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Encyclopedia > Williamite war in Ireland

For the context of this war see Jacobitism and Glorious Revolution. This article is not about the Jacobite Orthodox Church, nor is it about Jacobinism or the earlier Jacobean period. ... The term Glorious Revolution refers to the generally popular overthrow of James II of England in 1688. ...


The Williamite war in Ireland, which could also be described as the Jacobite war in Ireland and is known in Ireland as Cogadh an Dá Rí or The War of the Two Kings, was the opening conflict following the deposition of James VII of Scotland and II of England and Ireland in 1688 when he attempted to regain the throne of his Three Kingdoms from his daughter Mary II who replaced him jointly with her husband William of Orange. It influenced the Jacobite Rising in Scotland led by "Bonnie Dundee" which started at about the same time. While William successfully defeated Jacobitism in Ireland and subsequent Jacobite Risings were confined to Scotland and England, the War was to have a lasting effect on Ireland, confirming British and Protestant rule over the country for over a century. The iconic Williamite victories of the Siege of Londonderry and the Battle of the Boyne are still celebrated by the Unionist community in Northern Ireland today. King James VII and II ( 14 October 1633–16 September 1701 ) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Queen Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689 until her death, and as Queen of Scotland from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... William III King of England, Scotland and Ireland William III and II (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William Henry and William of Orange) was Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland from 11 April... Each Jacobite Rising formed part of a series of military campaigns by Jacobites attempting to restore the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland (and after 1707, Great Britain) after James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in 1688 and the thrones usurped by his... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... John Graham, Viscount Dundee (c. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... For context see the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobitism. ... William III King of England, Scotland and Ireland, Stadtholder of the Netherlands The Battle of the Boyne was a turning point in the Williamite war in Ireland between the deposed King James II of England and VII of Scotland and his son-in-law and successor, William, for the English... In the Irish context, Unionists form a group of largely (though not exclusively) Protestant people in Ireland, of all social classes, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which the Northern Ireland provincial state created in... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1...

Contents


The Glorious Revolution

The War in Ireland began as a direct consequence of the Glorious Revolution in England. James, who was a Roman Catholic attempted to introduce freedom of religion for Catholics and to bypass the English Parliament in order to introduce unpopular laws. For many in England, this was an unpleasant reminder of the rule of Charles I, whose conflict with the Parliament had ended with the outbreak of the English Civil War. The breaking point in James' relationship with the English political class came when his wife gave birth to a son - which opened the prospect of an enduring Catholic Stuart dynasty. As a result of this fear, some political figures hatched a conspiracy to invite William of Orange to invade England and to assume the Throne jointly with his wife, James' sister Mary. William accepted the offer, primarily because the Dutch Republic was at war with France, with whom James was in alliance and William wanted England's resources of men money and arms to be put at the disposal of his League of Augsburg. William invaded England in 1688 and James fled after putting up only a token resistance. The term Glorious Revolution refers to the generally popular overthrow of James II of England in 1688. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A body now called the English Parliament first arose during the thirteenth century, referred to variously as colloquium and parliamentum. It shared most of the powers typical of representative institutions in medieval and early modern Europe, and was arranged from the fourteenth century in a bicameral manner, with a House... The name Charles I is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland Charles I of France (also known as Charles the Bald) Charles I of Spain (also known as Charles V of the German Empire) Charles I of Romania Charles I... The term English Civil War (or Wars) refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651. ... William III of England (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and the Holy Roman Empires Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland... The Grand Alliance (known, prior to 1689, as the League of Augsburg) was a European coalition, consisting (at various times) of Austria, Bavaria, Brandenburg, England, the Holy Roman Empire, the Netherlands, the Palatinate of the Rhine, Saxony, Spain, Sweden, and the United Provinces. ...


