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Encyclopedia > William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne
The Earl of Shelburne
Period in Office: 4 July 17822 April 1783
Predecessor: The Marquess of Rockingham
Successor: The Duke of Portland
Date of Birth: 2 May 1737
Place of Birth: Dublin, Ireland
Date of Death: 7 May 1805
Place of Death: Berkerly Square, London
Political Party: Whig

William Petty Fitzmaurice, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne (2 May 17377 May 1805), also known as the Earl of Shelburne (1761–1784), was a British statesman. He was born in Dublin, Ireland. July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British politician, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, (April 14, 1738 - October 30, 1809) was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... Dublins Hapenny Bridge. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... This article is about the British Whig party. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Dublins Hapenny Bridge. ...


William Petty was a descendant of the Lords of Kerry (dating from 1181), and his grandfather Thomas Fitzmaurice, who was created Earl of Kerry (1723), married the daughter of Sir William Petty. On the death without issue of Sir William Petty’s sons, the first Earls of Shelburne, the estates passed to his nephew John Fitzmaurice (advanced in 1753 to the earldom of Shelburne), who in 1751 took the additional name of Petty. ... The title Earl of Kerry was created in 1723 for Thomas Fitzmaurice, the holder of the ancient Irish barony of Kerry, which was created in the thirteenth century. ... The title of Marquess of Lansdowne was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1784 for William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne, the former Prime Minister. ...


John's son William spent his childhood "in the remotest parts of the south of Ireland," and, according to his own account, when he entered Christ Church, Oxford, in 1755, he had "both everything to learn and everything to unlearn." From a tutor whom he describes as "narrow-minded" he received advantageous guidance in his studies, but he attributes his improvement in manners and in knowledge of the world chiefly to the fact that, as was his "fate through life," he fell in "with clever but unpopular connexions." Christ Church, Oxford - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Shortly after leaving the university he served in Wolfe’s regiment during the Seven Years War, and so distinguished himself at Minden and Kioster-Kampen that he was raised to the rank of colonel and appointed aide-de-camp to the King (1760). Being thus brought into near communication with Lord Bute, he was in 1761 employed by that nobleman to negotiate for the support of Lord Holland. He was returned to the House of Commons as member for Wycombe, but in 1761 he succeeded his father as Earl of Shelburne in the Irish peerage, and Baron Wycombe in the peerage of Great Britain (created 1760). Though he declined to take office under Bute he undertook negotiations to induce Charles James Fox to gain the consent of the Commons to the peace of 1763. Fox affirmed that he had been duped, and, although Shelburne always asserted that he had acted in thorough good faith, Bute spoke of the affair as a "pious fraud." The Death of General Wolfe by Benjamin West. ... This article is about the 1756–1763 war. ... The Battle of Minden was a battle fought on August 1, 1759 during the Seven Years War. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Colonel Colonel is a military rank, usually the highest below general grades, and just above Lieutenant Colonel. ... An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. ... John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute (May 25, 1713 - March 10, 1792), was a Scottish nobleman who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain (1762-1763) under George III. He had previously served as tutor to George, who was then the Prince of Wales. ... Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, (28 September 1705-1 July 1774) was an English statesman. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... The Peerage of Ireland is the term used for those peers created by British monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland. ... The Peerage of Great Britain comprises all extant peerages created in the Kingdom of Great Britain after the Act of Union 1707 but before the Act of Union 1800. ... The Right Honourable Charles James Fox (January 24, 1749 - September 13, 1806) was an English politician. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Shelburne joined the Grenville ministry in 1763 as President of the Board of Trade, but, failing in his efforts to include Pitt in the cabinet, he in a few months resigned office. Having moreover on account of his support of Pitt on the question of Wilkes’s expulsion from the House of Commons incurred the displeasure of the King, he retired for a time to his estate. After Pitt’s return to power in 1766 he became Secretary of State for the Southern Department, but during Pitt’s illness his conciliatory policy towards America was completely thwarted by his colleagues and the King, and in 1768 he was dismissed from office. George Grenville (October 14, 1712—November 13, 1770) was a British Whig statesman who served in government for the relatively short period of nine years (reaching the position of Prime Minister of Great Britain); Sir Robert Walpole served as Prime Minister alone for twenty-one years, for example. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708–11 May 1778) was a British statesman who achieved his greatest fame as war minister during the Seven Years War and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... Statue of John Wilkes (Fetter Lane London) John Wilkes (October 17, 1727 – December 26, 1797) was an English radical, journalist and politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1782 he consented to take office under the Marquess of Rockingham on condition that the King would recognize the United States. On the death of Lord Rockingham in the same year he became premier; but the secession of Fox and his supporters led to the famous coalition of Fox with North, which caused his resignation in the following April, his fall being perhaps hastened by his plans for the reform of the public service. He had also in contemplation a bill to promote free commercial intercourse between England and the United States. When Pitt acceded to office in 1784, Shelburne, instead of receiving a place in the cabinet, was created Marquess of Lansdowne. Though giving a general support to the policy of Pitt, he from this time ceased to take an active part in public affairs. 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British politician, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ...


