°C) on June 26, 1952 and August 22, 1983. The lowest recorded temperature was -7.0°F (-21.6°C) on January 21, 1985. Summer is a season of the year that is defined as beginning on June 21st, and ending in September in the Northern Hemisphere. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons Trees covered with snow Snow covering a leaf. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Summer is a season of the year that is defined as beginning on June 21st, and ending in September in the Northern Hemisphere. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 11,998 people, 3,619 households, and 1,787 families residing in the city. The population density is 542.4/km² (1,404.1/mi²). There are 3,880 housing units at an average density of 175.4/km² (454.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 79.54% White, 13.34% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 4.58% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.75% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. 2.52% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The Hispanic world Hispanic (Spanish: Hispano) is a term denoting a derivation from Spain, its people and culture. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 3,619 households out of which 16.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.2% are married couples living together, 9.6% have a female householder with no husband present, and 50.6% are non-families. 35.9% of all households are made up of individuals and 11.4% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.07 and the average family size is 2.66. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


The age distribution, which is heavily influenced by the College of William and Mary, is: 9.6% under the age of 18, 46.0% from 18 to 24, 17.7% from 25 to 44, 15.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 23 years. For every 100 females there are 81.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 80.8 males. The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...


The median income for a household in the city is $37,093, and the median income for a family is $52,358. Males have a median income of $28,625 versus $26,840 for females. The per capita income for the city is $18,483. 18.3% of the population and 9.3% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 29.7% of those under the age of 18 and 5.5% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Williamsburg is notable for the fact that a high proportion of city residents derive a significant percentage of their annual income from investment sources, either in addition to or in lieu of income from work. This is because many retirees relocate to Williamsburg, who typically draw income from investments such as 401(k) plans and the like (see also retirement community). The 401(k) plan is a type of employer-sponsored retirement plan in the United States and some other countries, named after a section of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. ... A retirement community is a very broad, generic term that covers many varieties of housing for retirees and seniors - especially designed or geared for people who no longer work, or restricted to those over a certain age. ...


Economy

The tourist volume of Colonial Williamsburg has attracted many other related businesses to the area. Notable among these was Anheuser-Busch, which established large operations in James City County and York County just outside the city. The company operates a large brewery there, and a subsidiary of the company operates two of its theme parks near the brewery, Busch Gardens Europe, and Water Country USA. Anheuser-Busch's subsidiary Busch Properties also operates a commerce park, McLaw's Circle, and Kingsmill on the James a gated residential neighborhood that contains a resort of the same name. Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ... The entrance of a brewery. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Busch Gardens Europe is a theme park located in James City County, Virginia about 3 miles (5 km) southeast of Williamsburg. ... Water Country USA is a water theme park in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. It is the Mid-Atlantics largest water park, and it contains spectacular entertainment, shops and restaurants, water rides, and other attractions, all of which have a 1950s or 1960s surf theme. ... McLaws Circle is commerce park located along U.S. Route 60 in James City County, Virginia just east of the independent city of Williamsburg. ... Kingsmill was the name of a plantation located in James City County, Virginia. ... Resorts combine a hotel and a variety of recreations, such as swimming pools A resort is a place used for relaxation or recreation, attracting visitors for holidays or vacations. ...


The city is also notable for the fact that a high proportion of city residents derive a significant percentage of their annual income from investment sources, either in addition to or in lieu of income from work. This is because many retirees relocate to Williamsburg, who typically draw income from investments such as 401(k) plans and the like (see also retirement community).[citation needed] The 401(k) plan is a type of employer-sponsored retirement plan in the United States and some other countries, named after a section of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. ... A retirement community is a very broad, generic term that covers many varieties of housing for retirees and seniors - especially designed or geared for people who no longer work, or restricted to those over a certain age. ...


Culture

Media

The major daily newspaper in Williamsburg is the Daily Press, published in neighboring Newport News. The Virginia Gazette is a bi-weekly, local newspaper, published in Williamsburg, and is the first newspaper paper to be published south of the Potomac River, starting in 1736. It's publisher was William Parks, who had similar ventures in Maryland. The Daily Press is a newspaper published in Newport News, Virginia. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... The Virginia Gazette (also called simply Virginia Gazette) is the local newspaper of the City of Williamsburg and James City County, Virginia. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... William Arthur Parks (11 December 1868 – 3 October 1939) was a Canadian geologist and paleontologist, following in the tradition of Lawrence Lambe. ...