However, whereas James II was very unpopular in England, he had widespread popular support in Ireland. The native Irish were almost all Roman Catholics and had fought en masse for the Stuart dynasty in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms that accompanied the English Civil War. Moreover, James had given them some concrete concessions, appointing an Irish Catholic, Richard Talbot, 1st Earl of Tyrconnell as Lord Deputy of Ireland, and re-admitting Catholics into the Army, public office and the Irish Parliament. Most of the native Irish landowning class had lost their lands and property after the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland to Protestant settlers from England and Scotland. They hoped to recover these under James' rule. For these reasons, when James fled England, he looked to Ireland to muster support for a re-conquest of his Three Kingdoms. James II can refer to: James II of Scotland James II of England James II of Aragon James II of Cyprus This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Wars of the Three Kingdoms include an intertwined series of conflicts that took place in Scotland, Ireland, and England between 1639 and 1651 which included the Bishops Wars of 1639 and 1640, the Scottish Civil War of 1644-5; the Irish Rebellion of 1641, Confederate Ireland, 1642-9 and... The term English Civil War (or Wars) refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651. ... Richard Talbot, 1st Earl of Tyrconnel (1630 – 14 August 1691), the fifth son of Sir William Talbot, Bart. ... Official standard of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (also known as the Viceroy or in the Middle Ages as the Lord Deputy) was the head of Englands (pre-1707) or Britains (post 1707) administration in Ireland. ... This article is about the legislature abolished in 1801. ... Oliver Cromwell landed in Ireland with his New Model Army on behalf of the English Parliament in 1649. ... Plantations in 16th and 17th century Ireland were the seizure of land owned by the native Irish and granting of it to colonists (planters) from Britain. ...


War Breaks Out - Campaign in Ulster

James' Lord Deputy, Richard Talbot, 1st Earl of Tyrconnell took action to ensure that all strong points in Ireland were held by garrisons of the newly recruited Irish Catholic army. The northern province of Ulster, which had the heaviest concentration of English and Scottish settlers, was the only part of Ireland where Talbot encountered significant resistance. Richard Talbot, 1st Earl of Tyrconnel (1630 Р14 August 1691), the fifth son of Sir William Talbot, Bart. ... Ulster (Irish: C̼ige Uladh, IPA: ) is one of the four provinces of Ireland. ...


By November 1688, only the walled city of Londonderry had a Protestant garrison. An army of around 1,200 men, mostly "Redshanks" (Highlanders), under Alexander Macdonnell, 3rd Earl of Antrim, was slowly organised (they set out on the week William of Orange landed in England). When they arrived on December 7th 1688 the gates were closed against them and the Siege of Londonderry began. While the Jacobites appeared to have great advantages in terms of numbers in Ireland, in fact, the troops raised by Tyrconnell were mainly hastily conscripted peasant bands, most of them very badly armed and trained. // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Derry or Londonderry (in Irish, Doire or Doire Cholm Chille), often called the Maiden City, is a city in Northern Ireland. ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... For context see the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobitism. ...


When James was deposed and fled to France, King Louis XIV of France (already at war with William of Orange) gave him support to regain his crown. On March 12th 1689 James landed in Kinsale, Ireland, with 6,000 French soldiers. He took Dublin and with a Jacobite army of Catholics, Protestant Royalists and French marched north, joining the Siege of Londonderry on April 18th 1689. James had found himself leading a predominantly Catholic nationalist movement, and on 7th May he reluctantly agreed to the Irish Parliament's demand for an Act declaring that the Parliament of England had no right to pass laws for Ireland. He also agreed, again reluctantly, to restore Irish Catholics to the lands confiscated from their families after the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland. British warships arrived off Londonderry on June 11th, but refused to risk shore guns until, ordered by Marshal Frederic Schomberg, they broke through and relieved the siege on July 28th 1689. Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638 – September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... The War of the Grand Alliance (also known as the War of the League of Augsburg, the War of the English Succession, and the Nine Years War) was a major war fought in Europe and America from 1688 to 1697, between France and the League of Augsburg (which, by 1689... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Market Street in Kinsale, one of the towns oldest thoroughfares Kinsale (Cionn tSáile in Irish) is a town in County Cork, Ireland. ... Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath),is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region. ... Oliver Cromwell landed in Ireland with his New Model Army on behalf of the English Parliament in 1649. ... Derry or Londonderry (in Irish, Doire or Doire Cholm Chille), often called the Maiden City, is a city in Northern Ireland. ...


