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Encyclopedia > William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth

Born April 7, 1770(1770-04-07)
Cockermouth, England, UK
Died April 23, 1850 (aged 80)
Ambleside, England, UK
Occupation Poet
Literary movement Romanticism

William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. Wordsworth could mean: William Wordsworth, the English roomantic poet Wordsworth(hip-hop artist), an underground hip-hop artist Wordsworth, a puppet character on the television show Wonder Showzen Category: ... A portrait of William Wordsworth. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... , Ambleside is a town in Cumbria, in north-west England. ... This article is about work. ... A poet (from the ancient Greek ποιητης, poïêtes (artisan) ; ποιέω, poieō) is a person who writes poetry. ... ... Romantics redirects here. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Henry Vaughan (April 17, 1622 - April 28, 1695) was a Welsh Metaphysical poet and a doctor, the twin brother of the philosopher Thomas Vaughan. ... There are several persons with the name David Hartley: David Hartley (1705-1757), English philosopher David Hartley (1731-1813), son of David Hartley the philosopher, and signatory to the Treaty of Paris David Hartley, musician This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... This page is about the nineteenth century English poet. ... Goethe redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... John Walking Stewart (19 February 1747 – 20 February 1822) was an English traveller and philosopher. ... Charlotte Turner Smith (May 4, 1749 - October 28, 1806) was an English poet and novelist whose works have been credited with influencing Jane Austen and particularly Charles Dickens. ... John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873), British philosopher, political economist, civil servant and Member of Parliament, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... Matthew Arnold Caricature from Punch, 1881: Admit that Homer sometimes nods, That poets do write trash, Our Bard has written Balder Dead, And also Balder-dash Family tree Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic, who worked as an inspector of schools. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Sir Leslie Stephen (November 28, 1832 – February 22, 1904) was an English author and critic, the father of two famous daughters, Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell. ... Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (March 18, 1893 – November 4, 1918) was a British poet and soldier, regarded by many as the leading poet of the First World War. ... Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (Hailey, Idaho Territory, United States, October 30, 1885 – Venice, Italy, November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, critic and intellectual who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in early-to-mid 20th century poetry. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933 photograph, author unknown. ... Lord Byron redirects here. ... Edmund John Millington Synge (IPA: ) (April 16, 1871 – March 24, 1909) was an Irish dramatist, poet, prose writer, and collector of folklore. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Romanticism largely began as a reaction against the prevailing Enlightenment ideals of the day. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... Romantics redirects here. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Lyrical Ballads, 1798, was the flame that lit the English Romantic movement, its spark being that of the somewhat earlier William Blake. ...


Wordsworth's masterpiece is generally considered to be The Prelude, an autobiographical poem of his early years which the poet revised and expanded a number of times. The work was posthumously titled and published, prior to which it was generally known as the poem "to Coleridge". Wordsworth was England's Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death in 1850. The Prelude is an autobiographical poem in blank verse by the English poet William Wordsworth. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and education

The second of five children born to John Wordsworth and Ann Cookson, William Wordsworth was born April 7, 1770 in Cockermouth in Cumberland—part of the scenic region in north-west England called the Lake District. His sister, the poet and diarist Dorothy Wordsworth, to whom he was close all his life, was born the following year. After the death of their mother in 1778, their father sent William to Hawkshead Grammar School and sent Dorothy to live with relatives in Yorkshire. She and William did not meet again for another nine years. His father died when he was 13.[1] April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cumberland is one of the 39 traditional counties of England. ... The panorama across Eskdale from Ill Crag. ... Dorothy Mae Ann Wordsworth (December 25, 1771 – January 25, 1855) was an English poet and diarist. ... Hawkshead Grammar School in Hawkshead, Cumbria, England was founded in 1585 by Archbishop Edwin Sandys, of York, who petitioned a charter from Queen Elizabeth I to set up a governing body. ...


Wordsworth began attending St John's College, Cambridge in 1787, maintained by his maternal grandparents. He returned to Hawkshead for his first two summer holidays, and often spent later holidays on walking tours, visiting places famous for the beauty of their landscape. In 1790, he took a nearly three thousand mile walking tour of Europe, during which he toured the Alps extensively, and also visited nearby areas of France, Switzerland, and Italy. The following year, he graduated from Cambridge without distinction. His youngest brother, Christopher, rose to be Master of Trinity College.[2] College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... Alp redirects here. ... Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury Christopher Wordsworth (June 9, 1774 - February 2, 1846), English divine and scholar, youngest brother of the poet William Wordsworth, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1798. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street...


