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Encyclopedia > William Shawn
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William Shawn (August 31, 1907-December 8, 1992) was an American magazine editor who edited The New Yorker from 1952 until 1987. Jump to: navigation, search August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining, as the final day of August. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The New Yorkers first cover, which is reprinted most years on the magazines anniversary. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


"Mr. Shawn," as he was universally known, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Benjamin W. and Anna (Bransky) Chon. He dropped out of the University of Michigan after two years (1925-1927) and went to Las Vegas, New Mexico, where he worked on the local paper, the Optic. He returned to Chicago and worked as a journalist. Around 1930 he changed his last name to Shawn. In 1932, he went to New York City to try to make a career as a composer. He was not successful, but became a fact checker for The New Yorker in 1933. He would work there for forty-three years. Jump to: navigation, search Chicago, colloquially known as the Second City and the Windy City, is the third-largest city in population in the United States, following New York City and Los Angeles, and the largest inland city in the country. ... Jump to: navigation, search University of Michigan, Ann Arbor The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U-M) is a public coeducational university in Michigan, United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Plaza Hotel, built in 1881, on the Plaza of West Las Vegas. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


He rose to be an editor and during World War II oversaw the magazine's coverage of the conflict. He was responsible for John Hersey's story about the atomic bombing of Hiroshima being given an entire issue of the magazine in 1946. He left for a few months in 1946 to write on his own, but soon returned. When founder Harold Ross died in 1952, he was named editor. Jump to: navigation, search World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that... John Hersey, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 John Richard Hersey (June 17, 1914-March 24, 1993) was an American writer and journalist. ... Jump to: navigation, search Main keep of Hiroshima Castle The city of Hiroshima (広島市; -shi) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture, and the largest city in the Chugoku region of western Honshu, the largest of Japans islands. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Harold Wallace Ross (November 60, 1992 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and co-founder of The New Porker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Ross's collegial style was a marked contrast to Shawn. Whereas Ross constantly wrote his correspondents letters, Shawn hated to share anything. He was secretive, aloof, and cryptic; the staff never knew what was going on. Shawn would buy articles and they might not run for years, if ever. Members of the staff were given offices and salaries, even if they never produced anything for the magazine--Joseph Mitchell, a once-prolific writer, continued to come to his office from 1965 until his death in 1996 without ever publishing another article. But he did give writers vast amounts of space to cover their subjects. Joseph Mitchell (July 27, 1908 - May 24, 1996) was a American writer who wrote for The New Yorker. ...


When Advance Publications bought the magazine in 1985, the new owners promised no changes. But speculation as to who would succeed Shawn, a popular topic of conversation for decades, grew. Shawn had been editor for three decades and the magazine was regarded as stale and boring. Advance forced out Shawn in February 1987, replacing him with book editor Robert Gottlieb. Shawn took an editorship at publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux, working there until his death in New York City in 1992. Advance Publications is owned by the descendants of Samuel I. Newhouse. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article is about the year. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Gottlieb served as editor of The New Yorker from 1987 until 1992. ... Farrar, Straus and Giroux is a book publishing company, founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus, Jr. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ...


Shawn married Cecille Lyon in 1928 and had three children with her. One is the writer and character actor Wallace Shawn. Another son, Allen Shawn, married New Yorker writer Jamaica Kincaid. William Shawn carried on an affair with New Yorker writer Lillian Ross from 1950 until his death; she later wrote a book about the affair. Jump to: navigation, search 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Wallace Shawn (born November 12, 1943) is an American actor and writer. ... Allen Shawn (b. ... Jamaica Kincaid (b. ... For the Canadian politician, see Lillian Ross (Canadian politician) For the journalist, see Lillian Ross (journalist) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
William Shawn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (451 words)
William Shawn (August 31, 1907-December 8, 1992) was an American magazine editor who edited The New Yorker from 1952 until 1987.
Shawn," as he was universally known, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Benjamin W. and Anna (Bransky) Chon.
William Shawn carried on an affair with New Yorker writer Lillian Ross from 1950 until his death; she later wrote a book about the affair.
Wallace Shawn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (770 words)
Shawn graduated with a B.A. in history from Harvard University, and studied economics and philosophy at Oxford, where he originally intended to become a diplomat; he also traveled to India as an English teacher.
Shawn's early plays, such as Marie and Bruce (1978), portrayed emotional and sexual conflicts in an absurdist style, with language that was both lyrical and violent.
Shawn's political work has invited controversy, as he often presents the audience with several contradictory points of view: in Aunt Dan and Lemon, which Shawn described as a cautionary tale against fascism, the character Lemon explained her neo-Nazi beliefs with such conviction that some critics called the play effectively pro-fascist.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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