Williamsburg is served by the Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport News designated market area (DMA), which is the forty-second largest in the U.S. with 712,790 homes (0.64% of the total U.S.).[3] Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... Map Political Statistics Founded 1752 County Independent city Mayor Dr. James W. Holley III Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 120. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... A designated market area is a group of counties in the United States that are covered by a specific television station. ...


Museums and other points of interest

View of Duke of Gloucester Street in Colonial Williamsburg.
View of Duke of Gloucester Street in Colonial Williamsburg.

Williamsburg is perhaps best known for its tourist and historical points of interest, the centerpiece of which is Colonial Williamsburg, which is essentially a living history museum, depicting the lifestyles and culture of the 18th Century colonial period in American history. Major points of interest in this historic district include the Virginia's first capitol building, the Governor's Palace, Bruton Parish Church (the oldest continually-operating church in the United States), and the College of William and Mary. ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_Duke_of_Gloucester_Street. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Colonial_Williamsburg_Duke_of_Gloucester_Street. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... An actress playing the role of Queen Elisabeth I at a Scottish fair in 2003. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... Capitol Building The Capitol at Williamsburg, Virginia was the first Capitol building in America in 1705. ... The Governors Palace from Palace Green The Governors Palace, home of the Colony of Virginias Royal Governors, is located on Duke of Gloucester Street in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Bruton Parish Church is located in the restored area of Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... It has been suggested that Ecclesia (Church) be merged into this article or section. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...


Other highlights in the city include The Williamsburg Winery (Virginia's largest winery), the Williamsburg Botanical Garden, and the National Center for State Courts. Also located in Williamsburg are two major theme parks, Busch Gardens Europe and Water Country USA. The Williamsburg Winery is Virginias, largest winery with an annual production of some 60,000 cases. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Wine Barrels A winery is a facility where fruit, usually grapes, is processed into wine. ... The Williamsburg Botanical Garden is a non-profit botanical garden currently taking shape in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The National Center for State Courts, or NCSC, is a non-profit organization charged with improving judicial administration in the United States and around the world. ... Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... Busch Gardens Europe is a theme park located in James City County, Virginia about 3 miles (5 km) southeast of Williamsburg. ... Water Country USA is a water theme park in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. It is the Mid-Atlantics largest water park, and it contains spectacular entertainment, shops and restaurants, water rides, and other attractions, all of which have a 1950s or 1960s surf theme. ...


Infrastructure

Government

The independent city has operated under the council-manager form of government since 1932. The governing body is composed of public-spirited citizens serving on a part-time basis to decide major policy issues. The Mayor is elected by the city council, and presides over council meetings and served as the Chief Elected Official for the city. The city council consists of five members that serve staggered, four-year terms. A city manager is hired by the city council, and is comparable to a corporation's chief executive officer. This person is usually a professionally-trained public administrator, who is charged with implementing the policies and directives of the city council, and has broad administrative authority with strict rules prohibiting political interference in administrative matters. An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... A Chief Executive Officer (CEO), or Chief Executive, is the highest-ranking corporate officer, administrator, corporate administrator, executive, or executive officer, in charge of total management of a corporation, company, organization or agency. ...


As of 2007, the current Mayor of the city of Williamsburg is Jeanne Zeidler, and the Vice Mayor is Clyde A. Haulman. Other members of the city council are Paul Freiling, Bobby Braxton, and Mickey Chohany. The current city manager is Jackson C. Tuttle. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ...


The city shares constitutional officers, courts, and the Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools system (WJCC) with adjacent James City County, and is the county seat. A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... The Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools (locally known also as WJCC) is a combined public school system which serves the independent city of Williamsburg and James City County in the Virginia Peninsula area of the Hampton Roads region in southeastern Virginia. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ...


As a college town, Williamsburg's large student population has also resulted in a few conflicts with the local city government. For example, in addressing concerns of property values and noise complaints near the campus, the council has undertaken initiatives to reduce student off-campus residential presence in the city by instituting a maximum occupancy rule of three-unrelated persons for single-family dwellings,[4] as well as a plan to buy rental houses with taxpayer dollars and resell them with the stipulation that the new owners must occupy them.[5] There are also issues of student voting rights in the city, as the local government has interpreted Virginia law to exclude a high percentage of students, since they would be registered in the home districts, while many students feel this is unfair and puts up an additional barrier to voting in the city, compared to other college towns in Virginia (Blacksburg, Charlottesville) that are inclusive of their high student populations in voting.[6] For the place adjoining the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in the UK, see College Town, Berkshire. ... Blacksburg is located in Montgomery County, Virginia. ... Nickname: C-Ville Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Albemarle County Founded 1762  - Mayor David E. Brown Area    - City 26. ...


