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Encyclopedia > William Morris
William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement.
William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement.

William Morris (March 24, 1834October 3, 1896) was an English artist, writer, socialist and activist. He was one of the principal founders of the British arts and crafts movement, best known as a designer of wallpaper and patterned fabrics, a writer of poetry and fiction and a pioneer of the socialist movement in Britain. William Morris can refer to: William Morris (1834–1896), British writer, designer and socialist William Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield (1877–1963), British motor manufacturer Bill Morris (born 1938), Jamaican-born British trade union leader William Morris Agency, American talent and literary agency This is a disambiguation page, a list of... William Morris - Project Gutenberg eText 13619 - http://www. ... William Morris - Project Gutenberg eText 13619 - http://www. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Socialism is a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... Artichoke wallpaper, by John Henry Dearle for William Morris & Co. ... Mary Cassatts painting of two ladies drinking tea in a room with red-blue striped wallpapers. ... This article is about the art form. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life and education

Born on his family's estate of Elm House in Walthamstow, he went to school at Marlborough College, but left in 1851 after a student rebellion there. He then went to Exeter College, Oxford after studying for his matriculation to the university. He became influenced by the work of art and social critic John Ruskin while there. , Walthamstow is a town in the London Borough of Waltham Forest, North East London, England. ... Marlborough College is a British independent boarding school in the county of Wiltshire. ... College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Simon Heawood Undergraduates 299 MCR President Meredith Riedel Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Exeter College... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... An art critic is normally a person who have a speciality in giving reviews mainly of the types of fine art you will find on display. Typically the art critic will go to an art exhibition where works of art are displayed in the traditional way in localities especially made... A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis; a social critic of a given society, but the overlap is large. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ...


Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

It was at Exeter that Morris met his life-long friends and collaborators, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, Ford Madox Brown and Philip Webb. He also met his wife, Jane Burden, a working-class woman from Oxford whose pale skin, figure, and wavy, abundant dark hair were considered by Morris and his friends the epitome of beauty. Dante Gabriel Rossetti (May 12, 1828 - April 10, 1882) was an English poet, painter and translator. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... The Last of England, 1855 Ford Madox Brown (April 16, 1821 – October 6, 1893) was an English painter of moral and historical subjects, notable for his distinctively graphic and often Hogarthian version of the Pre-Raphaelite style. ... Philip Speakman Webb born 12 January 1831 died 17 April 1915 was an architect who designed The Red House at Bexleyheath in 1859 and also the house Standen with William Morris. ... Jane Burden (October 19, 1839 – January 26, 1914) was the embodiment of the Pre-Raphaelite ideal of beauty. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ...


These friends formed an artistic movement, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. They eschewed the tawdry industrial manufacture of decorative arts and architecture and favoured a return to hand-craftsmanship, raising artisans to the status of artists. He espoused the philosophy that art should be affordable, hand-made, and that there should be no hierarchy of artistic mediums. Persephone, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ... The decorative arts are traditionally defined as ornamental and functional works in ceramic, wood, glass, metal, or textile. ... This article is about building architecture. ... An artisan, also called a craftsman,[1] is a skilled manual worker who uses tools and machinery in a particular craft. ...


Marriage and family

Morris married Jane Burden at St Michael at the Northgate, Oxford, on 26 April 1859. They had two daughters, Jane (called Jenny), who developed epilepsy after a boating accident, and Mary (called May), who herself became a designer and writer. The Saxon tower of St Michael at the Northgate. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... May Morris as a young girl, 1872, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ...


Business career

David's Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts.
David's Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts.
Morris's painting La bele Iseult, also called Queen Guenevere, is his only surviving easel painting, now in the Tate Gallery.
Morris's painting La bele Iseult, also called Queen Guenevere, is his only surviving easel painting, now in the Tate Gallery.