Relationship with Annette Vallon

In November 1791, Wordsworth visited Revolutionary France and became enthralled with the Republican movement. He fell in love with a French woman, Annette Vallon, who in 1792 gave birth to their child, Caroline. Because of lack of money and Britain's tensions with France, he returned alone to England the next year.[3] The circumstances of his return and his subsequent behaviour raise doubts as to his declared wish to marry Annette but he supported her and his daughter as best he could in later life. During this period, he wrote his acclaimed "It is a beauteous evening, calm and free," recalling his seaside walk with his daughter, whom he had not seen for ten years. At the conception of this poem, he had never seen his daughter before. The occurring lines reveal his deep love for both child and mother. The Reign of Terror estranged him from the Republican movement, and war between France and Britain prevented him from seeing Annette and Caroline again for several years. There are also strong suggestions that Wordsworth may have been depressed and emotionally unsettled in the mid 1790s.

With the Peace of Amiens again allowing travel to France, in 1802 Wordsworth and his sister, Dorothy visited Annette and Caroline in France and arrived at a mutually agreeable settlement regarding Wordsworth's obligations.[3] For other uses of terror, see Terror; Great Fear . ... The Treaty of Amiens was signed on March 25, 1802 (Germinal 4, year X in the French Revolutionary Calendar) by Joseph Bonaparte and the Marquis Cornwallis as a Definitive Treaty of Peace between France and Britain. ...


First publication and Lyrical Ballads

In his "Preface to Lyrical Ballads" which is called the 'manifest' of English Romantic criticism, Wordsworth calls his poems ' Experimental'. 1793 saw Wordsworth's first published poetry with the collections An Evening Walk and Descriptive Sketches. He received a legacy of £900 from Raisley Calvert in 1795 so that he could pursue writing poetry. That year, he also met Samuel Taylor Coleridge in Somerset. The two poets quickly developed a close friendship. In 1797, Wordsworth and his sister, Dorothy, moved to Alfoxton House, Somerset, just a few miles away from Coleridge's home in Nether Stowey. Together, Wordsworth and Coleridge (with insights from Dorothy) produced Lyrical Ballads (1798), an important work in the English Romantic movement. The volume had neither the name of Wordsworth nor Coleridge as the author. One of Wordsworth's most famous poems, "Tintern Abbey", was published in the work, along with Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner". The second edition, published in 1800, had only Wordsworth listed as the author, and included a preface to the poems, which was significantly augmented in the 1802 edition. This Preface to Lyrical Ballads is considered a central work of Romantic literary theory. In it, Wordsworth discusses what he sees as the elements of a new type of poetry, one based on the "real language of men" and which avoids the poetic diction of much eighteenth-century poetry. Here, Wordsworth also gives his famous definition of poetry askeets "the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings from emotions recollected in tranquility." A fourth and final edition of Lyrical Ballads was published in 1805. Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Dorothy Mae Ann Wordsworth (December 25, 1771 – January 25, 1855) was an English poet and diarist. ... Nether Stowey is a small village in Somerset, South West England. ... Lyrical Ballads, 1798, was the flame that lit the English Romantic movement, its spark being that of the somewhat earlier William Blake. ... // Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth - Lyrical Ballads (published anonymously, includes the Rime of the Ancient Mariner) George Canning and J. H. Frere parody Erasmus Darwins The Loves of the Plants in their The Loves of the Triangles January 5 - David Macbeth Moir, Scottish March 30 - Luise Hensel, German... Romantics redirects here. ... Tintern Abbey, 1993 Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye During a Tour. ... One of a set of engraved metal plate illustrations by Gustave Doré: the Mariner up on the mast in a storm. ... // the life and works of Robert Burns published William Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems, including Preface to the Lyrical Ballads Caroline Clive Thomas Babington Macaulay William Cowper Mary Robinson Joseph Warton Poetry List of years in poetry Categories: | | ...


Germany and move to the Lake District

Wordsworth, Dorothy, and Coleridge then travelled to Germany in the autumn of 1798. While Coleridge was intellectually stimulated by the trip, its main effect on Wordsworth was to produce homesickness.[3] During the harsh winter of 1798–1799, Wordsworth lived with Dorothy in Goslar, and despite extreme stress and loneliness, he began work on an autobiographical piece later titled The Prelude. He also wrote a number of famous poems, including "the Lucy poems". He and his sister moved back to England, now to Dove Cottage in Grasmere in the Lake District, and this time with fellow poet Robert Southey nearby. Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Southey came to be known as the "Lake Poets". Through this period, many of his poems revolve around themes of death, endurance, separation, and grief. Coordinates: Time zone: CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country: Germany State: Lower Saxony District: Goslar City subdivisions: 12 districts Lord Mayor: Henning Binnewies (SPD) Basic Statistics Area: 92. ... Dove Cottage Dove Cottage is a house on the edge of Grasmere in the Lake District. ... Grasmere village and lake as seen from the fell of Stone Arthur Dove Cottage Grasmere is a village in central Cumbria in the north of England. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... The Lake Poets all lived in the Lake District of England at the turn of the nineteenth century. ...

