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Encyclopedia > William Oughtred
William Oughtred
William Oughtred

William Oughtred (March 5, 1575June 30, 1660) was an English mathematician. Portrait of William Oughtred, from http://www-groups. ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... Events February 13 - Henry III of France is crowned at Reims February 14 - Henry III of France marries Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont June 28 - Oda Nobunaga defeats Takeda Katsuyori in the battle of Nagashino, which has been called Japans first modern battle. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... Events Expulsion of the Carib indigenous people from Martinique by French occupying forces. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Oughtred is credited as the inventor of the slide rule in 1622, and introduced the "×" symbol for multiplication as well as the abbreviations "sin" and "cos" for the sine and cosine functions. The slide rule, or slipstick, is an analog computer, usually consisting of three interlocking calibrated strips and a sliding window, called the cursor. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... In mathematics, multiplication is an arithmetic operation which is the inverse of division, and in elementary arithmetic, can be interpreted as repeated addition. ... In mathematics, the trigonometric functions are functions of an angle, important when studying triangles and modeling periodic phenomena. ... In mathematics, the trigonometric functions are functions of an angle, important when studying triangles and modeling periodic phenomena. ...


Oughtred was born at Eton, and educated there and at King's College, Cambridge, of which he became fellow. Being admitted to holy orders, he left the university about 1603, and was presented to the rectory of Albury, near Guildford in Surrey; and about 1628 he was appointed by the Earl of Arundel to instruct his son in mathematics. He corresponded with some of the most eminent scholars of his time on mathematical subjects; and his house was generally full of pupils from all quarters. It is said that he expired in a sudden transport of joy upon hearing the news of the vote at Westminster for the restoration of Charles II. Eton is a town in Berkshire, England, lying on the opposite bank of the River Thames to Windsor and connected to it by Windsor Bridge. ... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Acting Provost Dr Tess Adkins Location Kings Parade Undergraduates 397 Postgraduates 239 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, built... King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March - Samuel de Champlain, French explorer, sails to Canada March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James I of... Albury is a village and civil parish in the borough of Guildford in Surrey, England, about four miles south-east of Guildford town centre. ... Guildford is the county town of Surrey, England, as well as the seat for the borough of Guildford and the administrative headquarters of the South East England region. ... Surrey is a county in southern England, part of the South East England region and one of the Home Counties. ... Events March 1 - writs were issued in February 1628 by Charles I of England that every county in England (not just seaport towns) pay ship tax by this date. ... Thomas Howard, 21st Earl of Arundel, 4th Earl of Surrey and 1st Earl of Norfolk (7 July 1586 - 4 October 1646), was a prominent English courtier during the reigns of King James I and King Charles I but made his name as an art collector rather than a politician. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (retrospectively de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ...


He published, among other mathematical works, Clavis Mathematicae (The Key to Mathematics), in 1631; a treatise on navigation entitled Circles of Proportion, in 1632; works on trigonometry and dialling, and his Opuscula Mathematica, published posthumously in 1676. // Events February 5 - Roger Williams emigrates to Boston. ... There are several traditions of navigation. ... See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen... Trigonometry (from the Greek trigonon = three angles and metro = measure) is a branch of mathematics dealing with angles, triangles and trigonometric functions such as sine, cosine and tangent. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ...


External link

  • John J. O'Connor and Edmund F. Robertson. William Oughtred at the MacTutor archive.

BITCH!111 ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
William Oughtred - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (253 words)
William Oughtred (March 5, 1575 – June 30, 1660) was an English mathematician.
Oughtred is credited as the inventor of the slide rule in 1622, and introduced the "×" symbol for multiplication as well as the abbreviations "sin" and "cos" for the sine and cosine functions.
Oughtred was born at Eton, and educated there and at King's College, Cambridge, of which he became fellow.
Roger Gaskell Rare Books (1360 words)
William Oughtred was the inventor of the slide rule, first in the circular form described here – the Circles of proportion of the title – a logarithmic slide rule for multiplying and dividing numbers and trigonometric functions.
Oughtred certainly invented the rectilinear slide rule, a short description of which is normally found in the later issues of Circles of proportion.
In Oughtred’s circular slide rule, the logarithmic scales are laid out in a circle, and two pointers are attached to the centre to act as a pair of compasses on its side.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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