FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > William Tell
Statue of William Tell and his Son in Altdorf, Switzerland (Richard Kissling, 1895).
Statue of William Tell and his Son in Altdorf, Switzerland (Richard Kissling, 1895).

William Tell (German: Wilhelm Tell; French: Guillaume Tell; Italian: Guglielmo Tell) is a legendary hero of disputed historical authenticity who is said to have lived in the Canton of Uri in Switzerland in the early 14th century. William Tell may refer to: William Tell, legendary hero in the founding myths of Switzerland William Tell (play), a play by Friedrich Schiller William Tell (opera), an opera by Gioacchino Rossini, based on Schillers play The Adventures of William Tell, 1950s TV series on ITV The Legend of... Download high resolution version (766x1024, 102 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (766x1024, 102 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For the municipality in the canton of Schaffhausen, see Altdorf, Schaffhausen. ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... Uri (German:  ) is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...

Contents

The legend

William Tell from Bürglen was known as an expert marksman with the crossbow. At the time, the Habsburg emperors were seeking to dominate Uri. Hermann Gessler, the newly appointed Austrian Vogt of Altdorf raised a pole in the village's central square with his hat on top and demanded that all the local townsfolk bow before it. As Tell passed by without bowing, he was arrested. He received the punishment of being forced to shoot an apple off the head of his son, Walter, or else both would be executed. Bürglen is a village of the Canton of Uri, Switzerland, (, about 4000 inhabitants) at the entrance of the valley Schächental. ... This article is about the weapon. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Albrecht (also known as Hermann) Gessller (c. ... Vogt is a word of Germanic languages(except for English), originated from latin language vocatius, refers to: People named Vogt: Alfred Elton (A. E.) van Vogt Andrea Vogt Berti Vogts Erik Vogt Howard C. Vogts Jørgen Herman Vogt Karl Vogt Paul Vogt Roland Vogt Tom Vogt Other: Funker Vogt... For the municipality in the canton of Schaffhausen, see Altdorf, Schaffhausen. ... This article is about the fruit. ...


Tell had been promised freedom if he shot the apple. On November 18, 1307, Tell split the fruit with a single bolt from his crossbow, without mishap. When Gessler queried him about the purpose of the second bolt in his quiver, Tell answered that if he had ended up killing his son in that trial, he would have turned the crossbow on Gessler himself. Gessler became enraged at that comment, and had Tell bound and brought to his ship to be taken to his castle at Küssnacht. In a storm on Lake Lucerne, Tell managed to escape. On land, he went to Küssnacht, and when Gessler arrived, Tell shot him with the crossbow. is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 18 - German king Albrecht I makes his son Rudolf king of Bohemia. ... This article is about the weapon. ... Küssnacht am Rigi (official name since 2004: Küssnacht) is a district and municipality in the Canton of Schwyz in Central Switzerland, consisting of three villages: Küssnacht, Immensee and Merlischachen. ... For other uses, see Lake Lucerne (disambiguation). ...


This defiance of the Austrian, Gessler, sparked a rebellion, leading to the formation of the Swiss Confederation.


The history of the legend

The legend of William Tell appears first in the 15th century, in two different versions. One version, found in a popular ballad (Tellenlied) from around 1470, in the chronicles of Melchior Russ from Bern (written 1482 to 1488) and in the first theater adaptation of the story, the Tellenspiel from 1512,[1] portrays Tell as the main actor of the independence struggles of the founding cantons of the Old Swiss Confederacy; the other, found in the Weisse Buch von Sarnen of 1470, sees Tell as a minor character in a conspiracy against the Habsburgs led by others. Aegidius Tschudi, a Catholic conservative historian, merged these two earlier accounts in 1570 into the story summarized above. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... Events May 15 - Charles VIII of Sweden who had served three terms as King of Sweden dies. ... Melchior Russ was a knight and a citizen of Lucerne. ... Location within Switzerland The city of Bern, English traditionally Berne (Bernese German Bärn , German Bern , French Berne , Italian Berna , Romansh Berna ), is the Bundesstadt (administrative capital) of Switzerland, and is the fourth most populous Swiss city (after Zürich, Geneva and Basel). ... Events Portuguese fortify Fort Elmina on the Gold Coast Tizoc rules the Aztecs Diogo Cão, a Portuguese navigator, becomes the first European to sail up the Congo. ... // January 8 - The present Royal Netherlands Navy was formed By decree of Maximillian of Austria. ... 1550 illustration for the Sempacherbrief of 1393, one of the major alliance contracts of the Old Swiss Confederacy The Old Swiss Confederacy was the precursor of modern-day Switzerland. ... Aegidius (or Giles) Tschudi (February 5, 1505 - February 28, 1572), was an eminent member of the Tschudi family, of Glarus, Switzerland. ...