In nearby Eniskillen, armed Williamite civilians drawn from the local Protestant population organised a formidable irregular military force. Operating with Eniskillen as a base, they carried out raids against the Jacobite forces in Connacht and Ulster. A poorly trained Jacobite army which advanced on them from Dublin on July 28th 1689 was defeated at the battle of Newtownbutler, many of the Jacobite's troops fled as the first shots were fired and up to 1500 of them were hacked down or drowned when pursued by the Williamite cavalry. Soon afterwards most of Ulster was cleared of Jacobites. Connaught redirects here. ... Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) is one of the four provinces of Ireland. ... Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath),is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region. ... Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) is one of the four provinces of Ireland. ... This article is not about the Jacobite Orthodox Church, nor is it about Jacobinism or the earlier Jacobean period. ...


William Arrives - Battle of the Boyne

On August 13th 1689 William's army under Marshal Frederic Schomberg landed at Ballyholme Bay in County Down and after capturing Carrickfergus marched unopposed to Dundalk where the soldiers were ravaged by fever. James's viceroy Tyrconnell raised an army to make a stand, but there was no battle and the two armies withdrew to winter quarters. The Williamites found themselves harassed throughout this winter and in the following two years by Irish Catholic guerrillas known as "rapparees". Schomberg's troops were decimated by disease in their winter quarters, due to the cold and wet weather and their poor food supplies. Part of this was down to Schomberg's organisational shortcomings as a commander, but it was also due to the Jacobite's devastating the countryside as they retreated, leaving no supplies behind for the Williamite army. The local civilian population also suffered terribly from this tactic. Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Friedrich Hermann (or Frédéric Armand), 1st Duke of Schomberg (originally Schönberg) (December 1615 or January 1616–1690), was both a marshal of France and an English general of all his Majestys Forces. Descended from an old family of the Palatinate, he was born at Heidelberg, the son of Hans... County Down, (An Dún in Irish) is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland, covering an area of 2,448 km² (945 square miles). ... Carrickfergus (Carraig Fhearghais, meaning Rock of Fergus, in Irish) is a town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... Dundalk (Irish: Dún Dealgan) is a town in County Louth in the Republic of Ireland, close to the border with Northern Ireland. ... Guerrilla (also called a partisan) is a term borrowed from Spanish (from guerra meaning war) used to describe small combat groups. ... Rapparees were Irish guerrilla fighters who operated on the Jacobite side during the 1690s Williamite war in Ireland. ...


Impatient with Schomberg's slow progress, William decided to take charge in person and arrived with a fleet of 300 ships at Belfast Lough on 14 June 1690. He landed at Carrickfergus, having mustered an army of 36,000 soldiers (including English, German, Dutch, Danish and French Huguenot troops), which marched towards Dublin. After some resistance near Newry the Jacobites withdrew to the south bank of the River Boyne, and on July 1st were defeated at the Battle of the Boyne. The Jacobite army retreated, little damaged, but demoralised and badly hit by desertion. The Williamites marched onto Dublin, Ireland's capital and occupied the city without a fight. James despaired of the prospects of victory in Ireland and rode ahead of his army to Duncannon and from there returned to France, because of this desertion James became known in Ireland as 'Séamus an Chaca' or 'James the Shit'. News of this defeat contributed to the Scottish Jacobites abandoning their struggle. Belfast Lough (Loch Lao in Irish) is a large intertidal sea lough situated at the mouth of the River Lagan on the east coast of Northern Ireland. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... Newry is a city in Northern Ireland. ... William III King of England, Scotland and Ireland, Stadtholder of the Netherlands The Battle of the Boyne was a turning point in the Williamite war in Ireland between the deposed King James II of England and VII of Scotland and his son-in-law and successor, William, for the English... Duncannon Fort and village Duncannon (Dún Canann in Irish, meaning the Fort of Conán, possibly Conán mac Morna of the Fianna) is a village in south west County Wexford, Republic of Ireland. ...


