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Encyclopedia > William Scranton
Scranton made the cover of Time in 1962
Scranton made the cover of Time in 1962

William Warren Scranton (born July 19, 1917) is a former U.S. Republican Party politician. Scranton served as Governor of Pennsylvania from 1963 to 1967. From 1976 to 1977, he served as United States Ambassador to the United Nations. Image File history File links Timescranton. ... Image File history File links Timescranton. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Notable Time magazine covers from the dates May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a Hamiltonian vision for modernizing the United States. ... Politics, sometimes defined as the art and science of government. ... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... Template:C20YearInnTopic 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the...

Contents


Early life

William Scranton was born in Madison, Connecticut, while the Scranton family was on vacation at a cottage in New Haven County, Connecticut in 1917. He was the son of Worthington Scranton, a wealthy Pennsylvania businessman, and Marion Margery Scranton, a member of the Republican National Committee for over two decades. Despite her own involvement in politics, his mother tried to dissuade him from entering politics, due to his childhood struggles with asthma, believeing that the stress of campaigning would be detrimental to his frail health. Mrs. Scranton died just before her son's election to Congress in 1960. He is the grandson of Joseph A. Scranton, a U.S. Congressman from Pennsylvania. The Scranton family were the founders and patriarchs of the city of Scranton, Pennsylvania. He is also a nephew by marriage of former U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Davis, a confidante of President Abraham Lincoln. His maternal ancestors came to America on the Mayflower. Madison is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut, and it occupies a central location in the Connecticut Shoreline area. ... New Haven County is located in the south central part of the state of Connecticut. ... Bush/Cheney, 2004 Campaign Manager Ken Mehlman is the current Chairman of the RNC. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the United States Republican Party. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Joseph Augustus Scranton (July 26, 1838 – October 12, 1908) was a Republican politician who represented Pennsylvania in the United States House of Representatives from 1881 to 1883, 1885 to 1887, 1889 to 1891, and 1893 to 1897. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... A sign welcoming people to Scranton, as seen from the Scranton Central Expressway. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... David Davis III (March 9, 1815 - June 26, 1886) was a United States Senator from Illinois and associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall (1882) The Mayflower was the ship which transported the Pilgrims from Plymouth, England to North Virginia (which later became part of the United States of America) in 1620, leaving Plymouth on September 6 and dropping anchor near Cape Cod on November 11 (both...


Education and World War II Service

He began his education at the Scranton Country Day School, which had been founded by his parents, completing his basic schooling at the Fessenden School in Newton, Massachusetts, and attended the prestigious Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut. He graduated from Yale University in 1939. While at Yale, he was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity, where he became friends with another fraternity brother from Delta Kappa Epsilon, future U.S. President Gerald Ford. He attended Yale Law School from 1939 to 1941, dropping out in advance of World War II, enlisting in the United States Army Air Corps and serving as an Air Transport Command pilot during the war. Although he did not serve in combat, he was assigned to aircraft mobilization and pilot training duties, and was stationed on three different continents during his tour of duty, including South America, Africa, and Asia. On July 6, 1942, he married Mary Lowe Chamberlain. The couple had four children, a daughter and three sons, Susan, William Worthington, Joseph Curtis, and Peter Kip. He was honorably discharged from military as a captain, but was active in the U.S. Air Force Reserves for two decades thereafter. Following the war, he resumed his studies at Yale Law School. He graduated in 1946, and was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar in August of that year. The Fessenden School is a private day and boarding school for boys founded in 1903 by Fredrick Fessenden. ... Nickname: The Garden City Official website: www. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... Lakeville, Connecticut is a village in Salisbury in Litchfield County, Connecticut, on Lake Wononskopomuc. ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... On May 20, 1841, 10 students at Union College created the fraternity with emphasis on the fraternal and social principles of a brotherhood, rather than the literary characteristics of the 7 existing societies starting with the formation of Phi Beta Kappa at William & Mary. ... A fraternity or brotherhood, also called by the German terms Männerbund or Brüderschaft, is an all-male human peer group, often bound together by oaths, codes of honour (see warrior code), initiation rites, mysticism or secrecy. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D K E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Yale Law School, established in 1843 in New Haven, Connecticut, is a division of Yale University. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... Combatants Allies: Poland, British Commonwealth, France/Free France, Soviet Union, United States, China, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, and others Casualties Military dead:17 million Civilian dead:33 million Total dead:50 million Military dead:8 million Civilian dead:4 million Total dead:12 million World War II... 1. ... Combat, or fighting, is purposeful conflict between one or more persons, often involving violence and intended to establish dominance over the opposition. ... The word pilot has several meanings: In aviation, a pilot, also known as an aviator, is someone who flies an aircraft. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second-most populous continent, after Asia. ... Asia is the largest and most populous region or continent depending on the definition. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ...