Morris left Oxford to join an architecture firm, but soon found himself drawn more and more to the decorative arts. He and Webb built Red House at Bexleyheath in Kent, Morris's wedding gift to Jane. It was there his design ideas began to take physical shape. (In honour of his connection with Bexleyheath, a bust of Morris was added to an original niche in the brick clock tower in the town centre in 1996.) He also built Standen House in Sussex along with Philip Webb. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1928x1834, 905 KB) Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris, in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1928x1834, 905 KB) Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris, in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... Trinity Church in Boston. ... Image File history File links Queen_Guinevere. ... Image File history File links Queen_Guinevere. ... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ... The decorative arts are traditionally defined as ornamental and functional works in ceramic, wood, glass, metal, or textile. ... View of Red House from the garden Red House in Bexleyheath in the southern suburbs of London, England is a key building in the history of the Arts and Crafts movement and of 19th century British architecture. ... Bexleyheath, formerly known as Bexley New Town, part of the London Borough of Bexley, consists of a suburban development located 12 miles (19. ... Standen is a house in West Sussex, near East Grinstead. ...


In 1861, he founded the firm of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. with Gabriel Rossetti, Burne-Jones, Ford Madox Brown and Philip Webb. In 1874 Rossetti and Ford Madox Brown decided to leave the firm, requiring a return on their shares which proved to be a costly business. Throughout his life, he continued to work in his own firm, although the firm changed names. Its most famous incarnation was as Morris and Company. The company encouraged the revival of traditional crafts such as stained glass painting, and Morris himself single-handedly recreated the art of tapestry weaving in Britain. His designs are still sold today under licences given to Sanderson and Sons and Liberty of London. A Morris & Co. ... A Morris & Co. ... Liberty is a well known department store in Regent Street in central London, England at the heart of the West End shopping district. ...


Morris's commissions included the ceiling within the dining room of Charleville Forest Castle, Ireland and interiors of Bullers Wood House, now Bullers Wood School in Chislehurst, Kent. Charleville Castle is located in the centre of Ireland, bordering the town of Tullamore, near the Shannon River. ... Bullers Wood School for Girls is a comprehensive secondary school based in Chislehurst, part of the London Borough of Bromley. ... Chislehurst is a place in the London Borough of Bromley. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ...


Writings

Poetry

Morris began publishing poetry and short stories through a magazine founded with his friends while at university. His first independently published work, The Defence of Guenevere (1858) was coolly received by the critics, and he was discouraged from publishing more for a number of years. He had also made a painting of King Arthur's Queen Consort. However, "The Haystack in the Floods", probably these days his best-known poem, dates from just after this time. It is a grimly realistic piece set during the Hundred Years War in which the doomed lovers Jehane and Robert have a last parting in a convincingly portrayed rain-swept countryside. Guinevere was King Arthurs Queen. ... The Haystack in the Floods, is a narrative poem of some 150 lines by William Morris. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


When he returned to poetry it was with The Earthly Paradise, a huge collection of poems loosely bound together in what he called a leather strapbound book. The theme was of a group of medieval wanderers who set out to search for a land of everlasting life; after much disillusion, they discover a surviving colony of Greeks with whom they exchange stories. The collection brought him almost immediate fame and popularity.


The last-written stories in the collection are retellings of Icelandic sagas. From then until his Socialist period Morris's fascination with the ancient Germanic and Norse peoples dominated his writing. Together with his Icelandic friend Eiríkr Magnússon he was the first to translate many of the Icelandic sagas into English, and his own epic retelling of the story of Sigurd the Volsung was his favourite among his poems. The Norse sagas or Viking sagas (Icelandic: Íslendingasögur), are stories about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, about early Viking voyages, about migration to Iceland, and of feuds between Icelandic families. ... Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ... The Ramsund carving depicting Sigurd and the Saga of the Völsungs In Norse mythology, Sigurd (also Siegfried) was a legendary hero, as well as the central character in the Volsunga saga, Nibelungenlied and Richard Wagners opera, Siegfried, which see for more details. ...


Due to his wide poetic acclaim, Morris was offered the Poet Laureateship, after the death of Tennyson in 1892, but declined. A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ...


Translations

Morris also translated large numbers of medieval and classical works, including collections of Icelandic sagas such as Three Northern Love Stories (1875), Virgil's Aeneid (1875), and Homer's Odyssey (1887). The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Classicism door in Olomouc, The Czech Republic Teatr Wielki in Warsaw Church La Madeleine in Paris Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity, as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ...