Gessler and Tell, drawing (1880)
Gessler and Tell, drawing (1880)

All these early written accounts focus on Tell's confrontation with Gessler. The different versions are not always consistent. The ballad mentions that Gessler had wanted to have Tell drowned in the lake, and Russ mentions that Tell shot Gessler immediately after having escaped instead of at Küssnacht. Similar variability exists concerning Tell's later life, of which the classic tale does not tell. Tschudi's version of the legend has it that he died in 1354 while trying to save a child from drowning in the Schächenbach, an alpine river in Uri. There is a fresco from 1582 in a chapel in Bürglen showing this scene.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x622, 108 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x622, 108 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Albrecht (also known as Hermann) Gessller (c. ... Events End of reign of John VI Cantacuzenus, as Byzantine emperor. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... Gregorian Calendar switch: Year 1582 involved conversion to the Gregorian calendar. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... A small village (about 4000 inhabitans) at the entrance of the valley Schächental. ...


The story of a great hero successfully shooting a small object from his child's head and then killing the tyrant who forced him to do it, however, is an archetype present in several Germanic myths. The motif also appears in other stories from Norse mythology, in particular the story of Egil in the Thidreks saga, as well as in the stories of William of Cloudsley from England, Palnetoke from Denmark, and a story from Holstein. Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Egil is a legendary hero of the Völundarkviða and the Thidreks saga. ... Thidreks saga (also Thidreksaga, Thidrekssaga, Niflungasaga) is a saga of the adventures of the hero Dietrich von Bern, believed to be based on the historical Theodoric the Great, and written down about 1250. ... Adam Bell was a legendary English outlaw. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Palnatoke was a legendary Danish hero and chieftain of the island of Fyn. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ...


There is also an entry in the Malleus Maleficarum regarding witch-archers that bears a surprising resemblance to the story of William Tell, telling of a wizard shooting a penny off the cap of his young son, including mention of a prince tempting the marksman to attempt the feat, and the second arrow intended for the prince in the event of failure.[2] Cover of the seventh Cologne edition of the Malleus Maleficarum, 1520 (from the University of Sydney Library). ...


Characters from the legend are featured in decks of playing cards popular in central Europe. The 48-card German deck was developed in the 15th century with various face-card designs, but the William Tell design became extremely popular after the Revolutions of 1848. The European Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations or the Year of Revolution, were a revolutionary wave which erupted in Sicily and then, further triggered by the revolutions of 1848 in France, soon spread to the rest of Europe and as far afield as...


Historicity debate

François Guillimann, a statesman of Fribourg and later historian and advisor of the Habsburg emperor Rudolph II, wrote to Melchior Goldast in 1607: "I followed popular belief by reporting certain details in my Swiss antiquities [published in 1598], but when I examine them closely the whole story seems to me to be pure fable.". In 1760, Simeon Uriel Freudenberger from Luzern anonymously published a tract arguing that the legend of Tell in all likelihood was based on the Danish saga of Palnatoke. (A French edition of his book, written by Gottlieb Emmanuel von Haller, was burnt in Altdorf.) Fribourg (French), (German: or , often Fribourg) is the capital of the Swiss canton of Fribourg and the district of Sarine. ... Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II Rudolf II Habsburg was an emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, king of Bohemia, and king of Hungary. ... Melchior Goldast ab Haiminsfeld (near Bischofszell, in the Swiss canton of Thurgau, January 6, 1576 or 1578 - Giessen, 1635) was a Swiss writer, an industrious though uncritical collector of documents relating to the medieval history and Constitution of Germany. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Lucerne (German: Luzern) is a city in Central Switzerland with a population of 60,274 (31 December 2003), capital of the canton of Lucerne. ... Palnatoke was a legendary Danish hero and chieftain of the island of Fyn. ... For the municipality in the canton of Schaffhausen, see Altdorf, Schaffhausen. ...