William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth
Portrait, 1842, by Benjamin Haydon
Portrait, 1842, by Benjamin Haydon

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (914x1400, 79 KB)William Wordsworth - Project Gutenberg eText 12933 - http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (914x1400, 79 KB)William Wordsworth - Project Gutenberg eText 12933 - http://www. ... Download high resolution version (2024x2481, 313 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2024x2481, 313 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Benjamin Robert Haydon (January 26, 1786 _ June 22, 1846) was an English historical painter and writer. ...

Marriage and Children

In 1802, after returning from his trip to France with Dorothy to visit Annette and Caroline, Wordsworth received the inheritance owed by Lord Lonsdale since John Wordsworth's death in 1783. Later that year, he married a childhood friend, Mary Hutchinson.[3] Dorothy continued to live with the couple and grew close to Mary. The following year, Mary gave birth to the first of five children.
John Wordsworth - June 18th 1803 - 1875. Married four times: 1) Isabella Curwen (d. 1848)had six children: Jane, Henry, William, John, Charles and Edward. 2) Helen Ross (d. 1854) no issue. 3) Mary Ann Dolan (d. after 1856) had 1 daughter Dora (b.1858). 4) Mary Gamble. no issue
Dora Wordsworth - August 16th 1804 - July 9th 1847. She married Edward Quillinan
Thomas Wordsworth - June 15th 1806 - December 1st 1812
Catherine Wordsworth - September 6th 1808 - June 4th 1812
William "Willy" Wordsworth - May 12th 1810 - 1883. He married Fanny Graham and had four children: Mary Louisa, William, Reginald and Gordon.


Autobiographical work and Poems in Two Volumes

Wordsworth had for years been making plans to write a long philosophical poem in three parts, which he intended to call The Recluse. He had in 1798–99 started an autobiographical poem, which he never named but called the "poem to Coleridge", which would serve as an appendix to The Recluse. In 1804 he began expanding this autobiographical work, having decided to make it a prologue rather than an appendix to the larger work he planned. By 1805, he had completed it, but refused to publish such a personal work until he had completed the whole of The Recluse. The death of his brother, John, in 1805 affected him strongly. The Prelude is an autobiographical poem in blank verse by the English poet William Wordsworth. ...


The source of Wordsworth's philosophical allegiances as articulated in The Prelude and in such shorter works as "Lines composed a few miles above Tintern Abbey" has been the source of much critical debate. While it had long been supposed that Wordsworth relied chiefly on Coleridge for philosophical guidance, more recent scholarship has suggested that Wordsworth's ideas may have been formed years before he and Coleridge became friends in the mid 1790s. While in Revolutionary Paris in 1792, the twenty-two year old Wordsworth made the acquaintance of the mysterious traveller John "Walking" Stewart (1747-1822),[4] who was nearing the end of a thirty-years' peregrination from Madras, India, through Persia and Arabia, across Africa and all of Europe, and up through the fledgling United States. By the time of their association, Stewart had published an ambitious work of original materialist philosophy entitled The Apocalypse of Nature (London, 1791), to which many of Wordsworth's philosophical sentiments are likely indebted. Tintern Abbey, 1993 Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye During a Tour. ... John Walking Stewart (19 February 1747 – 20 February 1822) was an English traveller and philosopher. ...


In 1807, his Poems in Two Volumes were published, including "Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood". Up to this point Wordsworth was known publicly only for Lyrical Ballads, and he hoped this collection would cement his reputation. Its reception was lukewarm, however. For a time (starting in 1810), Wordsworth and Coleridge were estranged over the latter's opium addiction.[3] Two of his children, Thomas and Catherine, died in 1812. The following year, he received an appointment as Distributor of Stamps for Westmorland, and the £400 per year income from the post made him financially secure. His family, including Dorothy, moved to Rydal Mount, Ambleside (between Grasmere and Rydal Water) in 1813, where he spent the rest of his life.[3] This article is about the drug. ... Rydal Mount was William Wordsworths home from 1813 to 1850. ... , Ambleside is a town in Cumbria, in north-west England. ...