Education

Elementary and secondary public schools

The public school system is jointly operated by the city of Williamsburg and James City County. The Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools system (known informally as "WJCC") consists approximately 9,000 students in 12 schools, of which there are 7 elementary schools, 3 middle schools, and 2 high schools. Within the county's boundaries, the two high schools, Lafayette and Jamestown, are considered above average institutions. A third high school, to be named Warhill High School, is under construction in the Lightfoot area. It and an eighth elementary school are scheduled to open in the fall of 2007. James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... The Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools (locally known also as WJCC) is a combined public school system which serves the independent city of Williamsburg and James City County in the Virginia Peninsula area of the Hampton Roads region in southeastern Virginia. ... Lafayette High School front of Lafayette High School Lafayette High School is a public secondary school in James City County, Virginia, just outside the city limits of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... -A Chorus Line (2007) - Jamestown High School- ... Warhill High School is a planned public secondary school in Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


James River Elementary School, located in the Grove Community in the county's southeastern end, is a magnet school. It offers the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme, one of only five such schools Virginia to do so.[7] James River Elementary School is a magnet school of the Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools (WJCC). ... Grove is an unincorporated community located in the southeastern portion of James City County, Virginia. ... In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... The IB World School logo The International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years Programme (PYP) is an educational programme created and managed by the International Baccalaureate Organisation (IBO) for students aged 3 to 12. ...


For the 2001-2002 academic year, the public school system was ranked among the top five school systems in the Commonwealth of Virginia and in the top 15% nationwide by Expansion Management Magazine. There are also two regional Governor's Schools in the area that serve gifted and talented students. 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ...


Higher education

The Wren Building on the campus of the College of William and Mary.

The city has also been the home to the College of William and Mary since its founding in 1693, making it America's second oldest college (behind Harvard University). Technically a university, the College of William and Mary was also the first U.S. institution to have a Royal Charter, and the only one to have coat-of-arms. The College campus closely adjoins the Historic District, and the Wren Building of the College at the head of Duke of Gloucester Street was one of the earliest restored by the efforts of Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin and the family of John D. Rockefeller Jr. as they began creating what is now commonly known as Colonial Williamsburg. Over 70% of the students of the College either work part-time or serve as volunteers in the community. Students contribute over 300,000 hours of volunteer service to the Williamsburg community annually.[8] Image File history File links Wren1. ... Image File history File links Wren1. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... A coat of arms or armorial bearings (often just arms for short), in European tradition, is a design belonging to a particular person (or group of people) and used by them in a wide variety of ways. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The Wren Building is a highly notable building on the campus of the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Reverend Dr. W. A. R. Goodwin (1869-1939), was the rector of Bruton Parish Church who began the 20th century effort which resulted in the preservation and restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia The Reverend Dr. William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin (1869-1939) (or W.A.R. Goodwin as he preferred... John D. Rockefeller, Jr. ...


Three other Universities are located within a one-hour drive of the city, including Christopher Newport University (Newport News), Old Dominion University (Norfolk), and Hampton University (Hampton). Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated as CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... Old Dominion University (ODU) is a university located in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American university located in Hampton, Virginia. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ...


There are also three community colleges, offering associate degrees and college transfer programs, within a twenty-five mile radius of Williamsburg: Thomas Nelson Community College, Paul D. Camp Community College, and Rappahannock Community College. A branch of Thomas Nelson Community College is located just east of the city limits in James City County. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Junior college. ... Thomas Nelson Community College (abbreviated form: TNCC) is a two-year college located in southeastern Virginia. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ...


Transportation

Airports

Williamsburg is served by the Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport, in nearby Newport News, approximately 20 miles distant. Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (IATA: PHF, ICAO: KPHF) is an airport in Newport News, Virginia, and serves the entire Hampton Roads metropolitan area along with Norfolk International Airport in Norfolk. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ...