Early career

Scranton practiced law and then entered the business community after the war becoming successful in several firms in northeastern Pennsylvania. He became active in Republican Party politics in the 1950s and came to the attention of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. In 1959, Eisenhower appointed Scranton as a special assistant to U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and later Christian Herter. Scranton served a little over a year before resigning to run for Congress. Scranton’s name recognition and family connections helped him win a 17,000 vote victory over incumbent Stanley A. Prokop in a largely Democratic district in 1960. Scranton represented Pennsylvania's 10th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1961 to 1963. Though a freshman Republican, he quickly gained a reputation as an outspoken centrist and supported much of President John F. Kennedy’s social agenda including civil rights and the Peace Corps. The media quickly dubbed him a “Kennedy Republican”. // Events and trends This map shows two essential global spheres during the Cold War in 1959. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969, popularly known as Ike) was an American soldier and politician. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles (February 2, 1888 – May 24, 1959) was an American statesman who served as Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Christian Herter For Christian Herter, 19th-century New York decorator, see Herter Brothers. ... // In politics The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... Stanley A. Propkop (July 29, 1909 – November 11, 1977) was a Democratic U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania from 1959 to 1961. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other one being the Republican Party. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Template:C20YearInnTopic 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who holds an intermediate position between two extreme or radical viewpoints. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... Peace Corps volunteers usually serve for two years. ...


1962 Election

In 1962, the Republican party in Pennsylvania, which had lost the two previous gubernatorial elections and seen the state's electoral votes go to Kennedy in the 1960 presidential election, became convinced that a moderate like Scranton would have enough bipartisan appeal to revitalize the party. He ran for Governor of Pennsylvania against Richardson Dilworth, the mayor of Philadelphia. The ticket was balanced by having Raymond P. Shafer, who would succeed him as governor, as his running mate. After one of the most acrimonious campaigns in state history, the Scranton/Shafer team won a landslide victory in the election besting their opponents by nearly half a million votes out of just over than 6.6 million cast. 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Born 1898. ... List of mayors of Philadelphia, arranged chronologically. ... Raymond Philip Shafer (b. ... A running mate is a person running for a subordinate position on a joint ticket during an election. ...


Governor of Pennsylvania

As Governor, he signed into law sweeping reforms in the state's education system including creation of the state community college system, the state board of education, and the state Higher Education Assistance Agency. Furthermore, he created a program designed to promote the state in national and international markets and to increase the attractiveness of the state's prouducts and services.


1964 Presidential Election

Although he did not actively seek the 1964 Republican nomination for President of the United States in the beginning, a “Draft Scranton” movement quickly gathered momentum among moderate Republicans who saw him as an alternative to ultraconservative front-runner Senator Barry Goldwater. Early in the campaign, he announced that he would be willing to accept the nomination for Vice President. Scranton first declined to enter the race but later threw his hat into the ring on June 12, 1964. Scranton won the support of ten state delegations, but Goldwater went on to win the nomination on the first ballot. RNC Chairman William E. Miller was nominated for Vice President. For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a United States politician and a founding figure in the modern conservative movement in the USA and a major inspiration for many of his youthful followers to join the libertarian movement. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... William Edward Miller (March 22, 1914 – June 24, 1983), was an American politician. ...


