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Encyclopedia > William Smith (lexicographer)

Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. He was originally destined for a theological career, but instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes. He was entered at Gray's Inn in 1830, but gave up his legal studies for a post at University College School, and began to write on classical subjects. 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A lexicographer is a person devoted to the study of lexicography, especially an author of a dictionary. ... Enfield is the name of several places around the world including: London Borough of Enfield, England Enfield, London, England a place in that borough Enfield, Australia Enfield, Connecticut, USA Enfield, Maine, USA Enfield, Massachusetts, USA Enfield, Nebraska, USA Enfield, New Hampshire, USA Enfield, New York, USA Enfield, North Carolina, USA... In the United Kingdom and countries having a similar legal system the legal profession is divided into two kinds of lawyers: the solicitors who contact and advise clients, and barristers who argue cases in court. ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... The term university college is used in a number of countries to denote institutions that provide tertiary education but do not have full or independent university status. ... Grays Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in around the Royal Courts of Justice in London, England to which barristers belong and where they are called to the bar. ... University College School entrance, Frognal, Hampstead University College School, known generally as UCS, is a leading Independent boys school in Hampstead in Northwest London. ...


He next turned his attention to lexicography. His first attempt was the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, which appeared in 1842. The greater part of this was written by himself. In 1849 followed the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, and the Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography in 1857. In this work some of the leading scholars of the day were associated with him. In 1850 he published the first of the school dictionaries; and in 1853 he began the Principia series, which marked a distinct step in the school teaching of Greek and Latin. Then came the Students' Manuals of History and Literature, in which the Greek history was the editor's own work. In carrying out this task Smith was most ably seconded by John Murray, the publisher, who, when the original publishers of the dictionaries got into difficulties, volunteered to take a share in the undertaking. The most important, perhaps, of the books edited by William Smith were those that dealt with ecclesiastical subjects. These were the Dictionary of the Bible (1860‑1865); the Dictionary of Christian Antiquities (1875‑1880), undertaken in collaboration with Archdeacon Cheetham; and the Dictionary of Christian Biography (1877‑1887), jointly with Dr. Henry Wace. The Atlas, on which Sir George Grove collaborated, appeared in 1875. From 1853 to 1869 Smith was classical examiner to the University of London, and on his retirement he became a member of the Senate. He sat on the Committee to inquire into questions of copyright, and was for several years registrar of the Royal Literary Fund. He edited Gibbon, with Guizot's and Milman's notes, in 1854‑1855. In 1867 he became editor of the Quarterly Review, which he directed with marked success until his death on the 7th of October 1893, his remarkable memory and accuracy, as well as his tact and courtesy, specially fitting him for such a post. He was D.C.L. of Oxford and Dublin, and the honour of knighthood was conferred on him the year before his death. Title page A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities is single volume encyclopedia in English language first published in 1842. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... John Murray is a British publishing house, renowned for the roster of authors it has published in its history, including Jane Austen, Lord Byron and Charles Darwin. ... This article is about the Christian buildings of worship. ... An archdeacon is a position in Christian churches. ... Very Reverend Henry Wace (December 10, 1836 - January 9, 1924) was the Dean of Canterbury from 1903, edited in and contributed to publications in Christian and Ecclesiastical history. ... Sir George Grove (August 13, 1820 - May 28, 1900) was an English writer on music, immortalised in the title of Groves Dictionary of Music and Musicians. ... Senate House, designed by Charles Holden home to the universitys central administration offices and its library The University of London is a federation of colleges which together constitute one of the worlds largest universities. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Dublins Hapenny Bridge. ...


See also

  • Gymnopédie

The Gymnopédies are three piano compositions by Erik Satie, which were published in Paris from 1888 on. ...

External links


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. Project Gutenberg (PG) was launched by Michael Hart in 1971 in order to provide a library, on what would later become the Internet, of free electronic versions (sometimes called e-texts) of physically existing books. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sir William Smith - LoveToKnow 1911 (413 words)
SIR WILLIAM SMITH (1813-1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents.
In carrying out this task Smith was most ably seconded by John Murray, the publisher, who, when the original publishers of the dictionaries got into difficulties, volunteered to take a share in the undertaking.
From 1853 to 1869 Smith was classical examiner to the University of London, and on his retirement he became a member of the Senate.
William Robertson Smith - Encyclopedia.com (794 words)
William Robertson Smith 1846-94, Scottish biblical scholar and Orientalist.
Where there's a William, you need a third way `If you are called William Smith, a third name tends to relieve the tedium and make up for the Smith bit'
Where there's a William, you need a third way; `If you are called William Smith, a third name tends to relieve the tedium and make up for the Smith bit'.(Comment)
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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