This view remained very unpopular, however. Friedrich von Schiller used Tschudi's version as the basis for his play Wilhelm Tell in 1804, interpreting Tell as a glorified patriot assassin. This interpretation became very popular especially in Switzerland, where the Tell figure was instrumentalized in the early 19th century as a "national hero" and identification figure in the new Helvetic Republic and also later on in the beginnings of the Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, the modern democratic federal state that developed then. When the historian Joseph Eutych Kopp in the 1830s dared to question the reality of the legend, an effigy of him was burnt on the Rütli, the meadow above Lake Lucerne where—according to the legend—the oath was sworn that concluded the original alliance between the founding cantons of the Swiss confederacy. Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (November 10, 1759 - May 9, 1805), usually known as Friedrich Schiller, was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official seal of the Helvetic Republic (depicting William Tell). ... In 1847, a civil war broke out between the Catholic and the Protestant cantons (Sonderbundskrieg). ... // Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Evolutionary theorist Charles Darwins expedition on the HMS Beagle. ... The effigy of John Gower in Southwark Cathedral, London. ... Photo from Seelisberg of Rütli Rütli is a mountain meadow near Urnersee in Seelisberg where the legendary oath of the Rütlischwur first occurred. ... For other uses, see Lake Lucerne (disambiguation). ...


Historians continued to argue over the saga until well into the 20th century. Wilhelm Öchsli published in 1891 a scientific account of the founding of the confederacy (commissioned by the government for the celebration of the first National holiday of Switzerland on August 1, 1891), and clearly dismissed the story as a saga. Yet 50 years later, in 1941, a time where Tell again had become national identification figure, the historian Karl Meyer tried to connect the events of the saga with known places and events. Modern historians generally consider the saga just that, as neither Tell's nor Gessler's existence can be proven. The legend also tells of the Burgenbruch, a coordinated uprising including the slighting of many forts; however, archeological evidence shows that many of these forts were already abandoned and destroyed long before 1307/08. Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... A slighting is the deliberate destruction of a fortification without opposition from its builders or its last users, respectively. ...


In spite of all this, William Tell lives on as a "real" hero in popular culture. He is still a powerful identification figure, and according to a recent survey, 60% of the Swiss believe that he really lived.[citation needed]


A possible historical nucleus of the legend was suggested by Schärer (1986). He identified one Wilhelm Gorkeit of Tellikon (modern Dällikon in the Canton of Zurich). "Gorkeit" is explained as a version of the surname Armbruster (crossbow maker). Historians were not convinced by Schärer's hypothesis, but it is still referred to by the nationalistic right sometimes, denouncing its rejection by academia as an "internationalist" conspiracy.[3] Dällikon (47°26′ N 8°26′ E)is a village in the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland. ... The Swiss canton of Zürich (German: Kanton Zürich) has a population of about 1. ... This article is about the weapon. ...


In modern politics and arts

Antoine-Marin Lemierre in 1766 wrote a play inspired by Tell. The success of this work established the association of Tell as a fighter against tyranny with the history of the French revolution. Antoine-Marin Lemierre (January 12, 1733 _ July 4, 1793), was a French dramatist and poet. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...

Official seal of the Helvetic Republic.
Official seal of the Helvetic Republic.

The French revolutionary fascination with Tell found its reflection back in Switzerland with the establishment of the Helvetic Republic. Tell became, as it were, the mascot of the short-lived republic, his figure being featured in its official seal. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x775, 181 KB) Summary Sceau de la République helvétique. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x775, 181 KB) Summary Sceau de la République helvétique. ... Official seal of the Helvetic Republic (depicting William Tell). ...


