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Encyclopedia > William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville
The Lord Grenville
William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville
Term of Office: 11 February 180631 March 1807
Predecessors: William Pitt the Younger
Successors: The Duke of Portland
Date of Birth: 25 October 1759
Place of Birth: Wotton House, Buckinghamshire
Date of Death: 12 January 1834
Place of Death: Burnham, Buckinghamshire
Political Party: Whig

William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville (October 25, 1759 - January 12, 1834), was a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759–23 January 1806) was a British politician during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, (April 14, 1738 - October 30, 1809) was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 67 days remaining. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is a county in South East England. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... There are several places known as Burnham: In England: Burnham, Buckinghamshire in England, for which Burnham Beeches is named Burnham Overy Town in Norfolk, England Burnham Market in Norfolk, England Burnham-on-Crouch in Essex, England Burnham-on-Sea in United States: Burnham, Illinois Burnham, Maine Burnham, Pennsylvania This is... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is a county in South East England. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... This article is about the British Whig party. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 67 days remaining. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the British Whig party. ... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ...


The son of Prime Minister George Grenville, Grenville studied at Eton, Christ Church, Oxford, and Lincoln's Inn, and entered the Commons in 1782 and soon became a close ally of Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger, serving in the government as Paymaster of the Forces from 1784 to 1789. In 1789, Grenville entered the Cabinet as Home Secretary, and became Leader of the House of Lords when he was raised to the peerage the next year as Baron Grenville. The next year, in 1791, he succeeded the Duke of Leeds as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. Grenville's decade as Foreign Secretary was a dramatic one, seeing the Wars of the French Revolution. During the war, Grenville was the leader of the party that focused on the fighting on the continent as the key to victory, opposing the faction of Henry Dundas which favored war at sea and in the colonies. Grenville left office with Pitt in 1801 over the issue of Catholic Emancipation. George Grenville (October 14, 1712—November 13, 1770) was a British Whig statesman who served in government for the relatively short period of nine years (reaching the position of Prime Minister of Great Britain); Sir Robert Walpole served as Prime Minister alone for twenty-one years, for example. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (that is, an independent, fee-charging secondary school) for boys. ... Christ Church, called in Latin Ædes Christi (i. ... Lincolns Inn is one of four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759–23 January 1806) was a British politician during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... The Paymaster of the Forces was a British government position. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... 1791 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... The French Revolutionary Wars occurred between the outbreak of war between the French Revolutionary government and Austria in 1792 and the Treaty of Amiens in 1802. ... Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (April 28, 1742 - May 28, 1811) was a British statesman. ...


In his years out of office, Grenville became close to the opposition Whigs leader Charles James Fox, and when Pitt returned to office in 1804, Grenville did not take part. Following Pitt's death in 1806, Grenville became the head of the "Ministry of all The Talents", a coalition between Grenville's supporters, the Foxite Whigs, and the supporters of former Prime Minister Lord Sidmouth, with Grenville as First Lord of the Treasury and Fox as Foreign Secretary as joint leaders. Grenville's younger brother, Thomas Grenville, served briefly as First Lord of the Admiralty. The Ministry ultimately accomplished little, failing either to make peace with France or to accomplish Catholic emancipation (the later attempt resulting in the ministry's dismissal in March, 1807). It did have one significant achievement, however, in the abolition of the slave trade in 1807. The Right Honourable Charles James Fox (January 24, 1749 - September 13, 1806) was an English politician. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1806-1807. ... Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth (May 30, 1757 - February 15, 1844) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1804. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Thomas Grenville (1755-1846), was a British politician and bibliophile. ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity and the Test Acts. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In the years after the fall of the ministry, Grenville continued in opposition, maintaining his alliance with Lord Grey and the Whigs, criticizing the Peninsular War and, with Grey, refusing to join Lord Liverpool's government in 1812. In the post-war years, Grenville gradually moved back closer to the Tories, but never again returned to the cabinet. His political career was ended by a stroke in 1823. Grenville also served as Chancellor of Oxford University from 1810 until his death in 1834. Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (March 13, 1764 - July 17, 1845). ... This article is about the British Whig party. ... The Peninsular War (1808–1814) was a major conflict during the Napoleonic Wars, fought in the Iberian Peninsula with Spanish, Portuguese, and the British forces fighting against the French. ... Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Chancellor (Latin: cancellarius), an official title used by most of the peoples whose civilization has arisen directly or indirectly out of the Roman empire. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


The Ministry of All the Talents, February 1806 - March 1807

Arms of William Wyndham Grenville
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Arms of William Wyndham Grenville