William's victory at the Boyne, taken together with James' flight, might have been the end of the war in Ireland. However, William published very harsh peace terms in Dublin, excluding the Jacobite officers and the Irish Catholic landed class from the pardon he offered to Jacobite foot-soldiers. As a result, the Irish Jacobite leaders felt they had no choice but to fight on until they had recieved guarentees that their lives, property and civil and religious rights would be respected in peace settlement.


Limerick, Aughrim and the end of the War

The war continued with the Irish retreating to Limerick, where they repulsed a Williamite assault with heavy casualties in August 1690. The Irish position was now a defensive one, holding a large enclave in western Ireland, including all of the province of Connacht bounded by the Shannon river. The Irish Jacobites were encouraged by their successful defence of Limerick and still hoped they could win the war with help from France. William left Ireland in late 1690, entrusting command of the Williamite forces there to the Dutch general Ginkel. Ginkel broke into Connacht via the town of Athlone, after a bloody siege there. He then advanced on key Jacobite stronghold of Galway and Limerick. St Ruth, the Jacobite's French commander attempted to black Ginkel's advance at Aughrim, but Ginkel's army inflicted a crushing defeat on the Irish at the Battle of Aughrim, where the Jacobites lost up to 8000 men (or about half their army), killed wounded and taken prisoner. St Ruth himself was among the Jacobite dead. Ginkel took Galway, which surrendered on terms and went on to besiege Limerick. The siege of Limerick ended with Irish surrender on September 23rd 1691, when Patrick Sarsfield, dispairing of any hope of victory, overthrew the French officers in command of the city and opened negotiations with Ginkel. The peace Treaty of Limerick signed on 3rd October 1691 offered generous terms to Jacobites willing to stay in Ireland and give an oath of loyalty to William III. Peace was concluded on these terms between Sarsfield and Ginkel, but the Protestant dominated Irish Parliament refused to ratify the articles of the Treaty that gave toleration to Catholicism and full legal rights to Catholics. In fact the penal laws, which discriminated against Catholics were updated and reinforced after the war by the "Protestant Ascendancy" in Parliament. Irish Jacobites saw this as a severe breach of faith. A popular contemporary Irish saying went, cuimhnidh Luimneach agus feall na Sassanaigh ("remember Limerick and English treachery"). Part of the treaty required the Irish army to leave Ireland for France, the "Flight of the Wild Geese" which led to the setting up of the Irish Brigade. Around 14,000 men left Ireland with Patrick Sarsfield in 1691 along with around 10,000 women and children. Limerick (Irish: Luimneach) is a city and the county seat of County Limerick in the province of Munster, in the midwest of the Republic of Ireland. ... The city of Limerick in south-western Ireland was besieged several times in the 17th century, first during the Irish Confederate Wars of the 1640s and’50s again in the Williamite war in Ireland. ... Connaught redirects here. ... The River Shannon, Irelands longest river, divides the West of Ireland (mostly the province of Connaught) from the east and south (Leinster and most of Munster). ... Remains of the abbey at Athlone. ... Aughrim is a village in County Galway in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Battle of Aughrim was the decisive battle of the Williamite war in Ireland. ... Galway (official Irish name: Gaillimh) is the only city in the province of Connacht in Ireland and capital of County Galway. ... Limerick (Irish: Luimneach) is a city and the county seat of County Limerick in the province of Munster, in the midwest of the Republic of Ireland. ... The city of Limerick in south-western Ireland was besieged several times in the 17th century, first during the Irish Confederate Wars of the 1640s and’50s again in the Williamite war in Ireland. ... The Treaty of Limerick ended the Williamite war in Ireland between the Jacobites and the supporters of William of Orange. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender October 3 - Treaty of Limerick which guaranteed civil rights to catholics was signed. ... This article is about the legislature abolished in 1801. ... In the most general sense, penal is the body of laws that are enforced by the State in its own name and impose penalties for their violation, as opposed to civil law that seeks to redress private wrongs. ... The Flight of the Wild Geese refers to the depature of an Irish army under the command of Patrick Sarsfield from Ireland to France, as agreed in the Treaty of Limerick on October 3, 1691, following the Williamite war in Ireland with the Jacobites. ... The Irish Brigade was formed in May 1690 when five Jacobite regiments were sent from Ireland to France in return for a larger force of French infantry who were sent to fight in Ireland. ...


