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Encyclopedia > William P. Fessenden
William Pitt Fessenden
William P. Fessenden

In office
July 5, 1864 – March 3, 1865
Preceded by Salmon P. Chase
Succeeded by Hugh McCulloch

Born October 16, 1806
Boscawen, New Hampshire, USA
Died September 8, 1869
USA
Political party Whig, Opposition, Republican
Profession Politician, Lawyer

William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1146x1500, 806 KB)TITLE: Hon. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Boscawen is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... The Opposition Party represented a brief but significant transitional period in American politics from approximately 1854 to 1858. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities referred to... Official language(s) None (English de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ...


Fessenden was a Whig (later a Republican) and member of the Fessenden political family. He served in the United States House of Representatives and Senate before becoming Secretary of the Treasury under President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... During its history, the United States has seen many families who have repeatedly produced notable politicians from their ranks, and these historic U.S. political families have had a significant impact on politics in the United States. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...

The Running MachineAn 1864 cartoon featuring Fessenden, Edwin Stanton, Abraham Lincoln, William Seward and Gideon Welles takes a swing at the Lincoln administration.
The Running Machine
An 1864 cartoon featuring Fessenden, Edwin Stanton, Abraham Lincoln, William Seward and Gideon Welles takes a swing at the Lincoln administration.

Fessenden was born in Boscawen, New Hampshire. He graduated from Bowdoin College and became a lawyer, practicing with his father Samuel Fessenden, who was also a prominent anti-slavery activist. He was a founding member of the Maine Temperance Society in 1827.[1] He served four non-consecutive terms in the Maine House of Representatives, and he was elected for one term in the United States House of Representatives. He was elected in 1854, with the support of Whigs and Anti-Slavery Democrats, to the U.S. Senate. Upon taking office, he immediately began speaking against the Kansas-Nebraska Act and participated in the organization of the United States Republican Party, being re-elected to the Senate from that group in 1860. Image File history File links RunningtheMachine-LincAdmin. ... Image File history File links RunningtheMachine-LincAdmin. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Edwin McMasters Stanton (December 19, 1814 – December 24, 1869), was an American lawyer, politician, United States Attorney General in 1860-61 and Secretary of War through most of the American Civil War and Reconstruction era. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... Gideon Welles (July 1, 1802–February 11, 1878) was the United States Secretary of the Navy from 1861 to 1869, including the entire duration of the American Civil War: his dedication to naval blockades was one of the key reasons for the Norths victory over the South. ... Boscawen is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... Bowdoin College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1794, located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Samuel Fessenden was an American abolitionist, state legislator and father of U.S. Treasury Secretary William Pitt Fessenden. ... The debating chamber of the Maine House of Representatives inside the State House The Maine House of Representatives is the lower house of the Maine Legislature. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... This 1854 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


President Abraham Lincoln appointed Fessenden United States Secretary of the Treasury upon Salmon P. Chase's leave to become Chief Justice. He served from July 5, 1864 until March 3, 1865, when he resigned to take a seat in the senate again. The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


He served as chairman of the Finance Committee during the 37th through 39th Congresses, which led to his Cabinet appointment. He also served as a chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds during the 40th Congress, the Appropriations Committee during the 41st Congress and the U.S. Senate Committee on the Library, also during the 41st Congress. The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... United States Capitol // The Thirty-seventh United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... Dates of Sessions 1865-1867 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 4, 1865 to July 28, 1866. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds was a committee of the United States Senate from 1883 until 1946. ... // Dates of Sessions 1867-1869 First session: March 4, 1867 - December 1, 1867 Second session: Washington, DC from December 2, 1867 - November 10, 1868 Third (lame duck) session: December 7, 1868 - March 3, 1869 In addition, the Senate was called into special session by President Andrew Johnson and met from... U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... Dates of Sessions 1869-1871 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from March 4, 1869 to April 10, 1869. ... The Joint Committee on the Library is a joint committee of the U.S. Congress devoted to the affairs and administration of the U.S. Library of Congress, which is both the private library of the federal legislature and Americas national library. ...