Later career

Under the then-existing Pennsylvania law, Scranton was limited to a single term and could not run for reelection in 1966. That same year, he announced that he would never again seek elected office. After his term in office, Scranton attended the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention of 1967-1968 and helped write a new constitution for the state, which included a provision allowing future governors to seek a second term. In 1968, President-elect Richard Nixon asked Scranton to become Secretary of State, but he declined. He did serve as a special envoy to the Middle East but in this capacity he made several remarks and recommendations which some in the American Jewish community regarded as antisemitic and Nixon quickly distanced himself from the former governor. In accordance with his 1966 pledge never to seek elected office, he rebuffed a draft movement encouraging him to run for the U.S. Senate. After the Kent State shootings in 1970 Scranton was asked to chair the Commission on Student Unrest to investigate this and other incidents of campus violence. The committee’s conclusions came to be known as the “Scranton Report”. Following Nixon's resignation from the Presidency in 1974, he was appointed as a transition team member for incoming President Gerald Ford. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Jews (Hebrew: יהודים, Yehudim) are followers of Judaism or, more generally, members of the Jewish people (also known as the Jewish nation, or the Children of Israel), an ethno-religious group descended from the ancient Israelites and converts who joined their religion. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Mary Ann Vecchio kneels over the body of Jeffrey Miller The Kent State shootings, also known as May 4 or the Kent State massacre, occurred at Kent State University in the city of Kent, Ohio, and involved the shooting of students by the Ohio National Guard on Monday, May 4... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


Scranton reentered the business world and served on the boards of several high profile American corporations such as A&P, IBM, The New York Times, Pan American Airways, and the H.J. Heinz Company and was president of Northeastern National Bank and Trust Company. He has also been associated with the Trilateral Commission, the Council on Foreign Relations, and was a trustee of Yale University, his alma mater. A&P redirects here. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue; NYSE: IBM) is a computer technology firm headquartered in Armonk, NY, USA. The company, which was founded in 1888 and incorporated June 15, 1911, manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, infrastructure services, hosting services, and consulting services. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. ... Pan American World Airways, commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal international airline of the United States from the 1930s until its collapse in 1991. ... H. J. Heinz Company, commonly known as just Heinz, famous for its 57 Varieties slogan, was founded in 1869 by Henry John Heinz in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. ... The Trilateral Commission is a private organization, founded in 1973 at the initiative of the heads of the Council of Foreign Relations and of the Bilderberg Group, among them David Rockefeller, Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is a think tank which describes itself as dedicated to increasing Americas understanding of the world and contributing ideas to U.S. foreign policy. ... Alma mater is Latin for El Sahddai. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the Father God, and in Medieval Christianity for the Holy Emmanuel. ...


In 1976, Scranton was chosen by President Ford to become United States Ambassador to the United Nations. His measured approach to diplomacy and genuine interest in human rights earned him much respect in his short time in office. Some in the Republican Party pushed for Scranton to be named Ford’s running mate for the 1976 presidential election, but Ford chose Senator Robert Dole of Kansas instead. After his term as U.N. Ambassador, Scranton retired to his home in Dalton, Pennsylvania. 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... United Nations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The United Nations, with its headquarters in New York City, is the largest international diplomatic organization. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Bob Dole Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) is best known as a former Republican United States Senate Majority Leader and Senator from Kansas. ... Official language(s) None Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 15th 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² 211 mi; 340 km 400 mi; 645 km 0. ... Dalton is a borough located in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, USA. As of the 2000 census, the borough had a total population of 1,294. ...


Scranton's son, William Scranton, III served as Pennsylvania's Lieutenant Governor under Richard Thornburgh. He ran unsuccessfully for governor in 1986 and was for a while considered a leading candidate for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in 2006, but has since dropped out of the race. William Worthington Scranton, III (born July 20, 1947 in Scranton, Pennsylvania) served as the Republican lieutenant governor of the state of Pennsylvania from 1979 to 1987 in the administration of Governor Richard Thornburgh. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Categories: People stubs | 1932 births | U.S. Attorneys General | Governors of Pennsylvania ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Preceded by:
David Leo Lawrence
Governor of Pennsylvania
1963–1967
Succeeded by:
Raymond Philip Shafer
Preceded by:
Daniel Patrick Moynihan
United States Ambassador to the United Nations
1976–1977
Succeeded by:
Andrew Young


David Leo Lawrence (June 18, 1889–November 21, 1966), served as the Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania from 1959 to 1963. ... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... Raymond Philip Shafer (b. ... Daniel Patrick Moynihan Daniel Patrick Pat Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a U.S. Senator, ambassador, and academic. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Andrew Young in 1977 Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. ...