Fantasy novels

In the last nine years of his life, Morris wrote a series of fantasy novels – including The Wood Beyond the World and The Well at the World's End – that have been credited as important milestones in the history of fantasy fiction, because, while other writers wrote of foreign lands, or of dream worlds, or the future (as Morris did in News from Nowhere), Morris's works were the first to be set in an entirely invented fantasy world.[1] A fantasy world is a type of fictional universe in which magic or other similar powers work. ...


These were attempts to revive the genre of medieval romance, and not wholly successful, partly because he eschewed many literary techniques from later eras.[2] In particular, the plots of the novels are heavily driven by coincidence; while many things just happened in the romances, the novels are still weakened by the dependence on it.[3] Nevertheless, large subgenres of the field of fantasy have sprung from the romance genre, but indirectly, through their writers' imitation of William Morris.[4] The Wood Beyond the World, is considered to have heavily influenced C. S. Lewis' Narnia series, while J. R. R. Tolkien was inspired by Morris's reconstructions of early Germanic life in The House of the Wolfings and The Roots of the Mountains. James Joyce and even Nightwish drew inspiration from his work.[5] As a literary genre, romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ... The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... Nightwish is a Finnish Symphonic metal band formed in 1996 in the town of Kitee. ...


Architecture

Although Morris never became a practising architect, his interest in architecture continued throughout his life. In 1877, he founded the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings. His preservation work resulted indirectly in the founding of the National Trust. Combined with the inspiration of John Ruskin — in particular his essay "The Nature of Gothic" from the second volume of The Stones of Venice — architecture played an important symbolic part in Morris's approach to socialism. His patterns became used for such household objects such as wallpaper and bathroom tiles. The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) was founded by William Morris in 1877, to oppose what he saw as the insensitive renovation of ancient buildings then occurring in Victorian England. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ...


Socialism

Morris and his daughter May were amongst Britain's first socialists, working directly with Eleanor Marx and Engels to begin the socialist movement. In 1883, he joined the Social Democratic Federation, and in 1884 he organised the breakaway Socialist League. Morris found himself rather awkwardly positioned as a mediator between the Marxist and anarchist sides of the socialist movement, and bickering between the two sides eventually tore the Socialist League apart. This side of Morris's work is well-discussed in the biography (subtitled "Romantic to Revolutionary") by E. P. Thompson. It was during this period that Morris wrote his best-known prose works, in particular A Dream of John Ball and the utopian News from Nowhere. Eleanor Marx (16th January 1855 – 31st March 1898) was a Marxist author and political activist. ... Engels redirects here. ... This article is about the British political party. ... The Socialist League was an early revolutionary socialist organisation in the United Kingdom. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Edward Palmer Thompson (February 3, 1924 - August 28, 1993), was an English historian, socialist and peace campaigner. ... Artwork from William Morris A Dream of John Ball (1888) A Dream of John Ball (1888) is a novel by English author William Morris about the English peasants revolt of 1381 and the rebel John Ball. ... News from Nowhere is a classic work of utopian fiction written by the artist, designer and socialist pioneer William Morris. ...


Morris and Rossetti rented a country house, Kelmscott Manor at Kelmscott, Oxfordshire, as a summer retreat, but it soon became a retreat for Rossetti and Jane Morris to have a long-lasting affair. After his departure from the Socialist League, Morris divided his time between the Company, then relocated to Merton Abbey,[6] Kelmscott House in Hammersmith, the Kelmscott Press, and Kelmscott Manor. At his death at Kelmscott House in 1896 he was interred in the Kelmscott village churchyard. Kelmscott Manor is a limestone house in the Cotswold village of Kelmscott. ... Kelmscott can refer to: Kelmscott, England Kelmscott, Western Australia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Merton Priory was founded in 1114 by Gilbert, a sheriff of Henry I. By 1117 the foundation was colonised by canons from the Augustinian priory at Huntingdon and re-sited close to the River Wandle. ... Kelmscott House is a historic building in Hammersmith, the London home of William Morris from April 1879 to his death in October 1896. ...

William Morris, publisher
William Morris, publisher
The Nature of Gothic by John Ruskin, printed by Kelmscott Press. First page of text, with typical ornamented border.
The Nature of Gothic by John Ruskin, printed by Kelmscott Press. First page of text, with typical ornamented border.