Following the close of the Civil War, which he helped finance on the Union side in cooperation with Lincoln, his predecessor Salmon P. Chase and members of the Congress, he was considered a moderate, rather than Radical, Republican. Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ...


He died in 1869 and was interned at Evergreen Cemetery in Portland, Maine. 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Evergreen Cemetery is a cemetery in Portland, Maine. ... Nickname: The Forest City Country United States State Maine County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Mayor Nicholas Mavodones, Jr Area    - City 136. ...


Two of his brothers, Samuel C. Fessenden and T.A.D. Fessenden, were also Congressmen. He had three sons who served in the American Civil War: Samuel Fessenden, killed at the Second Battle of Bull Run, and Brigadier-General James D. Fessenden and Major-General Francis Fessenden, the latter of whom wrote a two-volume biography of his father which was published in 1907. Samuel Clement Fessenden (March 7, 1815–April 18, 1882) was a United States Congressman and brother of Treasury Secretary William Pitt Fessenden and congressman T. A. D. Fessenden. ... Thomas Amory Deblois Fessenden, (January 23, 1826–September 28, 1868) was a U.S. Representative from Maine and brother of Treasury Secretary William Pitt Fessenden. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders John Pope Robert E. Lee James Longstreet Stonewall Jackson Strength 63,000 54,000 Casualties 1,747 killed 8,452 wounded 4,263 captured/missing 1,553 killed 7,812 wounded 109 captured/missing The Second Battle of Bull Run...


Sources

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

Preceded by
Albert Smith
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maine's 2nd congressional district

March 4, 1841March 3, 1843
Succeeded by
Robert P. Dunlap
Preceded by
James W. Bradbury
United States Senator (Class 2) from Maine
March 4, 1853July 1, 1864
Served alongside: Hannibal Hamlin, Amos Nourse and Lot M. Morrill
Succeeded by
Nathan A. Farwell
Preceded by
Salmon P. Chase
United States Secretary of the Treasury
July 5, 1864March 3, 1865
Succeeded by
Hugh McCulloch
Preceded by
Nathan A. Farwell
United States Senator (Class 2) from Maine
March 4, 1865September 8, 1869
Served alongside: Lot M. Morrill and Hannibal Hamlin
Succeeded by
Lot M. Morrill