He was twice married, first to Lady Sophia (1745—1771), daughter of John Carteret, 1st Earl Granville, through whom he obtained the Lansdowne estates near Bath, and secondly to Lady Louisa (1755—1789), daughter of John Fitzpatrick, 1st Earl of Upper Ossory. John Henry Petty Fitzmaurice (1765—1809), his son by the first marriage, succeeded as 2nd Marquess, after having sat in the House of Commons for twenty years as member for Chipping Wycombe. John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville (April 22, 1690 - January 22, 1763), English statesman, commonly known by his earlier title as Lord Carteret, was the son of George Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1667 - 1695), by his marriage with Grace Granville (September 3, 1654 - October 18, 1744), daughter of Sir John Granville... Palladian Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Bath is a city in south-west England, most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... John Fitzpatrick, 1st Earl of Upper Ossory, in County Cork Ireland Decended from Barnaby FITZPATRICK 1st B. Upper Ossory, who took an oath of allegiance to King Henry VIII on October 8, 1537. ...


He died on the 7th of May, 1805. During his lifetime he was blamed for insincerity and duplicity, and he incurred the deepest unpopularity, but the accusations came chiefly from those who were dissatisfied with his preference of principles to party, and if he had had a more unscrupulous regard to his personal ambition, his career as a statesman would have had more outward success. He was cynical in his estimates of character, but no statesman of his time possessed more enlightened political views, while his friendship with those of his contemporaries eminent in science and literature must be allowed considerable weight in qualifying our estimate of the moral defects with which he has been credited. 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Lord Shelburne's Government, July 1782 - April 1783

The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Edward Thurlow, 1st Baron Thurlow (9 December 1731 - 12 September 1806), Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, was born at Bracon Ash, in the county of Norfolk. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden (1714-18 April 1794), Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, was a leading proponent of civil liberties in eighteenth century England. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as Presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton (October 1, 1735 - March 14, 1811), was a British politician of the Georgian era. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney (24 February 1732 - 30 June 1800), the British politician after whom the city of Sydney, Australia, is named, was born at Frognal House, near Chislehurst in Kent. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... Thomas boob, 2nd Baron pop (1738-1786), British politician and statesman, was the son of Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Augustus Keppel, 1st Viscount Keppel (25 April 1725 - 2 October 1786), was a British admiral who held sea commands during the Seven Years War and the War of American Independence. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, or just the Commander-in-Chief (C-in-C), was the professional head of the British Army from 1672 until 1904, when the office was replaced by the Chief of the General Staff, soon to become Chief of the Imperial General Staff. ... Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1733 - December 1806), was one of the most remarkable men of the 18th century, being chiefly famous for his advanced views on the question of parliamentary reform. ... The Master-General of the Ordnance (MGO) was an important British military position before 1855, when its duties were largely abolished. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759–23 January 1806) was a British politician during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ... John Dunning, 1st Baron Ashburton (1731 - 1783) was an English jurist and politician. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ...

See also

  • Landsdowne portrait


Preceded by:
Charles Townshend
First Lord of Trade
1763
Succeeded by:
The Earl of Hillsborough
Preceded by:
The Duke of Richmond
Secretary of State for the Southern Department
1766–1768
Succeeded by:
The Viscount Weymouth
Preceded by:
Secretary of State for the Home Department
1782
Succeeded by:
Thomas Townshend
Preceded by:
The Marquess of Rockingham
Prime Minister
1782–1783
Succeeded by:
The Duke of Portland
Leader of the House of Lords
1782–1783


This page is on the former Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire (30 May 1718 - 7 October 1793), was a British politician of the Georgian era. ... Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1733 - December 1806), was one of the most remarkable men of the 18th century, being chiefly famous for his advanced views on the question of parliamentary reform. ... The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. ... Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth (1734-1796), English politician, was the elder son of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth (1710—1751), and the great-grandnephew of Thomas Thynne (c. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney (24 February 1732 - 30 June 1800), the British politician after whom the city of Sydney, Australia, is named, was born at Frognal House, near Chislehurst in Kent. ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British politician, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, (April 14, 1738 - October 30, 1809) was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ...



Preceded by:
New Creation
Marquess of Lansdowne
Succeeded by:
Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice
Preceded by:
John Petty
Earl of Shelburne


The title of Marquess of Lansdowne was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1784 for William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne, the former Prime Minister. ... The title of Marquess of Lansdowne was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1784 for William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne, the former Prime Minister. ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/William Petty (3642 words)
William Petty was born in Romsey on the 26th of May 1623 to a family of middle income, his father being a Hampshire clothier, as was his grandfather.
Petty counted among his many scientific interests naval architecture: he had become convinced of the superiority of double-hulled boats, although they were not always successful; the Experiment reached Porto on 1664, but sank on the way back.
Petty thus carved a niche for himself as the first dedicated economic scientist, amidst the merchant-pamphleteers, such as Thomas Mun or Josiah Child, and philosopher-scientists occasionally discussing economics, such as Locke.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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