William Morris from Prose and Poetry, publ. ... William Morris from Prose and Poetry, publ. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (590x853, 231 KB) Kelmscott Press - The Nature of Gothic by John Ruskin (first page of text, with ornamented border). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (590x853, 231 KB) Kelmscott Press - The Nature of Gothic by John Ruskin (first page of text, with ornamented border). ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ...

The Kelmscott Press

In January 1891, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press at Hammersmith, London, in order to produce examples of improved printing and book design. The books were designed to make reference to the methods and techniques he used, which he saw as traditional methods of printing and craftsmanship, in line with the Arts and Crafts movement as a whole, and in response to the prevalence of lithography, particularly those lithographic prints designed to look like woodcut prints. He designed clear typefaces, such as his Roman 'golden' type, which was inspired by that of the early Venetian printer Nicolaus Jenson, and medievalizing decorative borders for books that drew their inspiration from the incunabula of the 15th century and their woodcut illustrations. Selection of paper and ink, and concerns for the overall integration of type and decorations on the page made the Kelmscott Press the most famous of the private presses of the Arts and Crafts movement. It operated until 1898, producing 53 works, comprising 69 volumes, and inspired other private presses, notably the Doves Press. Hammersmith is a town in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in west London. ... For other uses, see Print. ... Lithography is a method for printing on a smooth surface. ... “Font” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Nicolas Jenson (1420 - 1480) was a French engraver, typographer and printer who did most of his work in Venice. ... A page from a rare Blackletter Bible (1497) printed in Strassburg by J.R.Grueninger. ... Four horsemen of the Apocalypse by Albrecht Dürer Ukiyo-e woodcut, Ishiyama Moon by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1889) Woodcut is a relief printing artistic technique in printmaking in which an image is carved into the surface of a block of wood, with the printing parts remaining level with the surface... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... An ink is a liquid containing various pigments and/or dyes used for coloring a surface to render an image or text. ... Private Press is a term used in the field of book collecting to describe a printing press operated as a personal enthusiasm, rather than as a purely commercial venture. ... Doves Press was a small printing company based in Hammersmith, London between 1900 and 1916. ...


Among book lovers, the Kelmscott Press edition of The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, illustrated by Burne-Jones, is considered one of the most beautiful books ever produced. A fine edition facsimile of the Kelmscott Chaucer was published in 2002 by The Folio Society. The Luttrell Psalter (2006) Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (1962) The Wind in the Willows (2006) The Folio Society, founded in 1947, is based on the fringes of Bloomsbury, London. ...


Morris today

"Vision of the Holy Grail" (1890)
"Vision of the Holy Grail" (1890)

The Morris Societies in Britain, the US, and Canada are active in preserving Morris's work and ideas. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x332, 85 KB) Galahad, Bors and Percival achieve the Grail by William Morris,1870 Museum and Art Gallery of Birmingham File links The following pages link to this file: Holy Grail ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x332, 85 KB) Galahad, Bors and Percival achieve the Grail by William Morris,1870 Museum and Art Gallery of Birmingham File links The following pages link to this file: Holy Grail ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


The influence of William Morris lives on in modern interiors and architecture. Companies such as Harvest House and Stickley Furniture continue to sell Arts and Crafts-style pieces. Gustav Stickley (March 9, 1858–April 21, 1942) was a furniture maker and architect as well as the leading spokesperson for the American Arts and Crafts movement. ...


A fountain located in Bexleyheath town centre, named the Morris Fountain, was created in his honour and unveiled on the anniversary of his birth. Bexleyheath, formerly known as Bexley New Town, part of the London Borough of Bexley, consists of a suburban development located 12 miles (19. ...


In April 2007, The Guardian newspaper reported that funding for the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow was threatened by cost cutting by the London borough of Waltham Forest. A campaign to avoid the reduction in opening times and dismissal of key staff is underway.[7] For other uses, see Guardian. ... William Morris Gallery, viewed from the front The William Morris Gallery, opened by Prime Minister Clement Attlee in 1950, is the only public museum devoted to Englands best known and most versatile designer. ... , Walthamstow is a town in the London Borough of Waltham Forest, North East London, England. ... The London Borough of Waltham Forest is a London borough of outer north London. ...