The Prospectus

In 1814 he published The Excursion as the second part of the three-part The Recluse. He had not completed the first and third parts, and never would complete them. However, he did write a poetic Prospectus to "The Recluse" in which he lays out the structure and intent of the poem. The Prospectus contains some of Wordsworth's most famous lines on the relation between the human mind and nature:

My voice proclaims
How exquisitely the individual Mind
(And the progressive powers perhaps no less
Of the whole species) to the external World
Is fitted:--and how exquisitely, too,
Theme this but little heard of among Men,
The external World is fitted to the Mind . . .

Some modern critics recognise a decline in his works beginning around the mid-1810s. But this decline was perhaps more a change in his lifestyle and beliefs, since most of the issues that characterise his early poetry (loss, death, endurance, separation, abandonment) were resolved in his writings. But, by 1820 he enjoyed the success accompanying a reversal in the contemporary critical opinion of his earlier works. By 1828, Wordsworth had become fully reconciled to Coleridge, and the two toured the Rhineland together that year.[3] Dorothy suffered from a severe illness in 1829 that rendered her an invalid for the remainder of her life. In 1835, Wordsworth gave Annette and Caroline the money they needed for support. 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The Poet Laureate and other honours

Wordsworth received an honorary Doctor of Civil Law degree in 1838 from Durham University, and the same honour from Oxford University the next year.[3] In 1842 the government awarded him a civil list pension amounting to £300 a year. With the death in 1843 of Robert Southey, Wordsworth became the Poet Laureate. When his daughter, Dora, died in 1847, his production of poetry came to a standstill. Affiliations 1994 Group European University Association Association of MBAs EQUIS Universities UK N8 Group Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


Death

Gravestone of William Wordsworth, Grasmere, Cumbria
Gravestone of William Wordsworth, Grasmere, Cumbria

William Wordsworth died of pneumonia on the 23rd April 1850 and was buried at St. Oswald's church in Grasmere. His widow Mary published his lengthy autobiographical "poem to Coleridge" as The Prelude several months after his death. Though this failed to arouse great interest in 1850, it has since come to be recognised as his masterpiece. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 3,072 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 3,072 pixels, file size: 3. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Grasmere village and lake as seen from the fell of Stone Arthur Dove Cottage Grasmere is a village in central Cumbria in the north of England. ... The Prelude is an autobiographical poem in blank verse by the English poet William Wordsworth. ...


Major works

  • Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems (1800)
    • Preface to the Lyrical Ballads
    • "Strange fits of passion have I known"[5]
    • "She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways"[5]
    • "Three years she grew"[5]
    • "A Slumber Did my Spirit Seal"[5]
    • "I travelled among unknown men"[5]
    • "Lucy Gray"
    • "The Two April Mornings"
    • "Nutting"
    • "The Ruined Cottage"
    • "Michael"
  • The Excursion (1814)
    • "Prospectus to The Recluse"
  • Ecclesiastical Sketches (1822)
    • "Mutability"