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Tom Allen - Website - Maine 1st Michael Michaud - Website - Maine 2nd[1] Notes ^ House of Representatives List of Members Category: ... Maine congressional districts since 2003 Maines second congressional district is the larger of Maines two congressional districts, covering most of the state. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... James Ware Bradbury (June 10, 1802–January 6, 1901) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809 – July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... Nathan Allen Farwell (February 24, 1812 – December 9, 1893) was a politician, businessman and United States Senator from Maine. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... Nathan Allen Farwell (February 24, 1812 – December 9, 1893) was a politician, businessman and United States Senator from Maine. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809 – July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Seal of the United States Department of the Treasury. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 — July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and founder of the Federalist party. ... Oliver Wolcott Jr. ... Samuel Dexter (May 14, 1761–May 4, 1816) was an early American statesman who served both in Congress and in the Presidential Cabinet. ... Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761 – August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American ethnologist, linguist, politician, diplomat, Congressman, and the longest-serving United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... George W. Campbell George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769–February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. ... Dallas, as portrayed in an 1881 copy of a Gilbert Stuart painting Alexander James Dallas (June 21, 1759 – January 16, 1817) was an American statesman who served as the U.S. Treasury Secretary under President James Madison. ... Portrait of U.S. politician William H. Crawford William Harris Crawford (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician during the early 19th century. ... Wikipedia also has an entry for Richard Rush (director) Richard Rush Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Samuel Delucenna Ingham (September 16, 1779–June 5, 1860) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Andrew Jackson. ... Louis McLane Louis McLane (May 28, 1786–October 7, 1857) represented the state of Delaware in both the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and served as the Secretary of the Treasury and later the Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. ... William John Duane (May 9, 1780 - September 27, 1865) was a U.S. (Irish-born) lawyer. ... Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States, from 1836 until his death in 1864, and the first Roman Catholic to hold that office. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Walter Forward (January 24, 1786–November 24, 1852) was an American lawyer and politician. ... John Canfield Spencer (January 8, 1788–May 18, 1855) was an American politician who was Secretary of War from 1841 to 1843 and Secretary of the Treasury from 1843 to 1844 under President John Tyler. ... George Mortimer Bibb (October 30, 1776–April 14, 1859) was an American politician. ... Robert John Walker (July 23, 1801–November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman. ... William Morris Meredith (June 8, 1799–August 17, 1873) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Thomas Corwin Thomas Corwin (also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy) (July 29, 1794 - December 18, 1865) was a member of the United States House of Representatives (elected as a Whig to the 22nd Congress and to the four succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1831, until... James Guthrie (December 5, 1792 – March 3, 1869) was an American businessman and politician. ... Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815–October 9, 1868) was an American political figure. ... Philip F. Thomas For the actor, see Philip Michael Thomas. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798–April 21, 1879) was an American politician. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... 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David Franklin Houston (February 17, 1866–September 2, 1940) was an American academic, businessman and politician. ... Mellon at his Desk, 1929. ... Ogden Livingston Mills (August 23, 1884–October 11, 1937) was an American businessman and politician. ... Woodin, 1933, Time Woodins signature, as used on American currency William Hartman Woodin (1868–1934) was a U.S. industrialist. ... Henry Morgenthau Jr. ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890 – September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ... Portrait of John W. Snyder U.S. Secretary of the Treasury painted by Greta Kempton. ... Humphreys signature, as used on American currency George Magoffin Humphrey (March 8, 1890–January 20, 1970) was an American lawyer, businessman and Cabinet secretary. ... Robert Bernard Anderson Andersons signature, as used on American currency Robert Bernard Anderson (June 4, 1910–August 14, 1989) was a U.S. administrator and businessman. ... Dillons signature, as used on American currency Clarence Douglas Dillon (August 21, 1909 – January 10, 2003) son of Clarence and Ann (Douglass) Dillon, was U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to France (1953-1957) and 57th secretary of the United States Department of the Treasury (1961-1965). ... Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Joseph Walker Barr (January 17, 1918–February 23, 1996) was an American businessman and politician. ... For the American historian, see David M. Kennedy (historian). ... John Connally, Governor of Texas, Secretary of the Treasury Connallys signature, as used on American currency John Bowden Connally, Jr. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927–June 3, 2000) became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 8, 1974, during the Nixon administration. ... Blumenthal, on the cover of Time magazine Blumenthals signature, as used on American currency Werner Michael Blumenthal, Ph. ... Chairman Miller, Time, 1978 Millers signature, as used on American currency George William Miller (March 9, 1925 – March 17, 2006) served as the 65th United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Carter from August 6, 1979 to January 20, 1981. ... Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Reagan administration, where he advocated supply-side economics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. ... James Addison Baker III (born 28 April 1930 in Houston, Texas) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H... Nicholas F. Brady Nicholas Frederick Brady (born April 11, 1930, in New York City) was United States Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and is also known for articulating the Brady Plan in March 1989. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Robert Edward Rubin (b. ... Lawrence Henry (Larry) Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ... Paul Henry ONeill (born December 4, 1935) served as the 72nd United States Secretary of the Treasury for part of President George W. Bushs first Administration. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ...

References

  1. ^ Rolde, Neal (1990). Maine: A Narrative History. Gardiner, ME: Harpswell Press, 175. ISBN 0-88448-069-0.

 
 

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