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe learned of the Tell saga during his travels through Switzerland between 1775 and 1795. He got hold of a copy of Tschudi's chronicles, and considered writing a play about Tell. Ultimately, he gave the idea to his friend Friedrich von Schiller, who in 1803-04 wrote the play Wilhelm Tell, which had its debut performance on March 17, 1804, in Weimar. Schiller's Tell is heavily inspired by the political events in the late 18th century, the French revolution in particular. Schiller's play was performed at Interlaken (the Tellspiele) in the summers of 1912 to 1914, 1931 to 1939 and every year since 1947. In 2004 it was first performed in Altdorf itself. “Goethe” redirects here. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (November 10, 1759 - May 9, 1805), usually known as Friedrich Schiller, was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and dramatist. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... William Tell, (German: Wilhelm Tell), Friedrich Schillers 1804 eponymous play about the legendary marksman William Tell, plays an important part in the modern history of Europe, dealing with the political question of tyrannicide. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Weimar (disambiguation). ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Interlaken is a municipality in the Canton of Bern in Switzerland. ... For the municipality in the canton of Schaffhausen, see Altdorf, Schaffhausen. ...


Gioacchino Rossini in turn used Schiller's play as the basis for his 1829 opera William Tell; the William Tell Overture is one of his best-known pieces of music, and has become widely reused in popular culture. Portrait Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 – November 13, 1868)[1] was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Guillaume Tell (William Tell) is an opera in four acts by Gioacchino Rossini to a French libretto by Etienne de Jouy and Hippolyte Bis, based on Friedrich Schillers Wilhelm Tell. ... The overture to the opera William Tell, especially its high-energy finale, is a very familiar work composed by Gioacchino Rossini. ...


John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of Abraham Lincoln was inspired by Tell. Lamenting the negative reaction to his deed, Booth wrote in his journal on April 21, 1865, "[W]ith every man's hand against me, I am here in despair. And why; For doing what Brutus was honored for and what made Tell a Hero. And yet I for striking down a greater tyrant than they ever knew am looked upon as a common cutthroat." John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) assassinated Abraham Lincoln the 16th President of the United States at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Marcus Junius Brutus (85 –42 BC), or Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic. ...


Following a national competition, won by the submission of Richard Kissling (1848-1919), Altdorf in 1895 erected the monument to its hero. Kissling casts Tell as a peasant and man of the mountains, with strong features and muscular limbs. His powerful hand rests lovingly on the shoulder of little Walter. The scene does not depict the apple. The depiction is in marked contrast with that used by the Helvetic Republic, where Tell is shown like a landsknecht rather than a peasant, with a sword at his belt and a feathered hat, bending down to pick up his son who is still holding the apple. Landsknecht. ...


The first film dedicated to Tell appeared shortly later, made by French director Charles Pathé in 1900. Only a short fragment survives of this work.[citation needed] Charles Pathé (1863 – December 26, 1957) was a major French pioneer of the film and recording industries. ...


The new design of the Federal 5 francs coin issued from 1922 features the bust of a generic "mountain shepherd" designed by Paul Burkard, but due to a similarity of the bust with Kissling's statue, in spite of the missing beard, it was immediately widely identified as Tell by the population. ISO 4217 Code CHF User(s) Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Campione dItalia Inflation 1. ...