Changes Image File history File links Arms of William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Image File history File links Arms of William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... The Right Honourable Charles James Fox (January 24, 1749 - September 13, 1806) was an English politician. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... Thomas Erskine, 1st Baron Erskine (10 January 1750 - 17 November 1823), Lord Chancellor of England, was the third and youngest son of Henry David Erskine, 10th Earl of Buchan, and was born in Edinburgh. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... William Wentworth Fitzwilliam, 4th Earl Fitzwilliam in Ireland, 2nd Earl Fitzwilliam in Great Britain (30 May 1748 - 8 February 1833) was a British politician of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as Presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth (May 30, 1757 - February 15, 1844) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1804. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... George John Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer (1 September 1758 - 10 November 1834) was a Whig politician of the late 18th and early 19th century. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... William Windham (1780-1810) was an English statesman, born of an ancient Norfolk family. ... The Secretary of State for War and the Colonies was a British cabinet level position responsible for the army and the British colonies (other than India). ... Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (March 13, 1764 - July 17, 1845). ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne (1780-1863), Son of the 1st Marquess by his second marriage, was born on 2 July 1780 and educated at Edinburgh University and at Trinity College, Cambridge. ... The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ... Francis Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings, 2nd Earl of Moira (9 December 1754 - 28 November 1826) was a British politician who served as Governor-General of India from 1813 to 1823. ... The Master-General of the Ordnance (MGO) was an important British military position before 1855, when its duties were largely abolished. ... Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough (November 16, 1750 - December 13, 1818), English judge, was born at Great Salkeld, in Cumberland, of which place his father, Edmund Law (1703-1787), afterwards bishop of Carlisle, was at the time rector. ... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor, and the presiding judge of Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal, and of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court. ...

  • September, 1806 - On Fox's death, Lord Howick succeeds him as Foreign Secretary and Leader of the House of Commons. Thomas Grenville succeeds Howick at the Admiralty. Lord Fitzwilliam becomes Minister without Portfolio, and Lord Sidmouth succeeds him as Lord President. Lord Holland succeeds Sidmouth as Lord Privy Seal.


September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Grenville (1755-1846), was a British politician and bibliophile. ... Henry Richard Vassall-Fox, 3rd Baron Holland (21 November 1773 - 22 October 1840), was an English politician and a major figure in Whig politics in the early 19th century. ...

Preceded by:
Richard FitzPatrick
Chief Secretary for Ireland
1782–1783
Succeeded by:
William Windham
Preceded by:
Edmund Burke
Paymaster of the Forces
1784–1789
Succeeded by:
The Lord Mulgrave and The Marquess of Graham
Preceded by:
Charles Wolfran Cornwall
Speaker of the House of Commons
1789
Succeeded by:
Henry Addington
Preceded by:
Lord Sydney
Home Secretary
1789–1791
Succeeded by:
Henry Dundas
President of the Board of Control
1790–1793
Preceded by:
The Duke of Leeds
Leader of the House of Lords
1790–1801
Succeeded by:
Unknown
Foreign Secretary
1791–1801
Succeeded by:
The Lord Hawkesbury
Preceded by:
William Pitt the Younger
Prime Minister
1806–1807
Succeeded by:
The Duke of Portland
Preceded by:
The Lord Hawkesbury
Leader of the House of Lords
1806–1807
Succeeded by:
The Lord Hawkesbury


The Chief Secretary was the most important position for determining Ireland after the Lord Lieutenant, and was frequently a cabinet level position in the 19th and early twentieth centuries. ... William Windham (1780-1810) was an English statesman, born of an ancient Norfolk family. ... Edmund Burke Edmund Burke (January 12, 1729 – July 9, 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman, author, orator and political philosopher, who served for many years in the British House of Commons as a member of the Whig Party. ... The Paymaster of the Forces was a British government position. ... Constantine John Phipps, 2nd Baron Mulgrave (May 19, 1744 - October 10, 1792) was an English explorer. ... James Graham (8 September 1755 - 30 December 1836), 3rd Duke of Montrose, was a Scottish nobleman and statesman. ... In the British House of Commons the Speaker of the House of Commons controls the day to day running of the house. ... Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth (May 30, 1757 - February 15, 1844) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1804. ... Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney (24 February 1732 - 30 June 1800), the British politician after whom the city of Sydney, Australia, is named, was born at Frognal House, near Chislehurst in Kent. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (April 28, 1742 - May 28, 1811) was a British statesman. ... The President of the Board of Control was a British government official in the late 18th and early 19th century responsible for overseeing the British East India Company and generally serving as the chief official in London responsible for Indian affairs. ... Francis Godolphin Osborne, 5th Duke of Leeds (29 January 1751 - 31 January 1799, was a British politician. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759–23 January 1806) was a British politician during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, (April 14, 1738 - October 30, 1809) was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool (June 7, 1770 - December 4, 1828) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1812 to 1827. ...


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