Governors of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State Flag
Mifflin | McKean | Snyder | Findlay | Hiester | Shulze | Wolf | Ritner | Porter | Shunk | Johnston | Bigler | Pollock | Packer | Curtin | Geary | Hartranft | Hoyt | Pattison | Hastings | Stone | Pennypacker | Stuart | Tener | Brumbaugh | Sproul | Pinchot | Fisher | Pinchot | Earle | James | Martin | Bell | Duff | Fine | Leader | Lawrence | Scranton | Shafer | Shapp | Thornburgh | Casey | Ridge | Schweiker | Rendell
United States Ambassadors to the United Nations U.N. Flag
Stettinius | Johnson | Austin | Lodge | Wadsworth | Stevenson | Goldberg | Ball | Wiggins | Yost | Bush | Scali | Moynihan | Scranton | Young | McHenry | Kirkpatrick | Walters | Pickering | Perkins | Albright | Richardson | Burleigh | Holbrooke | Cunningham | Negroponte | Danforth | Patterson | Bolton

This is a list of Governors of Pennsylvania. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Clinton County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Pennsylvania Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Lancaster, Pennsylvania Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Bedford County, Pennsylvania York County, Pennsylvania Wyoming County, Pennsylvania Westmoreland County... Thomas Mifflin , John Singleton Copley, 1773. ... Thomas McKean Thomas McKean (March 19, 1734–June 24, 1817) was the second President of the United States in Congress assembled, from July 10, 1781, until November 4, 1781. ... Missing image Simon Snyder Simon Snyder Simon Snyder (5 November 1759 - 9 November 1819) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1808 to 1817. ... Categories: People stubs | 1768 births | 1846 deaths | Governors of Pennsylvania | United States Senators ... Joseph Hiester Joseph Hiester (18 November 1752 - 10 June 1832) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1820 to 1823. ... John Andrew Shulze John Andrew Shulze (July 19, 1774 - November 18, 1852) A Pennsylvania political leader and sixth Governor of Pennsylvania. ... George Wolf (12 August 1777 - 11 March 1840) was the governor of Pennsylvania from 1829 to 1835. ... Categories: Stub | 1780 births | 1869 deaths | Governors of Pennsylvania ... Categories: 1788 births | 1867 deaths | Governors of Pennsylvania | People stubs ... Categories: People stubs | Governors of Pennsylvania ... William Freame Johnston (29 November 1808 - 25 October 1872) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1848 to 1852. ... William Bigler (January 11, 1814 – August 9, 1880) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1852 to 1855, and later a U.S. Senator. ... James Pollock (10 September 1811 - 19 April 1890) was the governor of Pennsylvania from 1855 to 1858. ... Categories: People stubs | 1807 births | 1870 deaths | Governors of Pennsylvania ... Andrew Gregg Curtin (April 22, 1817 – October 7, 1894) was a U.S. lawyer and politician who served as Governor of Pennsylvania during the American Civil War. ... John White Geary in the Civil War John White Geary (December 30, 1819 – February 8, 1873) was a lawyer, politician (mayor of San Francisco, governor of the Kansas Territory, and governor of Pennsylvania), and Union general in the American Civil War. ... Categories: People stubs | 1830 births | 1889 deaths | American Civil War people | Medal of Honor recipients | Governors of Pennsylvania ... Henry Martyn Hoyt (8 June 1830 - 1 December 1892) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1879 to 1883. ... Categories: People stubs | 1850 births | 1904 deaths | Governors of Pennsylvania ... Daniel Hartman Hastings (26 February 1849 - 9 January 1903) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1895 to 1899. ... Missing image William Alexis Stone William Alexis Stone William Alexis Stone (18 April 1846 - 1 March 1820) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1899 to 1903. ... Samuel Whitaker Pennypacker (9 April 1843 - 1 September 1916) was governor of Pennsylvania from 1903 to 1907. ... Edwin Sydney Stuart (1853–1937) was an American politician who served as the governor of Pennsylvania from 1907 to 1911. ... John Kinley Tener (July 25, 1863 – May 19, 1946) was an Irish-American politician who served as the governor of Pennsylvania from 1911 to 1915. ... William Cameron Sproul (September 16, 1870–March 21, 1928) was Governor of Pennsylvania 1919 to 1923. ... Gifford Pinchot (August 11, 1865 – October 4, 1946) was the first Chief of the United States Forest Service (1905-1910) and the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania (1923-1927, 1931-1935). ... Gifford Pinchot (August 11, 1865 – October 4, 1946) was the first Chief of the United States Forest Service (1905-1910) and the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania (1923-1927, 1931-1935). ... George Howard Earle III (1890–1974) was an American politician. ... Arthur Horace James (July 14, 1883–April 27, 1973) was an American politician. ... Edward Martin (September 18, 1879–March 19, 1967) was an American lawyer and Republican party politician from Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. ... John Cromwell Bell, Jr. ... James Henderson