Salvador Dalí painted two pieces of William Tell in 1931, one entitled The Old Age of William Tell and the other William Tell and Gradiva, and in 1933, he painted The Enigma of William Tell. Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Adolf Hitler was enthusiastic about Schiller's play, quoting it in his Mein Kampf, and approving of a German/Swiss co-production of the play where Göring's mistress appeared as Tell's wife. From 1938, however, following the assassination attempt by young Swiss Maurice Bavaud (who was later dubbed a "New William Tell" by Rolf Hochhuth), Hitler had the play banned for its subversive qualities. At a banquet in 1942, Hitler is reported to have exclaimed "Why did Schiller have to immortalize that Swiss sniper!".[citation needed]Max Frisch in his "William Tell for Schools" deconstructed the legend, portraying the bailiff as a well-meaning administrator suffering from being placed in a barbaric back-corner of the empire, while Tell is a simpleton who stumbles into his adventure by a series of misunderstandings.[citation needed] Hitler redirects here. ... Mein Kampf (English translation: My Struggle) is a book by the German-Austrian politician Adolf Hitler, which combines elements of autobiography with an exposition of Hitlers National Socialist political ideology. ... Hermann Göring Hermann Wilhelm Göring (also Goering or Goring in English) (January 12, 1893 – October 15, 1946) was an early member of the Nazi party, founder of the Gestapo, and one of the main perpetrators of Nazi Germany. ... Maurice Bavaud (born 15 January 1916 in Neuchâtel; died 14 May 1941 in Berlin-Plötzensee) in 1938 attempted to assassinate Adolf Hitler. ... Rolf Hochhuth (born April 1, 1931 in Eschwege) is a German author and playwright. ... Max Frisch (May 15, 1911 – April 4, 1991), was a Swiss architect, playwright and novelist, one of the most representative writers of German literature after World War II. In his creative works Frisch paid particular attention to issues relating to problems of personal identity, morality and political commitment. ...


Spanish playwright Alfonso Sastre re-worked the legend in "Guillermo Tell tiene los ojos tristes" (William Tell has sad eyes) in 1955, It was not performed until much later because of censorship by the Franco regime.[citation needed]


Numerous other pictorial and textual references exist, ranging from a black humour cartoon by Gary Larson to album covers (e.g. the National Lampoon's "Greatest Hits" album), song lyrics (e.g. in St. Stephen from the Grateful Dead and many others), movies such as the 1928 Charlie Chaplin film The Circus, and even computer games like that in the Inform Beginner's Guide. Black comedy, also known as black humor, is a subgenre of comedy and satire that deals with serious subjects – death, divorce, drug abuse, et cetera in a humorous manner. ... Gary Larson (b. ... January 1973 cover of National Lampoon National Lampoon was an American humor magazine that began in 1970 as an offshoot of the Harvard Lampoon. ... Aoxomoxoa is the third studio album by the Grateful Dead. ... This article is about the band. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... The Circus is a 1928 silent film which finds Charlie Chaplins Little Tramp character being chased by a policeman at a circus. ... Inform is a programming language and design system for interactive fiction originally created in 1993 by Graham Nelson. ...


Tell City, Perry County, Indiana, USA, is named after William Tell. Tell City is a city in Perry County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Perry County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ...


See also

1550 illustration for the Sempacherbrief of 1393, one of the major alliance contracts of the Old Swiss Confederacy The Old Swiss Confederacy was the precursor of modern-day Switzerland. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b Kaiser, P.: Liberation myths in German, French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland. Version of 2002-05-20. URL last accessed 2006-11-06.
  2. ^ Malleus Maleficarum, part II, question I, chapter XVI
  3. ^ So denounced in a speech held by Rudolf Keller, at the time president of the Swiss Democrats on 1 August 2004 in Basel [1]

The Historical Dictionary of Switzerland is an encyclopedia on the history of Switzerland that aims to take into account the results of modern historical research in a manner accessible to a broader audience. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Swiss Democrats (Schweizer Demokraten, Démocrates Suisses, Democratici Svizzeri) is a controversial right-wing (some say far-right) political party in Switzerland. ...

References

  • Öchsli, W.: Die Anfänge der Schweizerischen Eidgenossenschaft; Zürich, 1891.
  • Schärer, Arnold Claudio, Und es gab Tell doch, Lucerne (1986), ISBN 3-85725-106-9, OCLC 19264018.
  • Salis, J.-R. v.: Ursprung, Gestalt, und Wirkung des schweizerischen Mythos von Tell; Berne, 1973. (In German.)
  • John Fiske, 1877. Myths and Myth-Makers: Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology Ch. 1: (On-line) Quotes Saxo Grammaticus, the ballad of William of Cloudeslee, and instances other independent occurrences.

The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... For other uses, see Berne (disambiguation). ... Saxo, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857 – 1945) Saxo Grammaticus (estimated. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m