Long-Term Effects

The Williamite victory in the war in Ireland had two basic long term results. The first was to ensure that James II would not regain his thrones in England, Ireland and Scotland by military means. The second was to ensure future British and Protestant dominance over Ireland. Until the 19th century, Ireland would be ruled by the "Protestant Ascendancy" , the English Protestant ruling class. The majority Irish Catholic community and also the Ulster-Scots Presbyterian community were systematically excluded from power. James II can refer to: James II of Scotland James II of England James II of Aragon James II of Cyprus This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Protestant Ascendancy refers to the political, economic and social domination of Ireland by the class of Protestant landowners, Church of Ireland clergy and professionals during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. ... Ulster-Scots is a term mainly used in Ireland and Britain (Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irishis commonly used in North America) primarily to refer to Presbyterian Scots, or their descendents, who migrated from the Scottish Lowlands to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland), largely across the 17th century. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ...


For over a century after the war, Irish Catholics maintained a sentimental attachment to the Jacobite cause, portraying James and the Stuarts as the rightful monarchs who would have given a just settlement to Ireland (including self-government and restoration of confiscated lands) and supported Catholicism. Thousands of Irish soldiers left the country to serve the Stuart monarchs in the Irish Brigade of the French Army. Up until the mid-eighteenth century, France remained committed to restoring the Stuarts to their British Kingdoms and Irish soldiers in the French service fought on the Jacobite side in the Scottish Jacobite uprisings up to the Battle of Culloden in 1745. The Irish Brigade was formed in May 1690 when five Jacobite regiments were sent from Ireland to France in return for a larger force of French infantry who were sent to fight in Ireland. ... The French Army (Armée de Terre) is the land-based component of the French Armed Forces. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Battle of Culloden (April 16, 1746), was the last military clash in mainland Britain, between the forces of the Jacobites and the British Army. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected...


Protestants, on the other hand, portrayed the Williamite victory as a triumph for "religious and civil liberty" in the British Isles. In Ireland, the Protestant community believed that their victory had saved their community from massacre and annihilation at the hands of Irish Catholics. For this reason, the battles of the Williamite war are still commemorated by Protestant unionists in Ulster, principally by the Orange Order on the Twelfth of July. The British Isles consist of Great Britain, Ireland and a number of much smaller surrounding islands. ... In the Irish context, Unionists form a group of largely (though not exclusively) Protestant people in Ireland, of all social classes, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which the Northern Ireland provincial state created in... Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) is one of the four provinces of Ireland. ... The Orange Order is a Protestant fraternal organisation largely based in Northern Ireland and in western Scotland but which has a worldwide membership. ... Annual Protestant celebrations on the 12th of July, originating in Ireland, commonly known as The Twelfth but also as, Orangemens Day or as the Boyne celebrations, commemorating the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 and the Glorious Revolution. ...


See also

The Monmouth Rebellion of 1685, also known as the Pitchfork Rebellion, was an attempt to overthrow the King of England, James II, who became king when his elder brother, Charles II, died on 6 February 1685. ...

External links

  • BBC-History Williamite Wars

  Results from FactBites:
 
Battle of Aughrim - Wiki Ireland (1148 words)
The Battle of Aughrim was the decisive battle of the Williamite war in Ireland.
It was fought between the Jacobites and the forces of William III on 12 July 1691, near the village of Aughrim in County Galway.
Thereafter, it was superseded by the battle of the Boyne in commemorations on the "Twelfth" due to the switch to the Gregorian calendar.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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