Duff (January 21, 1883–December 20, 1969) was an American lawyer and politician in the mid-20th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... George M. Leader (b. ... David Leo Lawrence (June 18, 1889–November 21, 1966), served as the Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania from 1959 to 1963. ... Raymond Philip Shafer (b. ... Gov. ... Richard Dick Thornburgh Richard L. Dick Thornburgh (born July 16, 1932) is a lawyer and Republican politician who served as the Governor of Pennsylvania from 1979 to 1987, and then as the U.S. Attorney General from 1988 to 1991. ... Robert P. Casey Robert Patrick Casey, Sr. ... Tom Ridge Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 26, 1906) is a U.S. political figure who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives (1983–1995), Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of... Mark S. Schweiker Mark Steven Schweiker (born January 31, 1953) was the governor of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania from 2001 to 2003. ... Edward Gene Rendell (born January 5, 1944) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. ... Herschel Johnson may refer to Herschel Vespasian Johnson, a United States governor. ... Warren Robinson Austin (November 12, 1877–December 25, 1962) was an American politician and statesman; among other roles, he served as Senator from Vermont. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... James Jeremiah Wadsworth (often called Jerry Wadsworth) (born 1905) was a U.S. diplomat. ... Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... Arthur Goldberg Arthur Joseph Goldberg (August 8, 1908 – January 19, 1990) was an American statesman and jurist who served as the U.S. Secretary of Labor, Supreme Court Justice, and Ambassador to the United Nations. ... George Wildman Ball (1909 - 1994) was born in Des Moines, Iowa. ... James Russell Wiggins (December 4, 1903 in Luverne, Minnesota – November 19, 2000 in Brooklin, Maine) was the managing editor of The Washington Post from 1947 to 1966 and the United States ambassador to the United Nations from 1968 to 1969 during the Lyndon Johnson presidency. ... Charles W. Yost (born in Watertown, NY in 1907 – died in Washington, DC in 1981), educated at Hotchkiss School and Princeton University, was a Career U.S. Ambassador and ambassador to the United Nations from 1967 to 1971. ... George Herbert Walker Bush, GCB, (born June 12, 1924 in Milton, MA) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... John A. Scali (US Ambassador to the United Nations) ... Daniel Patrick Moynihan Daniel Patrick Pat Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a U.S. Senator, ambassador, and academic. ... Andrew Young in 1977 Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. ... Donald F. McHenry (October 13, 1936 (unconfirmed)-- ) was the Ambassador and U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations from September 1979 until January 20, 1981. ... Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (born November 19, 1926) is an American conservative political scientist and member of the neoconservative movement. ... Vernon A. Walters (January 3, 1917 - February 10, 2002) was a U.S. Army officer and a diplomat. ... Thomas Reeve Tom Pickering (born November 5, 1931), is a retired U.S. diplomat. ... Edward J. Perkins (born 1928), U.S. diplomat, U.S. ambassador to United Nations 1992-1993. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born May 15, 1937 in Prague) served as the 64th United States Secretary of State. ... William Blaine Bill Richardson (born November 15, 1947) is an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Richard Charles Albert Holbrooke (born April 24, 1941) has had a varied career as a professional American diplomat, magazine editor, author, Peace Corps director, and investment banker. ... John D. Negroponte John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939) (IPA ) is a career diplomat currently serving as Director of National Intelligence for the United States. ... John Danforth John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936), also referred to as Jack Danforth, is a former United States Ambassador to the United Nations and former Republican United States Senator from Missouri. ... Anne W. Patterson (born 1949 in Fort Smith, Arkansas), was the acting United States Ambassador to the United Nations in 2005. ... John R. Bolton John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948) is an American political figure and diplomat, serving currently as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. ...

External link

  • Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission Biography

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Scranton at AllExperts (1311 words)
Scranton served as Governor of Pennsylvania from 1963 to 1967.
William Scranton was born while the Scranton family was on vacation at a cottage in Madison, Connecticut.
Scranton represented Pennsylvania's 10th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1961 to 1963.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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