The Norfolk International Airport and Richmond International Airport, each located about 55 miles away via Interstate highways, are larger and offer considerably more flights. Williamsburg is roughly equidistant from these two airports. However, due to traffic concerns in crossing the harbor of Hampton Roads, the Richmond airport is often a shorter driving time away. Norfolk International Airport (IATA: ORF, ICAO: KORF, FAA LID: ORF) is a public airport located in Norfolk, Virginia, United States. ... Richmond International Airport (IATA: RIC, ICAO: KRIC) is a public airport located in Sandston, Virginia, an unincorporated community within Henrico County which is about 5 miles (8 km) east of Richmond. ...


The Williamsburg-Jamestown Airport is a small general aviation airport located 3 miles southwest of Williamsburg, that provides air transport for private and small business jets.


Highways

Williamsburg is located adjacent to Interstate 64 which parallels U.S. Route 60 and runs east-west in the area. State Route 199, officially named the Humelsine Parkway, surrounds the city in a semicircle. State Route 5 links the city with the James River Plantations along the north shore of the James River, Interstate 295 and Richmond. State Route 31 links the city to Jamestown and the toll-free Jamestown Ferry. Interstate 64 in Virginia runs east west through the middle of the state from West Virginia via Covington, Lexington, Staunton, and Charlottesville to Richmond. ... U.S. Route 60 in Virginia runs east-west through the central part of the state, generally following the Interstate 64 corridor. ... State Route 199 is a primary state highway in and near Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... State Route 5 runs between the independent cities of Richmond and Williamsburg in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... James River Plantations were established in the Virginia Colony along the James River between the mouth at Hampton Roads and the head of navigation at the fall line where Richmond is today. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... Interstate 295 (abbreviated I-295) is an eastern bypass of Richmond and Petersburg as well as a northern bypass of Richmond. ... State Route 31, known as the John Rolfe Highway, is located in the eastern part of the state, and connects U.S. Route 460 in the town of Wakefield in Sussex County with State Route 5 and State Route 199 in Williamsburg. ... Jamestown Ferry (also known as the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry) is an automobile ferry on the James River in Virginia, connecting Jamestown in James City County with Scotland in Surry County. ...


The Colonial Parkway provides a bucolic low-speed link between the points of the Historic Triangle which in addition to Colonial Williamsburg, includes Jamestown and Yorktown. It passes under the "Restored Area" in a tunnel. With the exception of buses, commercial vehicles are not allowed on the Parkway. Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ... This article reads like an advertisement. ... A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ...


In the "restored" or Historic Area, motorized traffic is not allowed on Duke of Gloucester Street, helping visitors to gain a perspective of what life was really like transportation-wise in the colonial days (before the invention of the automobile). There are bus stops and some parking areas located conveniently nearby, however. The only exceptions to this are for residents living in the historic area, and members of Bruton Parish Church, who have limited access and parking on Sundays.


Transportation center: intercity rail, bus and local services

See also: Williamsburg (Amtrak station)

Unlike many U.S. destinations, Williamsburg offers good non-automobile driving alternatives for visitors and citizens. The area has both a central intermodal transportation center and a public transit bus system. The transportation center affords easy access to the Colonial Williamsburg Visitor's Center and is located near the downtown and restored areas and the College of William and Mary. Parking Yes; free Baggage check No Other information Accessible Code WBG Traffic Passengers (2006) 37,957 1% The Williamsburg (Amtrak station) is located at 468 North Boundary Street in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... A Volvo articulated bus in contract service for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, operated by Virginia Overland Transportation, an urban-suburban bus line, in 2003 A transit bus (also known as a commuter bus) in the United States is usually operated by an urban-suburban bus line, a governmental... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...


The Williamsburg Transportation Center itself is a restored building which is a former Chesapeake and Ohio Railway station now owned by Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. It is served by several Amtrak trains a day, with direct service to Newport News, Richmond, and points along the Northeast Corridor from Washington DC through New York City to Boston. Intercity bus service is provided by Greyhound Lines (Carolina Trailways) and Hampton Roads Transit (HRT). The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ... View of Duke of Gloucester Street Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Most of the NEC (those sections shown in red, except Boston to the Rhode Island state line) is owned by Amtrak. ... The Bus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ... Hampton Roads Transit (HRT) formed in 1999 by the merging of Pentran in Hampton and TRT in Norfolk, Virginia. ...