Literary works

A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark is a fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first modern fantasy writer to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus the precursor of much of present-day fantasy literature. ... News from Nowhere is a classic work of utopian fiction written by the artist, designer and socialist pioneer William Morris. ... The Glittering Plain by William Morris, Newcastle Publishing Company, 1973 The Story of the Glittering Plain is an 1891 fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first modern fantasy to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus the precursor of much of present-day fantasy... The Wood Beyond the World is a fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first modern fantasy to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus the precursor of much of present-day fantasy literature. ... Child Christopher and Goldilind the Fair is a fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first modern fantasy writer to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus the precursor of much of present-day fantasy literature. ... The Well at the Worlds End is a fantasy book by British artist and author William Morris, published in 1896. ... The Water of the Wondrous Isles is a fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first modern fantasy to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus the precursor of much of present-day fantasy literature. ... The Sundering Flood is a fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first modern fantasy to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus the precursor of much of present-day fantasy literature. ...

Translations

  • Grettis Saga: The Story of Grettir the Strong with Eiríkr Magnússon (1869)
  • The Saga of Gunnlaug the Worm-tongue and Rafn the Skald with Eiríkr Magnússon (1869)
  • Völsung Saga: The Story of the Volsungs and Niblungs, with Certain Songs from the Elder Edda with Eiríkr Magnússon (1870) (from the Volsunga saga)
  • Three Northern Love Stories, and Other Tales with Eiríkr Magnússon (1875)
  • The Odyssey of Homer Done into English Verse (1887)
  • The Aeneids of Virgil Done into English (1876)
  • Of King Florus and the Fair Jehane (1893)
  • The Tale of Beowulf Done out of the Old English Tongue (1895)
  • Old French Romances Done into English (1896)

The Ramsund carving in Sweden depicts 1) how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnirs brother. ...

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Lin Carter, ed. Kingdoms of Sorcery, p 39 Doubleday and Company Garden City, NY, 1976
  2. ^ L. Sprague de Camp, Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers: The Makers of Heroic Fantasy, p 46 ISBN 0-87054-076-9
  3. ^ L. Sprague de Camp, Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers: The Makers of Heroic Fantasy, p 40 ISBN 0-87054-076-9
  4. ^ L. Sprague de Camp, Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers: The Makers of Heroic Fantasy, p 26 ISBN 0-87054-076-9
  5. ^ Anette Olzon, 'Nightwish: The story, p 79, 2004
  6. ^ William Morris Society: Merton Abbey
  7. ^ News from Waltham Forest
  8. ^ http://morrisedition.lib.uiowa.edu/jason.html

Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907 – November 6, 2000) was an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers by L. Sprague de Camp, Arkham House, 1976 Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers: the Makers of Heroic Fantasy is a 1976 work of collective biography on the formative authors of the heroic fantasy genre by L. Sprague de Camp, published by Arkham House. ...

See also

Artichoke wallpaper, by John Henry Dearle for William Morris & Co. ... Eco-socialism or Green socialism is an ideology fusing Green movement values with socialism. ... Persephone, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ... Dante Gabriel Rossettis drawing room at No. ... This article is about the British political party. ... Socialism is a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... The Socialist League was an early revolutionary socialist organisation in the United Kingdom. ...

External links

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Sources Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Other Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco. ... The Online Books Page is an index of e-text books available on the Internet. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
William Morris - MSN Encarta (527 words)
William Morris (1834-96), English poet, artist, and socialist reformer, who urged a return to medieval traditions of design, craftsmanship, and community.
Morris was born in Walthamstow, Essex, on March 24, 1834.
The work of Morris, both in poetry and in the applied arts, is characterized by an emphasis on decorative elements, especially on those that he thought to be characteristic of the art of the Middle Ages.
William Morris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1323 words)
William Morris (March 24, 1834 – October 3, 1896) was one of the principal founders of the British Arts and Crafts movement and is best known as a designer of wallpaper and patterned fabrics, a writer of poetry and fiction, and a pioneer of the socialist movement in Britain.
Morris found himself rather awkwardly positioned as a mediator between the marxist and anarchist sides of the socialist movement, and bickering between the two sides eventually tore the Socialist League apart.
Morris and Rossetti rented a country house, Kelmscott Manor at Kelmscott, Oxfordshire, as a summer retreat, but it soon became a retreat for Rossetti and Jane Morris to have a long-lasting affair.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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