Lyrical Ballads, 1798, was the flame that lit the English Romantic movement, its spark being that of the somewhat earlier William Blake. ... // Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth - Lyrical Ballads (published anonymously, includes the Rime of the Ancient Mariner) George Canning and J. H. Frere parody Erasmus Darwins The Loves of the Plants in their The Loves of the Triangles January 5 - David Macbeth Moir, Scottish March 30 - Luise Hensel, German... The Thorn is a comedy movie released on the 24 May 1974 directed by Peter Alexander starring John Bassberger as Jesus Christ and Bette Midler as Virgin Mary. ... Tintern Abbey, 1993 Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye During a Tour. ... Lyrical Ballads, 1798, was the flame that lit the English Romantic movement, its spark being that of the somewhat earlier William Blake. ... // the life and works of Robert Burns published William Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems, including Preface to the Lyrical Ballads Caroline Clive Thomas Babington Macaulay William Cowper Mary Robinson Joseph Warton Poetry List of years in poetry Categories: | | ... The Preface to the Lyrical Ballads was written by William Wordsworth in 1800 and enlarged with the third edition of the Lyrical Ballads in 1802. ... STRANGE FITS OF PASSION HAVE I KNOWN Strange fits of passion have I known: And I will dare to tell, But in the Lovers ear alone, What once to me befell. ... She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways is a three-stanza poem written by the English Romantic poet William Wordsworth in 1798. ... // Joel Barlow, The Columbiad Lord Byron: Hours of Idleness, which will be attacked in the Edinburgh Review Poems on Various Occasions George Crabbe, Poems and The Parish Register Thomas Moore, Irish Melodies William Wordsworth William Wordsworths, Poems in Two Volumes includes: Resolution and Independence I Wandered Lonely as a... Wikisource has original text related to this article: I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud The Daffodils is an 1804 poem by William Wordsworth. ... The Solitary Reaper is a poem by William Wordsworth in which the poet recounts his tale of meeting with a girl, reaping in the fields alone. ... It Ended on an Oily Stage was the first single from British Sea Powers second album Open Season. ... Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 is an 1802 poem by William Wordsworth. ... London, 1802 by William Wordsworth Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour: England hath need of thee: she is a fen Of stagnant waters: altar, sword and pen, Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower, Have forefeited their ancient English dower Of inward happiness. ... THE WORLD IS TOO MUCH WITH US The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! The Sea that bares her bosom to the... // September 14 — Francis Scott Key writes The Star-Spangled Banner during the British attack near Baltimore, Maryland Augusta Gordon bore her half-brother Lord Byrons daughter July 27 — Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin elope to war-ravaged France, accompanied by Godwins step-sister, Mary Jane (later... See also: 1821 in literature, other events of 1822, 1823 in literature, list of years in literature. ... // Alfred, Lord Tennyson becomes Poet Laureate Sir Richard Burton, translator, The Arabian Nights Henrik Ibsen, The Burial Mound Thomas Lovell Beddoes, Deaths Jest-book (posthumous) Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Sonnets from the Portuguese Robert Browning, Christmas Eve and Easter Day Leigh Hunt, Autobiography in three volumes Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The... The Prelude is an autobiographical poem in blank verse by the English poet William Wordsworth. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/William_Wordsworth
  2. ^ Appendix A (Past Governors) of Allport, D.H. & Friskney, N.J. "A Short History of Wilson's School", Wilson's School Charitable Trust, 1987
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h [1]Everett, Glenn, "William Wordsworth: Biography" Web page at The Victorian Web Web site, accessed January 7, 2007
  4. ^ Kelly Grovier, "Dream Walker: A Wordsworth Mystery Solved", Times Literary Supplement, 16 February 2007
  5. ^ a b c d e M. H. Abrams, editor of The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Romantic Period, writes of these five poems: "This and the four following pieces are often grouped by editors as the 'Lucy poems,' even though 'A slumber did my spirit seal' does not identify the 'she' who is the subject of that poem. All but the last were written in 1799, while Wordsworth and his sister were in Germany, and homesick. There has been diligent speculation about the identity of Lucy, but it remains speculation. The one certainty is that she is not the girl of Wordsworth's 'Lucy Gray'" (Abrams 2000).

is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Times Literary Supplement (or TLS) is a weekly literary review published in London by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation. ...

Sources

  • M. H. Abrams, ed. (2000), The Norton Anthology of English Literatures: Volume 2A, The Romantic Period (7th ed.), New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., ISBN 0-393-97568-1 
  • Stephen Gill, ed. (2000), William Wordsworth: The Major Works, New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., ISBN 0-19-284044-4 

External links

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William Wordsworth
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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

General information and biographical sketches

Wordsworth's works

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Preceded by
Robert Southey
British Poet Laureate
1843–1850
Succeeded by
Alfred Tennyson
Persondata
NAME Wordsworth, William
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION English poet
DATE OF BIRTH April 7, 1770
PLACE OF BIRTH Cockermouth, England
DATE OF DEATH April 23, 1850
PLACE OF DEATH Ambleside, England

The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; Italian: ; German: ; Spanish: ; Swedish: ; Polish: ; Portuguese: ) was an eighteenth-century movement in Western philosophy. ... Victorianism is the name given to the attitudes, art, and culture of the later two-thirds of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ... A poet (from the ancient Greek ποιητης, poïêtes (artisan) ; ποιέω, poieō) is a person who writes poetry. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... , Ambleside is a town in Cumbria, in north-west England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
William Wordsworth (1075 words)
William Wordsworth was born in Cockermouth, Cumberland, in the Lake District.
Wordsworth's financial situation became better in 1795 when he received a legacy and was able to settle at Racedown, Dorset, with his sister Dorothy.
Wordsworth was of a good height (five feet ten), and not a slender man; on the contrary, by the side of Southey, his limbs looked thick, almost in a disproportionate degree.
William Wordsworth at Old Poetry (2016 words)
Born to an attorney, Wordsworth was the second, with an elder brother Richard, a younger sister, Dorothy and two younger brothers, John and Christopher.
Wordsworth often used Dorothy's journal as a starting point for poems, but more than this he recognised her importance to him in their shared response to the world around them.
Wordsworth's disillusionment with the French Revolution has a long and complicated progress (going back even to the Reign of Terror), but this is certainly an important milestone in the poet's turn to conservatism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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