The center also offers several modes of local transportation. Williamsburg Area Transport (WAT) uses the center as a transfer hub for its network of handicapped accessible transit bus routes serving the city, James City County, and most portions of York County adjacent to the Williamsburg area, with hourly service 6 days a week during daytime and evening hours. Taxicabs and rental cars are also based at the transportation center. Williamsburg Area Transport (or WAT) provides bus service in the City of Williamsburg, York County, and James City County. ... A Volvo articulated bus in contract service for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, operated by Virginia Overland Transportation, an urban-suburban bus line, in 2003 A transit bus (also known as a commuter bus) in the United States is usually operated by an urban-suburban bus line, a governmental... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ... Taxicab, short forms taxi or cab, is a type of public transport for a single passenger, or small group of passengers, typically for a non-shared ride. ...


Local bus services: WAT, CW, and W&M

The community's public bus system, Williamsburg Area Transport (WAT), has its central hub at the transportation center. Various color-coded routes, with buses accessible to disabled persons, serve many hotels and motels, restaurants, stores, and non-CW attractions in the City of Williamsburg and much of neighboring James City County and part of York County. The system also provides paratransit services and operates replica trolley buses at the Yorktown Riverfront attraction. Williamsburg Area Transport (or WAT) provides bus service in the City of Williamsburg, York County, and James City County. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a County located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the U.S. State of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ... Paratransit is an alternative mode of flexible passenger transportation that does not follow fixed routes or schedules. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ...


WAT connects with the much larger Hampton Roads Transit (HRT) (Route 116) bus system at Lee Hall in northwestern Newport News and at the Williamsburg Transportation Center (HRT Route 121). HRT routes connect to many other cities to the east in Hampton Roads and Greyhound Lines bus routes serve a nationwide network. Hampton Roads Transit (HRT) formed in 1999 by the merging of Pentran in Hampton and TRT in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Lee Hall is a former unincorporated town (or village) which is now a community in the extreme western portion of the independent city of Newport News in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ...


WAT also operates a bus line for the College of William and Mary and its students, faculty, and staff, connecting the central university campus with points in the city of Williamsburg and James City County, the law school campus, and various outlying dormitories and auxiliary buildings owned or operated by the university that are not contiguous with the main campus. The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...


See also

Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... The Williamsburg Winery is Virginias, largest winery with an annual production of some 60,000 cases. ...

References

  1. ^ David F. Muraca (1998). The John Page Site:Excavation of a Major House Site on the Bruton Heights Property. Colonial Williamsburg. Retrieved on 2006-05-31.
  2. ^ Charles A. Grymes (1998). Second-Worst Decision of the State of Virginia?. Retrieved on 2007-02-20.
  3. ^ Holmes, Gary. "Nielsen Reports 1.1% increase in U.S. Television Households for the 2006-2007 Season." Nielsen Media Research. August 23, 2006. Retrieved on February 20, 2007.
  4. ^ Evans, James (November 5, 2004). Three's a Crowd, Four is Illegal. DoG Street Journal. Retrieved on 2006-05-30.
  5. ^ Damon, James (March 17, 2006). City Council Votes to Purchase House. The Flat Hat. Retrieved on 2006-05-30.
  6. ^ Evans, James (April 6, 2004). Voter Registrar Responds to Claims of Disenfranchisement. DoG Street Journal. Retrieved on 2006-05-30.
  7. ^ "About James River." James River Elementary School. Retrieved on [{February 24]], 2007.
  8. ^ Whitson, Brian (April 27, 2006). Community contributions: Students invest more than 300,000 hours. William and Mary News. Retrieved on 2006-05-31.

1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is a U.S. firm, headquartered in New York City, and operating primarily from Oldsmar, FL, which measures media audiences, including television, radio and newspapers. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... James River Elementary School is a magnet school of the Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools (WJCC). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Williamsburg, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2611 words)
Williamsburg, in the center of the Historic Triangle of Virginia (which includes Jamestown and Yorktown), is well-known for the restored colonial area of the city, Colonial Williamsburg, and for the College of William and Mary which is situated mostly within the city of Williamsburg.
Virginia militia led by Patrick Henry responded to the "theft" and marched on Williamsburg.
Williamsburg is notable for the fact that a high proportion of city residents derive a significant percentage of their annual income from investment sources, either in addition to or in lieu of income from work.
Colonial Williamsburg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2670 words)
Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia.
Williamsburg was to be the capital of Virginia for the remainder of the Colonial Period.
Williamsburg is located adjacent to east-west Interstate 64 and the parallel U.S. Highway 60 actually passes through the city.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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